State College News FAREWELL PARTY, FRIDAY NIGHT Last Event of Summer Session

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State College News
(Summer Edition)
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
ALBANY, N. Y., AUGUST 15,
VOL. II NO. 6
50 cents for Summer
1922
FAREWELL PARTY, FRIDAY NIGHT
Last Event of Summer Session
On Friday evening, August 18th,
a farewell party will be given to
the student body by the Summer
School Entertainment Committee,
that has provided such enjoyable
Friday night affairs during the
session. This energetic committee
has augmented its past efforts in
ninking these weekly events a
memorable part of the summer
school session by arranging for an
evening which will be a veritable
personification of State College
graeiousness.
That this evening may not be
tinged by the melancholy which
usually accompanies farewell parties, amusing bits of nonsense have
been injected into the highly original program. It is expected that
every matriculated student will
take this opportunity of increasing
the pages of his happy book of
reminiscences of the summer of
1922.
STATE COLLEGE FALL
SEMESTER
College will open on Monday.
September 18, for entrance examinations which will continue for
three clays.- Tuesday and Wednesday, September 10 and 20. will be
devoted to the registration of the
new students. Tl'.c regular recitations will begin on Thursday,
the 21st, at 8:10 A. M. On the following morning at 11:30 o'clock,
the first student assembly will be
held in the auditorium.
Registration for the freshman
class is exceptionally large as this
last issue of the " N e w s " goes to
press. Four times as many freshmen have applied for admission as
had applied a year ago. Out of
this large number three hundred
are to be elected. This makes the
registration for next year approximately eight hundred, thus bringing the regis'ration close to that
of pre-war years.
CLASS IN COMMERCIAL ED.
VISIT TELEPHONE EXCHANGE
The members of the class in
Methods of Teaching Commercial
Subjects, visited the main telephone exchange on State street
and were cordially received by Mr.
Stott. Through his courtesy, the
group was taken to every part of
the building, from the wire chief's
room, down to the toll department,
The visit through the training department was very instructive,
while the two-hour trip was most
enlightening from the, instructional
and techivcal point of view. Mr.
F.hrlich, the instructor of the
Methods'
class, expressed his
thankfulness to the management
for the opportunity afforded the
class.
INFORMATION ON THE
NEAR EAST RELIEF
Dr. A. C. McCrea.
A small but very interested
group gathered on Tuesday evening and listened to a splendid lecture by Dr. A. C. McCrea, of the
Near East Relief. Dr. McCrea
talked of his experiences in the
Transcaucasian
republics, where
famine conditions have been rampant since the war, As the guest of
the Bolshevik government, Dr. McCrea had an opportunity to observe the misery of the unfortunate
people of Tillis, Erivan and Alexandropol, and had a share in relieving their distress. A description of life in these cities is a harrowing one. With no food, no
clothing but rags, and with the
horrible diseases which attack their
skeleton bodies. thousands of
refugees throng the cities where
they hope to obtain help. But
therq is no help in the cities, for
there, is no sanitation, no water
system, not even a light at night.
Despite these awful conditions,
Dr. McCrea believes that there is a
better future in store for these people, especially if America continues to help them during the
time in which they arc evolving a
democratic form of government.
They arc done with czars and are
suffering what every nation suffers
after a mighty revolution.
After the lecture, a moving picture, Alice in Hungerlati'l, was
shown. The picture added 'n what
Dr. McCrea had already said, and
gave an excellent idea of the work
accomplished by the
Near East
Relief in the operat : on of feeding
stations, hosnilas, and orphanages
where a million unfortunates have
been cared for. There arc still
thousands of lives dependent upon
American funds and American
workers.
During the showing of the picture, Mr. John T. Birgc, Chairman
ot the Near Fast Relief in Albanj
and Rensselaer Counties, made
some interesting remarks.
CALENDAR
WEDNESDAY. AUGUST 16
8:00 P. M.
Meeting of Princirals and Supervisors. Room 101,
THURSDAY. AUGUST 17
Examinations
3-5 P. M.
8 O'clock Classes
FRIDAY. AUGUST 18
9-11 A. M.
9 O'clock Classes
2-4 P. M.
10 O'clock Classes
8 P. M.
Farewell Party, Dancing in the
Gvm.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 19
9-11 A. M.
11 O'clock Classes
FOURTH ORGAN RECITAL
OF THE SERIES BY MR.
CANDLYN
Prof. Candlyn gave the fourth of
his series of organ recitals on August 9.
The program was as follows:
1. Grand Choeur Dialogue
Gigont
Eugene Gigout is organist at St.
Augustin's, Paris. This "Dialogue"
was written for use at St. Angustin's, where, as in most French
churches, there are two organs. In
this case, and contrary to custom,
these organs are connected, so that
the "Dialogue" produces a striking effect.
2. Chanson
Candlyn
3. Festival Toccata
Fletcher
4. The Angelus
Massenet
A popular number in which the
organ chimes are freely used,
5. (a) Pastorale
(I)) Finale from 1st Sonata..
Guilmant
These two movements represent
Guilmant at his best, although the
Finale is sometimes conventional
in the type of passage work employed.
(a) is a typical example of the
French school. The middle section
is hymn-like in character, with
figures from the first theme interwoven with the chorale Ihemc.
(b) is a brilliant finale of the
Toccata type.
The following nunvbers have
•been requested for August 16:
Fargo
Handel
Fargo front' " New Wor'd "
Symphony
Dvorak
" Deep River" ....Negro Spiritual
DR. WHEELOCK TALKS ON
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL
Dr. Charles F. Wheelock, assistant commissioner of education,
spoke to the principals and superintends last Wednesday evening on
"The Junior High School." According to Dr. Wheelock, there arc
three essentials; opportunities for
varied minds, groups, its seventh,
eighth, and ninth class in one room
for administration, and advances
are made by subject and not by
grade; which is still an opportunity, and not yet an achievement.
" Rochester and Detroit have almost perfected their junior high
school systems, but according to
rcnorts received in m.y office, those
of Detroit are not the kind wanted
in New York State," declared Dr.
Wheelock. "since they try to entertain and amuse the student too
much in their subjects and make it
too easy going for the pupils them(Continued on page 3.)
APPRECIATIVE AUDIENCE
ATTEND READINGS
Fast Friday evening's entertainment under the able direction of
the faculty, provided one of the
m'ost enjoyable programs of the
summer session. Miss Jcanette
Barry Lane, of Finch School, and
Mr. Benjamin Brown, of Brown
University, visiting instructors in
English department, presented two
one-act plays, " The Constant
Lover" and "The Twelve Pound
Fook."
"The Constant Cover" had for
its theme a summer flirtation in the
woods. Mr. Brown portrayed the
constant loving of the inconstant
Jovcr with remarkable exactitude.
"The Twelve Pound Fook" afforded the players greater opportunity for displaying their highly
developed dramatic capabilities,
and was admirably presented.
SIGHT-SEEING ON THE MOHAWK TRAIL
Saturday morning, August 5,
dawned clear and warm'; much to
the surprise of those who had
planned to spending the day by
seeing the sights the historic
Mohawk Trail had to offer. Two
large bus loads left the college
promptly at nine o'clock, as bright
and gay as the day itself. The
party crossed the Hudson, went
through Rensselaer to Pittsficld
and from there to North Adams.
That ride was wonderful, but
manv little knew what was in store
for them at "Whitcomb's Summit."
They stopped at the foot of the
" T r a i l " to eat lunch in the large
shady lawn of some very accommodating people, who served coffee
for the parly.
Then began the long climb to the
highest point on the trail. The
first stop was at the famous "Hairpin Turn," where such exclamations
as; "flow long would it take to
drop down there?" " H o w far you
can see!" " What a wonderful
view!" and " I t make me faint to
look down here!" were heard from
the top of the tower. After refreshing themselves with cold
drinks and ice cream, and buying
some souvenirs, the party again
started heavenward. In til's case
prices rose as they proceeded toward heaven, for at the next stop,
"Western Summit," ten cents was
charged to go up in the tower.
From that tower three states and
seven lakes could he seen. Mount
Grevlock, 3,605 feet high, loomed
up high above the opposite horizon.
But still the top had not been
reached. From "Whitcomb's Summit," the highest point, both sides
of the mountain can be seen.
(Continued on page 2)
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, AUGUST 15. 1922
PageTwo
(Summer Edition)
Vol. II
August 15,
No. 6
Published weekly on Tuesdays
during the Slimmer Session by the
Student Body of the New York
State College for Teachers at Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is fifty
cents per session for those not
purchasing a Student Association
ticket. Advertising rates may be
had on application to the Business
Manager.
Editor-in-Chief,
Robert C. R, MacFarlane.
Managing Editor,
Doris Butler,
Business Manager,
Grace Fox.
Reporters
Harvey Fenner
Orena Relyea
APPRECIATION
The News Board wishes to
thank the members of the faculty
and those students of the summer
session who have so kindly acted
as reporters or voluntarily contributed articles to the College
News. We realize that the summer session means a busy season
for the majority of us, and in view
of this fact, we appreciate your efforts all the more. We feel that
we should especially acknowledge
the services of:
Miss Janet Anthony, Helen Finley, Elsie Kcnney, Mildred Blcnis,
Agnes Smith, Ruth Kim nicy, Miss
Marie Wccdon, Mr, Hcth G.
Coons.
OUR FINAL WORD
Tf the events of summer school,
both pleasant and scholastic, have
not entirely filled your minds, you
will remember that six weeks ago
we told you of the opportunities
that could be realized. As the
weeks have raced by, we have met
time after time, both in class and
out of class. There have been the
entertainments and parties every
Friday evening to refresh the
brain, worn out by a week's hard
work. The Saturday trips have
done their bit to straighten out the
kinks produced by overwork in
stuffy libraries. Evcrytime that
the sociability urge came along
there was the big opportunity to
make friends.
Now, when it is time for the college doors to close after the sixth
summer session, we feel that we
must say something appropriate to
the occasion. We could say goodbye and get quite sentimental. But
we are not going to.
We hope that this summer session has meant much to you both
mentally and socially. Some people have held themselves aloof.
For them we arc sorry. Others
have shown that even the most
hard boiled school teacher can be
human when he is among friends.
We hope that you will carry this
friendly spirit with you when you
go home. State College will mean
so much P'orc to you when it is
peopled with pleasant memories.
We hope that you have enjoyed
this summer session so much that
you will come again. We have enjoyed your friendly spirit of interest, ft is our hope that we have
in some way at least pleased you
with our publication. If this is the
case, then we will rest peacefully
in the hope that we will see you
again.
THE DIRECTORS AU REVOIR
Several days ago a representative of the " News " came to the director's office to inform him that
it was customary for the director
of the summer session to write an
epitaph for the last number of this
summer's " News" before it and
the summer school " passed down
into history." This seemed at first
a very simple matter. The director thought that all this implied
was the writing of some such
phrase as, " The end of a perfect
day" over his signature.
The
writer of the paragraph in last
week's "News," describing the trip
to Indian Ladder, " beat him to it,"
and appropriated this expression.
To praise the summer session was
also out of the question, because it
might smack a bit too strong of
Aeneas' modest description of the
fall of Troy: "Quarum rcriim
magna pars lini." Yet there is certainly a place for praise in this final
greeting of the director to the
faculty and students of the summer
session of 1922,
There has been a splendid spirit
of co-operation manifested by
faculty and students, which has
lightened the duties of the director
and made his work pleasant. Requests from his office have been
quickly and courteously carried out
and regulations punctiliously observed.
For this he thanks
faculty and students. It certainly
has created " a genial spirit which
makes his work cay." lie feels,,
too, that the Students Committee,
who have arranged so many delightful excursions and made our
Friday evenings so enjoyable,
merit the especial thanks of the entire faculty and student body.
In closing the director hopes that
every student in the summer session will return home with a pleasant impression of State College
lingering in his memory. He trusts
that in spite of credits earned or
lost, each student may take with
him the eager and persistent desire
to learn more about some one
branch of learning. If he has this
love of learning in his heart, the
summer session will have done
niorc for his future success as an
inspiring teacher than it could do
in anv other way. This, then, is
the director's "ail revoir."
W. C. DECKER,
PLEDGE FOR THE DORMITORY FUND
Students are asking the why and
the wherefore of the pink cards
that were distributed on Thursday,
August 10. We arc asking the enrolled students of summer school
as well as the regular students to
contribute toward the dorni'tory
fund which has been constantly
growing under the supervision : of
the Alumni with the co-operat on
of the students.
Many of the people who are in
a'tendance at the session this summer, have been here previous years,
and many of the people who arc
here this summer anticipate returning for future sessions, Now we
hope that vou feel that vou belong
to State College, indeed, we hope
that you have such a strong inclination for the institution, that
you will want to express that feeling in a substantial way and contribute toward the fund for building dorms.
Now please do not argue that
the dormitories arc of benefit to
students of the regular session but
GRINS
If you hold her hand, she may
think you foolish.
If you don't, she will wonder
why.
If you kiss her, she may think
you a cad.
If you don't, she may think you
slow.
If you offer her a cigarette, she
may be offended.
If you don't, she may think you
consider her puritanical.
If you (ell her of the women
you've met, she may think you're
a rounder.
Tf you don't, there's no telling
what she may think.
If you tell her she is the first you
have loved, she may think you lie.
If you tell her she is the first you
have kissed, she will know you lie.
Now, what in II
is a fellow
lo do?—Rambler.
PHOOLOSOPHY
Many a man's reputation
pends on wdiat isn't found
about him.
deout
Powder is the dust given to
women by the gods to blind the
eyes of man.
A good man gone wrong is just
a bad one found out.
A girl sat pensively milking a goat,
But paused a moment to mutter,
" I wish, you brute, you would
turn to milk!"
And the animal turned to butt 'cr,
MUST UV WENT TO HER
HEAD
Mary had a little lamp,
She fill'd it with benzine;
She went to light her little lampShe hasn't since benzine.
"LITTLE WILLIE" IN MANY
PARTS
Little Willie found some dynamite,
Didn't understand it quite.
Curiosity never pays;
It rained Willie seven days.
HISTORY REJUVENATED
The night was dark,
The coast was clear,
When out of the barn
Came Paul Revere,
lie jumped in his Ford
And gave her the gas;
The darn thing exploded—
He lit on the grass.
Sight-Seeing on the Mohawk Trail
(Continued from page 1)
Many pictures were taken from
there.
After everyone had enjoyed the
sights of the Trail, the party
started home by the wav of Bennington and Troy. When they
reached
Bennington,
everyone
wished to climb the monument
marking the battlefield where John
Stark made the British retreat.
This monument is among the
highest in the world.
When the tired, but satisfied
bunch finally arrived at State College, even though the parly was
four hours later than was expected, everyone felt that their
money had been well spent.
Without a doubt the Student
Association of the summer session
of 1922 has been an immense success. It has provided Friday evening entertainments and dances,
organized trips on Saturday, and
supported the summer edition of
" News." We feel that Miss Grace
Fox, of Albany, a member of the
Class of '23, as director of the
social activities for the summer
session, has supervised recreation
in such an efficient manner as to
materially add to the success of
our six weeks' of work and play.
not to you. These rooming places
will be open to you as well as to
regular students and think how
convenient it will be to stay in a
place approximately on the college
campus and not have to chase all
over the city of Albany to find a
place to drop your traveling bag.
Furthermore, just picture living in
REPORT CARDS
The envelopes that contain report cards are always opened with
an attendant anxious feeling, but
still very few of us would nrss the
opportunity to laud our successes
and lament our failures. Therefore
if you wish your report card sent
to your home, please leave a
stamped envelope in the Registrar's
office. The envelopes of regulation
size, may be purchased at the
Co-op.
a place adapted for the special
needs of students and compare such
a haven with the improvised condition of rooming houses
We
have faith that if you stop to conjure up in your imagination a dorm
which your money has helped to
build, you will be willing to contribute toward the good cause,
even though your con'ribution
may be small. But let our motto
be: "Pile the Pennies," for dorms
at State College.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, AUGUST 15, 1922
POINTS OF INTEREST
No. 3—The Historical and Art
Institute
There is only one more week of
slimmer school left—so let lis make
the most of the short time that is
allotted us. Perhaps you have already visited the Capitol and the
Education building, but, if you
have, let that be an added incentive
to explore the Historical and Art
Institute which is on Washington
Avenue, above the Education building.
Mere, you may gaze at the old
mahogany clock that used to hang
in the old Capitol and wonder if
the pendulum is cut glass or just
plain glass, or you may look in the
wonderful mirrors in the main hall
and lament the fact that your
rooming house affords no such
marvelous looking glasses.
If you are in a romantic mood,
there is the wedding dress of the
Flapper of 1775, who wore such
extreme high heels and had such
tiny feet and whose gown was so
lavishly embroidered and whose
skirt was so long and full.
And if you ever had a fancy for
fans, here is the opportunity for
indulging aforesaid fancy. There
are- wonderful, carved ivory fans,
or Japanese fans, or silk fans, or
in fact, most any kind of fans.
Then too, there arc the huge
locks and keys which were formerly used on forts in Albany, and
we are immediately glad that we
do not have to attach such cumbrous keys to our keyrings—although we admit that there is one
advantage, because with a key of
that size we would not be liable to
lose it as often as we are accustomed to misplace our house, lab,
and locker keys.
There are mammoth candlesticks which remind us of the
piano lamps of to-day, and there
are the cradles in which the good
old mothers of New Amsterdam
rocked their babies to sleep.
There arc displays of silver,
jewelry, chinawarc and pewter,
that would please the heart of the
most fastidious examiner, and, if
you arc blessed with an historical
turn of mind, you may view the
pictures of all the ex-presidents o:'
the United States in the lecture
hall of the Institute, and beside
each picture it the original handwriting of the ex-president.
Last but not' least, it is rumored
that among the many wonders of
the second floor are some real
mummies. \ started to use the expression " real live," but 1 guess
that the mummies are far from
alive.
SPANISH CLUB
The last meeting of the Spanish
Club was held at the college, Tuesday evening, August 8. A musical
program was given, consisting of
a talk on Spatrsh music, arid a
group of.Spanish folk dances by
Mr. Lansing and a solo by Miss
Carpenter.
All who have attended the meetings are agreed, that they have
been helpful for a better unclers'anding of things Spanish.
WANTED
Two Teachers of one or more
'•ears experience, for a small High
School in the vicinity of Albany.
Salary $1,200 to $1,400 to begin.
Between them they would be exrected to teach FRENCH, BIOLOGY, HISTORY and COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS. Students
who are interested, should see the
Director at once.
THE CRITICS' VCERDICT
WE CRITICS
Have
The hardest lives
Mortal men
Of any
Our job
It is
To tell you
WHY!
And so we
Come again.
" Believe not
What
You hear "
YOU KNOW
" And just
Half
What you sec "
We are not
So sceptical
We know you
Must be
Nice
But just to
Prove how
Sweet you
Are
Why not expose
To
View those
PHOTOGRAPHS
Of your
NEWS STAFF
So cherished
All by you?
Our verdict's
In
So now
We'll say
Mow much
We have
Enjoyed this
play!
—We, Us and Co.
THE JUDGE'S ANSWER
T H E CRITIC'S VERDICT
We enjoyed
And answer
Now
Wc make
OUR .TOP. it
Is to tell
You
HOW!
Hear now the
TALE
We state.
Advice we take
Nor
Scorn lo
Keep
Advisors we arc
Kind to
Hut when it
Comes to
Believing
Things
We'll say we
Never mind to.
Too sweet
Wc were by
Nature made
To make
Your eyesight
Fail by showing you
OUR PHOTOGRAPHS
Without a
WARNING
Grave!
But if vou will
Sec them, von know
THE PERIL
You must
BRAVE.
Now to the
JUDGES' ANSWER
Please give attention
Due
While answer we,
Your last
Remark with
THANKS! THE SAME TO
YOU!
—The News Board.
Page Three
VISITING FACULTY
TEACHERS WANTED!
Miss Caroline A. Whipple
Miss Whipple, who has entire
charge of the Immigrant Education
courses, which has three main divisions, is a graduate of Mount
Holyoke College, with a degree of
A. M. She is now a specialist tn
the Division of Immigrant Education, State Department of Education, Albany, N. Y. Miss Whipple has a very interesting exhibit,
illustrating the progress of Americanization, in the corridor on the
second floor of the College, which
is well worth examination.
For all kinds of school positions now
open for the next school year. yC ,
Summer school students who wish to
teach and have not yet secured positions are cordially invited to call at our
office at their earliest convenience to
inquire about vacancies in which they
may be interested.
Let us help you find the kind of position you desire. Our office is conveniently located on Broadway, near the
Post Office.
NEW YORK STATE
TEACHERS BUREAU
467 Broadway
Main 3062
Mr. Maxwell Erhlich
Mr. Erhlich, who is filling Mr.
Charles Hamilton's place so ably
here at State College, during the
Summer Session, is a graduate of
C. C. N. Y., and now teaches in
the Continuation Schools of New
York City. lie also lectures in
Hunter College on the subject of
Commercial Education. Mr. Erhlich's work here at State College is
in the Special Courses in Continuation School Work.
Dr. Wheelock Talks on Junior
High School
(Continued from Page 1)
selves, the teachers doing most of
the work.
" There is altogether too much
teaching being done in our schools
throughout the slate and country.
The consciousness of the pupil of
his own personal power has not
been developed and not until this
is done will our schools come up
Miss Julia T. Conner
Miss Conner graduated from to the proper standard of eduRadclilT College with the degrees of cation. The pupils are everlastingA. B, and B. S. After receiving ly being held up by teachers and
her ^ degrees she taught mathe- guided too far in their work. This
matics in the high school of Sum- must stop.
mcrviiie, Mass., for a time. Miss
" New York Slate will lead the
Conner later was graduated from country in junior high school systhe Prince School of Retail Selling tems within another year. So far
and is now an Organizer and the state has not made much progTeacher of Retail Store Service in ress in comparison with other
the Part Time School of Worces- states, especially Michigan, but
ter, Mass. She is an instructor in cities in general throughout the
Special Courses in Continuation state are realizing the predicament
School Work here at State College of Ihc coming term. Big classes
during this Summer Session.
are reported in every one of the
senior high schools and relief must
lie sought in the situation of junMr. Kemp Randall Blanchard
ior
high schools, where the pupils
Flint
_ Mr. Flint, who is here at State will be held back for a year, and
thereby
alleviate the crowded conCollege this summer, is a Professor of Political Science in Nor- ditions of the senior high schools.
wich University, Vermont. Mr.
" Special emphasis should be laid
Flint is an instructor in Economics upon the teaching of general
during the Summer Session. He science in the junior high school.
has charge of the entire Economics So far this course in the senior
department and proves himself an high schools has not been beneable instructor by the manner in ficial. Tt has merely imparled inwhich he conducts his large formation to the pupil which has
classes. Mr. Flint is a graduate of been crammed lo the extent that it
Norwich University, with a degree exceeds the mental capacity of tha
of A. M.
average fourteen year old pupil.
" In the junior high school this
subject should be taught for a
Miss Alice Kilgbre
three
year course, being given in
Miss Kilgorc, who is a graduate
of the University of Minnesota, the seventh, eighth and ninth
with a degree of B. A., is here at grades. In this way a more specific
State College this summer in- study would be made and the pupil
structing in the Education Courses. would have a greater knowledge of
She lias charge of two courses, science rather than more inforReading and Language in the Ele- mation."
mentary
Grades, and General
On Wednesday, August 16, ProMethods of Teaching in the Ele- fessor J. S. Kingslcy will speak.
mentary Grades. Miss Kilgorc has
been Principal of a Grammar
School and Supervisor of the Cadet made still more interesting by the
School in Minnesota. She is now way in which Miss Knox "gets
a Special Elementary Teacher in her ideas across," as one student
the public schools of Minneapolis, remarked.
Minnesota.
Mr. Julius Stanton Kingsley
Mr. Kingslev is a Professor of
Miss Grace M. Knox
Secondary
Education in MiddleMiss Knox, who is here at State
College during the Summer Ses- bur v College, Middlebury Vermont.
He
is
here at State College
sion as an instructor in the Fine
Arts Department, is a Teacher of during this Summer Session as instructor
in
the
Education Courses,
Drawing in the Schenectady High
School, Schenectady, N, Y. Miss having entire charge of two
courses,
"The
Jumor
High School"
Knox has charge of two courses
this summer, Design and Theory and "History and Principles of
of Color, and Craft Work and De- Education." Mr. Kingslcy is a
sign applied to Block Printing, graduate of Chicago University,
Batik, Tie Dyeing, Gesso, and New York University, and ColumTooled Leather. Both courses are bia University, vv'th the clegrces of
intensely interesting to those who M. S, A. M. and Ph. M.
are interested in Art and they are
fConlinued on page 4)
Page Fo
THE LITERACY TEST
Tuesday, August 8, at 1:30, Mr.
Alfred E. Rejall, of the State Department of Education, spoke to
the Immigrant Education class on
the new literacy test law passed by
the last legislature, which affects
all who vote this fall for the first
time in New York.
The law itself is in two parts.
The first provides for testing the
ability of the applicant to read and
write English, on registration day.
The Secretary of State in accordance with the law, has prepared one
hundred extracts from the New
York State Constitution, approximately fifty words each. These are
to be printed by each district " on
uniform pasteboard slips in double
small pica type and the slips shall
be kept by the inspectors in a box
so constructed as to conceal the
slips from view." The voter shall
draw out one of these slips at random and read aloud intelligently
the extract found there. The inspector then selects ten words from
the extract for the voter to write.
The slip is then returned to the
box and the contents shaken up by
an inspector.
There is another method provided to determine the literacy
qualification. Tbo new voter may
present a certificate of literacy
signed by the principal of a public
school recognized by the State Department.
This certifies
that
the voter can read and write English and that the signature appearing on the certificate was made in
the presence of the principal. The
voter presenting such a certificate
will be required to make his signature in the presence of the inspectors. If it corresponds to the
other on the certificate he is not
required to take the Secretary of
State's test unless an inspector demands it. The last sentence provides that "The board of regents
of the University of the State of
New York may adopt and enforce
rules governing the issuance and
further authentication of such certificates of literacy and the preparation and examination of applicants therefore."
Mr. Rejall is chairman of the
committee that has been devising
the test to be given by the Regents.
The latest principles of psychology
have been followed in trying to devise the best possible scheme.
The standard set was that of the
ability of a child just completing
the fourth grade. The tests have
been tried out in several cities. The
committee chose seven topics on
which to base their selections for
testing. These topics arc (1)
America; (2) Americanization; (3)
America's History and Government; (4) Citizenship and Naturalization; (5) Civic Duties, Virtues,
and Institutions; (6) Industries
and Occupations; (7) International
Relationships.
Ninety-three concrete types have been chosen based
on the seven major topics. A paragraph is written on some of these
topics. Questions are formulated
on the paragraph. Six. of these paragraphs have been chosen for the
examination to be given this year
during the week of October 2. The
principal or superintendent in each
district will decide as to the details
of time and place. The applicant is
given very clear instructions before
beginning. The idea of this test is a
reading — writing — comprehension test. He is to answer the
questions in writing and as briefly
as possible.
The examiners have very definite
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, AUGUST 15, 1922
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE
FOR TEACHERS, SUMMER
SESSION 1922
Notice Concerning Final Examinations
Final Examination in the Summer Session courses will be held
according
to
the
following
schedule:
8 o'clock classes, Thursday, August 17, 3-5 P. M.
9 o'clock classes, Friday, August
18, 9-11 A. M.
10 o'clock classes, Friday, August 18, 2-4 P. M.
11 o'clock classes, Saturday, August 19, 9-11 a. m.
Please observe the following
regulations governing the conducting and-rcporting of examinations:
1. Auditors may not be admitted
to final examinations.
2. Regularly enrolled students
who have more than two unexcused
absences should not be admitted1 to final examinations except
by the written permission of the
Director of the Summer Session.
3. Intructors
should
report
grades for all students taking examinations according to the following scale:
A Excellent
B Good
C Fair
D Passed
E Failure.
4. Students who are entitled to
take an examination, but who absent themselves from it, should be
reported " a h ; " those who arc excluded because of unexcused absences, " F.'oc."
5. Instructors are requested to
report to the Registrar all grades
on or before Friday, August 25.
6. Reports of examinations will
be sent to students who leave a
self-addressed stamped (2 cents)
envelope at the Registrar's office.
7. Students who do not take the
examinations but who .des're a
statement concerning their attendance should address written requests to the Director.
8. All regular classes will be held
on Thursday, August 17. No
classes will be held on Friday, August 18.
W. C. DECKER,
Director.
Visiting Faculty
(Continued from page 3)
Miss Mary Fay
Miss Fay, a teacher in French,
Hunter College High School in
New York City, N. Y., is here at
State College this summer as our
only instructor in French. Her
classes arc large and are made interesting by the manner in vvlr'ch
Miss Fay conducts them and the
"different" way she has of presenting things. She is a-graduate
of Hunter College, New York City,
with the degree of A. B.
instructions about marking the
papers. Each person taking the
lest will receive either the certificate literacy or a card saying he
has failed to pass the test but is not
debarred from taking the Secretary
of State's test at the polls.
The purpose of the law is a very
commendable one. It is impossible
to say how the law, as it now exists, will work. Mr. Rejall tried to
impress upon everyone the need
for co-operation and suggestions
for improvement. There may be
several loopholes for abusing the
law, and if so it will have to be
amended.
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