State College News (Summer Edition) FACULTY-STUDENT RECEPTION FRIDAY NIGHT

advertisement
T/v
»
State College News
(Summer Edition)
NEW YORK STATE COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED HY THE CLASS OK 1918
VOL. II
ALBANY, N. Y., JULY 10, 1922
NO. I
$3.00 PER YEAR
Large Enrollment at Summer Session
FACULTY-STUDENT RECEPTION FRIDAY NIGHT
FACULTY AND STUDENT
RECEPTION
When we are eight hundred
strong and have hut six weeks in
which lo gel acquainted, il is a
difficult matter for us In know our
fellow Students. The easiest way
lo do this is lo come lo our "gel
acquainted" social gathering Friday evening at 8 o'clock.
There will he various methods of
meeting people, both students and
faculty. If you were lo look at the
directory for summer school you
would find people from various
narts and from numerous colleges.
Look, also, flit the different institutions in which our summer school
instructors have taught. Come and
meet one another.
You will hear from Dr. |3rttbachcr, president of the college;
Professor Decker, director of the
summer session; and Grace Fox,
'23, director of social activities for
the summer session.
The dancing was a popular
phase of the social activities
last summer. This will he enjoved after the reception. Refreshments will also he served.
If you don't want to feel embarrassed by not knowing our summer school students be sure to attend this friendly gathering fin Friday. This is only the beginning
event of a scries of good times.
For this there will be no ticket
required,
CALENDAR
MONDAY, JULY 10
Registration, 9 A. M.-5 P. M.
TUESDAY, JULY 11
Instruction begins, 8 A, M.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 12
Meeting of high school principals, Room 101, 8 P. M.
FRIDAY, JULY 14
Faculty-Student Reception, Gym,
8 P. M.
OUR PRESIDENT
THE SUMMER SESSION OF
1922
There is an eagerness and an OUR DIRECTOR'S GREETING
evidence of industry in .Summer
An editorial writer in the New
Session students that is too often
lacking in college students of the York Times of Sunday, July 2, in
regular term. lie who gives his commenting upon the long vacasummer In research and study tions of teachers, said that for
rather than to idle recreation is most of us they are not periods ol
professionally alert and forward- dormancy. The large numbers of
looking. In teachers these are vir- teachers attending this and other
tues that used lo be rare, but are summer schools prove the truth
now becoming quite common. It of this assertion. The. school vacabespeaks great tilings for the tion should return the teacher to
.schools of our country, and prom- his work physically and menially
ises gratifying growth in our pro- refreshed. This cannot be done if
fessional stature. A hundred thou- either mind or body is neglected.
sand teachers engaged in profes- Probably a majority of the teachsional study during the middle of ers in attendance at summer
the summer is an inspiration. schools take too many hours of
Where will you find similar devo- work in the class-room. They
lion to ideals? Not in the ancient would do better to attempt less.
and honorable profession of law, They would be aolc to do less
medicine and Divinity. Not in the more thorouphly and so be more
new claimants for recognition as liaule to gain real intellectual reprofessions—engineering, nursing, freshment. At the same time the
architecture, journalism. .The sum- physical strain would be much less
mer schools of teachers and for tense. It would appear, therefore,
that those who do one or two
teachers are unique.
The men and women who are courses in such a way that they
enrolled in State College for the can thoroughly assimilate the sub(Continued on page 3)
(Continued on page 4)
JOIN THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
The tickets of the Summer Students' Association are now on
sale in the rotunda. These entitle the bearer to admission to all
functions given by the Association. They entitle the bearer to
receive a copy of the " News" every week. They give the bearer a
special right lo have a voice in the direction of the summer's activities. The price is one dollar.
NEW SCIENCE COURSES
OFFERED
For the first time in the history
of State College courses in Physics
and Chemistry are being offered
in slimmer session. In the past
there has been quite a demand for
these courses by people who are
teaching or intend to teach science
in the 'high schools of the state.
The course in Physics, known as
SiA, will be given by Dr. Carleton E. Power, assistant professor
of Physics at the college. This
course corresponds to the first half
of the course in general physics
which is offered to freshmen at the
regular session. The course treats
with mechanics and heat from an
experimental point of view. There
will be lectures, recitations and
laboratory work. The work taken
up in the course will be of a practical character. There will be recitations and lectures daily at 11 A.
M. in Room ISO. There will be
three laboratory periods, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, from
1:00 to 3:45 P. M. Three hours'
credit will be given.
The course in Chemistry, known
as CiB, will be given by Professor
Barnard S. Bronson, head of the
Department of Chemistry at the
college. This course is different
from any one given in the regular
session. Its purpose is to give
teachers of high school chemistry
who have had only a course in Elementary Chemistry a sufficient
background of chemical phenomena and theories. It is not a course
for beginners and only those who
have 'had a course in Elementary
Chemistry will be admitted, In the
course the following phases will be
treated: Chemical theory and application, kinetic molecular hypothesis, theory of solutions, ionization,
indicators, chemical equilibrium,
etc. The course will he given daily
at 10 A. M. in Room 250. Laboratory periods will be .held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from
1 to 3 P. M. Three hours' credit
will be given.
ORGAN RECITALS
Summer students are invited to
hear a series of free organ recitals
to be given at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church on Lancaster street, bclov,
Swan s'rect, on Wednesday afternoons at 5 o'clock by Mr. T. Frcd(Continued on page 4)
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JULY 10, 1922
Page Two
GOOD TIMES PLANNED
(Summer Edition)
Vol. II
July 10
No. I
Published weekly on Mondays
during the Summer Session by (lie
Student Body of the New York
State College for Teachers at Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is fifty
cents per session for those not
purchasing n Student Association
ticket. Advertising rates may lie
had on application to t/hc Business
Manager,
Editor-in-Chief,
Robert C, R, MacFarlanc,
Managing Editor,
Dorothy I )angremond
Business Manager,
Grace l'"ox.
HELLO, FRIEND
There is no greeting that expresses half the sincerity as a good,
cheery, hearty "hello, friend; we
are glad to see you." And that is
the way we want to welcome each
one of you, with a hearty handshake implied. Froifi now on our
paths will be more or less common.
The best way to greet a fellowtraveler is to do as Sam Walter
h'oss suggests, ''Step right up and
say hello."
VVe are glad to see many of the
old, familiar faces. They give the
college life a more homelike atmosphere, lint we are especially
glad to see many new faces. With
each newcomer our circle of friendship is broadened. Each one means
a new booster for good old Slate.
For six weeks we are here at college to work together. We also
will play together. There will be
many hard bumps along the road.
Some places are pretty hard to
get over. There is where the
friendship idea fits in. You will
always find some one ready to
help you. There is always a helping hand ready, That is the true
spirit of State College- If tbere is
anything that you would like to
know, we who can help you will
be glad to do so. We hope that
you will help us by any suggestions that you may see fit to offer.
But when all these wishes and
these hopes are boiled down to the
simplest form tbere is left the
greeting with which we started,
Hello, friend, we are rjlad to see
you.
NOTICES
The attention of high school
principals attending the summer
session is called to the meeting of
high school principals scheduled
for Wednesday, July 12, at S P.
M., in Room 101. Elementary
school principals will meet at the
same hour on Wednesday in Room
111. Principals and supervisors
are urged to be present at these
meetings.
Two courses not announced in
the catalog will be offered to the
students of the summer session,
viz., a course for graduate registered nurses, and anotbe.r one in
business writing. The course for
nurses consis's of lectures in public hygiene, by Dr. Barrows, at
8 o'clock; problems of the school
nurse, by Miss Naukom, at 9
Don't think for a minute that because you come to summer school
vou have to work all the time. The
all-wise providers who arrange
things knew you wouldn't, anyway, so they are getting up a good
program of sports, hikes, trips, etc,
It is intended that you have a good
vacation along with your mental
recreation.
In the first place there are ifoing
to be some lively tennis tournaments. There has always been a
large number of formidable racket
wielders at Slimmer session who
are always ready to have a match
with any contestant, There will be
singles and doubles tournaments
for botlh men and women,
Then there will be organized
hikes under the direction of the
Bioloey Department. There is a
great (leal of interesting biological
material in this vicinity, which will
amply repay a visit. The History
Department will also conduct hikes
to points of historical interest, such
as Schuyler Mansion, Fort Cralo
and the Saratoga Battlefield.
. From time to time groups of students, who desire to make the most
of their opportunities, also organize trips by bus. Last summer
there was a very enjoyable trip
through the Berkshires along the
Mohawk Trail. The good roads
from Albany to pleasure and summering resorts make long trips
pleasurable occasions instead of
tiresome ordeals.
Then, to finish the season with a
bang, there is the Kingston Point
excursion. You all have probably
heard of this event. The all-day
trip on the Day Line certainly
can't be beat. It is something you
will always remember.
o'clock, and elementary sociology,
by Prof. Flint, at 10 o'clock. All
lectures in this course will be held
in Room 108. Nurses who successfully complete this course and are
engaged as school nurses may obtain certificates as public health
teachers from the State Education
Department. The lectures in sociology arc open to all students and
may be taken for credit toward a
degree.
Teachers of penmanship who
complete the course in business
writing will receive the Palmer
teachers' certificate. The course
will last only, three weeks. The
sessions will be held in Room 304,
at 8 o'clock. It is open to all students.
Owing to illness, Mr. Charles
Hamilton was forced to resign
from the faculty of the summer
school. His place will be taken by
Mr. Maxwell Ehrlich, teacher in
the part-time schools of New York
City and lecturer on commercial
education in Hunter College.
Everybody is advised to arrange
to attend the organ recitals to be
given by Mr. Candlyn on July 19,
26 and August 2, 9 and 16. The recitals will be given in St. Paul's
Church, on Lancaster Street, at 5
o'clock in the afternoon. Mr.
Candlyn is not only an accomplished player on the organ but is
also well known as a composer.
The student body is urged to attend the reception given by the
faculty on Friday evening, July 14.
Announcement will be made
from time to time on the bulletin
board of special lectures to be he'd
in the auditorium between the
hours of 12 and 1 o'clock. Several
GRINS
Three boys were discussing the
greatness of their fathers, each one
bragging more than the other. The
first boy said: " M y father just
takes a piece of paper with lines on
it, and makes a few dots on them.
That's music, and he gets $50 for
it." " Oh, that's nothing," said the
second boy. "My father writes
sonic words on a piece of paper in
verse. That's poetry, and he gets
$100 for it." The third boy came
back strong. He said: " My father
writes out some words on paper
and then preaches them in church.
That's a sermon, and it takes six
men to bring in the money.—Boston Globe.
He—" Miss Susie, I'm going to
propose—"
Sue—"Oh, really, Mr. Snookums, this is so sudden! "
" That we have some ice cream
"Oh, I shall be delighted!"
"Sometime when the weather
gets warmer."—Judge.
Fat—" I'hwat was the last card
I dealt ye, Mike?"
Mike—"'Twas a spade,"
Fat—" Didn't <)i know it? Begorra, I saw ye spit on yjpur bauds
when ye picked it up."
FAMOUS SAYINGS OF
FAMOUS PEOPLE
T am sorry that 1 have no more
lives to give for my country.—Flutare h,
You can't keep a good man
down.—Jonah.
The bigger they are the harder
they fall.—David.
So this is Paris—Helen of Troy.
I don't know where I am going
but I'm on my way.—Columbus.
Keep the home fires burning.—
Nero.
It floats,—Noah.
The first hundred years are the
hardest.—Methuselah.
—Exchange.
The beautiful motorist, stopped
by the traffic cop on account of
headlight trouble, turned her gaze
full upon him.
"Your ' l a m p s ' are all right,"
said the susceptible young officer.
"Drive on!"—Boston Transcript.
" My father weighed only four
pounds when he was born."
"Great heavens, did he live?"—
Harvard Lampoon.
" Bill's face is quite wrinkled."
" Sign of care."
" And his clothes are wrinkled,
too."
"Sign of don't care."—Boston
Transcript.
It's a great life, if you don't
weaken.-—Adam.
I'm strong for you, kid.—Samson.
Customer (in book store)—" I
want the last word in dictionaries."
Clerk—" Yes, sir.
Zythum."—
Yale Record.
interesting speakers have already
promised to talk on topics of general appeal,
' Each week a list of students
who have been reported absent
from recitations will lie posted on
the bulletin board. Students whose
names incorrectly., appear on this
list must at once explain the mistake
to the member of the faculty so
reporting them. Only students
who_ are taking the course for
credit will be reported. The rule
that no student may be absent
from, more than two recitations in
any subject will be strictly enforced.
Dr. Morrison will not meet his
class, S. G. 105, on Tuesday, July
11.
the visitor. There are quiet reading rooms and libraries, where we
frequently go for reference work.
The museum is very interesting,
not only to the student of science,
but to everyone in general. There
one can see how pottery is finished
from its crude form, the varieties of
coal, geological fossils, precious
stones, birds and animals. Anybody can spend several days at this
museum and never feel as if he
knew all he wished to know about
it. Don't forget the Indian groups,
which are works of art. Recently
there has been erected a life-size
mastodon, the only one in existence. Go and see what if is like.
Visit the Historical and Art
Society. Its art gallery and the
collections of china maintain qne's
interest for endless lengtihs of
time. You must actually pull yourself away from the place.
In the Capitol a few interesting
features are the rooms of the Senate and Assembly, the famous
staircase, and the portraits of New
York State governors.
Resides the Schuyler Mansion,
other historic places about Albany
arc the Yankee Doodle House and
the Van Rensselaer Building, in
Rensselaer, and tthe Saratoga Battlefield, at Saratoga. There probably will be organized trips to
thes , If there arc not, be sure to
go, anvway.
ALBANY, T H E HISTORIC
How much do we know abom
this old Dutch city of Albany and
the historic places just outside it?
There are the Education Building,
the Capitol, the Historical and Art
Society Building and the Schuyler
Mansion, which people are anxious
to know about, even if they are in
Albany but a short time.
The Education Building is first
of all a piece of beautiful architecture.
Its massivenesa impresses
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JULY 10, 1922
SOCIAL COMMITTEES
ADMINISTRATIVE
APPOINTED
OFFICERS
Summer School Faculty
Other Colleges Represented
Grace E, Fox, '23, Director of
Social Activities.
Refreshment Committee
Ruth Kinmiey, Chairman.
Catherine Peltz.
Lillian Ershlcr.
Elizabeth Biicld.
Edward Vines.
Doris Riddick.
I lelen Moore.
Eleanor Giffen,
Abram Royer llrubadicr, Ph.D.,
President of the College.
Marian lloyt Horner, A. M., Pd.
D., Dean of the College.
Winfred Cornwall Decker, Pd.l'..,
A.M., Professor of German, Director of the Slimmer Session.
Clarence Joseph Deyo, Financial
Secretary,
Elizabeth Van Denburgb, A.B.,
Registrar.
Mary Elizabeth Cobb, A.B.,
B.L.S., Librarian.
Oliver Putnam.
Speakers' Committee
Clara Whitcomhe, Chairman.
Elsie Leonard.
Marjorlc Smith.
Edith Sanders.
Music Committee
Muriel Daggett, Chairman.
Margaret Hutchins.
Charles Rcilly.
Information Committee
Lcland Foster, Chairman.
Doris Keep.
Mary Bull,
John Cassavant.
Elizabeth Murray.
Erva Littcl.
Hclcnc Leach.
Louise Austin.
Kalhcryn Merchant.
Thirzn Wheeler.
Catherine Htm ley.
Eleanor Eraser,
Angeline Sanchirco.
Decoration Committee
Clara Fahnstock, Chairman.
Victoria Peterson.
Florence Preihs.
Marion McCormack.
Katherine Sauter.
Dorothy Viets.
Caroline Berberick.
Ethel Mead.
Publicity Committee
Agnes S. Smith, Chairman.
Dorothy Dangremoncl.
Excursion Committee
Robert MacFarlanc. Chairman.
Harvey Fcnner.
Athletic Committee
John Cassavant, Chairman.
Victoria Peterson.
Orena Relyea.
Have you a little S. A, ticket in
your pocket, this morning?
FACULTY
Winfred Cornwall Decker, Pcl.B.,
A.M., Director.
Harry Birchenough, A.M., Professor of Mathematics.
David Hutchison, A.M., D.B.,
Professor of Government.
Jesse Floyd Stinard, A.M., Assistant Professor of Spanish.
Arthur Kennedy Beik, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Education.
George MacFeely Conwell, A.M.,
Ph.D., Assistant
Professor of
Mathematics.
Clarence Albert Hidlcy, A.M., Instructor in History.
Martha Scott Stuart, A.B., Assistant Instructor in Library Management.
Blanche Morrison Avery, U.S.,
Instructor in Commercial Education.
Barnard Sawyer Bronson, A.M.,
Professor of Chemistry.
Minnie Brink Scotland, A.M., Instructor in Biology.
Carleton EUlerkiji. Power, Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor of Physics.
Gertrude
Elizabeth
Douglas,
A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in Biology.
Harry Worthington Hastings,
A.M., Ph.D., Professor of English.
George Morell York, A.B., Professor of Commercial Education.
THE " CO-OP."
The " Co-Op" will cooperate
with vou again this summer. Tt
was successfully managed last summer by Miss Helen T. Fay. She
with the assistance of Miss Eleanor
Eoote, will run this college store
during the summer.
Among the many things on sale
in the " Co-Op " will be found the
following:
Complete line of required drawing supplies, all text books used in
VISITING INSTRUCTORS
Mr. Lamont I''. Hodge, Deputy
Superintendent of Schools, Yonkers, N. Y.
Mr. J, Cayce Morrison, Ph.D.,
Specialist in Educational Measurements, State Education Department, Albany, N. Y.
Miss Liliia VV. Olcolt, Supervisor
of Drawing, State Normal School,
Cortland, N. Y.
Mr. Chester Joseph Terrill, Supervisor in Commercial Education,
Albany High School, Albany, N. Y.
Mr. Charles VV. Hamilton, Instructor in Part-Time and Continuation Schools, Rochester, N. Y.
Mr. Benjamin W. Brown, A.M.,
Instructor in Public Speaking,
Brown University.
Miss Jane Jones, .A.M., Principal
of the Brown School, Schenectady,
N. Y.
Mr. Jarcd Scuddcr, A.M., Latin
Master, .Albany Boys' Academy.
Mr. VV. Randall Waterman, A.M.,
Instructor in History, Dartmouth
College.
Miss Mary Fay, A,It., Teacher of
French, Hunter College High
School, New York, N. Y.
Mr. Kemp Randall P.lanchard
Flint, A. M., Professor of Political
Science, Norwich University.
Miss Caroline A. Whipple, A.M.,
Specialist in the Division of Immigrant Education. State Department
of Education, Albany, N. Y.
Miss Grace M. Knox, Teacher of
Drawing,
Schenectady
High
School, Schenectady, N. Y.
Miss Alice Kilgorc, A.B., Special
Elementary Teacher in the Public
Schools, Minneapolis, Minn.
Miss Jcanette B. Lane, Ph.B.,
Teacher of Expression, Finch
School, N. Y.
Mr. lulius Stanton Kingsley,
M.S., A.M., Pd.M., Professor of
Secondary Education, Middlcbury
College.
Miss Ora Strange, Teacher of
Drawing, F.ast Orange Public
Schools, East Orange, N. J.
Miss Julia T. Connor, A.B., B.S.,
Organizer and Teacher of Retail
Store Service, Part Time School,
VVorces'er, Mass.
Summer School, College seal stationery, candy.
Second Hand Book Department:
Batons for Music Department, College Photograph Books, Fountain
Pens.
Page Three
ROTARY CLUB ELECT DEAN
HORNER
Dean Harlan Hoyt Horner has
just returned from San Francisco,
where he attended the national convention of Rotary Clubs. At this
convention
Dean Homer was
elected governor of flic Metropolitan District of New York. £Fhis is
a most important post, as ingives
jurisdiction over all the clubswfiTi
cities in Eastern New York from
New York City to Amsterdam.
In electing Dean Horner to this
office the Rotarians have sound
judgment. Besides being a noted
educator, be also is active in other
lines of civic activity. He has been
an ardent booster in every movement to better conditions in Albany. During the war be took active part in organizing and putting
over the various drives, lie was
one of the leaders in the municipal
Christmas tree celebration, which
has elicited much favorable comment in the past few years.
Dean itorner has a wide experi
once in Rotary affairs. During the
past year he has served as president of the Albany Chili. During
his term of office many innovations
have been introduced. At the
noon-day lunch and meetings there
have been novel programs of
sneeches and stunts.
In its selection of Dean Horner
as district governor, the Rotary
Clubs have made a very wise
choice. He is an eminent scholar
and a progressive leader. His term
of office should be marked by some
big strides forward.
OUR DIRECTOR'S GREETING
(Continued from page 1)
ject-matter of these courses return
to the class-room better refreshed
mentally and physically than those
who take so much work that their
minds never have an opportunity
to digest the facts presented by
their instructors.
The students
who have the time to go in library
or laboratory beyond the mere requirements of the courses they are
pursuing are the ones who receive
real benefit. Mental drudges like
physical drudges are liable to be
slatterns.
State College welcomes you to
its summer session of 1922. Its
director trusts that your sojourn
here may give you the ideal vacation for a (cache"
W. C. DECKER.
Follow the crowd. They are
buying their Student Association
tickets. The line forms to the
right.
Miss Fay invites criticism.
Do you want to see how far a
dollar can go? Buy a S. A. ticket.
Buy that ticket now. Then you
won't be disappointed when they
are all sold.
/83S
Buy early and avoid the rush.
Page Four
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JULY 10, 1922
Boarding *** Rooming Accomodations ALBANY HARDWARE & IRON CO.
Here is the place you want
I t is desirable for s t u d e n t s t o m a k e a r r a n g e m e n t s in a d v a n c e for b o a r d
and roorn^ d u r i n g t h e s u m m e r session. A list of approved places appears
below. Effort will be m a d e on t h e opening d a y to aid students w h o a r e
unable to m a k e suitable a r r a n g e m e n t s in advance t o find comfortable
quarters.
Mrs. E r n e s t B e a u m o n t
490 H a m i l t o n Street
Miss Caroline Carl
159 W e s t e r n Avenue
Miss K a t h a r i n e Doyle
560 M y r t l e Avenue
Miss Elizabeth H a w n
8 M a n n i n g Boulevard, N o r t h
Mrs. W i l l i a m .[-tenderer
8 McPherson Terrace
173 L a n c a s t e r Street
Miss M a r i a n n a H u s t e d
Mrs. M a r y R. J o h n s o n ( b o a r d o n l y )
192 W e s t e r n Avenue
Mrs, E d w a r d A, Keelcr
14 South L a k e Avenue
Mrs. P . J. Kccnan
. . 4 2 1 W a s h i n g t o n Avenue
Mrs. J o s e p h Klein ( m e n )
139 D a n a Avenue
Mrs. M a r y N o r t h Kimball
186 W e s t e r n Avenue
Mrs. J o h n Lakely ( m e n )
•
14 J u d s o n Street
Mrs. F. W . Lobdell ( m e n )
77 Robin Street
Mrs. William H. M c K e n n a
27 South Lake Avenue
Miss Delia M a r s h m a n ( m e n )
.183 W a s h i n g t o n Avenue
Mrs. J. Paltihson ( m e n )
399 W a s h i n g t o n Avenue
Mrs. A. E . Splatt
148 O n t a r i o Street
Mrs. 1'. J. Story
431 W e s t e r n Avenue
Mrs. G. R. Underbill ( m e n )
23 W e s t e r n Avenue
Mrs. William Wallen
160 W e s t e r n Avenue
Mrs. E. R, W o o d .
65 South Lake Avenue
Y House (Miss A u g u s t a K n a p p )
747 Madison Avenue
Syddum Hall
•
1 E n g l e w o o d Place
193 Lancaster Street
Chi S i g m a T h e t a H o u s e
Psi G a m m a H o u s e (Miss R u t h TefTt)
124 South Lake Avenue
K a p p a D e l t a R h o H o u s e ( m e n ) (Mr. Harvey F e n n e r )
20 South Allen Street
ORGAN RECITALS
THE
crick H . Candlyn, Mr. Candlyn is
organist and c h o i r m a s t e r a t St.
Paul's Church a n d a n i n s t r u c t o r in
music at the college in regular session. H e is very widely k n o w n as
an organist, h a v i n g served a s dean
of o r g a n i s t s in this n o r t h e a s t e r n division, and as a c o m p o s e r . T o give
you an idea about his w o r k s we
are publishing the following list of
compositions put o u t in the last
two years:
Anthems:
" O Come, O Come, I m m a n u e l "
(Gray).
" S l e e p , Little S o n " ( G r a y ) .
"Nativity S o n g " (Gray),
" R e s u r r e c t i o n " ( B o s t o n Music
Co.).
" T h e P e a c e of G o d " ( G r a y ) .
" O n Christmas D a y " (Composers' P u b . S o c i e t y ) .
" E a s t e r Alleluia" (Composers'
Pub. Societv).
" T e D c u m in D F l a t " ( G r a y ) .
Solos:
" O God of A r m i e s " ( G r a y ) .
" God that M a d e s t E a r t h and
Heaven " ( G r a y ) .
" T Will L a y Me D o w n in P e a c e "
(Schirmer).
Organ Compositions:
" Marche
Hcroique"
(Boston
Music Co.).
" Chanson " (Schirmer).
" Scherzo Caprice" (Gray).
Songs "
(A.
SESSION
ALBANY, N. Y.
39-43 STATE STREET
GREETING
CARDS
FOR ALL
OCCASIONS
JlasljiitgtiTU (Sift j§l|np
2 4 4 W A S H I N G T O N AVE.
ALBANY, N. Y,
TELEPHONE
WEST
P.
Bright"
Cantata:
" T h e P r i n c e of P e a c e " ( G r a y ) .
T h e first of t h e o r g a n recitals
will be W e d n e s d a y , J u l y 19.
BERBERICK
South End Florist
I 3 3 B W
Quality
SILKS
A n d Dreas Goods At
HEWITTS SILK SHOP
Over Kresges 5 and
10c. Store.
26 SECOND A V E N U E
ALBANY, N. Y.
, , ,_ „ „ , „
15-17 No. Pearl St.
Ideal Service
Ideal Food
$5.00 Meal Ticket (or $4.50 to College Students
Ideal Restaurant
GEORGE F HAMP, Prop.
Phone, West 4 4 7 2
208 Washington Avenue, Albany, N. Y.
Regular Dinner 40c.—11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
OF
Supper 40c— 5 p. m. to 8 p. m.
G. Wiley & Bro.
IQ22
(Continued from page 1)
Secular C h o r u s e s :
" Three
Shakespeare
(Gray).
" A Hottentot Child"
Schmidt Co.).
" Sleep, Sleep, Beauty
(Schmidt).
SUMMER
TENNIS SUPPLIES
BATHING SUITS - SPORTING GOODS
Dealers in A l l K i n d , of
(Continued from page 1)
s u m m e r have large opportunities
before them.
T h e S t a t e Library,
the State Museum, the Capitol offices, each and all offer great advantages to teachers. Y o u will find
here in Albany much material that
will illuminate and enrich your
work a s teachers. Seize upon it;
make it y o u r s . If you possess it,
it will pass cm to y o u r students as
a valuable heritage.
But there is also much around
Albany to relieve the m o n o t o n y of
s u m m e r work. T h e r e is the H u d son river for boating, canoeing and
larger or s h o r t e r excursions. F o r
variety of b e a u t y and recreation,
you will find none betler.
There
are the historical i n t e r e s t s — S a r a toga Battlefield; Fort Cralo and
Yankee D o o d l e ; Schuyler Mansion; Citizen Genet; M a r ' i n Van
Buren; the S c h e n e c t a d y M a s s a c r e
of 1690; the lingering evidences of
the first s'eam railroad between Albany and Schenectady; the old
Erie Canal; and a h u n d r e d m a ' t c r s
of historical _ interest in Albany
City—all within the scone of an afternoon's o u t i n g or a S a t u r d a y excursion. _ And the teacher of science will find unexpected revelations in the General Electric Company in S c h e n e c t a d y or in (he
power stations of Spier Falls and
Schaghticoke.
State College claims all of ihesc
scenic, historic and scientific interests as part of her s u m m e r equipment, and each student is invited,
even cordially urged, to enter these
great opportunities for study, in addition to t h e class-room and labora t o r y activities to which you will
of course nay vour first and m o r e
regular devotions.
1 hope t h e
S u m m e r Session of 1922 will be intellectually s t i m u l a t i n g and fruitful for each m e m b e r of our summer family. If it can also be full
of j o y and provocative of health,
our hopes a n d desires will be realized.
A. R. B R U B A C H E R ,
Fresh and Salt Meat
and Poultry
FOUNTAIN PEN INK
We can supply you with
Waterman Ink and Onoto
Ink — two of the best for
fountain pen use.
348 State Street, Corner Lark
Telephones 544 and S43
IF YOU
CO-OPERATE
WITH THE
«7fef£NCOTV05
"CO-OP"
fSTABUSHEO - IS87
We will supply all your
College Needs
CDtlNER-HUDBON AVE*»o SD.PEARL
ALBANY PRINT SHOP, Inc.
ALBANY, N. Y.
394-396 BROADWAY
Special Attention Given Work
for Student Societies
P R I N T E R S
OF
T H E
S T A T E
C O L L E G E
NEWS
FRANK H. EVORY & CO.
General Printers
36-38 Beaver Street
A FRIEND
ALBANY, N. Y.
STAHLER
Central Avenue's Leading
Confectionery and Ice
Cream Parlor
A large line of fancy box
chocolates, booklets favors,
etc.
::
::
::
::
I f 11 Soar •Nonf Ittra
Expert Hemstitching, Buttonholes,
Buttons, all kinds of Pleating, Trimmings and Embroidery
260 Lark Street, A bany, N. Y.
PHONE MAIN 5 8 7 5
LAST BUT NOT LEAST
The Gateway Press
QUALITY 'PRINTERS
AT YOUR ELBOW-WEST
336 Central Avenue
2037
Download
Related flashcards

Literature

26 cards

Medieval literature

42 cards

14th-century books

15 cards

Fiction

18 cards

Typographical symbols

20 cards

Create Flashcards