State College News INTERCLASS MEET RESULTS VI. No. 27 Freshmen Score 33 Points

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State College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OP
VOL.
VI. No. 27
PROGRESS OF FUND
$3,000 Pledged
Although the ;iliinini of Slate
College are just beginning to get the
machinery of their dormitory fund
in motion, approximately $3,000 has
been subscribed or pledged already.
The alumni plan to raise $300,000
with which they will build .the very
best sort of modern dormitory for
State. The slogan of the drive is
"Give or Get $100,"
The general plan of organization
is to place a chairman in charge of
the work in eacb county of the state.
The chairman will direct the work of
her captains who are local officers
within the county. There will be a
captain for every fifteen alumni in
the county, About eighty per cent,
of the county chairmen have been
chosen and have accepted. Many
report that they have already been
able to procure their captains, It
has been decided to write individually
to those alumni who arc not taken
care of by this system. The statewide drive has not been started yet,
but as the machinery is in order, results will not be long in coming.
The issue of the Alumni Quarterly,
which will come out this week, is
devoted entirely to the dormitory
drive. It is illustrated, and it contains letters endorsing the dormitory
project from Dr. Finegan, Dr. Finley,
and Dr. Graves. Moreover, there
will appear numerous testimonials
from people interested in the various phases of education on what our
State College people do.
The organization and work of the
Albany committee is especially interesting because of the number of
people that must be reached. There
are four hundred alumni of State
in the city of Albany. Five chairmen: Miss Minnie Scotland, Miss
Mary Isdcll, Mrs, Grover Long, Mrs.
Elizabeth Ogsbury, and Mrs. C. A,
Woodward have general charge of
the work. They plan ways of earning money and securing publicity.
They then distribute the literature
and tickets for their various projects
through their captains, who are about
forty in number. The captains plan
to get in touch with their people.
The activities of the Albany committee are numerous. They will preContinued on page 4
ALBANY, N. Y., APRIL 3,
1918
1922
$3.00 PER YEAR
INTERCLASS MEET RESULTS
Flapper Movement Now CountryWide
Freshmen Score 33 Points
Last Monday afternoon at the
Men's Jnterclass Track Meet some
very creditable record's were made.
Of course there were no new world's
records made, but the track seasun is yet young, For ail event so
early in the season, the men participating showed splendid form and
ability. Twenty-three men participated,
Having got the habit of walking
off with things lately, the Frosh
romped off with the honors. The
"Red and White" scored thirty-three
points, The Seniors came a close
second with thirty points, and the
Sophs got third place with seventeen
points, 'file Juniors were not entered, 'file entries and results were
as follows:
Points Scored
Event
1922 1923 1924 1925
100 yard dash.
1. McGltier . . . .
5
2. Laurin
3
3. Stahlman
1
Tiiuc — Ws sec.
25 yard dash.
1. McCluer , . ,.
5
..
..
2. Howe
3. Collins
300 year dash.
1. Breslau
2. Hen I ley
3
Time — 57'A sec.
THE SPRING SHOWING
Clothes are always a topic of universal interest. If any State College girl is ambitious to be attired
in the best fashion she need only
adopt the following suggestions as
to what is in order this spring:
1000 yard run.
1. II ornuiig ..,.
. McCluer", . .. 3
..
, Baldwin
1
..
Time — 4 hi'hi.", Ws sec.
Shot Put.
, Carrolan , , ..
Heaver
Distance—31' W".
Discus.
, Link . ,
5
. Carrolan
. Roberts .
I Hslance - -60' 9".
Javelin.
. Link. . ,
. Roberts .
Distance- 79'/,'.
High Jump.
. Horniing
, Howe
. Cassavant . . . .
Height — 4 ' 9".
Broad Jump.
Carrolan
Baldwin
Collins
Distance— 10' 3".
TOTAL . . . . .
SHIFTER EPIDEMIC IN
NEW YORK SCHOOLS
30
..
17
33
Scorer— Fcnner,
Timers — Shcrley, Lanclon.
Judges — Juckett, Mayes, Johnson.
Event
1922 1923 1924 1925
Event
1922 1923 1924 1925
FACULTY NOTES
Dr. Beik gave a very interesting
lecture for teachers on "Educational
Measures" in Gloversville last Friday.
Among the new instructors at the
summer session of the College this
year, will .be Miss Jane Jones formerly instructor of English in the
College. She will assist in the English Department.
Prof. Kingsley of Middlebtiry will
have charge of the Junior High
School organization work.
Mr. Ernest G. Hesser formerly of
Albany, now of Indianapolis will
teach music.
Mr. Benjamin W. Brown of Brown
University will assist in the English Department.
W. Randall Waterman of Dartmouth will teach in the History Department,
Miss Mary Fay of Columbia University will teach in the French Department.
Miss Janette B. Lane of New York
City iwill teach Dramatics and Oral
English.
Colors
Red—porcelain, perwinkle.
Red—cherry.
Yellow—dandelion, canary.
A .tendency toward black and whife.
Fabrics
COLLEGE CALENDAR
Silks —' crepes — canton, firshieu,
roshanara; charmiuse; taffeta.
Wool—tweed, rep.
TUESDAY, APRIL 4
Cotton—chinty,
swisis,
muslin,
3 p. m.
voile, ratine, cotton eponge.
Y. W. C. A. Meeting —Room B } Silhouette
Neck line—Batian, Bromley.
WEDNESDAY. APRIL 5
Waist line—low.
8 p. m.
Skirt line—uneven.
Chemistry Club — Room 250
Official skirt length—8 inches from
floor for afternoon and evening
FRIDAY, APRIL 6
wear; shorter for sport wear.
11.35 a. m.
Hats
Student Assembly — Freshman
Shapes
Stunt
Large hats—cape line effects.
5.40 p. m.
Clocke, some clocke with roll in
Spring Vacation Begins
front.
FROSH STUNT
Small hats—rolling brim.
TUESDAY. APRIL 18
High
crown.
8.10 a. m.
April 7, the Freshman stunt will
Instruction Resumed
Continued on page 4
be given in assembly.
The badge is a paper clip, stuck
in the coat lapel. The vow is "Be
a good fellow; get something for
nothing," and the purpose of the mysterious now secret society is to enrich the members through confessedly petty graft. The Shifters, organization which ilms spread so rapidly in New York in recent weeks,
has found its way in a comparatively
short! time to practically every largo
city in the eastern part of the
country. It has penetrated nearly
every high school in New York.
One principal said that every one of
his pupils was a member of ill. It
lias spread to many of the colleges,
one of which is Princeton, where
shifters are as numerous as Hies in
summer. The numbers there have
multiplied by leaps and bounds since
the hrst member appeared a week
ago.
What purports to be headquarters
of the society of Shifters is at 303
Fifth Avenue, Now York, Upstairs
the society occupies rooms with
a "jewelry" manufacturing concern,
the Shifters' Emblem Company,
This firm produces a small enamel
pin, with which it hopes to rival
the paper clip commonly worn.
The by-laws of the Society of
Shifters, which Miss Robinson-Smith,
the president, made public last week,
are as follows;
"The Shifters arc an organization
of brotherly and sisterly love,
"To hecomc a member :
"Make ,thc initiate put his right
hand over his bead and left hand
over his heart.
"fie or she must promise to be a
good fellow or sister and to help
other Shifters at all times.
"As a fee the initiate pays anything
asked for by the person bringing
him into /the order."
After meeting these requirements,
the ritual continues:
"Password1—T have paid my check,'
"Hand shake-—Place the palms of
the hands together, but not closing
the hand, then put hand in the coat
and say: 'Be a good fellow, get
something for nothing.'
"As this is a secret order, all persons must promise not to divulge the
foregoing signs, etc., of the Shifters.
"Yours truly,
"John Doe,
"Official Shifter."
Since Che Shifter Society has
passed from the status of harmless
fad to that of dangerous craze, it
has 'been condemned by high school
principals on the ground that it invites informalities, promotes cordiality, and gives opportunity for indiscriminate acquaintances.
NOTICE
Any student who is proposing to
teach next year and wants assistance
from the Appointment Bureau should
file credentials immediately and make
out an application.
Seniors who have not filed their
photographs .wiWi the Appointment
Bureau must do so at once.
Page Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, APRIL 3, 1922
State college Reu>$
PROSH AND SOPHS
ATTENTION
Where arc those line red and
white caps that the frosh men wore
last fall? It is long .past the first
day of spring and still they have not
Published weekly, during the colmade their appearance,
ft is a
lege year, by the Student Body of
college tradition that the caps should
the N e w York State College for
be
worn
The
caps
are
not
unbeTeachers, at Albany, N e w York.
coming. In fact we think they arc
T h e subscription rate is three dolfine.
Therefore
we
think
the
frosh
lars per year.
Advertising rates
men should consider it a pleasure
may be had on application t o the
and a duty to don their class colors
business manager.
in the form of head gear,
[Articles, manuscripts, etc., must
Now as to the sophs. You soph
be in the hands of the Editors befellows have a great black mark
fore Thursday of the week of pubagainst your spirit. You allowed the
lication.]
••- I
frosh >to walk off with your banner,
Why not retalliate by some drastic
Editor-in-Chief.
enforcement
of college traditions?
Louise D. Persons, '22
Of course the college will stand back
Managing Editor,
of you in all you do to enforce tradHope D. Persons, 22
itions. The park lake is rather convenient, A word to the wise is sufBusiness Manager,
ficient.
Let's see the cans or some
Alice O'Connor, '22
action.
Subscription Manager,
Ethel Huyck, '22
To the E d i t o r :
Assistant Business Managers,
We are thoroughly tired of hearing
Grace Fox, '23
the modern girl denounced, arc we
Edith Sanders, '23
not? We, the modern college girls,
have only disgust for those doleful
Associate Editors,
prophets of today who say that "our
Robert MacFarlane, '23
national
standards of young womanEira Williams, '23
hood arc being most speedily and
Vera Nolan, '23
disastcrously lowered." They aren't,
Reporters
we protest
And we stand at attenDorothy Bennit. '24
lion, ready to defend ourselves and
Doris Butler, *23
our generation, ready to prove that
Dorothy Dangremond, '23
I holt glh we are young and by good
right impulsive, we are worth while,
and honorable, and fair minded, and
sanely moral.
LET'S HAVE MORE
In the J a n u a r y copy of the
"Woman's H o m e Companion' 1 there
were two articles, one by Mary
Say, folks, didn't we have a nice
Roberts Rineliart, denouncing the
time in student assembly on Friday
modern college, business, and society
the twenty-fourth? We didn't know
girl, and a rather weakly defensive
we bad such a fine orchestra did we?
article by Cora Harris, saying that
In spite of the fact that we missed
anyway it was all mother's fault. In
the pleasure of hearing the men's
the February issue appeared an anquartet, we enjoyed all that did hapswer by a college girl, speaking for
pen. The women's clhorus -ring well
girls in general. She did not name
and .with spirit. And didn't you enher college, but she said she was sure
joy those negro ballads? My how we
the opinions of her college were those
sang! That shows we have some
of
others, and as I read it I was
pop when we aren't too—let's say
proud to think that no one at State
tired—•to show it. The trouble with
College would belie her splendid deus is that we think it's lots more
fense, in any way.
interesting to sit back in our seats
Very well, then, we hereby estabwith a bored air and yawn, "My,
lish ourselves, flic girls of State Colbut student assemblies are stupid."
lege,
as a good, steady funloving,
Student assemblies arc just what the
but fairly studious group, and I
students make them. It we're bored,
think we shall find plenty of support
they will be boreing, If we're full
for this ixit of egotism among our
of en'tihusiasm and eager to enjoy
faculty. Of course we a r e young and
them, they are bound to interest us.
often
thoughtless, but do we realWhy shouldn't we sing more? I'm sure
ize that the good opinion we feel we
that the average student likes to
deserve by an act of sheer thoughtsing. Well, then, let's learn our
lessness?
When a State College
songs. Suppose we begin with the
girl puts on her paper clip, and calls
Alma Mater? Let's learn the words,
herself an energetic Shifter, she
all of them, and let's learn them
does it in a spirit of adventure and
correctly. A student body thait can't
fun. She would resent the imputasing its own Alma Mater correctly
tions she does not realize she is
can't be interested in putting its
bringing upon herself.
But this
college on the map. Just get out
Shifter movement is more than the
that dust covered song book, sit
clean joke we have here considered
down for ten minutes, and learn youi
it. Do we know what it means to
Alma' Mater. Learn where "let the
the public wlhen the papers tell of
freedom
wihich cometh through
State College Shifters along with the
knowledge" comes, and don't put il
multitude of others. It means that
in the wrong place.
in the eyes of the outsider we are
allying ourselves with the very w o r s t
Now we know it. Let's sing. Let's
kind of modern girl, we are bringing
just make that auditorium ring next
against us the charges we have hated
Friday, The way we sing our songs
to hear against her, losing the strength
of the assertion we have so intensely
shows how much we love our colheld to—that she is in the minority,
lege.- We can^t be here long. Let's
and not a representative of average
work for lier and love her and all
Amerioan.
young woman, It may be
she stands for,
a joke among us, and it is, for we
are
as
wholeheartedly
decent as we
If you don't like the songs we
have claimed, but young womansing, make some new ones, They're
hood
belongs
t
o
us
to
defend more
always acceptable. Above all, let's
than to any other class, so let us be
try to be interested and we soon
careful to ally ourselves with no
will be, We've enjoyed,this one asmovement that will hurt our defense,
sembly and we can enjoy them all
'24
if'we' only will,
Let's try.
Vol.
VI
April 3
No. 27
A FABLE BY AESOP, JR,
Once upon a time, in the land oi
long agvi, a certain maiden made
ready for a great festival.
Anil
there were to be many young men
and maidens at this festival, and they
planned to meet each other there,
And vviheti the young maiden made
her plans, she took care ihat she
should meet only young men and
maidens for vvihoni she cared exceedingly,
'Now when one young maiden
spoke to her concerning the festival,
she looked oh her with scorn and
said unto herself "She is not of
tts." Then to the maiden she replied, "f shall be very busy at the
festival." And when another came
to her, she gave thought to the mat-
ter and considered that those with
her would be strange, and so the
answer was, "I shall be very busy at
the festival." But there came to the
young maiden another maiden for
whom she . had affection, but she
dared n o t to make a promise to her
for the festival, for the other maidens with her had commanded that
she promise to them,
And in all of the festivals of this
maiden's life, she made promises to
the same maidens. And when she
came to the judgment scat of the
gods, Zeus made accusation of exclusiveness against Iter and decreed,
"Let 'her always be with the maidens s.lic despised, and let her never
see flic .maidens of her former fes
tivals again." And the scribe in writing opposite her name in the book
ofi men, wrote beginning, "She thai
sailh her dance order is filled
"
'ROUND THE COLLEGE
Dr. and Mrs. Harold Thompson
and Dr. Thompson's mother were
guests at dinner at the Home Management House on Wednesday evening, March 22,
Miss Archie Hellin of the Bureau
of _ Associated Charities met the
seniors in Home Economics on
Thursday, March 21, for the purpose
of discussing the work of that
bureau.
Proif, and Mrs. T. F. H. Candlyn
were recent dinner guests at the
Home Management House.
Students in the class in Dietetics
are interested in Home Visiting in
connection with the work of the
South E n d Clinic,
known as the Clark Liberal Club,
his subject being, "Control of P u b
lie Opinion." Dr. Harry E. Barnes,
Professor of History of Thought
Chemistry Club
and Culture, presided. T h e meeting
T h e regular meeting of Chemistry
had
been advertised
throughout
Club will be held Wednesday eve
Worcester, and an audience of 200
niing, April 5, 1922. A paper on
students, professors', and townspeople
abrasircs will 'be presented by Miss
—each having paid 25c to hear the
Ethel Meade,
speaker—crowded the assembly hall.
At the last meeting, Friday afterDr. Ncaring's address had 'been
noon, March 24, Robert MacFarlane
in progress an hour and threeoutlined' the life of Priestly. We
quarters, when Dr. W. VV. Atwood,
learned that Priestly was a minister
president of Clark, entered the hall.
by profession and did his chemical
Within live minutes thereafter, he
work in his spare time. Indeed he
rose, crossed over to Ross Fraser,
preached the gospel not only in Eng'22, president of the Liberal Club,
land, but also in America.
and ordered Mr. Fraser to "stop
Priestly's contributions
to the
•him," to "tell him to stop." M r .
science of chemistry a r c well known,
Eraser went to the platform and
but 'his influence on the development
spoke to Dr. Nearing who immediof chemistry in America has not been
ately stopped his address.
Meanfully appreciated. T h e firey upholder
while Dr. Atwood had stepped to
of the philogiston theory interested
the platform. Facing the audience
young Americans in chemistry and
he declared the meeting dismissed.
stimulated them to further investiAmazement held the audience m o gate into the new science.
tionless.
Dr. Atwood repeated in
Y. W . C .A.
an angry 'manner several times,
"This meeting is dismissed!" T h e
. T h e Rev. Creighton, rector of St,
bulk of the audience still remaining
Andrew's Church will be ithe speaker
in the iha.ll, Dr. Atwood ordered' the
at Y. W. C. A, on Tuesday. Marion
| janitor to exilinguisih the lights, a n d
Miller is to be the leader.
intimated that the police might be
T h e meeting will be held in Room
summoned.
13.
ORGANIZATIONS
LOOK IT UP
When friends called, ' " 2 4 , Wake
u p ! " '24 turned over and slept on.
Enemies now have shouted, "'24, Get
up." "Is '24 awake?" H e r friends
are ceasing to say, " S h e will awake."
They are quoting the motto of "Life."
'24, look up "lethargy" in the dictionary, then—don't be it.
'22.
CLARK STUDENTS FIGHT
FOR ACADEMIC
FREEDOM
Worcester, Mass., March 24, 1922—
At Clark University in 'this city there
is a revolt of the student body which
suggests the wrathful days of 1775-6,
and the indignation of t h e colonists
against the crown.
On the evening of March 14 Dr.
Scott Nearing spoke under the
auspices of a student organization
As soon as they had recovered
sufficiently from their amazement,
the students who had arranged the
meeting, accompanied by Dr. Nearing and followed by part of the audience, led the way out of the hall
to a nearby fantcrnity house, where
the lecturer finished his address.
Dr. Atwood's sud'den action came
as a great shock to the students.
T h e m e e t i n g had been scheduled
since D e c e m b e r ; Dr. Atwood had a s signed t h e hall in wihich it was
to be held and1 had granted the
privilege of charging adimission; he
had made a disparaging remark concerning the speaker at the time of a s signing the hall, which evidenced the
fact -that he was acquainted with D r .
Ncaring's philosophy. Later, in accounting f o r his action Dr. Atwood
said to the reporters, "I closed the
meeting because there were so many
of our undergraduates' present.
I
Page Three
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, APRIL 3, 1922
STAHLER
Central Avenue's Leading
Confectionery and Ice
Cream Parlor
A large line of fancy box
chocolates, booklets, favors,
etc.
::
::
::
::
Man-Made Lightning
F
RANKLIN removed some of the mystery. But
only recently has science really explained the
electrical phenomena of the thunderstorm.
EASTER NOVELTIES
GREETING CARDS
Uauljtmjtim (gift &ljttp
2 4 4 WASHINGTON AVE.
ALBANY. N. Y.
Dr. C. P. Steinmetz expounds this theory. Raindrops retain on their surfaces electrical charges,
given off by the sun and other incandescent bodies.
In falling, raindrops combine, but their surfaces do
not increase in proportion. Hence, the electrical
pressure grows rapidly, Finally it reaches the limit
the air can stand and the lightning flash results.
And now we have artificial lightning. One million
volts of electricity—approximately one fiftieth of the
voltage in a lightning flash—have been sent successfully over a transmission line in the General Engineering Laboratory of the General Electric Company.
This is nearly five times the voltage ever before
placed on a transmission line.
OPEN EVENINGS
PHONE WEST
IJSiW
COME TO
COLLEGE CO-OP
FOR
Boo^s, Supplies, College
Stationery and College Banners
Quality
SILKS
Much valuable knowledge of high voltage phenomena—essential for extending long distance transmission—was acquired from these tests. Engineers
now see the potential power in remote mountain
streams serving in industries hundreds of miles away.
Man-made lightning was the result of ungrudging
and patient experimentation by the same engineers
who first sent 15,000 volts over a long distance
thirty years ago.
"Keeping everlastingly at it brings success."
I t is difficult to forecast what the results of the next
thirty years may be.
GeneralHElectric
General Office
naturally would feel a responsibility
for their hearing further statements
such as were being made by the
speaker."
Dr. Nearing's address was an attempt to show that the dominant interests in any society, in order to
protect
themselves,
get
control
of the opinion-creating forces,—
the press, the pulpit, and the schools.
The authorities referred to by him
were Bryce's "American Commonwealth" Part S, and Veblen's "Theory
of Che Leisure Class." Clark students are chuckling over the fact
that Thorsten Veblcn is Dr. Atwood's
brother-in-law, and has 'been invited
by the latter to lecture at the university.
In commenting on the affair from
the situdent point of view, ±1css
Fraser said "Students and faculty
Company
alike resent the attitude of President
Afcwood at the meeting last night.
Nothing could better illustrate and
prove the argument of the lecturer.
We feel that Dr. Afcwood has violated the essential spirit of Clark,
which has always been exemplified
in freedom of speech."
Students Summon President
By Wednesday morning the excitement of the meeting had spread
throughout the student body, and the
local newspapers were whetting the
interest of the public. At the instigation of three of the students
—not members of the Liberal Club
—the president of the Student Body
called a meeting to discuss the affair.
T h e men who precipitated this action
were F . Lovell Bixb'y, '22, president
of the Musical Clubs, W a r r e n Hume,
president of the Senior class and
Schenectady, N. Y.
A n d Dreas G o o d s A t
H E W E T T S SILK S H O P
OVW
10ces1".5a,,d
IS
"17
Ni> P e M l
*•
Danker
We Grow
"Say k with
Our Own
Flowers"
40 and 42 Maidm L»n»
WRMJLEYS
Newest
Creation
9S-485HD
Amateur Boxing Champion of New
England, and Stewart M. Pratt, '22,
manager of the Baseball team. When
questioned as to the basis of their
procedure P r a t t said, "President Atwood's action appeared to us as a
direct thrust at the intellectual freedom which makes Clark a live place,
and at a tradition of which we are
all proud."
With the exception of ten students,
who refrained from voting, the meeting of the student body was in favor
of asking President Atwood to address the students in explanation "of
the views of the administration regarding the freedom of thought and
its expression to be allowed in Clark
University under said administration." T h e t r e a t m e n t of the ten students, conspicuous £y their neutrality, may be citod as characteristic
of the spirit in which Clark stu-
P e p p e r m i n t faed chewing g u m
vored
with
Peppermint
Sugar Coating.
Sugar jacket
"melts in your
m o u t h , " leaving
the deliciously
flavored gum
center to aid
digestion,
brighten teeth
and
soothe
m o u t h and throat.
GREAT
TREATF
:32
Pfgi Four
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, APRIL 3,1922
for the doctrines promulgated within
its wftlls
The students of Clark are not satisfied with the President's definition.
They are prepared to resist the cenDistinctive Photography
sorship which they anticipate will 'be
imposed. The Liberal Club membership has increased from thirty to
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR GIFTS AND
one hundred fifty.
REMEMBRANCE
The students concede President
Atwood the proprietary right over
the premises which entitles him to
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR REPRODUCTION AND
Resent Charge of Bolshevism
bar speakers to whom he objects.
The protest initiated at ithe StuBUSINESS USE
But they do not concede him the
dent Body meeting on the 15th has right to dictate whom they shall
hten steadily gaining in momentum. hear in their fraternities or in outSpecial Rales to Students
The committee appointed by the side lecture halls, and if prevented
meeting scattered at once to the from meeting on the campus, they
stacks in the library and soon the are prepared to go elsewhere in the
48 No. Pearl Street
Phone Main 991
college bulletin boards were plastered
future.
with quotations from Wendell Phillips, Thomas Jefferson, Lincoln, etc.,
supporting free speech. Someone Dear friend who contributes:
I hand it to you,
even dug out a clause in the will of
the founder, James G, Clark, stipu- But, of course, everybody may have
his own view.
lating for intellectual freedom in the
There are those who like bobbed
university.
|MJ
hair, and those, too, who don't;
The undergraduate students have
There
are those who will bob theirs,
prepared the following statement in
and, 1 hope those who won't.
answer to charges made chiefly in
I
deny
not your statement that, when
the local press and from the pulpits
men cut tiheir hair
of sonic of the churches:
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO USE IT FOR
The women agreed to it. I don't
1. We do not advocate SocialBUSINESS PURPOSES
know,
wasn't
there.
ism, Bolshevism, Communism, or
But I fear you've forgotten that the
Anarchism.
•men
of
that
day
2. We do believe in the inconLESTER H. HELMES, PRES.
trovertible right and duty of ed- Completed their job,—they went not
half Way.
ucators, educational institutions
They
cut
their
hair
short,
cut
it
short
and most especially institutions of
ivvitih A will,
iiigher learning to teach, to disAnd afitcr this fashion men cut their
G. W i l e y <& Bro.
cuss and announce the truth in
hair still.
whatever form it may appear,
Dealers in All Kind) of
wholly free from coercion by any If our present-day "bobs" are a step
Fresh a n dSalt Meat
FOUNTAIN PEN INK
toward that,
influence of special interest or inand Poultry
Then, to them and their purpose, I
sidious propaganda.
take off my hat.
We can supply you with
3. Most pertinent to the present
348
State
Street, Corner Lark
But if such is the case, I have not
local situation, we believe that the
Waterman Ink andOnoto
Telephone 544 and 543
yet found one
issue is not bound up with support
Ink—two of the best
of socialistic or anarchistic doc- With the courage to finish the task
she's begun.
for fountain pen use.
trines. To such doctrines we do
And,
pray
tell,
do
those
"short
not subscribe,
BRENNER'S
golden curls" which you men4. We do believe that Clark Uniitr, PEN cornel
Exclusive
tion
versity ceases to exist as an inNever snarl up, or tangle, or need
stitution of higher learning when
Furs,
Gowns,
Suits
your attention ?
it is deprived of those peculiarly
(STABLISH&-IBB7
Has experience not taught you that
a n d Wraps
characteristic principles enunciated
the breezes will twist
CORNER-HUDSON AVE."*>SO.PEARU
by its benefactor and founder,
8 8 N o . P e a r l St.
A l b a n y , N. T .
Jonas Oilman Clark, and carefully And tangle and pull them that way
and
this?
nuturcd by its former President,
G. Stanley Hall, throughout its There's much more 1 could say here
Ideal Service
Ideal Food
tout maybe you know it.
previous existence.
$5.00 Meal Ticket for $4.50 to College Student*
So
I'll
close
now.
5. These principles are that there
GEORGE F. HAMP, Prop.
Yours truly,
shall never be any abridgement of
The Wandering Pocl
the inalienable iright of self-exPhone, Weit 4472
pression within the environs of
the University; that, in the words
PROGRESS O F FUND
208
Washington
Avenue,
Albany,
N. Y.
of the founder which we 'believe
Continued from page 1
Regular Dinner 40c.—11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
Supper 40c—5 p. m. to 8. p.
to be •peculiarly relevant to the sit- sent the motion picture sequel of
uation, "—its doors miay be ever "Alice in Wonderland," "Through the
open to all classes and persons Looking Glass," on Thursday, April
whatsoever -may be their religious
11 in the afternoon and evening at
faith or political sympathies, or Chancellors Hall. There will be an
to whatever creed, sect, or party extra one-reel film also—"Paul ReT H E HAMILTON PRINTING CO.
they may belong."
vere's Ride." In the evening, Mary
SIGNED BV THE EXECUTIVES OF THE Which, contralto, and Mrs. Henry
22 UNDERGRADUATE SOCIAL, ATHPhillips, soprano, will render special
LETIC AND SCHOLASTIC ORGANIZAPRODUCERS OF THK BETTER CLASS or
selections.
TIONS.
During the first week of May there
will be a five day benefit motion picIssue Still Undecided
ture presentation at the Strand.
BOOKLETS, C A T A L O G S , P U B L I C A T I O N S A N D
On the 16th the graduate students Plans for a card party and dance at
passed a resolution expessing disap- college, late in May, are under way.
DIRECT BY M A I L ADVERTISING
proval of President Atwood's action. One of the Albany captains is .workSeveral members of the faculty have ing on a plan to secure agencies for
made common cause with the stu- the sale of articles by alumni who
dents in their stand for intellectual would prefer this method of getting
liberty, and almost all agree in de- their $100. The Albany alumni have
claring President Atwood's action at aided greatly also in the work of the
least a tactical blunder.
bazaar which was given last week.
The .most recent scene in the drama
was the appearance of President AtTHE SPRING SHOWING
wood before a Student Body meeting
'
Continued from page 1
on March 20th. In substance his
Fabrics
miwraM cw Turn amr* eoLtMma mmwm
position as stated in his speech was,
Milan straw.
that while are open forum might
Fabric straws—haircloth, visca.
serve a useful purpose outside, he
Taffeta.
doubted its .place in a university and
Satin.
he put himself on record for an
Trimmings
academic freedom which should be
Ribbon 'bows—chic and unusually
tempered by the judgment of the placed.
2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
ALBANY. N. Y.
authorities. He laid emphasis upon
Large flowers,
the responsibility of the university
Fruit.
dents arc handling their side of the
controversy. Some of the overzealous were for trying the ten dissenters as to their sympathies. It
sufficed for one person to rise in the
meetirig and to declare "if we arc
fighting for the right of free speech
we miist concede the right of free
silence." The ten Were allowed to
leave the room unmolested.
ALBANY ART UNION
THIS SPACE
B E L O N G S TO
H E L M E S BROS., INC.
Ideal Restaurant
4&
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