State College News BIG ALUMNI BAZAAR—SATURDAY Senior Class Dance

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State College News
N E W YORK S T A T E C O L L E G E FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF
VOL.
VI.
No. 26
1918
ALBANY, N. Y., MARCH 27,
1922
.00 PER YEAR
BIG ALUMNI BAZAAR—SATURDAY
Senior Class Dance
SOPHOMORE SOIREE
DORMITORY
The sowee, the long tal'kcd of,
great event in the lives of .the
sophomores and all Stale College,
lias arrived and is gone. Seventylive couples had the lime of the
season, lasl Friday evening. On
entering the gym th'cy felt the formality and .stateliness mixed with
.informal good cheer and fellowship.
The hall was attractively decorated
with crepe paper streamers, artificial tulips and pussy willows, all
of Which gave a springlike atmosphere, while the. palms suggested
dignified simplicity, The balcony
had a homelike air to keep the
dvaperons from envying the students too much.
During the evening refreshments
of punch, iicc cream, and wafers
were served. The color scheme of
the sophomore class was carried
nut in the yellow punch and yellow
and white wafers.
/.ita's orchestra gave a very pleasing and fairly long program. The
dance orders, too, attracted everyone. The favors were card eases,
white kid for the young ladies, and
brown leather for the incn,
The: patrons and patronesses of
the soiree were: Mr. and Mrs.
Suavely, Dr. Croasdale, Mr. and
Mrs. Thompson, Professor and Mrs,
Rislcy. The honorary members of
the class who were present were
Coach Sivavely. Miss Keith, Mr.
Continued on page 4
COLLEGE CALENDAR
MONDAY, MARCH 27
4 p. m.
Track Meet—Gymnasium
TUESDAY, MARCH 28
3 p. m.
Y. W. C. A.—Auditorium.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29
4 p. m.
French Club—Room 103.
8 p. m.
Joseph Henry Society—Room ISO
THURSDAY, MARCH 30
4:50 p. m.
Senior Class Meeting—Room 250.
FRIDAY, MARCH 31
11:35 a. m,
Student Assembly.
8-12 p. m.
Senior Class Dance—Gymnasium.
8 p. m.
Reading by Miss Futterer—Cohoes
High School.
SATURDAY, APRIL 1
2-10 p. m.
Alumni Bazaar- •Gymnasium.
ENTERPRISE
feci!!
dffflm
j l a
wfiittB'
•• Hit
'
IBlljpii
wSm
PS
A cut of the Library which they hope to build at the
University of Louvain,
Dr. Irubacher
of the Student
March 31, lie
speaker who vvil
East Relief.
will have charge
Assembly, Friday,
will introduce a
discuss the Near
FROSH CHAMPIONS
In a hard fought battle last week
Wednesday, March 22, the juniors
lost the cage-hall championship to
the freshmen, the latter winning by
a score of 21-8. This game was
one of the most spirited of the year,
for each cilass set as its goal, the
champioinship. The fros'h, however,
had had more opportunities to
practice for the tackle. Especially
good was the work done by Miss
Craddoek and Miss Lecming. Good
work for the juniors was done by
Miss Bailey, Miss George, and Miss
Wood.
The freshmen, having won one
more game than ithe juniors, meet
I the seniors next week.
Mis-s Rice will explain to the
student body the project to rebuild
the library at the University of
Louvain.
BENEFIT PHOTOPLAY
The following alumni of the State
College for Teachers comprise the
ticket committee for the benefit
photoplay, "Through the Looking
Glass," 'which is to be given in
Chancellor's Hall, April 11: Mrs.
C, A. Woodard, Miss 'Mary
W Irish, Mrs. John Schilling, Mrs.
Harry Cook, Mrs. Frank Ryder,
Muss Jean Elmcndorf, Mrs. F. DeBeer, Miss Katharine Eastman,
Miss Minnie Scotland. Mrs. Grover
Long, Mrs. E. Ogsbury, Miss
Lsdcill, Miss Anna Coggeshalf, Mrs.
H, LiKllunr, 'Mrs. K, Ingraham,
Mrs. William Kennedy, Miss Anna
Lamahan, Miiss Huckleman, Miss
Katharine Wansboro. Miss Anne
dishing, Miss Anna Tillingham,
Mrs. Mildred Meslair, Miss Eleanor
W'hite, Mrs. Eleanor Jacobi, Miss
Mary
S'hee'han,
Mrs. Tsa'bella
Lidzey, Mrs. Jessie Myer, Miss
Louise 'Carmody, Miss
Helen
Shccran.
In the Alumni bazaar, which will
be held April 1, from 2:30 o'clock
in the afternoon until 10 o'clock at
nig'h|t, in the college gymnasium,
the students of State College Have
an unusual opportunity to help and
to call in the aid of their friends
in doing something toward the
dormitory fund. Those who are
directing the work are anxious for
the students to lake up this idea:
A ticket for each student in State
and tickets for all his friends. To
facilitate matters, it has bc'en^ suggested cadi student get his tickets
from the member of his class who
has charge of them. Eunice Rice
has the tickets for the seniors,
Maybelle Jocluiiinseu for the juniors,
Evelyn Dutchcr for the sophomores, and Marion Schroder for the
freshmen.
The display of goods to be offered
for sale at (he bazaar ranges from
llowers, under 'tire direction of Miss
Martinez, to groceries, which will
he taken care, of by Miss Lansing.
The in-bctwceins include Miss Fultercr's candy booth, Miss Stuart's
shop Which is given over to toilet
articles, Miss Kelso's fancy work
table, and Mrs. Conwcll's homebaked goods. If all this looks too
tempting for your slender purses—
bring a friend who has a nice fat
pocketbook. ,
Supper tickets must be procured
before Thursday, March 30. ftjiss
Filii'iiig'ham is diredting the arrangements for ithe supper, and promises
a real home-cooked meal for only
fifty cents. As an added attraction,
the different tables are to be given
over to the various organizations,
so that the sorority girls, G. A. A.'s,
Newman ites, Y. W;'s, frat men may
may
mee't their old associates and their
I heir
present ones in the most mirth
producing of all atmospheres
Continued on page 4
Alumni Bazaar
Cut Flowers
Fancy Work — Groceries
Candy
Toilet Articles
Entertainment
APRIL 1, 1 9 2 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 27, 1922
Page Two
trot College item
Vol. VI
March 27
No, 26
PublUhed weekly, during the college year, by the Student Body of
the New York State College for
Teacher*, at Albany, New York.
The subscription rate ii three dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
[Articles, manuscripts, etc., mutt
be in the hands of the Editors before Thursday of the week of publication.]
Editor-in-Chief,
Louise D. Persons, '22
Managing Editor,
Hope D. Persons, '22
Business Manager,
Alice O'Connor, '22
Subscription Manager,
Ethel Huyck, '22
Assistant Business Managers,
Grace Fox, '23
Edith Sanders, '23
Associate Editors,
Robert MacFarlane, '23
Eira Williams, '23
Vera Nolan, '23
Reporters
Dorothy Bennit, '24
Doris Butler, '23
Dorothy Dangremond, '23
resolution.- To wit: "To make a
Hying start and keep going strong
all semester."
There is only one thing that can
compare with a flying start and that
is a brilliant finish, As vacation
draws nigh let us, step on the gas
and rush the profs, off their feet.
Let's throw off our lackadaisical
attitude and hit it up. What would
make a .better limpression on the
"powcrs-that-bc" than for each and
everyone to came under the wire
with colors flying and 'hitting on
al'I four cylinders.
Therefore be it highly resolved
that we 'have been going at half
speed all along and that now we
will open 'the cut out and hit nothing but high spots. Old man mercury will look like a snail wading
through a sea of LePage's glue
compared witih us and our speed
during the next two weeks.
SPRING FEVER
A FABLE BY AESOP. JR.
Once upon a time in the land of
long ago there was a young maiden
who was much beloved by her parents, And these parents had dread
of the time when she should leave
them; so tlhcy, when the other
young maidens and young men
called to her, said,. "Pray remain at
home." And she did remain at
home and knew not the young men
and maidens,
But the time came one day when
she was sent forth to a far kingdom
and there there were many young
men and maidens. Now when the
festival time came, the young maiden was 'filled with great dread for
she knew not of a companion for
the great festival day. And she
wrote a message to 'her own kingdom for a companion at the festival,
but the young men reasoned in their
hearts and said, "We knew her not;
she was not at our festivals; s'he
knows not the way of >a festival."
Andl they sent 'back word that there
This is a peculiar malady which
strikes hardest at the very young.
The symptoms of the disease arc
generally recognizable as they ocSOPHS TO ASSIST
cur in two forms—moody listless SENIORS
ncss or fiery exuberance, though
at times an April shower effect derived from a mingling of the two
Sing a Feature of the Hop.
has been know to occur.
A student afflicted with the
moody listlcssncss noted above may ,1'lans for the senior hop which will
Most sincere sympathy is _ ex- develop individual symptoms of a be held u'n the 'College gymnasium
peculiar
nature, lie may feel that on March 31, arc progressing raptended to Louise D. Persons, editorin-chief of the News, in the death life is but an empty dream—be is idly under the direction 01 one genof her father, Dr. Eli S. Persons of glad the end is near, lie is so tired eral committee:
Helen Walsh,
he cannot long endure the pressure dhairman; Martha Parry, Fanny
Slingerlands.
of raid-years, lie may be "bored
Ollto
Huddle,
and
to death" with the boisterous jolli- Sduiilman,
BOOST
fications of his one time friend and Thomas Bentlcy.
go in search of solitude befitting
The decorations in blue and
The past week has been observed one "in the world, but not of it."
white are going to transform the
A student afflicted with the fiery gymnasium, through some mysteriat college as Clean Up Week. All
the rubbish that had gathered dur- exuberance of Spring suffers or ous1 process, into a fairy-like forest.
ing six and one-half months of col- makes others suffer in a different
lege life has been thrown out, and, way. lie sails blithely in and out Knowing 'the abilities of the senior
as a result, there is a fresher, bright- of class unmindful of the growls, class, it is not doubted that the
er atmosphere around. Have you the taunits of profs—he is young and resulting forest will be charming to
ever thought that this cleaning up it is spring. He may even be in see, Myerhoff's orchestra will play
process could be extended further? Love. Especially, if this last is —just the sort of,music appropriate
During.the many weeks that we true, will .he burst into poetry—the for such a deligihltftt'l setting and
have worked and played here there freer the verse, the 'better for oh! atmosphere.
has been a gradual accumulation of blue is the sky, and gentle is the
This year the seniors seem to be
worthless mental rubbish. Things wind in Spring!
Those few who have escaped the endowed with an extraordinary
have gone wrong, games have been
lost, unpleasant events have oc- maladv sigh and wait stoically for genius for planning original and
curred. Each little fault or griev- the only relief in sight—Spring va- surprising delights, The most unance has been stored up until now cation.
usual of these is the sing in connecthere is quite an accumulation. But,
tion with the dance. The seniors
what good is the old stuff anyway?
are
going to sing every one of their
When you come right down to
THE CAMPUS
class son.gs—even those very first
facts, it is no good and never was
ones which Hhey learned as" freshany good,
men. And in order that their
Now it is spring, and everything
Spring is the time when we are guests may enjoy the jolly 'inforis rosy. Why not cast all the gloom
anxious
to
have
everything
about
mality of singing UJO, the wordis of
away and start out thinking good
of everybody and everything? Stop us harmonious and beautiful, ft each song will be flashed on the
knocking and 'begin boosting. If is the season of the year when we wall. Surely none but the seniors
anything is wrong don't howl about are in a hurry to get all our work would have thouglht of such a
it, but get out and work. Then done in the shortest possible time unique plan for the pleasure of their
things will come out right. Each so that we can enjoy the pleasures guests.
one of us will better enjoy the life of life with a free conscience. Also
when we can honestly feel that our in spring the rain and the melting
Then, of course, there are the
little push is helping to make con- snow make the ground soft and refreshments. Here again appears
muddy, and it yields under the
ditions better.
lightest hurrying foot. All of which another evidence of the before-menSp/ring sports and contests are insinuates to State College students
about^to begin. In a few weeks that they must keep their unhal- tioned originality. They will be
the first baseball game will take lowed feet from our campus while served 'in none other place than the
place, Then there is the dormitory it is in this impressionable state. cafeteria by thirteen girts of the
drive and numerous other oppor- We do not want any deep ugly senior's sister class: Lillian Ershler,
r
[Catherine Monk, Dorothy Jones,
tunities for the booster, With 6S0 scars m
the smoothness of
boosters State College will be on
Elizabeth Nagle, Emily Bclding,
through the coming Muriel Dagget, Eleanor Abrams.
the map iin such big letters that no the gr.'i.
,ore stop to think when
one can miss it. College life at year. T
Wilhclmina
Hcinefnann,
Mary
State can't be 'beat anywhere. We you are rushing madly to an 8:10 or Mahcr, Marion Miller, Jane Green,
12:15.
It
is
no more necessary to
all know it. Tell the good news to
be On time now than in midwinter Betty MdManus, Helena Borsick.
the rest of the-world.
when that delectable path across The substance of the dainties to be
campus was blocked by drifted served is kept a dark secret.
snows.
However, we know they'll be good.
SPEED
We 1iopo that, even if this nips
The chaperons for the hop will
In the first issue of this semester in 'the bud the resolutions of the
we called attention to the fact that tardy one, it will aid in preserving be Miss Bennett, Miss Scotland and
Miss Phillips.
it was a fine time to make a new the beauty of the campus.
was a mighty war in the kingdom
and that perforce they muslt fight.
Whereupon the maiden in ,her
trouble boseeched tlhe other young
maidens to find a companion for
her at the festival. But the other
young maidens looked upon her disdainfully and said among them'
selves, "The young men would be
displeased at us far she knows not
the way of a festival." So when
the festival day came, the young
maiden drew near to the festival
and watched, but she had no companion.
And 'all 'her days 'this young maiden drew near and watched festivals
but never found a companion. And
when s'he came to the judgment
seat of the gods, Zeus pitied her
and said, "Let 'her be taught in the
way of festivals and men; then let
her find companions lor festivals;
and therefore she shall be happy
on Oilympus." And the scribe, in
writing opposite her name in the
book of men, wrote beginning:—
"She that lacketh a man for
Soiree
"
HOW'S YOUR SPIRIT?
We mean your college spirit,
Is it a 'healthy, virile, growing spirit,
ready to boost and support and
cheer, or is it the antithesis of the
splendid thing it should .be? liascbaM season is opening—the 'Varsity team has already begun to
break in.
The procession of
paraphernalia has begun. Bats and
balls, gloves and masks, uniforms
and shoes, old timers and rookies
are springing up out of the earth
like, the proverbial mayflower. Has
your college spirit called your attention to these .indications that
State lis preparing to make a name
for'herself in halls of baseball fame?
Are you interested, aliivc to the possibilities and excited over the prospect? Who's out for the team?
Look them over: Captain Jack McClu'er, Johnson, Baldwin, Casarette,
Cassavant, Breslau, Hayes, Daly,
Crane, Jackctt, Ifornung, Flynn,
Continued on page 4
Y. W. C. A.
Church goers and stay at homes!
Attention! Tuesday you have an
engagement in the music room at
3 o'clock. Edna Sc'hafer is going
to start a discussion on What My
Church Means to Me and it is up
to us to follow up the discussion.
Some of the questions are "Why
do T go to church? " " Why don't f
go?"
"Why should T go, even if
f don't like t o ? "
The meeting is to take the form
of a denominational rally, just to
see how many of eaoh denomination are supporting Y. W. meetings.
Of course your denomination is
helping, for you always come.
Some interesting news about Y. W.
rniembcrship will be disclosed, but
if you aren't there you won't know
about it. So come out and support
your own particular church; but,
better still, support your own particular State College Y, W,
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 27, 1922
Page Three
STAHLER
Central Avenue's Leading
Confectionery and Ice'
Cream Parlor
A large line of fancy box
chocolates, booklets, favors,
etc.
::
::
::
::
Man-Made Lightning
F
RANKLIN removed some of the mystery. But
only recently has science really explained the
electrical phenomena of the thunderstorm.
EASTER NOVELTIES
GREETING CARDS
itaaljiugtim (gift Slpp
2 4 4 WASHINGTON AVE.
ALBANY, N. V.
Dr. C. P. Steinmetz expounds this theory. Raindrops retain on their surfaces electrical charges,
given off by the sun and other incandescent bodies.
In falling, raindrops combine, but their surfaces do
not increase in proportion. Hence, the electrical
pressure grows rapidly, Finally it reaches the limit
the air can stand and the lightning flash results.
And now we have artificial lightning. One million
volts of electricity—approximately one fiftieth of the
voltage in a lightning flash—have been sent successfully over a transmission line in the General Engineering Laboratory of the General Electric Company.
This is nearly five times the voltage ever before
placed on a transmission line.
OPEN E V E N I N G S
PHONE WEST 1 1 3 B W
COME TO
COLLEGE CO-OP
FOR
Books, Supplies, College
Stationery and College Banners
Quality
SILKS
Much valuable knowledge of high voltage phenomena—essential for extending long distance transmission—was acquired from these tests. Engineers
now see the potential power in remote mountain
streams serving in industries hundreds of miles away.
Man-made lightning was the result of ungrudging
and patient experimentation by the same engineers
who first sent 15,000 volts over a long distance
thirty years ago.
" Keeping everlastingly at it brings success."
I t is difficult to forecast what the results of the next
thirty years may be.
GeneralilEle ctri c
General Office
'ROUND THE COLLEGE
E l i s a Rigouard, '22, spent t'be
week-end at her ironic in Pougfh1'eepsic
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. M o n r o e of
Kingston, were guests of their
daughter, Jacciuelyn, '25, at t h c " Y "
House, T h u r s d a y evening.
E s t h e r Oatrander, '24, was a
week-end guest at Schenectady.
Jacquielyn Monroe, '25, s p e n t the
week-end at her home in K i n g s t o n .
Caateila B e e s , '22, violinist, and
D o r o t h y D a n g r e m o n d , '23, pianist,
played at Che Wells College banquet
at t h e T e n E y c k last T u e s d a y evening.
Kappa
Delta
entertained
at
tea on Saturday 'her faculty, city
Company
alumni, a n d a few additional g u e s t s .
Lillian Ershilier, '24, spent the
week-end a t ' h e r ' h o m e in Saugerties.
To that "Wandering Poet" who
hates a bobbed head,
W e all can a g r e e t h a t there's to be
said:
Has he ever inquired vv^hy girls bob
their hair?
,
H a s he been really 'honest—or quite
fair a n d s q u a r e ?
W h e n the m e n cut their 'hair off in
days long gone by,
Did the w o m e n complain of it,
m u r m u r o r cry?
When t h e m e n wanted comfort and
cleanliness too,
Tid the w o m e n all wail, " I t ' s a
w r o n g t h i n g t o d o ! ! !"
Schenectady, N. Y.
A n d Dreaa Gooda A t
H E W E T T S SILK S H O P
°V*rio"sioreS""d
15-17 Na. Pe.il St.
Danker
W e Grow
"Say it with
Our Own
Flowers"
40 and 42 M.id.n Una
WRKLETS
Newest
Creati
9S-485HD
D o e s a man really, truly, prefer on
a girl
A snarled up old puff or a s'hort
golden curl?
If experience teaches, t a k e my word
for it,
I t ' s the ginl with t h e bobbed locks
w'ho m a k e s a big hit.
If that W a n d e r i n g P o e t Ji'as "thinkworlcs" at all,
His capacity for using them must
be quite small,
F o r in winter o r s u m m e r , in fall or
in spring,
A D u t c h cut is Dhe r e a l l y sensible
thing.
Brains aren't d e t e r m i n e d by puffs,
r a t s or curls,
And t h e "up to d a t e b o b s " are the
capable girls.—Contributed.
P e p p e r m i n t flavored c h e w i n g g u m
with
Peppermint
Sugar Coating.
Sugar jacket
" m e l t s in your
m o u t h , " leaving
the deliciously
flavored g u m
center t o aid
digestion,
brighten teeth
and
soothe
m o u t h and throat.
GREAT
54
TREAT!
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 27, 1922
Page Four
POLITICAL SCIENCE
Professor Walker addressed the
last meeting of Political Science
Clu.b and spoke on "Factors Which
Influence the Establishment of
Industries." Tihc next meeting ot
the Club will be held Wednesday,
April S at 4 p, m., in room 101. Dr.
Erasmus 'Corning will speak. Dr.
Corning is a prominent Albany
physician, and served during the
war with Olio Albany Medical Unit
which established Base Hospital
No. 31, in England. He will speak
on the Disarmament Conference
from the point of view of present
world conditions.
Dr. Leonard \V. Richardson has
accepted tihe unaniimbus invitation
which the members of 'Che Political
Sci&nce Club extended to him
recently and has become an honorary member of the club.
SOPHOMORE SOIREE
Continued from page 1
Camdlyn, and Miss Kelso. The receiving line consisted of: Miss Ellen
Sheehan, president of the sophomore class, Miss Emily Deleting,
vice-president, Eunice Rice, president of Student Association, Dr.
and Mrs. A, It. Brttb'acher, Dean
Pierce, Prof, and 'MirS, Risley, and
Dr. Croastlale.
The committees in charge of the
dance were as follows: General
chairman, Annie Olson; guests, etc.,
chairman, Marion Miller, Margery
L. Oayless, Lucy Keller, l.ietty
Bach;
refreshments,
chairman,
Dorothy Davidson, Esther Amos,
Evelyn Dutcher; decorations, chairman, Oliver Putman, Sarah Schocnberg, Rebecca Axclrod, Fred Scott;
orders, chairman, Dorothy Rennet,
Clara Fahnestock; music, chairman,
Betty Naglc, Dot Jones; floor,
chairman, Mary Wright,
Billy
Hcinemau,
DORMITORY ENTERPRISE
Continued from page 1
There is to 'be an entertainment
in the afternoon and evening. Dr.
Thompson will lead in community
singing of college and popular
somgs during tfhc evening. It is
expected, also, that the junior girls
quartet will sing. There will 'be
dancing, too, and if the night be
warm—the floor will be crowded—
there will be gallons of ice cream
waiting to be devoured.
There arc a great many people
who believe in helping those who
help themselves—in the abstract, of
course. If we can sihow the alumni,
the faculty, and the people of
Albany we support the alumni enthusiastically in this bazaar and are
ready to work for the dormitory
fund, will it not be publicity of the
best kind for our fund?
HOW'S YOUR SPIRIT?
Continued from page 2
Rude, Linderman, Hare, Loren,
Sherley, Cole, Stahiman. Roberts.
These men have signed up to play
winning baseball for State. Again
we ask—'how's your spirit? Are
you ready to help Uhe team win?
Last year a small dozen "fans" were
out for the first game. Watch the
bulletin board and Vhe News for announcements.
Start the season
rigttt.
'22.
COLLEGE GIRLS TO
SPEND VACATIONS
AS APPRENTICES
ALBANY ART UNION
Distinctive 'Photography
Try-Out System Devised to Avoid
"Blind-Alley" Jobs.
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR GIFTS AND
Baltimore, 'March 23.—Fully 16S
Gouchcr College girls, leaving toREMEMBRANCE
day for the spring recess, vyill spend
their vacations as apprentices wk'h
PHOTOGRAPHS
FOR REPRODUCTION AND
industrial and professional organization's in Baltimore and in the
BUSINESS USE
tovvms and cities of t'hc 38 states to
whicli the students are returning.
Special Rates to Students
This method has 'been adopted by
tlie Bureau of Vocational Guidance
and Placement, under the superPhone Main 991
vision of Dr. I va L, Peters, in order 48 No. Pearl Street
to prevent .haphazard selection of
vocations after graduation, and to
insure the girls from drifting into
''biiiid-all'cy jobs.
THIS SPACE BELONGS
TO
Among 227 girls w'lio ivavc expressed vocational preferences, 90
are. said to prefer teaching; 52,
social service; 28, writing or jourH E L M E S B R O S . , INC.
nalism; 22, business; 22, industrial
chemistry; eight, library work, and
live, agricultural pursuits.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO USE IT FOR
"The introduction of job analysis
into business," said Dr. Fellers toBUSINESS PURPOSES
day, "is affecting men and women
in the higher reaches of industry
even more rapidly t'hau is true in
LESTER H. HELMES, PRES.
teaching and social work. Exact
tests of the abilities needed in business life arc putting individuals
where t'hey belong, and the problem
G . W i l e y (EL B r o .
for t'lie college giri is one of finding
her special gifts. If the blind-alley
Dealers in All Kinds of
job is to continue to exist, it must
F r e s h a n d Salt Meat
be reserved for the individual to
The Onoto Ink Pencil
and Poultry
whom it represents the limit of
gives pencil-handiness
development. Gaucher College has
348 State Street, Corner Lark
discovered that if the blind-alley
and pen-permanency.
Telephone 544 and 543
job for the college girl is taken over
Let us show you the
as part of t'lie learning process, it
Onoto.
becomes immensely useful. The
try-out system during vacations can
BRENNER'S
reduce t'hc 'hire and lire' system
crffe PEN CORNER,
K .
Exclusive;
after graduation."
During the^past year, the Bureau
Furs,
Gowns,
Suits
has helped 225 Goucher graduates
eSTABUBHEO-ISB?
and Wraps
to improve their vocational choices
CORNER-HUDSON AVE."* SO.PEARL.
and has made 27 readjustments
5 8 N o . P e a r l St.
A l b a n y . N. Y.
among teachers, 10 among social
workers, eight among laboratory
technician's, and four in the general
Ideal Service
Ideal Food
field of business. In supervising
$5.00 Meal Ticket for $4.50 to College Students
the choices of vocations, the
GEORGE F. HAMP, Prop.
Bureau works in close co-operation
with all departments of the college,
Phone, West 4472
getting a complete picture of the
students from the records of the
208
Washington
Avenue,
Albany,
N. Y.
registrar, the academic dean, and
Supper 40c— 5 p. m. to 8. p. m.
'he - department of physical adit ca- Regular Dinner 40c.—11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
tion .
#—^s»—%
Ideal Restaurant
CHANGE IN VACATION
THE
The attention of the 'Students is
called to the change in the date of
the Easter vacation,
Formerly, the recess began at
5:40 the Tuesday preceding Easter
Sunday, and ended the Tuesday
morning after Easter, exactly seven
days.
According to the new rule, the
recess begins at the close of recitations on the Friday preceding Palm
Sunday and ends the Tuesday
morning after Easter, exactly ten
days; 'the actual dates for this year
being from April 7 to April 18.
The _ above item was published
Sorne_ time ago. It is printed again
at this time as a pleasant reminder.
HAMILTON
PRINTING
CO.
PRODUCERS OF THE BETTER CLASS OF
BOOKLETS.
CATALOGS,
DIRECT
PUBLICATIONS
BY M A I L
AND
ADVERTISING
m
PHIHTWIte Of THK BTATU OOLLtTQ* HMWm
TRACK MEET
The Men's Inter-Class Track
Meet which was scheduled to take
place last Monday has been 'postponed a week and will take place
this afternoon at 4 o'clock in the
gymnasium.
24Q HAMILTON STREET
ALBANY, N. Y.
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