State College News Annual Soiree Friday—Two Alumni Games VI. No. 25 ""

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State College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OP
VOL.
VI. No. 25
""
ALBANY,
N. Y.,
MARCH
1918
20, 1922
$3.00
PER YEAR
Annual Soiree Friday—Two Alumni Games
TWO
MORE
GAMES
$65,000 A S K E D S E N A T E T O
BUY COLLEGE LAND
BIG DANCE FOR
Alumni vs. Varsity
Oil Saturday evening, March 25,
there will he two basketball games
in the Gymnasium of Albany High
School between the Stale College
Alumni teams and State College
Varsity teams. The girl's game
will start at 7.30, and will be followed immediately by the men's
game. The girl's Varsity team will
lie picked from the best members
of the class teams, and the girl's
Alumni team from the classes of
'IS, '19, '20 and '21. The Slate
Varsity will be picked from the following men: Johnson, t-Iomung,
Sherley, Baldwin, l.inck. Juckett,
Howe, and Bresfan. The line-up
of the men's Alumni team is rather
uncertain at this time, but it will
probably include llathorne, Lobdell, Fitzgerald, Cassavanl, and
possibly Springniaii. There will be
dancing after the games.
The
music will be furnished by the
Men's Orchestra of Stale College.
The evening's entertainment is being planned, as a benefit for the
Dormitory Fund, by the Men's
A. A. and G, A. A. of State College.
An admission of ($..15) thirtyfive cents will be charged at the
door which will include both games
and the dancing afterward. Students will not be admitted on Student Tax Tickets. Every student
at State College should plan to be
Continued on page 4
CLEAN UP
RAID
From Monday through Friday
the students of State College arc
to engage in a " clean up " raid in
the locker rooms, within, above,
and beneath.
This campaign is
carried on under a student faculty
committee, Dr. Croasdale, Dr.
Evans, Mr. Suavely, and student
representatives from each class.
COLLEGE
CALENDAR
MONDAY, MARCH 20
4 p. m.
Men's Interclass Track Meet.
Gymnasium
TUESDAY, MARCH 21
3 p. m.
Y. W. C .A, Auditorium
FRIDAY, MARCH 24
4 p. m.
Chemistry Club. Room 250
9 p. m.
Sophomore Soiree. Gymnasium
SATURDAY, MARCH 25
8 p. m.
Alumni Games. Albany High
Gymnasium
Construction of Buildings in Albany
Assured in Bid for Fund
(Knickerbocker Press, Sunday,
March 12)
Construction of the. proposed additional building to the New York
State College for Teachers in Albany seemed assured yesterday,
ivlicn an appropriation of $65,OIK)
needed to buy land adjoining the
college site was asked in the senate
as part of the administration's
supplementary appropriation measure.
While there is as yet no appropriation for additional structures, the purchase of land adjoining the college gives good indication that such an appropriation will
be made at the 1923 session.
The appropriations being in yesterday's "supplementary" appropriation bill came as a surprise to
friends of the College,
If action had not been taken this
year on tile State College bill as introduced in the senate at last year's
session by Senator Frank I- Wiswall, the state would have lost
$5,000 on the option. The option
dale expired February 22, but extension of the time was granted.
The property which the total appropriation of $70,000 purchases for
use of the State College is located
between the Albany High School
and the College, between Washington and Western avenues. Proposed plans provide several buildings for the expansion of the College. These include a separate
structure in which to house Milne
High School. With this addition
practice teaching would be greatly
facilitated and would permit a
larger attendance at the College,
as well as at the Milne High
School, in addition to relieving the
Continued on page 4
SUBJECT
Ellen Sheenn, President
MEN
After much preparation instigated
chiefly by John II. Mc.Cluer, 1922,
an organization of the men of the
College has been brought about.
Officers were elected at a meeting
held Tuesday, March l-l.
McCluer, '22, l< A I', only candidate for the office, Was elected
president.
Edmund C. Osborne, senior class
president, member of Myskania and
S X K, was elected vice-president.
Elmer Roster, '22, and Ralph
Beaver, '24, arc to be secretary and
treasurer respectively, having won
out from a number of aspirants.
Oliver Putnam, '24; Otto Huddle,
'22, and Isadorc Breslan, '22, are
on the executive committee.
Although the men refrain from
informing the rest of the student
body concerning their aims, it is
believed that meetings are to be
held the first and third Tuesday
evenings,
ANNOUNCED
The subject for the President's
prize oration is The Quality of
Patriotism. All college men who
are interested should consult Dr.
Thompson regarding details.
MEN'S ASSOCIATION
The next regular meeting of the
Men's Association will take place
Tuesday evening, March 21. It will
be an informal get-tagether and
smoker in the college gym. There
will be a speaker and other worthwhile entertainment.
MOVING-UP DAY
The date for Moving-up Day has
been set for Friday, May 19.
ORGANIZE
INTERCLASS TRACK
MEET
There will be an interclass track
meet for men at 4 o'clock today.
The events will be held in the gymnasium under the direction of
Coach Suavely. The following is
the list of events:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Running High Jump
30 yard dash
100 yard dash
Running broad jump
Shot put
Hurdle Race'
Pole vault
1,000 yard run
300 yard run.
SOPHS
Preparations for the sophomore
soiree which is to be held in the
College gymnasium on March 24
are now being rapidly carried forward under the general management of Annie Olson, and indicate
that it is to be one of the best
that any sophomore class has had.
Seventy-live couples are expected; so you may look forward
lo a big affair. The decorations
and refreshments which arc being
kept secret will fulfill one's highest
expectations.
Good orders are
also promised, and Vila's orchestra
will furnish peppy music which will
give you such delight that when
the lights gradually go out at one
o'clock, it will seem that the evening has gone all two quickly. It
will be noticed that the sophomore
class has made the intitial step in
the right direction and believes that
jazzy music is not needed to make
Continued on page 4
MONSIEUR
BEAUCAIRE
Reading in Cohoes
Miss Agnes Futtercr will read
Booth Tarkington's MONSIEUR
BEAUCAIRE for the benefit of
the dormitory fund in the auditorium of the Cohoes High School on
March 31. If there are enough
people who care to go and who
will notify Ruth Tcfft by Monday,
March 27, the Traction Company
will put on two extra cars which
will leave the plaza at 7:00 o'clock.
The carfare—round-trip—will cost
(2cScJ twenty-eight cents; tickets
for the reading (50c) fifty cents.
Ruth Tcfft also has charge of selling these tickets. The. committees
from the towns north of Albany,
especially from Cohoes, will have a
chance to help the dormitory fund
by circulating tickets in their communities.
ALUMNI BAZAAR
College Organizations
to Serve
Supper
EAT YOUR'S HERE !
APRIL 1, 1922
STATE COLLEGE NEWS,
Page Two
itaucoiitstRtios
Published weekly, during the college year, by the Student Body of
the New York State College for
Teachers, at Albany, New York.
The subscription rate ia three dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
[Articles, manuscripts, etc., must
be in the hands of the Editors before Thursday of the week of publication.]
Editor-in-Chief,
Louise D. Persons, '22
Managing Editor,
Hope D. Persons, '22
Business Manager,
Alice O'Connor, '22
Subscription Manager,
Ethel Huyck, '22
Assistant Business Managers,
Grace Fox, '23
Edith Sanders, '23
Associate Editors,
Robert MacFarlane, '23
Eira Williams, '23
Vera Nolan, '23
Reporters
Dorothy Bennit. '24
Doris Butler, '23
Dorothy Dangremond, '23
the head of a frisky little freshman or a sombre senior, does not
quite know the dire fate that may
await it, To repose long hours in
a gloomy locker, on a lovely April
day in company with Angcll's Psychology and a batch of old themes
is a bit depressing, but if added to
Unit there, arc lunches from last
November, some passe shoes,
towels, blouses and stockings that
would make a hard-boiled laundress
blush—well, it is too much!
But to return to the mouse—if
he is a plain vulgar ordinary mouse
(mtisca domestical he will cat the
lunch vulgarly and blissfully, If he
is a scientific mouse (intisca scientific;!) he will cat your psychology
—you might not grieve so much—
though you are supposed to have
one. I f he is it brave, courageous
mouse (tnusca
? ?) he will cat
your themes and that would not
matter at all—but, if he is an artistic mouse, (musca artistica) he may
eat your Spring hat,
in order to avoid such calamities
as the foregoing, a student-faculty
committee has designated March
20-24 as Clean Up Week at S. T. C.
I!y Friday, March 24, let every one
have his locker so immaculate that
the most fragile Spring hat or the
most exquisite Spring poem could
reside therein safely and unmolested.
Come on, everybody, let's
CLEAN UP!
NOTICE
IF
The article on "The Work of the
American Teachers in the Philippities" in last week's "News" was
written by Mr. Isadorc Saniel, '23.
Mr. Saniel is a graduate of the University of the Philippines and has
had a great deal of experience in
Educational work.
It's peculiar bow some things
seem to be "catching" just like the
measles, the whooping cough, etc.
—contagious do they call it?
A week or two ago in Chancellor's Hall the movie, A Man Without a Country was shown, At some
time during the performance a picture of Abraham Lincoln was
Hashed on the screen. A group of
boy scouts who were present immediately on sight of the great
patriot became so enthusiastic that
they aroused the entire audience.
The auditorium fairly shook, and it
was only a short time before every
person present felt at least a part
O'f that enthusiasm that the boys
showed. This is only one of the
examples of the way in which pep
and enthusiasm runs throughout a
crowd of people. If it works in a
theatre where we arc thrown in
with a peppy audience for the space
of only an hour or two, what would
be the result if vvc actually associated with an equally enthusiastic
crowd every day in the week, four
weeks in a mouth, and nine months
in a year? What would be the result in State College?
Vol. VI,
March 20
No. 24
O. A. B.
He must indeed be blind and deaf
and secluded on a desert island who
will not know by next week, at
least, of the all-important significance of April 1—to us at State
College, vvc mean. In contrast to
our unfortunate above mentioned
friend, the rest of us know that
April 1 is the date for the long
heralded Alumni Bazaar.
By the first enthusiastic announcement in student
assembly and the recent information
gained from the busy student committees and from last week's paper
and today's front sheet, we are being subjected to the most luring
advertising process now known.
And the reason that all of the inducements sound so attractive is
because the products behind them
actually are so.
But then—everyone knows a
project is worth while when OUR
FACULTY and OUR ALUMNI
are back of it.
CLEAN UP WEEK
March 20-24
Spring is here!
The Spring
winds are blowing; the snow is almost gone; somebody said that
somebody saw a robin in the park.
The superintendents are interviewing the seniors, the freshmen have
a longing eye on Spring vacation
and billet-doux will soon be out.
The red maples are out, pussy willows are out—and—final confirmation of the arrival of Spring—
Spring hats are out! .
Alas! The alluring and unsuspecting little Spring hat that comes
gaily and trustfully into S. T. C. on
MARCH 20, 1922
A FABLE BY AESOP, JR.
Once upon a tinie, in the land of
long ago, there was a maiden who
was appointed hand-maiden to the
queen of the kingdom. Now the
hand-maiden loved the pleasures of
the land very much, and she disliked to remain in the kingdom all
the day and wait upon (he queen.
Therefore, one day, she said unto
the queen "My kinswoman in the
next kingdom is very ill, it is meet
that I should go to her to minister
unto her." And the queen took
pity on the plight of her hand
maiden and bade her go. And the
hand-maiden went unto the house
of her kinswoman, and there she
enjoyed much pleasure and forgot
the wiles by which she had gained
her freedom, And after she had
wasted many hours, she returned
unto the queen, and, when asked,
said, "My kinswoman is better,"
.And again one day, she wasted
her time and did not the task set
for her by the queen. And when
the queen questioned her concerning the task, she suddenly became
'ROUND THE COLLEGE
Augusta Knapp, '22, spent the
week-end in Ballston Spa.
Leila Lester, '23, and Mary
Miller, '23, spent the week-end in
Schenectady.
Miss 'Hallworth, student secretary
of the National Y. W. C, A„ who
is making a tour of the colleges to
confer with local Y. W. officers was
entertained Friday night at the
"Y" House.
Sarah Wilson, '00 of Brooklyn
was a guest at the Psi Gramma
House, Saturday,
Alpha Epsilon Phi held its annual Charity Ball at the Hotel Bilt-
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
Dr. Thompson has charge of a
musical program for student assembly on March 24. There will be
special music by the orchestra and
the chorus will sing. There will
also be group singing. Be prepared, and bring your song books.
FACULTY NOTES
THINK IT OVER
Dr. Brubacher has received from
Nicholas Murray Butler, chairman
of the National Committee of the
United States for the Restoration
of the University of Louvain, a
letter asking faculty and student
aid in a nation-wide movement to
collect, through small subscriptions,
money for the completion of a new
library building at Louvain. Columbia University has already inaugurated a movement fashioned
after the plan used in France which
limited individual subscriptions to
one "sou," but which netted over
200,000 francs. With the National
Committee of the United States,
Cardinal Mercier feels that once the
students of America back this
movement the plans for the completion of the library may be made.
On Monday there will be a faculty council meeting in Dr, Brubacher's oflfice.
wan and faint and murmured, "My
queen, I have felt ill." And the
queen, finding in her face weariness,
excused her from the task.
After this hand-maiden had done
this many times, the queen became
wearied of the excuse, and the
hand-maiden found that she must
do her tasks. But there came toiler mind another way. When the
queen questioned her concerning
her tasks, she smiled and made conversation with the quccli about
other tasks and that task also, but
not whal she had done toward it.
And the queen said unto herself,
"She likes her tasks; she speaks
of more than I ask."
And the hand-maiden did so all
her days, but when she came to the
judgment seat of the gods, Zeus
looked sternly at her. And he gave
command, saying, "Let this handmaiden set about to finish all those
tasks she should have done on
earth, and let her thereafter always
finish her tasks." And the scribe in
writing opposile her name in the
book of men, smiled as he wrote,
beginning, "She that ptittcth it over
on the faculty
"
On the first page is a brief account of Miss Futterer's reading of
Monsieur Beaucaire. The people
who arc arranging for this arc
most anxious to have a very large
attendance. They give the following important ' reasons why each
State College student should make
an effort to be there. Think each
one over carefully and if you don't
go for one reason, go for another.
Reasons:
more, New York City, recently.
The proceeds this year are to be
devoted to the Jewish War Relief.
Several Eta girls (State College)
attended the event,
Schenectady friends, members of
Miss Gillet's class in training for
evening school teaching, visited the
Department of Home Economics,
Thursday and Friday of last week.
Dr. and Mrs. Wiley were guests
of the Home Management House
and family, Thursday evening.
Miss Ftttterer and Miss Murtaugh
were entertained at the Home Management House, Friday evening.
ORGANIZATIONS
Chemistry Club
The next meeting of the Chemistry Club will be held Friday, March
24, at 4 o'clock in Room 250.
Robert MacFarline will give a
paper on Pricsthy,
Music Association
Tschaikowsky was studied at the
last meeting of the Music Association. The following program
was given:
Life of Composer^—
Esther Amos, '24
Piano Solo—Romance
Marion Shutts, '23
Piano Solo—Barcarole
Ailinc Alderson, '24
Victrola Records—
Andante Cantabile
Miniature March
Scherzo from Quartet.
TRIOLET
1. Fun on the trip.
2. The desire to support Miss
Futterer.
3. The opportunity to hear a fine
play given well
4. The desire to support the
dormitory fund.
Young Spring is in our city
With no one to receive her
Except this little ditty.
Young Spring is in our city
And thinks that school's a pity,
But deans, they won't believe her
So Spring is in our city
With no one to receive her.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 20, 1922
Page Three
STAHLERA
Central Avenue's Leading
Confectionery and Ice
Cream Parlor
A large line of f a n c y b o x
chocolates, booklets, favor*,
etc.
::
::
:•
;•
EASTER N O V E L T I E S
GREETING C A R D S
Huflhimjtmt (Gift &\pp
2 4 4 W A S H I N G T O N AVE.
ALBANY, N. Y.
OPEN E V E N I N G S
PHONE WE1T 1338 W
COME TO
COLLEGE CO-OP
FOR
Books, Supplies, College
A Gateway—Electrical
a forty-foot gateway bounded
ONLY
by two brick pilasters and ornamental lamps, but it is unlike any other gateway in the entire world.
For back of it is the General Electric
Company's main office building, accommodating 2300 employees. And just next
door is its main laboratory with the
best equipment for testing, standardizing
and research at the command of capable
engineers. Then down the street a mile
long—are other buildings where electrical
products are made by the thousands of
electrical workers who daily stream
through.
Through this gate messages and representatives from a score of other factories
and over fifty branch offices come and go
every hour—an endless chain of co-ordinated activities carrying on and enlarging the scope of over a quarter century's
work for the betterment of mankind.
What a story this gate would tell, if it
could, of the leaders of the electrical industry and of ambassadors from other
industries and institutions—and from
foreign lands. The story would be the history of electric lighting, electric transportation, electrified industrials and
electricity in the home.
GeneraliiEleetric
General Office
EXHIBITION AT UNION
An exhibition of photographs and
plans for small houses, assembled
by the Architectural League of New
York and paintings and etchings of
the West will be on view in Hanna
Hall, Union College Campus, Schenectady, on March 22, 23, 24, from
3:00 to 9.00 p. m., and on March 25
from 10:00 a. m. to 9:00 p. m. This
exhibition is secured by the College
Woman's Club of Schenectady from
the American Federation of Arts.
The price of admission is 25 cents.
BOBBED HAIR
Backward, turn backward, O time
in your flight!
Company
Some things in this universe aren't
going right.
I can stand almost anything,—cold,
hunger, and thirst,
Toothache, and earache, and lots
of things worse.
I can stand being cheated, swindled,
and robbed,
But I cannot endure a girl whose
hair's bobbed.
I don't care if she's cross-eyed,
freckled, or fat,
Sixteen or thirty, does her hair on
a rat.
Tall, short, or indifferent, homely
or fair,
I'll put up with 'most anything, if
she hasn't bobbed hair,
I can even endure galoshes that
flop,
Dresses short at the bottom and
short at the top,
Schenectady, N. Y.
Fur coats in summer and things
of that line,
But the girl with bobbed hair is no
friend of mine.
I do not approve of paint or
of powder,
Smoking, or talk which • grows
coarser and louder.
But if I were to choose and choose
fair and square
I'd prefer girls with these faults to
those with bobbed hair.
I may be particular and fussy, but
then
You'll find it is so with all sensible men,
Already they give me a pain in my
liver.
If they all bob their hair I'll go
jump in the river.
The Wandering Poet,
Stationery and College Banners
Quality
SILKS
A n d Dreaa Goods A t
H E W E T T S SILK S H O P
°'~&"f£? " d
" • " ".. r.4rt.St.
Danker
We Grow
Out Own
"Say it with
Flower*"
40uKl42M*i<i«iUn«
WMGLEYS
Newest
Creation
Peppermint
Tored chewing _
h P
witn
f eeppppce r m i n t
Sugar Coating.
Sugar jacket
"melti in your
mouth," leaving
GREAT
the delidoutly
flavored gum
center to aid
digestion,
brighten teeth
TRCAT!
and t o o t h e
mouth and throat.
;IZ
Page Four
TWO MORE GAMES
Continued from page 1
present at these games, It is one
of the very few times when State
College students arc asked to pay
at the College functions and should
be heartily supported, The evening's fun will be worth far more
than the price of admission, and
besides it may be the last basketball game at which the present students of State will have a chance
to cheer for their own College
teams, This is a line chance to
show a heap of College spirit. Take
advantage of it!
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 20, 1922
ELECTRIC CLOCKS IN
BIG HOTEL
ALBANY ART
UNION
*RT UNION
Installation has just been made by
the General Electric Company of
Distinctive 'Photography
Photography
the Warren electric clock systcnv
iii the annex to the Plaza hotel in
New York.
Tin's represents the
PHOTOGRAPHS5 FOR GIFTS AND
first hotel in New York in which
this system of regulating clocks
REMEMBRANCE
V1BRANCE
has been utilized. It is the second
installation of the sort in any hotel,
PHOTOGRAPHS
FOR
REPRODUCTION AND
I REPRODUCTION
the first having been made last year
in the Ritz-C'arlton hotel at AtlanBUSINESS
IESS
USE
tic City, where the clocks have
been thus' regulated with much
success for the last seven months.
Special Rates
ites to Students
In the Plaza installation there
arc about 50 clocks, located in the
TO BUY COLLEGE LAND
Phone Main 991
main rooms, in the foyers, salons, 48 No. Pearl Street
Continued from page 1
drawing rooms and dining rooms.
congestion somewhat at the Albany They are operated by small generHigh School.
ators which convert the direct curOther proposed plans as outlined
rent of the hotel's lighting circuit
by Dr. A. R. Brnbacher, president into .alternating current for the
THIS SPACE BELONGS
TO
of the State College, call for the purpose of tihe clock system, The
erection of a building to be used
converters, the master clock and
as the College library. At present
the control panel are all located in
H E L M E S B R O S . , INC.
the library in the College building the telephone exchange of the
is so limited that space cannot be hotel on the first floor.
found to keep all I he necessary
Tiny motors, so small that one
books for students' use.
of them easily nestles in the palm
W E R E S E R V E T H E R3IGHT
I G H T T O U S E IT F O R
In addition it is planned, if a of the hand are geared to the dial
sufficient appropriation is granted, hands of each of the secondary
B U S I N E S S! P U R P O S E S
to build a new gymnasium for the clocks connected with the system.
College, the present one being These small motors, which take the'
inadequate.
LESTER H. HELMES, PRES.
place of the usual intricate clock
Final plans for the dormitory mechanism and which arc of the
campaign arc being made by the synchronous type, will operate the
committee headed by Professor hands of clocks of any size. Big
John iM. Saylcs, principal of the clocks with dials five feet lit diamG. W i l e y (EL
<EL B
Brroo..
Milne High School. The goal of
^2£a
eter and little clocks with dials
Dealers in All Kinds of
the campaign lo be carried on dur- whose diameters arc only three
ing the latter part of May is set at inches are regulated equally well
Fresh a n d Salt Meat
There is no need to go
$300,000, to be contributed by mem- by these smallest of motors, none
and Poultry
There is no need to go
bers of the alumni association and
of flic dimensions of which exceed
without the service of
348 State Street, Corner Lark
others interested in the College. three inches.
without the service of
A fund has been raised by the comT e l e p h o n e 544 a n d 5 4 3
Absolutely
uniform
time is
your Waterman.
mittee to carry on the publicity
your Waterman.
shown by every clock of the syswork.
We can make it write!
tem at a given moment, The system is also self-regulating, and
BRENNER'S
therefore independent of voltage or
BIG DANCE FOR SOPHS
"M* PEN CORNER, t^i/7
Exclusive
frequency fluctuations incident to
Continued from page 1
the power lines from which it
soiree a success. Prof. Risley, Dr. draws its current.
Furs, Gowns, Suits
Croasdale, Dr. Evans, .Miss Stuart,
The master clock exercises conand Wraps
and Coach Suavely are expected to
stant control over the power generact as chapcroncs.
8 8 No. P e a r l St.
A l b a n y . N. Y.
ating
apparatus
which
drives
the
Orders may be obtained after
individual motors of the secondary
March 20 from Marion Miller, clocks.
This
control
by
the
Margery Bayless, Lucy Keller, or
Ideal Service
Ideal Food
clock enables all the seconBettv 'Bach. Don't forget lo see master
'$5.00 Meal Ticket for $4.50 to College Students
dary clocks to keep accurate time.
that before March 24 Lucy Keller They
never more tihan three
GEORGE F. HAMP, Prop.
has your slip of admittance on secondsarcslower
or faster than the
which the names of the couple arc master
Phone, West 4472
clock.
written.
The reliability of this system, as
208 Washington Avenue, Albany, N. Y.
revealed in actual service, is believed to bring prominently to the Regular Dinner 40c.—11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
Supper 40c—5 p. m. to 8. p. m,
CAGEBALL GAMES
front this novel idea of thus elecThe freshmen were again victori- trically operating clocks for hotels,
office
buildings,
manufacturing
ous in cageball when they won from
plants and institutions where it is
the seniors, Monday afternoon at
five. Although the freshmen out- desired to have a large number of
T H E HAMILTON PRINTING CO.
numbered the seniors, the game was clocks and to insure that they willvery exciting. On account of ithe all keep accurate and uniform time.
large number of their players, the
freshmen were able to keep fresh
P R O D U C E R S O F T H E BETTER C L A S S O P
F
"GIDDY" TEACHERS
players on the floor. Florence Bohne
TABOO
acted as referee.
The score was
21-15.
BOOKLETS. CATALOGS. PUBLICATIONS A N D
The freshmen lost their first game
Bositon, Feb. 22.-"Giddily attired"
Wednesday afternoon when they teachers, with hair and skirts cut
DIRECT BY MAIL ADVERTISING
battled with the juniors. At the end short and with evidence of rouge
of the first half the score was 10-8 and lipstick, arc not wanted by
in favor of the freshmen. There
school superintendents, according
was speotacular playing on the part to representatives of the Eastern
of Margaret Hutchins, Mildred Teachers' Agency,
Blevins, and May Wood. Margaret
The school employment manager
Hutchins scored several points in
quick succession for the juniors. The said:
"We
do not encourage the bobbed
'freshmen made a good showing, but
they lacked strength. The teams hair applicant for a teacher's position,
nor
the one who uses make-up
were evenly matched. The final
score was 21-13 in favor of the and dresses conspicuously when she
juniors. The referee was Florence tries to register with us. School
•wNrmts op TH& mvArm OOL
superintendents will not employ
Bohne.
them.
"Above all, women teachers must
have the good sense to dress themNut Season
selves, in accordance with modesty
and
good taste. They must be an
T'frje frost is on the pumqkin,,;,, '
2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
ALBANY, N. Y.
example in this, as in everything
The corn is on the cob,
else;,'to
the-'girls'and boys whom
The bath is in the bathtub,
The door is on the knob.— Ex. they are to teach and discipline."
mimm*
1
Ideal Restaurant
m
W.'.
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