State College News '22 SUPPORTS DORMITORY FUND VM VOL.

advertisement
State College News
NEW
YORK
STATE
ESTAIII.ISHIU)
VOL.
VI. No. 17
COLLEGE FOR
IIY THE
CLASS
Oh'
TEACHERS
1918
"""Au^TTNTYy,!^
$£00 VM YEAR
'22 SUPPORTS DORMITORY FUND
LAND N E E D E D BY
STATE
CONFLICT
EXAMINATIONS
Recognition in Legislature
A liill has been introduced in ihc
Legislature for I'lic inirposc of ptirchasing the land between Stale College and the Albany High School.
T h e bill provides for the apportionment of .$65,(1(10 for this purpose,
in addition to the $5,000 which lias
already been paid to secure an option cm tlie land.
The rapidly g r o w i n g registration
is n i a Icing the need o( Slate College
for mure grotliwl inure apparent
each year. I 'art icularly is she in
need of dormitory space, addilional
laboratory space, a library, a gynv
nasiiim, and a building fur the use
of the .Milne High School.
Is the interest of the members "f
the student body in this mailer
merely a passive imc, or is each
ime willing In (In bis share lo see
thai the hill is passed?
Remember
it depends on y o u ; so don't leave
I he job for Ihc next one. Make an
endeavor lo see the Assemblyman
of your districi and urge him lo
support the bill.
CHANGE
IN
VACATION
T h e attention of the students is
called to the c h a n g e in the date of
the Easier vacation.
Formerly, the recess began at
5:40 the T u e s d a y preceding Faster
Sunday, and ended the Tuesday
m o r n i n g after Raster, exactly seven
days.
According to [lie new rule, the
recess begins at the close of recitations mi lite Friday preceding Palm
Sunday and ends the Tuesday
it 1.i• iitit^ after Faster, exactly ten
class; the aclual dales for tin's year
being from April 7 to April 18.
T H U R S D A Y , F E B . 2, 1922
2 p. m.
E c o n o m i c s 1, R o o m 109
Drlscoll, Katherine
Finlcy, Helen
l l u y e k , Clarissa
( ) s t r a n d e r , Esther *
Siilson, Frances
Wheeler, F, T.
E n g l ' s h 2, R o o m 111
A m o s , Esther
I'.ertsch. Lucy I).
Fleleher, Madeline
Knolck. Anlouia l\.
I'eck, Katherine II.
French 3, Room 103
llarber, Adela'de
D e i u , DoiThca F.
I I owell, Leah F.
Xaylor, Alice K.
Kiddi-ck, Doris
First
J A N . 23 — F R I D A Y ,
JAM. 27
Examination Week
S A T U R D A Y , J A N U A R Y 28
State-Geneseo State N o r m a l — Bas
ketball — Albany H i g h Gym
POST-EXAM J U B I L E E
Following the precedent which
was set last year there will he a
I ' o s t - F x a m Jubilee on W e d n e s d a y
of the second week of examinations— F e b r u a r y 1.
Alice O ' C o n n o r . '2.', is general
chairman of the jubilee.
There
will be competitive s t u n t s for the
Catherine Peltz is chairman for I he
seniors; Caroline Herber'ck for the
j u n i o r s ; VVilhemiiui lleinemaitn for
the s o p h o m o r e s ; and Vivien 11 arte
for ihc freshmen.
Everyone of us k n o w s , rather
vaguely perhaps, that llie alumnae
have started a campaign for the
Stale College Hormi-lory
Fund.
We, who are: still u n d e r g r a d u a t e s
and thus very familiar with the
aciual living conditions of students,
Whether our homes are in Albany
or mil, realize to ihc utmost the
great need for college d o r m i t o r i e s
here, It is the personal business
of each one of us, from every freshman lo every senior, lo understand
Ibis new plan fully and lo further it
with all the power in us,
'I he plan is brielly t h i s : all alumnae are asked lo pledge thai it is
their intention to c o n t r i b u t e twenty
($20 00) dollars a year for live
years lo this D o r m i t o r y Fund. T h e
payment of this money is not colli'
pulsory. If, for any reason, the one
who pledges himself finds that he
is unable lo meet his obligation because of some unforeseen trouble, he
need mil pay. 'Pile m a t t e r is left
to our own sense of honor.
Each
g r a d u a t i n g class, as it leaves Slate
College, is to be asked lo help in
I he work as well as those men and
w- en who are alumnae now.
Without even analyzing our position as lo this new m o v e m e n t college spirit makes us want to help
all we can. Not many of us can
come to Stale College for four
years without learning lo love our
Alma Mater and w i t h o u t being
filled with a desire to repay her
for all thai s'he has done for us,
intellectually ami socially.
The
sense of loyalty and g r o u p feeling
which we have made o u r own here
will help us t h r o u g h o u r lives. Almost all the o t h e r colleges have
e n d o w m e n t funds raised and added
to by the alumnae. Are we going
lo he behind Vassar, Colgate, Smith,
Harvard, and the rest in supporting the future a d v a n c e m e n t of our
colleger' H o w can we expect New
York State to think that we are in
earnest about our needs and our
betterment when we do n o t h i n g for
ourselves? If we succeed in backing the D o r m i t o r y Fund effectively
and make it a working reality, the
slate will see that we act and are
not merely talkers and lookers-on.
She will see thai we are worthy of
help from her. T h e alumnae are
responding lo the plan most generously. T h e first pledge from one
of their number was for one t h o u sand ($1,000) dollars.
We, I he
alumnae of the future, must keep
up the standard that they are setting for us.
On a dollar and cent basis, we
owe to Stale College the hundred
dollars which is asked of us. If we
did not have the services of die
T e a c h e r s ' Agency here at college
lo help us secure positions, we
should have to pay sixty or seventy
($70.00) dollars lo outside agency
Continued on page 4
PAY
FOR
SENIOR
HOP
UP
FOR
PED! !
T h e Pedagogue Hoard a.nnoimec;
thill subscriptions will be payable
in the Rotunda as follows:
M a t h e m a t i c s 2, R o o m 100
Hall. Harriet
l l a y n e s , Mildred
Palmer. Clifford
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY
9 a. m.
3
E d u c a t i c n 1, R o o m 109
lliirehlield, I lenrielta
l l u y e k , I larissa A.
NOTES
Miss Pierce delivered a very in
t c r e s l i n g address at the State Agricultural School of Cobleskill. last
I rid \\ J .mil ir\ JO
I lie suhji rl ol
the a d d r e s s w a s : Choice or C h a n c e :
W h i c h shall rule my life?
Miss
Pierce pointed out to tile students
thai de!'bcrate choosing is bet lei
than being controlled by circum
stance. She told t l e n i how they
might enrich their fives by bringing
culture into their homes, and thai
the cost of doing this is not such a
t r e m e n d o u s one.
Dr. I'irubacher attended the conference held Friday and S a t u r d a )
at T e a c h e r s ' College,
Columbia
L''Diversity.
T h e W o o d r o w Wilson Fouiul'i
lion has invited the students ami
faculty of the Slate College lo io'n
in raising a million dollar fund in
c o m m e m o r a t i o n of W o o d r o w Wil
son
Miss Keim gave a talk on T h e
Principles of H o m e Decorat'on on
T h u r s d a y al the school of Agri
culture, Cobleskill \'ew York.
SENIORS LEAD
T h e Slate College 'Varsity quilllei will meet the fast (ieiieseo Slate
N'ormal live in the Albany High
Gymnasium
on S a t u r d a y
night,
J a n u a r y 28.
The Geneseo team is reputed as
b r i n g the fastest N'ormal School
team in the stale. With the reappearance of sonic of the men who
slatted the season with Stale, ibis
g a m e promises lo be Ihc best of the
season.
At a meeting of the senior class
held on J a n u a r y 12, 1922, the following committee was appointed to
m a n a g e Ihc class dance, to take
place later in the season: Helen
Walsh, chairman; Martha Parry.
Fannie Schiiliuan, CJtto HiiddL', ami
T h o m a s llenlley.
CALENDAR
MONDAY,
CHANGED
P r e c e d e n t Set for Underclasses
PLANS
F r e n c h 2, R o o m 207
lierkowitz, Ada
llralib, (iermione
i line, Marion I..
Cook, Marion
Currie, Flinina
llaire. Gertrude
Keek, Franees M.
Shine. I.etha
FACULTY
COLLEGE
SCHEDULE
State to Meet Fast N o r m a l Five
Monday, a. i n . J a n u a r y 23—after
11 is'lory 2 exam.
Monday, p. m . J a n u a r y 23—after
Fdiication 2 exam,
T u e s d a y , a. m , laiiuarv 24—after
Psychology.
W e d n e s d a y , a. m . J a n u a r y 25—
after Education.
Monday, February fi—all day.
All stlbf.crptions must be paid by
the 6th of February.
NOTICE
T h e "News'" will be published as
usual Monday, I miliary 17. and
Monday, February 0.
All d u b
uotes m u s t he in by the W e d n e s d a y
afternoon preceding the day of pub
lication.
The
New
York
Alumni
B r a n c h will hold its a n n u a l
reunion at the Aldine Club,
Fifth Avenue, New Y o r k , on
F e b r u a r y 25. T h e d i n n e r a t
6:30 will be followed by a
dance till twelve.
Bring a
friend.
Good
eats,
good
music, good speakers, g o o d
time, Tickets are three-fifty,
including dues. If you d o not
receive a personal notice of
this meeting and should like
to attend it, please notify
E t h e l M. Rooney, Sayville,
L o n g Island.
• STATE COLLEGE NEWS. JANUARY 23, 1922
Page Two
state College news
Vol. VI
J a n u a r y 23;
No,
17
Published weekly, during the college year, by the Student Body of
the N e w York State College for
teachers, at Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars per year.
Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
| Articles, manuscripts, etc., must
be in the hands of the E d i t o r s before T h u r s d a y of the week of publication,]
Editor-in-Chief,
Louise D, Persons, '22
Managing Editor,
Hope D, Persons, '22
Business Manager,
Alice O'Connor, '22
Subscription Manager,
Ethel lluyck, '22
A s s i s t a n t Business Managers,
Grace Fox, '23
Edith Sanders, '23
Associate Editors,
R o b e r t M a c F a r l a n c , '23
Eira Williams, '2i
Vera Nolan, '23
Reporters
D o r o t h y Bclinit. '24
Doris Butler, '23
D o r o t h y Dangreinond, '23
BULLETIN
HONOR
FRENCH CLUB ORPHANS
Of 'Course everyone knows that
for .the last three years Stale College has iuul two little French orphans to sttpponl. Until last year
the college body took care of these
two children, but last year the
French Club look the whole responsibility. This year a portion
of the proceeds from the French
Fete went for this purpose. ,Tlic
children, Francois I'ollet and Marie
Jacob, both live in the most desolated region of France, in barracks
made of rough boards, and of
course during the cold weather
they suffer imue.h from cold.
The
m o n e y we send helps to buy tood
and clothing for them, and enables
them to continue tit "school,
SYSTEM
Every m e m b e r of the State College
Student Association will want to
decide upon bis answer to these
questions in preparation for the
forum oil this subject, February 17.
1. W o u l d Stale College's reputation fur honesty be improved
by an h o n o r s y s t e m ?
2. Is the present system of
p r o e t o r i n g disturbing to the students t a k i n g tih'c examinations?
3. W o u l d the students be able
to concentrate more on the exa m i n a t i o n s if the honor system
were established?
4. Would reporting violations
conflict with student loyalty?
5. W o u l d a student judicial
body give as fair a judgment, in
view of experience, as the faculty?
6. W o u l d the individual character of s t u d e n t s be s t r e n g t h e n e d
or weakened by an honor system?
7. W o u l d
the S'tndeul
body
have less cheating under an lion
or s y s t e m ?
8. W o u l d a certain number of
s t u d e n t s who are dishonest now,
be honest under any other s y s tem?
9. W h a t would he the percentage of i m p r o v e m e n t ?
A FABLE —BY AESOP, JR.
Long, long ago, on the laud of
men was a young mini who never
had s m i l e d ; ' a n d he was a y o u n g
man of keen eyes. One night in a
dream a herald of the gods appeared to the sinileless y o u n g man,
and be said unto him: " T h e g o d s
have resolved lo help the race of
man and to lei •fhein read the mis
takes of their fathers. T h e y have
chosen you lo gather together the
chief of faults of man and write
them on a stone tablet for I he son.',
of man to read." When the y o u n g
man awoke, he remembered the
dream, and set forthwith lo the
task. Hut first he hewed out many
tablets of stone and laid them under a mighty tree. Then he sat by
[he side of the road and wrote on
the first tablet of all that passed
by. And soon one tablet was full
and he began to chip the faults of
man on the second tablet.
•And uiie day there came lo the
man a young man who said, " C o m e :
lei us travel this way together, and
be friends."
Ilul the lirsi young
man only .--cowled and began to chip
a sentence beginning, " F o u l s that
talk"
The man chipped tablet after tablet and placed litem all about
O n e day, a beautiful maiden came
u n t o him and whispered unto him,
" l i e happy with me," bin the man
saw not the beautiful ina'dcn, bin
the word he remembered, and
chipped " L e a r n i n g " is happiness."
And the sinileless y o u n g man grew
old, and till his days he chipped
by the side of the road, .And when
he was very old. the gods sent word
to him lo statu on the mountain
j o u r n e y to O l y m p u s , lint the lablets were so many thai they bur
dened the sinileless mail so thai lie
could walk but a little way before
rest. And- it was a year and a day
before he arrived at the gate of
the gods. And the beautiful maiden was dancing for Zeus, and the
y o u n g man witli his eternal youth
was (dicing with Apollo. And when
the gods asked the sinileless man
for his tablet, he pointed to ilia
pile of stone. And Zeus smiled nl
the man With Apollo, and gave the
decree of reward to the sinileless
m a n : " L e t the tablets form a wall
in front of him, and let them be so
placed that he may read them day
after day, and let him live cternalh
reading his tablets. And opposite
bis name in the book of men, let
the scribe write a sentence begin
iiing: ' l i e that ahandoncth b •.
fellowman for stone t a b l e t s - - . ' "
'ROUND THE COLLEGE
BOARDS
An a t t e m p t is being made to organize the p o s t i n g of notices on the
bulletin boards in the main halls,
namely: the one by the front door
and the one near the women's faculty room, In a n o t h e r section of the
" N e w s " the rules are printed which
an: to be followed.
Xow that
everyone knows just what is to be
done with regard to notices there
should be no such confusion as
there has been in the past.
People seem to have gotten the
idea thai the main bulletin board
is a place for lost and found
nut ices. T h e fact remains.'however,
that it is not such a bulletin and
never will be.
T h e convmittce is asking for the
cc-operation of every student in
college in helping to make the bulletin b o a r d s more orderly and wella r r a n g e d . If you have been making
niisiakesi please try to rectify them
in light of the suggestions which
are being made in this issue. '22.
THE
10. Should
responsibility
for
honesty at " S t a l e " resit with the
faculty" or the student body? •
A Senior,
Last year we showed a picture
of our little boy Francois I'ollet.
Xow here is our little girl, Marie
Jacob, twelve years old, and here
is a I d l e r which the French Club
recently received from her:
" M e s c fliers petits amis,
It is villi great p.easure that I
received your gifts which you were
kind enough to send me, and I
thank you from the bottom of my
heart.
I take pleasure in sending
you my photograph which I hope
will please you. I still go to school,
and am doing my best to study so
as to m a k e use of it later on.
i must say that it is not warm
here; it is indeed very cold, for it
is winter. W h e r e you are, perhaps
it is less cold. 1 must tell you also
that in our little village they are
raising to-day a monument for the
hcros of the Great W a r who died
for France, Unfortunately fur me,
I am one of those who share very
deeply in t'he significance of this
monument.
My d e a r friends, I close my letter, t h a n k i n g you with all my heart
for the generous gilts which you
have sent, and offering you my
best wishes and affections.
De votre petite amie de France,
Mai : Jacob."
T h e a d d r e s s of this little French
girl is:
Marie J a c o b ,
c / o Fernando Jacob,
Andilly, l i t e M a n i c . France.
She would be very, very pleased
to hear from any who care to write
to her. f.et's do it!
Cecilc Conkliii, '211, and Alice
Graham. '211, were week-end guests
at the I'si Gamma house.
Al i'e Norman, '17, was a week
end guest of Lela ( akener,
Al a recent meeting of I'si
Gamma, the following officers were
elected for the second s e m e s t e r :
president, Ktith I leminover; vice
president, Gladys Lodge; secretary,
Alicia
Currcy;
treasurer,
Lela
C'akener; corresponding secretary,
Marian lleiie liel; chaplain, Isabel
Peck; literary editor Katbryn Shipmtin; critic, Agues
Underwood;
marshals, Lucy Keller and Eliza
belli Stroupe.
Sarah Scihoeiiherg, CM, attended
the K, P. L—Albany Law Scboi
g a m e December 1-1.
Rose l l e r s h b e r g entertained I'1
A K 'I' girls ai a luncheon al In
h o m e recently.
Alpha Epsilou Phi extends
b e a n y welcome lo Rho and Sigma i
A 10 'I' ai the Universities of Wiconsin and Michigan respectively.
Members of the Eastern N'ei
York S i m m o n s Club met al dinue
in the H o m e Dining room of ib
H o m e Economics Department o
Monday evening, J a n u a r y Id
Genivieve I lagaiuan, class of li
is director of the Departineni i
H o m e - m a k i n g ai Cobieskiil, V Vork. '
JUNIOR-FROSH GAME
On the gym court Monday afternoon, January
16. the
juniors
clashed with the freshmen in a
rather one-sided contest. T h e frosh
put up a stiff light bill il was unavailable against file superior pass
work and shooting of the juniors,
for at the end of the second half
the score was 11-0 in favor of the
juniors.
Hut the freshmen cania back on
the court in a spirit of redemptive
assertion and revenge. T h e y tightened up their team work and broke
thru the junior's defense lo |ihc
extent of three field tallies, but the
green and white scpiad was still on
the warpath, scoring thirteen points
lo I he freshmen's eight. So when
the final whistle blew, the score
stood 2'1-H in favor of the juniors.
Following is the box score of the
game:
Juniors
]•'.(;. K i t . T.
Seymour, rf
6
(I
12
Bailey, If
5
2
12
Waugh, c
0
(I
(I
George, rg
0
0
0
Wood, lg
()
0
()
Totals
11
2
24
Freshmen
F.G.
Demarest, rf
2
Looming, If
1
llaitwnorslcy, e . . . ()
O ' H a r c , rg
0
Rife, lg
Totals
J)
F.Ii.
1
1
ti
0
J)
T.
5
3
0
0
3
2
8
0
ORGANIZATIONS
Commercial
Education
Club
At a meeting of the newly 01
gamV.ed
Conimcrical
Educai'on
Club on W e d n e s d a y . J a n u a r y IN
the following officers were elected
President, Sybil Halme, '22; vice
president, Charles Ueilly, '23; secretary and treasurer, May Woo,I,
'23.
T h e new club will begin lo func
lion properly al the beginning oi
the second semester. At that time
t h e r e will be a speaker of s
note to .talk to all those inlcrc-0 .1.
Canterbury
Club
T h e regular m e e t i n g of Canter
b u r y ' C l u b was held al Si. Andrew'
Church, Monday, J a n u a r y 10, ai
o'clock.
Prom. Notice
All who expect to attend the
J u n i o r Prom please sign up as soon
as possible as the o r d e r for orders
must be sent in soon.
Paper orders will be sold for $2.2(1. Do not
delay.
STATIC COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1922
OTHER COLLEGE FUNDS
Alumni have been showing a
greater interest in their colleges
within the last few years than ever
before. A large number of universities and colleges have recently
been c a r r y i n g on drives for funds,
making it special appeal to their
alumni, and they have responded
with great loyalty. 'Hie graduates
nl" a college are of course itliore interested in it than any one else, and
from them must conic the strongest
support for their Alma Mater. 'The
money raised in the drives is in
most instances toward general expense*, but a large portion of this
will be used for dormitories and
other buildings.
When we are discussing plans
for d o r m i t o r i e s at State College, it
is iii'leresting to know how some
o t h e r colleges have raised and arc
r a i s i n g money for their dormitory
expenses. T h e following arc sonic
colleges which have recently made
drives for funds.
Amhurst
Colgate
'Cornell
ritimil Ion
Harvard
Mt. I l o l y o k c . .
NadclilTe
Smith
T e a c h e r s ' College
Wellcslev
Vassar .'
$3,000,000
1.000,000
10,000,000
1,500.000
15,000,000
3,000,000
3,000(100
4,(KM),000
3,000,000
9,000.000
3 0(10,1100
Yule University has had no drive
for ;i specific sum, but every grad
utltc is expected as ;i inattcr_ of
course to contribute to the Vale
Alumni bund according to his ability,
The
annual
contribution
a m o u n t s to about $750,(100, This
provided for the Yale deficit during
I lie war. T h e fluid has been running for thirty years and means an
fiidownienl fund of $50 OOO.OfO.
In line H a r v a r d drive each alumnus was expected to contribute
twenty-live dollars for every live
year- that he had been out of college. T h e Syracuse plan specified
a certain a m o u n t for each year out.
In many cases this plan docs not
work very well since someone who
has only been out for a few year';
will just pay his quota when he
might be able to pay much more,
and someone who g r a d u a t e d a long
time ago cannot pay his given
amount.
"(live or get 330.33" was the
slogan of the Colgate drive in 191S.
This amount was asked for from
each alumnus to make a total ol
$1,000,000 plus the cost of a gym
nasiuni. A new d o r m i t o r y is now
being built, which will house eighty
men.
Continued on page 4
STATE
ALUMNA
WRITES
An article on the "< Md Van Cortland i Manor H o u s e " by Marian A.
Ileale was published in the New
York Times Hook Review and
Ma-'azine mi J a n u a r y 8. \'>22. Miss
Ileale was g r a d u a t e d from " S t a t e "
in the c'ass of '20. She is ai present teaching in Herkimer, X. Y„
and we have r e p o r t s to the elTcct
that sihe has been very successful
in the English department there.
In her article she gives a very
interesting account of the peonle
who have visited and lived in this
old manor bouse which stands at
ll.-irmnn, t h i r t v - t w o miles
from
New York. She tells the part the
Manor House had in the Revolution
and she describes the rare antiques
found in the ghost room and the
sitting room there.
The article
ends with two stories of the Manor
House chiellv concerning Benjamin
P'rankliu and Major Andre.
ATHLETIC FIELD FUND
T h e following is it report of the
Athletic hiehl bund dated J a n u a r y
I, 1922, which was submitted to
Dr. Ilruhacher by Professor llidley
on J a n u a r y 14:
R e p o r t of Athletic Field
J a n u a r y 1, 1922
Fund
Contributed by the class of
1916 (cash I
$265.00
Contributed by the class of
1017 (ca.-h)
230,411
Contributed by the class of
19*18 (bonds)
3(10.00
Contributed by the class of
1019 (bonds)
Contributed bv the class of
1020 t$IOtl.0O bonds, $8.00
coupons attached),
300.00
10X.00
Contributed bv the class of
1921 ( c a s h ) '
Bonds
Coupons attached
Contributed bv Prof.
hacher
250.00
250.00
10.12
RrtiI.on
Contributed by 1921 Pedagogue Hoard
"<
Total contributions
118.42
..$1,841.94
Accrued interest on time
deposit X, Y. Slate National Hank (cred.led on
pass i k in red ink I. ..
120.5.1
Coupons
clipped
from
bonds (other than the
coupons contributed, and
accounted above I
115.88
GENERAL STUDENT
ACTIVITIES
This section of the bulletin hoard
is reserved for notices from the
Student Council, Myskania, Athletic
Association, the W o m e n ' s AthleticAssociation, the D r a m a t i c and Art
Association, (he Music Association,
Ihe News, tillo Q u a r t e r l y , the Pedagogue, and the Press Club. .Notices
from nil other student organizations
will be posted on the other side of
Ibis bulletin hoard.
The back of this same bulletin board will be given up entirely
to
STUDENT
ORGANIZA
T I O N S . T h e rules g o v e r n i n g this
are:
T h i s whole section of the bulletin
board is reserved for notices from
the Chemistry Club, the French
Club, the Joseph H e n r y Society,
the Spanish Club, the Mathematics
Club, Fraternities and Sororities,
and the C a n t e r b u r y - C l u b , the .Newman Club, the Y. W. C. A., Ihe
Y. M. C. A., and other similar student organizations,
On the bulletin board opposite
the registrar's office class notices
are to be posted. It is divided into
four sections. T'he rules a r e :
lionds
' C a s h in bank
$2,078.35
The nogotations for the purchase
of an athletic field are ai a standstill because an a g r e e m e n t as to
price cannot be reached.
RULES FOR NOTICES
A committee has been at work
o r g a n i z i n g a system for p o s t m g
notice- on the Iwo bulletin boards
in l i e main halls T h e report which
they present follows:
Thi'
front side of the
board by the front e n t r a n c e
divided into three s e c t i o n s :
notices, official notices, and
student activities.
T h e rules governing the
these sections are:
bulletin
will be
faculty
general
use of
Central Avenue's Leading
Confectionery and Ice
Cream Parlor
A large line of fancy box
chocolates, booklets, favors,
etc.
::
::
::
::
GREETING CARDS
Haflliiufihm (Sift $l}iiff
2 4 4 W A S H I N G T O N AVE.
A L B A N Y , N. V.
OPEN E V E N I N G S
PHONE WEST 133B W
COME TO
COLLEGE CO-OP
This section of the bulletin board
is reserved exclusively for notices
for the freshman class,
FOR
SOPHOMORES
Books, Supplies, College
This section of the bulletin board
is reserved exclusively for notices
for the s o p h o m o r e class.
Stationery and College Banners
JUNIORS
Quality
This section of the bulletin board
is reserved exclusively for notices
for the junior class,
SILKS
$050.00
1,128.35
Respectfully submitted,
C. A. I I I D I . K Y , Trcas.
STAHLER
FRESHMEN
Total viilue of f u n d . . .$2,078.35
T h i s total is distributed as
follows
Page Three
SENIORS
This section of the bulletin hoard
is reserved exclusively for notices
of the senior class.
A n d Dress Goods A t
H E W E T T S SILK S H O P
Ov,r r
ioc rs'i" e 5 "Bd ,s'17 N °- P e w i S|Danker
We Grow
CONFERENCE REVIEW
"Say it with
Our Own
Flowers"
40 and 42 Maiden Lane
January 12.
Controversy as to (he method of
scrapping ships: France, Italy,
and the U, S. .are in favor of
sinking as many of the ships
as possible. England and Japan
arc in favor of c o n v e r t i n g the
vessels into commerical pursuits.
January 13.
It is anticipated thai the substitution of Poincarc in the place
of I'riand at the head of the
French cabinet will influence
the French delegation at the
A r m s Conference for a big
building p r o g r a m .
WMGLEYS
Newest
Creation
J a n u a r y 14.
FACULTY
NOTICES
T h i s section of the bulletin board
is reserved exclusively for notices
from
instructors
to
students
concerning
a s s i g n m e n t s , , special
m e e t i n g s of classes, omission of
classes, etc. Students will not post
any notices in this section.
OFFICIAL
NOTICES
T h i s section of the bulletin board
is reserved for notices from tin
office of the President, the Dean,
the Dean of Women, the SecretaryT r e a s u r e r , the College Physician,
and the Registrar.
S t u d e n t s will
not post any notices in thi- section.
Poincarc is not liable to follow
extremist policy to the point
of disrupting E n t e n t e .
January 16.
T h e tenth week of the Conference is to be given to the immediate and definite 1 settlement
of the F;ir Eastern questions.
J a n u a r y 18.
H u g h e s proposes
International
Hoard to maintain the Open
Door in China.
T h e Conference may last a n o t h e r
month.
P e p p e r m i n t flavored c h e w i n g g u m
with
Peppermint
Sugar C o a t i n g .
Sugar jacket
"melfs i n your"
m o u t h , " leaving
the deliriously
flavored g u m
center t o aid
digestion,
brighten tee'h
and
soothe
m o u t h a n d throat.
GREAT
P
TREAT/
T32
Page Four
STATE FIGHTS HARD
Men S h o w I m p r o v e m e n t
A l t h o u g h not successful as fatas ihc score ROCS in Uic three basketball (jfumes played in New York
city, State's live was successful as
r e g a r d s t h e i m p r o v e m e n t s h o w n by
every m e m b e r of the team. All
seven of t h e men who look the
Hour in (lie'three Metropolis g a m e s
deserve credit for their spirit and
"pep" exhibited ill all of the g a m e s
despite the fact that they played
against teams of greater training
and experience.
At last l l o r n t i n g has developed
bis a r t of s h o o t i n g baskets from t h e
foul line, This was evident In all
three g a m e s when he m a d e a total
of nineteen points from the fifteen
foot line out of about twenty-live
tries. He w a s the star of the game
against St. J o h n ' s College of Brooklyn, m a k i n g a total of thirteen
points, six from the floor and t h e
other seven from the' penalty line,
caging the seven out of ten shots.
J o h n s o n completed the .scoring for
State In' this g a m e with t w o field
goals. St. J o h n ' s won the contest
by the score of 40 to 17.
Tlic o t h e r t w o g a m e s which resulted in victories for P r a t t Institute. 26 to 1,1, and N'ew York Aggies, 40 to 15, were exceptionally
good contests in which the lighting
spirit and real college "pep was
exhibited by State's court w a r r i o r s .
Although
these three
defeats
make a s t r i n g of seven, Stale has
yet to lose three more to equal
Yale's record on the court thus far
this season.
Here's hoping State
doesn't rival Yale in their year's
schedule.
SENIORS LEAD
Continued from page 1
not only at the time when we secured our first position, but also
w h e n e v e r we changed our position
afterwards.
T h e services of the
college teaching agency are open to
us t h r o u g h o u t our teaching careers,
At a class meeting held on J a n uary \.'., it was voted unanimously
that 1922 pledge itself to support
the D o r m i t o r y h'tind, It is a serious responsibility that we seniors
have shouldered, and we mean to
see il t h r o u g h . W e are the lirst
class in the history of State College to m a k e t h i s pledge.
On February ID the music clubs
arc g o i n g to give a concert at Chancellor's 'Wall, and on F e b r u a r y 16
Miss Ful'lcrer is going to give a
r e a d i n g here, for the benclit of the
D o r m i t o r y Fund, Every student in
college o u g h t to feel it his pleasure
and duty to advertise and attend
these e n t e r t a i n m e n t s .
Come on,
everybody!; A r o u s e interest in the
D o r m i t o r y Fund. W o r k for it the
hardest that you know how.
OTHER COLLEGE FUNDS
Continued from page 3
Cornell s t a r t e d a drive for the
d o r m i t o r y fund about live years
ago, but it was given up at the
time of the $10,000,000 drive. At
t h a t time each g r a d u a t e was to
pledge from thirty to eighty dollars.
It is expected that this drive will
be renewed again soon. T h e alumni association at Cornell turns in
$25,000 a n n u a l l y toward the s u p p o r t
of the college.
Certain districts were assigned
q u o t a s t o raise in the Hamilton
drive. T h e Albany district was to
raise $20,000.
T h e r e arc about
thirty H a m i l t o n men in Albany,
and their contribution ranged from
$1,000 down.
Mt. I l o l y o k e g r a d u a t e s were e x pected to pledge $.305 each, which
could be raised in any way they
wished a n d paid within live years.
STATIC COUAIGE NEWS, JANUARY 23, 1022
of
The
Alumni
Association
T e a c h e r s ' College made a drive for
$3,000,(100 for the purpose of erecting a new library.
T h e pledges
were payable within three y e a r s .
O n e - t h i r d of the total a m o u n t was
raised from Alumni c o n t r i b u t i o n s
which varied front live to live
thousand dollars.
Nearly all these colleges have
come up to the s t a n d a r d s set for
them, State College g r a d u a t e s .must
not be behind hand in s h o w i n g their
loyalty and appreciation of what
their Alma Mater has done for
ALBANY ART UNION
Distinctive ^Photography
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR GIFTS AND
REMEMBRANCE
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR REPRODUCTION AND
BUSINESS USE
Special Rates to Students
thciiK
If the present plans of t h e Alumni Association are carried out we
will be as the best of colleges who
have made drives for alumni support. T h e d o r m i t o r y plan has already been outlined in t h e " N e w s . "
T h e plays given by the Dramatics
Class netted about $175 for t h e
dornritory fund. T h e goal of half
a million dollars will be reached if
all o u r alil'inui will respond 10 the
appeal.
BASKETBALL
SCHEDULE
D e c e m b e r 1, 1921—St, Michaels at
Albany.
D e c e m b e r 8, 1921—Clarksoii ai
Albany.
D e c e m b e r 10, 1921— Union at Schenectady.
December 16, 1921—R. I'. I. at
Troy.
J a n u a r y 12, 1922—New York Aggies
at Farmingdalc
J a n u a r y 13, 1922—Pratt at New
York.
J a n u a r y 14, 1922—St. J o h n s at New
York".
J a n u a r y 21. 1922—Si. S t e p h e n s at
Albany,
J a n u a r y 28, 1922— Gencsoo at Albany.
Phone Main 991
48 No. Pearl Street
THIS
SPACE
B E L O N G S
HELMES BROS., INC.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO USE IT FOR
BUSINESS PURPOSES
LESTER
H. H E L M E S , PRES.
^^^em
G. Wiley <a Bro.
Dealers in All Kinds of
Fresh a n d Salt Meat
and Poultry
If your Waterman needs
attention, bring it to us.
Our Waterman service
comes to the aid of
many a cast-off pen.
3 4 8 State Street, C o r n e r Lark
Telephone 544 and 543
BRENNER'S
m* PEN CORNER,
Exclusive
CHINA'S POSITION AT T H E
WASHINGTON CONFERENCE
B y V. K. W e l l i n g t o n K o o
T o speak the truth and work for
h a r m o n y has always been the ideal
t o w a r d which the Chinese people
have worked through m a n y centuries. In her philosophy China has
exalted t h e scholar above the soldier,
In her history she has developed a tradition of peace. She
still believes that to quarrel, plunder and murder, a m o n g nations as
a m o n g individuals, are things disa s t r o u s to the world. It is at once
the weakness of China and her
s t r e n g t h that her spirit has been
pacific where several oilier nations
have been otherwise.
At the turn of the century China
began lo realize the weakness of
her traditional attitude.
Russia,
G e r m a n y , and Japan gave her cause
to fear the d a n g e r of e n c r o a c h m e n t s , and thai danger has not as
yet a l t o g e t h e r disappeared.
Military p o w e r in China itself led to
disputes between civil and military
men. T h e great war saw the landing of J a p a n e s e forces in the neutral
territory of Shantung.
-And then
China's preparation to participate in
the E u r o p e a n war served r a t h e r to
accentuate differences within the
country.
Representatives tit Versailles did not settle questions thai
are of great concern to ('hina.
T h e s e questions might furnish
causes for future war. T h e people
of China a r e determined that the
territorial integrity and political
sovereignty of t i e Chinese republic
shall be respected
With great
satisfaction, therefore, they authorised the Chinese delegates to attend
the W a s h i n g t o n conference and
work for a ha'-nioniou- and just
s e t t l e m e n t of China's foreign relations.
T o arrive at a fair decision on
F a r Eastern questions based upon
TO
ESTABLISHED-IBB?
CORNER-HUDSON AVE.MO sa.PEARL.
Ideal Service
Furs, Gowns, Suits
and Wraps
5 8 N o . P e a r l St.
A l b a n y . N. Y.
Ideal Food
$5.00 Meal Ticket for $4.50 to College Students
GEORGE F, H A M P . P r o p
Ideal Restaurant
Phone, W e s t 4 4 7 2
208 Washington Avenue, Albany, N. Y.
Regular Dinner 40c.—11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
THE
HAMILTON
Supper 40c— 5 p. m. to 8 p. m.
PRINTING
CO.
P R O D U C E R S O F THE BETTER C L A S S O F
BOOKLETS. CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS
DIRECT BY M A I L ADVERTISING
II
PRINTERS
24Q H A M I L T O N
AND
&
OF THE STATE COLLEBE
NEWS
STREET
A L B A N Y . N. Y.
China's declaration of principles
and the firm assertion of h e r rights
hefore the bar of international law
and world opinion will r e m o v e the
cause .and threat of war. It will do
more than remove the threat of
war.
It will establish across the
Pacific a united republic, progressive and democratic, an illustrious
advocate of peace by n a t u r e and
disposition in the light of reason
and experience.
W h a t is the best settlement of
China's questions?
A permanent
settlement is t h e best settlement,
and injustice will never m a k e a permanent settlement, j u s t i c e is the
best g u a r a n t e e of peace.
So'iuc sacrifice must be made by
nations participating in the conference, as China has m a d e them in the
past to preserve peace; bill I hey
who help China to-day will Iheiiiselves derive benefits,
Along' the
path of peace the whole world will
enjoy the fruits of an invigorated
and friendly China.
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