State College News Wednesday —Colgate Musical Clubs VI. No. 10 PER YEAR

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State College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED ny THE CLASS or
VOL. VI.
No. 10
ALBANY, N. Y.,
1918
NOVEMBER 21,
1921
$3.00 PER YEAR
Wednesday —Colgate Musical Clubs
CONCERT TO BE GIVEN
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
Girls' Chorus to Assist
Nomination of Officers
The nomination of officers for the
When Colg'ale combs lo Stale
newly formed Student Association
Wednesday .night, .liquid notes of
look place lasi Ericlny morning,
music are going to How all around.
For president the candidates subIn the past Colgate has come here
lo try to del'eai us in basketball, mitted were: Eunice Nice, Isadorc
llreslan, John MoClurc, and Helen
hut tin's year it is going to enterWalker; for vice-president, Agnes
lain us. ' It is' not tile basketball
Smith, May Wood, Ruth Teffl, and
learn this lime. It is the Musical
Helen l.eary; for secretary, .Annie
t tubs.
Olsen, Evelyn Dtltcher, and Oliver
The concert given by the Colgate
Putnam,
Musical Clubs has always been a
Resolutions drawn up by Mystreat for those who appreciate line
kauia, endorsing the work of the
music. But this concert is going
Washington Conference on
the
to he better than ever, because at
Limitation of Armaments, were
this time there is going lo be an
added attraction. The program
Continued on page 4
will be improved by a selected
girls' chorus from State College
who Will show the audience that
all the melody isn't produced at AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
Colgate.
CONFERENCE
The program will he a varied
one, and will comprise vocal and
The conference of the North
instrumental solos, choruses, and Atlantic Section of the American
orchestral selections. The men Association of University Women
will'offer all kinds of music from was held in New York recently.
the stately college anthems to huMrs. (1. Ai. ConWell, who was
morous glee songs and the most graduated from Slate College in
jazziferous syncopation. So every- the class of 'Pi, attended, since she
one ought to be interested.
is the president of the Eastern
Because of the reputation of
New York Branch of tile Associathe clubs and 'the fact that this is tion,
the first glee club concert of the
The convention opened with a
season, hundreds of the Colgate meeting on Saturday morning,
Alumni and the general public, will when resolutions were proposed to
attend, If you want lo take ad- lie sent lo the Disarmament Convantage of this opportunity decide ference at Washington. Mrs. Kdat once or it may be too late. gciM-on Parsons, Ellen Fitz PendleTickets will he on sale Monday, ton, president of Wellesley College,
Tuesday and Wednesday at the and Mrs. Beatrice Eorbes-Roberttable in the rotunda. The prices son Hale marie thrilling speeches
arc $1 for reserved seats, and 75 on the armament problem.
cents for general admission.
M. Carey Thomas, president of
'Continued on page 4
Bryn Mawr, was toast-mistress at
a luncheon given that afternoon by
NOTICE TO SENIORS
the New York Branch for all of
the delegates. Mrs. Louise BrowDecember 1 is the last date for nell Saunders, at one time advisor
handing in Pedagogue write-ups. of women at Cornell, the HonorProd your friends. Hand them in able Mrs. 13, Russell, of London,
now.
Give them to Margaret Mrs. Carrie Chapman Call, and
Kirtland, Catherine Pcltz, ' Alice Mrs. F, Lewis Flack spoke upon
Clear, or Helen Van A ken, or leave the. "Educated Women in Politics."
Later a business meeting was
them in the mail box. Please be
held.
prompt!
Then three addresses followed,
given by Lucy 'M. Salmon, profesCOLLEGE CALENDAR
sor of history at Vassar, Agnes L,
Rogers, professor of education at
Coucher College, and Dallas Lore
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 21
Sharp,
professor of English at Bos4:30 p. m,
ton University.
The convention dinner was held
Mathematics Club Meeting
at the ffotel Commodore. Virginia
Room 201
Gilderslecvc, Dean of Barnard, was
toast-mistress,
Arthur Billiard,
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 22
snecial correspondent of the New
3 p. m.
York ''Times," Toyokichi Tycnaga,
Y. W. C. A. Meeting—Auditorium
Ph.D., director of the Eastern and
Western News Bureau, His ExcelWEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER.23 h'nev. P, K, C. Tyan, secretary of
the Chinese delegation to the Dis8 p. m.
armanent Conference,
and
P.
Colgate Concert—Auditorium
White-well Wilson, American corTHURSDAY, NOVEMBER 24- rcsnondent of the London "Daily
News," gave short speeches.
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25
Continued on page 3
Thanksgiving Recess
MISS MURRAY
liss Murray's successor will be
. Edith iCarr Cols'on, a gradubf the Slate'College in the class
If). She was an instructor in
;lish in the Schenectady High
ord after graduation, Follovvher marriage she was in 'China
three years,, where she was cnjd in educational work. After
husband's death she returned lo
country. Mrs. Colson will lake
her work here December 1,
GIRLS' GAMES
INTERESTING
SCHEDULE
The basketball game last Monday between the juniors and sophomores resulted in victory for the
sophomores by the close score ot
12-11, Good playing was shown
by both teams, which made the
game most exciting for the spectators. The score at the end of the
first half was 5-4 in favor of the
juniors.
In the second half Evelyn
Waugh took Ethel Rusk's place as
center, and May Wood took Martha
Baylcy's place as forward for the
juniors. During this half the play
became most exciting, as the result seemed likely lo be a tic. The
whistle finally blew with the score
10-10, meaning that the game would
have to be piayed until one team
made two points. The juniors succeeded in making one point from
the foul line, but Billy Heinernan
won the game for the sophomores
by a field basket.
The following is the box score
of the game:
Juniors,
E.G. F.B. T.
Bayley", If
2
0
4
Seymour, rf
0
5
5
Rusk, c
0
0
0
Georuc, Ig
0
0
0
Hutchins, rcr
0^
0
0
Continued on page 4
RESIGNS
Miss Gcraldinc II. Murray, a
graduate of State College in the
class of '10, resigns her position as
instructor in English and journalism .to take ellect December 1.
She will take up work with
the New York Slate Association, which is JI lion-partisan political association furnishing legislative news. Women's organizations ^ throughout the slate arc
adopting legislative programs, and
it is one of the purposes of the
New York Association lo furnish
those organizations with just as
complete news of the legislative
sessions as^ if they had individual
representatives there. This is the
worlc that Miss Murray will have
charge of.
During the sessions of the Legislature she will be at llie Albany
office, 41 Eagle street, with the exception of the week-ends when she
will be in New York and other
cities making reports to the organizations in these cities. Such
organizations as the New YorkSlate League of Women Voters,
the Women's Joint Legislative Conference, Albany City Club, and the
Stale Council of Jewish Women are
subscribers',
Miss Murray will be the associate editor of I he magazine published -bimonthly during the time
when the Legislature meets, The
New York State Association Bulletin. 11 discusses at length bills
reported on each day. As was
staled before, Ibis organization is
non-partisan, having as its chief
nlatform this year the question, of
Municipal Home Rule.
Beginning December 3, following
the annual meeting of the association, Miss Murray will be at the
New York office. 305 Broadway.
From December 10 to 18 she will
be making' a lour of all the larce
cities in I he state in nrepamtion
for the winter's work, She will address various women's clubs at
these places, ass'stinc them with
their legislative programs,
FRIENDSHIP FUND
Stand By the Students of Europe!!
Why?
To conserve the physical, menial,
and moral gains resulting from the
relief extended by American students during the past year:.
To carry out the ordinary implications of the Golden Rule, including the principle that the strong
should help the weak:
To give added force to the effort
to solve various interracial issues
involved in. the Conference to Reduce Armaments:
To help overcome the human
effects of war, privation, and pestilence:
To impress unmistakably upon
Continued on page 4
Page Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 1921
State College mm
Vol, VI
November 21
No. 10
Published weekly, during the college year, by the Student Body of
the New York State College for
Teachers, at Albany, New York.
The subscription rate is three dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
[Articles) manuscripts, etc., must
be in the hands of the Editors before Thursday of the week of publication.]
Editor-in-Chief,
Louise D. Persons, '22
Managing Editor,
Hope D. Persons, '22
Business Manager,
Alice O'Connor, '22
Subscription Manager,
Ethel Huyck, '22
Assistant Business Managers,
Grace Fox, '23
Edith Sanders, .'23
Associate Editors,
Robert MacFarlanc, '23
Eira Williams, '23
Vera Nolan, '23
Reporters
Dorothy Bennit, '24
Doris Butler, '23
Dorothy Dangremond, '23
The "News" extends to all of its
friends best wishes for a pleasant
Thanksgiving.
Aside from the
numberless things for which we
should be grateful is the fact that,
when our short vacation is over,
we have as line an Alma Mater as
State to which we can return.
The "News" Board regrets the
resignation of their advisor, Miss
Gcraldinc H. Murray, but extends
to her sinccrest good wishes for
success in her new work.
A PROPHECY AND
ITS FULFILLMENT
"Then let us pray that come it
may—
As come it will for a' that—
That sense and worth, o'er a' the
earth,
May bear the grce, and,a' that;
For a' that, and a' that,
That man to man, the world o'er,
Shall brithcrs be for a' that!"
And on November 11 delegates
from all the great civilized nations
of the world met in conference at
Washington to discuss the question of the limitation of the vast
armaments of the various powers,
and such limitation of armaments
is the first great step toward the
elimination of all possibility of
great wars in the future. Will that
step be taken in the near future?
There can be little doubt but that
all of the thinking, progressive individuals of all the nations of the
world arc hoping against hope that
it will be taken, Yet many of us
who acknowledge the hope are
conscious' of a strange hesitancy, a
veritable lack of enthusiasm, when
we face the issue of actually relaxing our nation's attitude of preparedness and allowing our fighting strength to 'be diverted into
other channels. Why? Certainly
not because we want war. It is
universally conceded that war is
abominable, impractical, useless;
that another war in this day and
age would be so far-reaching in its
dire consequences- as to frighten
the .most reckless of us into an
earnest desire to avoid it. Nor
can it 'be that we harbor any very
potent distrust of the other nations concerned, for we are all in
one and the same boat. Is it not,
perhaps, that we sense instinctively
—rather than actively consider—
the broader issue embodied in the
proposition of limitation of armaments, of cessation of all wars, of
amicable settlement of all controversies, the universal brotherhood
of man? We arc imbued with the
spirit of conservatism, of our nation's individuality, are conscious,
as Americans, of our power, our
ability, and there is a natural conflict of ideals as we rise to this new
proposition. VVc must play the old
game under new rules; -must put
our shoulder to the wheel, and
push for universal rather than national welfare.
'22.
HOW ABOUT IT,
FRESHMEN?
Oh, frosh, why did you do it?
It surely could not have been premeditated! 'We mean the outrage
done Minerva on Campus Day.
Don't you remember the get-wise
meeting? Why do you suppose
that first, before taking you through
so much fear-inspiring experience,
we made you bend the knee before
Minerva? Are you so green that you
don't know even now what Minerva symbolizes? Minerva symbolizes college spirit; so you bent
your knee to college spirit. After
that you should have supported
college spirit as was becoming sophisticated freshmen, 'Instead, on
n'riday you came with your tawdry
streamers and wrapped them about
our patron; you smudged her face
and hands with crimson; you
nearly toppled her over in your
mad surging. Frosh, what were
you thinking about! Does State
mean nothing to you? Then you
rushed the front door knowing that
the front door rule is a tradition,
You did it to pick a light with the
.sophomores. You paid them it big
compliment in expecting them to
seek vengeance for such wholesale
Haunting at traditions. Lint how
about that kind of class spirit?
Did you enjoy that riot in the
rotunda? Do you exult over your
exploit? It is time you realize that
there is a college spirit that should
be held inviolate. The class of '24
is back of it. Are you going to refuse to boost that spirit just because the sophs are trying to boost
it? If in trying to flaunt them you
smash through traditions and disregard college spirit you are fostering that kind of class spirit which
must not exist in State.
Now come on, '25, be sportsmanlike, college-spirited freshmen!
decided that the 'Conference and
Conventions' 'Committee of the
Y. W. C. A, will pay half the expenses of two delegates for this
trip, but this does not mean that
there are to be only two delegates.
What do you know about the
Student Volunteer Association of
State College? Do you know who
its members are? It was organized a year ago, and since its organization the membership has increased from live to nine. The
members are Margaret Cushman,
Mary Grace 'Congdon, Grace Fox,
Ruth Kim nicy, Frances Stilson,
Helen Walker, Hilda Utlcy, liarold Baldwin,, and Edmund Osborne.
Go to the Rochester conference.
VVc want State College to have a
good representation and a large
one.
We want to show other colleges that State is on the map.
And we'll do it, too. Don't you
remember the conference at Wells
last year? And at Skidmorc, and
the one 'way out in DesMoincs in
1920? Ask anyone who went to
any of these conventions if she's
sorry she went. Ask 'cm about
banquets and speeches and yells
and meeting people from other
colleges, and the trip itself. And
when I hey get through telling you,
you'll know you just have to go to
Rochester. So come on, everybody. Rah for State College I Rah
for the Student Volunteers! Rochester! Rochester! Rah! Rah!
Rah!
Subscriptions to the " 1922 Pedagogue " may be secured by those
who have not already subscribed
by sending the attached blank properly •filled out, to Frances Stilson,
Subscription Manager, 'before December 1, 1921. Payment will be
due on or before February 1, 1922,
and may be made by check.
Sonic one struck it right
When they called it the Baby
Class.
The jokes that they repeat were
stale.
When Roland blocked the pass.
Tf they must slam in public.
Although it's not polite,
Why don't they pull off something
new
Instead of something trite? '24
IN GREAT DEMAND
A superintendent of a New York
State high school called Dr, Brubacher on the telephone one day
and said that he needed a new
teacher for a certain subject, Tic
wanted no one. but a State College
graduate if he could get one. " Tf
you have one who is qualified for
the position, please send her down
immediately."
Dr. Brubacher answered that he
had a teacher for the position, A
girl was sent who proved a successful and satisfactory teacher. This
illustrates the way in which State
COME TO ROCHESTER
College graduates get positions.
There are a large number of suThe conference of the New York perintendents in New York State
State Student Volunteer Union will who always come here for a
be held at Rochester University,' teacher before they look anywhere
December 2, 3, and 4. It has been else.
The demand for our teachers is
greater than we can satisfy. Each
year about ninety per cent, of the
graduating class secure positions
as teachers. Of course, there is always a small percentage of a class
who get below seventy per cent,
in practice teaching. The appointment bureau cannot recommend
these people except for certain positions which they can fill adequately, 'but many of them arc
placed through agencies. Students
having a grade over seventy-live
and willing to teach in any part of
the State could usually be placed
twice over, Only six members of
last year's class were unable to secure positions, and some of these
failed because they did not wish to
teach away from home.
New York State College graduates arc teaching in every county
in the State. A larger percentage
is found in the eastern than in the
western part; for every one hundred cast of Syracuse there are
about ten west." A great number of
State 'College people teach in the
Hudson valley, especially near New
York'City. New Jersey has a great
many of our teachers, The higher
salaries paid 'in the Metropolitan
District draw them there.
The success of Slate College
teachers is very marked. Superintendents say that our graduates begin like experienced teachers. They
know how to .manage classes and
organize work. They can carrv on
the business part of teaching, keep
attendance and class records. They
arc skilled instructors when 'they
start. On the whole they arc better trained in subject matter than
teachers from colleges which do
not give special training in teaching. The chief reason for this is
that they have prewired to teach
specific subjects under our system
of majors and minors,
Since (be time of Dr. Milne's administration State College has attempted tn find teaching positions
for Graduates. The svstem of appointments was systematically organized in 1915; so that from
eicrhtv lo ninety per cent, of our
teachers arc now nlarcd throiurh
pnnolntment. D'\ Hodcrins. o? the
Federal Bureau for Vocational EdContinued on pace 4
Occullsh Prescriptions Receive Our
Careful Attention
MEYROWITZ BROS.
OPTICIANS
68 No. Pearl St.
ALBANY, N. Y.
Under Kenmore Motel
HOSLERS
Ice Cream of Quality
Used by this College. We
also manufacture, Sherberts,
Punches and etc. Qyality
and service our watchwords.
Date
I Hereby Promise to pay $3.5i for 1 copy of the " 1922 Pedagogue,"
on or before February 1, 1922.
HOSLERS ICE CREAM CO.
Signed
ALBANY, N.
N. Y.
Y.
ALBANY,
$
Payment
Sub.
Mgr.
Phone West 466-2831 -2832
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 1921
Page Three
STAHLER'S
fa,iy co-eds w HI p e s t e r Wisarpierie
tty nervcb a,vc uH9"t"YT>htf ,
rV< » ^ t rva-'m leaves a-tf 'A p*-6'" one;
I f i havewt d i s ^ s i * -
Ice Cream and Confectionery
MUSK
299 Central Avenue
->
H A L L O W E E N NOVELTIES
Albany, N. Y.
OREETINO C A R D S
Haaljtttgtim (Sift fcljitji
2 4 4 WASHINGTON AVE.
ALBANY, N. Y.
OPEN EVENINGS
ixc.tr cl«v-ss is ptts.t
PHONE WEST 1338 W
Home Cooking Restaurant
6
f*W Iun4»s w i l l aolla-f^ - "~"
OTQ. i a ^ ' t 4o V)Ovne. now"
Mrs. I. A. Altheiser
Former coo* at Stale College Cafeteria
2 8 9 CENTRAL A V E N U E
~P$. SViedoesnt^o-bulrst-il/ lives,
FRANK II.
tree in the world. Besides the pictures Dr. Douglas gave many personal experiences which added to
the pleasure of all present.
Joseph Henry Society
A special meeting of Joseph
Henry Society was held in room
150 on Monday, November 14, at
7:30. It was decided that the meetings of the Society would be on the
first and third Thursdays at 7:30,
The following officers were
elected: President, Edmund Osborne; vice-president, Mary G.
Smith; secretary, Thomas Bontlcy;
treasurer, Frederick Scott; reporter, Pauline George; honorary
critic, Dr. Hale.
'ROUND 7H£ COLLEGE
On Thu
Pauline George, '2.3, attended a
reunion of the Rockefeller family
at the Hotel McAlpin in New
York City last week.
Mr, 0 . F. Stetson was the guest
of his daughter, Mildred Stetson,
'22, last week.
Margaret Kirtland, '22, attended
the Yale-Princeton game last week.
. . 1 1 1 3 i l l U U l l U I UDIUU HI UU1UK I U I An informal house dance was low-tip work in cases of malnutriheld at the Eta I'hi house Friday tion!
Alpha Epsilon Phi had the folevening, November 18,
Anna Nelson, '17, spent a few lowing alumnae as her guests at a
days at the Eta Phi house recently. luncheon recently: Goldie Bloom,
Gamma Chapter, K.AV, welcomes '20, Julia Dobris, '20, Helen Goldthe following as pledge members, smith, '21, Ruth Grecnblath, '21,
Willard McGraw, '22, Otto Hud- Jennie Rosengard, '20, Bertha Galdel, '22, Rudolph Linderman, '22, lup, '20, Sophia J. Rosensweig, '19
and Edythc Sherman, '20.
Ralph Beaver, '24.
Nellie Fieldntau, ex-'23, was the
Miss Gillett and Miss Kelm are in guest of the AIM1 girls over the
attendance at the New York State week-end.
Home Economics Association and
Helen Strisowcr, '22, entertained
the State Teachers' Association
Bertha Stone of New York City
meetings at Buffalo, November 21, over the week-end'.
22 and 23.
^ Delta Omega welcomes Laura
_ Miss Gillett, Miss K'cinr, Miss Ebell into fuil membership, and
Sodeu, and the Home Management Elizabeth liudcl as a pledged memfamily motored to Troy on Sun- ber.
day afternoon to hear Dr, Hugh
George Schiavone, '20, was in
Black at the First Presbyterian town Saturday, November 12, He
Church. As Dr. Black spoke was 'Onondaga county's representespecially to students, his talk was ative to the Suite Inter-League
of vital interest to the visitors.
Basketball Council.
Chemistry Club
Chemistry Club was fortunate in
ORGANIZATIONS having
Doctor Douglas, of the
Biology Department, talk about her
western trip at their last regular
French Club
meeting of the club Wednesday
evening, November 15, at 7:30
French Club held its first initia- o'clock.
tion party Saturday afternoon, thus
Many slides, nearly all of which
teaching the freshmen a few things were
snapshots taken 'by Doctor
about French that they never knew Douglas
were shown.
before. It was all decidedly inter- Those whoherself,
were present saw picesting for everyone there.
tures of the places Dr. Douglas so
Plans for the Fete to be held vividly described in the News. Only
December 2 arc well under way, a few of the more interesting picand so far the Fete promises to be tures can be described here. Sliding
a great success. Get your ticket down a deep snowbank in August
now, from any one of the French on one day and the next day cookClub members.
ing a meal in a geyser seem like
fairy talcs, but the snap-shots prove
them to be true.
Press Club
Think of a chimney over 500 feet
Forty-five students have now high, One picture showed such an
joined Press Club. Sign up and enormous chimney used in a smelter
help make the meetings successful. plant. You can readily imagine how
A regular business meeting was large an ordinary man looked beheld Wednesday. Miss Murray side it. Then imagine an oak tree,
spoke. The next meeting will be under the spreading branches of
Dec. 14, The speaker will be an- which 7,800 people can stand. This
is supposed to be the largest oak
nounced later.
Mathematics Club
Some Practical Uses of Higher
Mathematics will be the subject of
Dr. Eichel's lecture at a meeting of
the Mathematics Club to be held
this afternoon, Monday, November
21, at 4:30 P. M. in Room 201.
Dr. Otto R. Eicbel is director of
the division of vital statistics of the
New York • State Health Department. Math. Club extends a
cordial invitation to all students
who are interested in mathematics,
and especially to those taking
analytical geometry,
Music Association
The following urogram was enjoyed at the meeting of the Music
Association, November 18th:
Piano solo, " Barcarolle " . . . . . .
EVORY & CO.
Printers
3(1 and 3 8 Heaver Street
Guier's Bakery
W e Bake t h e Best
OUR BREAD
A
SPECIALTY
83 North L.lte Ave.
Albany, N. Y .
Quality
SILKS
And Dress Goods At
H E W E T T S SILK S H O P
°v,rior,<S"f
and
15-17 No. Petri St.
EYRES
FLORIST
SAY IT WITH FLOWERS
"After Every Meal" .
WRIGLEYS
.MacDowcll
Marion Shutts, '23
Piano solo, " The Witches' Dance "
MacDowcll
Beulah Eckerson, '25
Reading, " The Barrel Organ "
A. Noycs
Margaret Kirtland, '22
Vocal solo
MacDowcll
Katherine Peck, '24
Piano solo, " Eroic Sonata"...
MacDowcll
Mr. T. F. Candlyn
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
Continued from page 1
"The Mission of the American
Association of University Women"
was the topic considered at a
luncheon at 'the Cosmopolitan Club
on Sunday. Sophia C. Hart, professor of English at Wellesley,
presided.
At present the graduates of State
College are eligible to become associate members of the association,
The Eastern Branch urges all to
TEN
FOR
FIVE CENTS
B130
TheflavorLasts!
Page Four
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, NOVEMBER 21, 1921
take advantage of this upon graduation in order that it may
strengthen the recommendation to
make State College graduates active members, which is soon to be
considered by the association council.
Mary had a little book,
The "Pedagogue" was its name;
And she was the happiest girl in
town,
Even though she was very lame.
For Mary sat at her window
And looked her "Ped" through
and through;
And everyone on the street stopped
in
To look it over, too.
CONCERT TO BE GIVEN
Continued from page 1
After it he concert there will lie
dancing in the gymnasium for college students and Colgate Alumni
only.
The itinerary of the clubs enables them to give concerts in New
York November 24; in Elizabeth,
N. J., November 25, and in Tarrytown, November 26.
Program
Songs of the Campus
The 'Clubs
Violin solo—In Elizabethan Days—
Kramer
i Mr. Alvah»H. Leeds
The Golden Sceptre. ...Scnulpcgrcll
The Instrumental Club
. Songs for baritone
Mr. John Freestone
Bits and Tid-liits
The Glee Club
Pan Can Tin
Hong Kong, Sing Sing
Echoes from Broadway
The Instrumental Club
A Romance
Dore
The Glee Club
Alma Mater
GIRLS' SCHEDULE
Cor.tmudd from page 1
Wood, If
1
0
Waugh. c,
0
0
Totals
Sophomores.
Hcineman, If
Miller, rf
Liebick, c
Bclding. lg
McManus, rg
Abrams, c
3
E.G.
2
2
0
0
0
f)
5
2
0
11
I
E.I!. T.
4
8
0
4
0
0
0
0
0
0
f)
0
F R I E N D S H I P FUND
Continued from page 1
the future leaders of Europe, who
are its' present students, that the
purpose of America's youth is
truly a ministry of friendship:
Because the broadly spiritual results of the relief work depend very
largely upon its being a work ol
friendship for students' by students i
To project the student body and
intelligence of America actively
into the transcendent task of world
reconstruction along lines of good,
will and progress:
To help meet our obligation to
European institutions to which our
educational h'fe owes much:
To help preserve principles and
institutions as well as human
values essential to the recovery of
Europe and the world:
Principles Followed in Relief.
I. Relief is administered impartially, without regard to race, nationality or creed,
EI, Relief is conducted on sound
economic lines. Students pay to
the utmost of their ability for whatever they receive.
III. Self-help is encouraged in
every possible way,
IV. Close co-operation is followed with existing agencies. By
correlation of effort maximum relief
is provided at the minimum of overhead expense.
Something New in International
Relationships
The students of America undertook in 1920, in common with the
students of other nations, lo bring
relief to their fellow-students in
Europe.
Students of twenty-six nations,
united, within one year raised $o()0,000 and brought direct relief to
70,000 students in eleven countries,
touching 120 different institutions
of higher learning, with an attendance pi 250,000 students.
This appeal is one from student
tQi student. In this year's campaign let us all respond to the call
which comes to our very door!
Dorothy Dangrcmond,
Chairman.
Ah! On Thanksgiving Day when
froni East and from West,
From North and South come the
pilgrim and guest,
When the gray haired North East
sees round his hoard
The old broken links of affection
restored,
When the care wearied man seeks
his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where
Hie girl smiled before,
What moistens the lips and what
brightens the eye?
What calls hack the past, like the
•"''eh pumpkin pie?
—Whitticr, " For an Autumn Festival."
Totals
4
4 12
The senior-frosh game brought
another defeat for the frosli. They
played well, but were no match
for the constant even play of the
seniors. A. Worth was always
there when her forward got the
ball. Gen. Zimbar easily evaded
the opposite center by her single
dribble, and the forwards just kept
the score gradually rising,
Seniors.
E.G. F.B. T.
Cackcno'r, rf
0
IN GREAT DEMAND
3
6
Walsh, If
0
4
8
Continued from page 1
Lodge, rg.
0
0
0 ucation,' made a study of the apWcrth, lg
0
0
pointment bureaus of a 1,1 the coln
Zimbar, c
0
0
0 leges in the country during this
last summer. After spending SepTotals
0
7 14 tember nineteenth going over the
Freshmen,
E.G. F.B. T. appointment bureau records of
Vorhecs, rf
0
1
2 State College, he said that they
Craddock, If
0
2
4 were the completcst that he had
Leeming, fg,
0
0
0 found. He recommended them beRife, lg.
0
0
0 cause they contain the complete
Hammcrsley, c
0
scholastic records of all students
0
n
O'Hare, rg
0
for their four vears in college,
0
n
Baker, rf
0
0
0 even . going hack to their high
school standings, a systematic iudtr. Totals
0
3
6 ment of their practice work by
Score at half time~r-Scniors, 6; their critics and the. heads of defrosh, 4. Fouls committcd-^-By partments, and an account of their
seniors,-5;-by frosh, 3. Referee- teaching experience after leaving
Miss Bennett,
Scorer—Martha college, with letters from superinParry. Time of periods—10 min- tendents' under whom they have
taught.
utes.
ALBANY ART UNION
'Distinctive 'Photography
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR GIFTS AND
REMEMBRANCE
PHOTOGRAPHS FOR REPRODUCTION AND
BUSINESS USE
Special Rates to Students
THIS
%
P h o n e Main 991
48 No. Pearl Street
SPACE
BELONGS
TO
HELMES BROS., INC.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO USE IT FOR
BUSINESS PURPOSES
LESTER
H. H E L M E S , PRES.
COME TO
College <Lo*op
FOR
Books, Supplies, College Stationery
and College Banners
rnnm*%
G. W i l e y (Q. Bro.
Dealers in All Kinds of
F r e s h a n d Salt Meat
and Poultry
FOUNTAIN PEN INK
We can supply you with
Waterman Ink and Ortoto Ink-two of the best
for fountain pen use.
emePEN CORNER,
3 4 8 State Street, Corner Lark
Telephone 544 and 543
TRY
Jack Gould's Moat Delicious
(^.
PUNCH
All Flavors
SERVED FOR ALL OCCASIONS
ESTABLISHED -1887
JACK GOULD'S ICE CREAM PARLOR
CORNER-HUDSON AVE"*" SO.PEARU
839 Broadway
Phone Main 2051-W
Ideal Service
I J
Albany, N. Y.
Ideal Food
$5.00 Meal Ticket for $4.50 to College Students
1 O
X
r,
GEORGE F. HAMP, Prop
ideal Kestauraiu
p»one, We.t 4472
208 Washington Avenue, Albany, N. Y.
Regular Dinner 40c—11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
Supper 4 0 c - 5 p. m. to 8 p. m.
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
and sophomore men and the freshman and sophomore girls.
II. That the freshmen stand when
Continued from page 1
the song "Freshmen, freshmen,
don't feel blue " js sung.
adopted by the student body. These
III. That the, frosh be required to
resolutions will be sent to the
purchase wool caps and wear them
President.
during the winter.
Modifications were made in the
The rules H, III, V, and VIII of
sophomore-freshman rules and what the college traditions were accepted
might be considered college tra- as sophomore rules in addition to
ditions.
those in the handbook,
The following additional items
The following was accepted as a
were accepted as traditions: . .
sophomore rule;
[. That for the day before MovThat no freshman be allowed to
ing-Up Day Myskania shall arrange wear a mustache or smoke on the
for a contest between the freshman campus,
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