S t a t e College N e w... BEAT COLGATE Colgate Plays State Friday V. No. 13

advertisement
S t a t e College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
VOL.
V. No. 13
ALBANY, N. Y., JANUARY 13, 1921
BEAT
"GET-TOGETHER" DINNER FOR S. C. T. ALUMNI
RESULTS IN A TEMPOR A R Y ORGANIZATION
FOR WESTERN N. Y.
COLGATE
Colgate Plays State Friday
Purple and Gold Five Ready for
At a dinner in Rochester during
Stiff Game
the meetings of the State Teachers
Association a group of alumni prepared the way for what they hope
The State College basketball Christmas recess, and he has been
will be a large and active permamanagement is preparing to handle putting the men through some stiff
nent association for Western New
a
record crowd next Friday even- practice ill preparation for Friday's
York.
They wish especially to
'The team is showing
thank Dr, Brubacher for his as- ing, when the Purple and Gold contest,
takes
on ihe strong Colgate Uni- marked improvement, especially in
sistance in helping along this project in many ways. Thanks are versity quintet in the second home shooting, which was one of the
weakest points in the opening
also rlue to Miss Grace Malcolm game of the season.
and Miss Joyce Sherer, without
The Maroon team has been dis- games.
State has played two games,
whose aid the Rochester meeting playing the same speed and good
could not have been held.
form, which in past years have winning the first from St. Michaels
The temporary committee re- made it one of the best combina- by a large .score, and losing Ihe
grets exceedingly that they were tions in intercollegiate circles. second to Union by a score of J.l
unable to reach every member. Jt
Colgate comes to Slate College to 17. With such a start, the Purwas with great reluctance, when with a clean slate, having won all ple and Gold rooters are confident
that Stae will put up a good battle
they had exhausted every possibil- games so far this season,
against the Maroon, and Albany
ity, that they had to turn away a
basketball
fans all agree in predictCoach
Suavely
has
had
the
few of those who came unexpectedly. The list of addresses ;it their varsity "lit every night since the ing a speedy and exciting r>>utest.
command was small, the replies to
the circular letter very slow and
the majority late in arriving, thereJUNIOR W E E K PLANS
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
fore only twenty were provided for
UNDER WAY
because of the uncertainty and
many more came. Through the
kindness of the management of
At present all of ihe plans for
Tenll's twenty-seven were accomThe chief interest in assembly junior week-end have not been armodated at the last moment. It
last Friday was the election of pea- ranged. It is .-.lill undecided as lo
is the hope of all that many more pic for certain positions of honor exactly what form the Thursday
will respond in time for the next in College. The results of the vot- night
affair will take, although it
meeting that none may be dis- ing will be reported in the Peda- will probably
be an informal junior
appointed.
gogue when it comes out. Some dance.
The success of the project rests of these positions were I be most
On Friday evening, February -I,
almost entirely on the individual popular member of the faculty, the
Ihe annual junior prom will be
members of the S. C. T. Alumni most popular student, the host
throughout the State, but particu- looking student, the laziest student, held in the ball room of the Fen
b-yck.
Extensive arrangements
larly on those hi Western New
the biggest grind, the biggest
being made and il promises to
York, The following were elected
bluffer, the biggest vamp, the most are
he
one
of
the best proms that State
as temporary officers: President, eccentric student, the most talkahas ever had. Fine dance orders,
17. Herrick Couriers, No, Tona- tive, the least talkative, the best
vvanda, N. Y.; secretary and treas- athlete, the biggest social hit, the good music, and a good lime are
urer, Mabel Wade. No, Tonawantla. biggest man hater, the biggest some of the things which one gets
X. Y. The temporary committee woman hater, the student with the upon the payment of the small sum
Edward I .inck.
appointed to arrange for the next best college snirit, the nerviest, the of four dollars.
vice-president of the junior class,
meeting and present a plan for a wittiest, the senior class doll, and
permanent organization is: Chair- ihe most dignified student. Mary is chairman of the prom committee.
To complete what will have been
man, Margaret Crist, Stanley Fitz- Grahn conducted the elections in a
thus far an almost perfect weekgerald, Adaline Mall of Buffalo. A
very effective manner.
end, everyone will have the privitax of SO cents was paid by those
Alida Ballagh spoke as business lege of going lo a first class basketpresent to provide working exmanager of the Fed. Those stu- ball game iii the Albany High
Continued on page 4.
dents who have not yet signed up "••mnasium on Saturday night, in
for a Pedagogue will have an op- which game the varsity team will
portunity to do so at the tabic in
meet the alumni, ft will undoubtBASKETBALL SONG
the hall sometime this week; and
edly lie a hot ganie, since we have
Ihe money for all Pedagogues is a fast team and we know that Ihe
Show Colgate Our Spirit!
due on the first of February.
alumni have some fast players, also.
" There is a college in Pine Hills,
The best in the world we're told,
And we as sons and daughters true
Cheer the Purple and Cold:
And when our men get on the floor
You listen and you may
near us shout out the following
words
In the following way:
Grab that ball — get your man;
Score two, you can,
For S-T-A-T-E spells victory.
Rah for State College! Rah for
State College!"
$3.00 PER YEAR
Another subject which was
brought up was that a great many
students study, write, or knit during student assembly.
Marjorie
Potter suggested that Ihe student
body should pass a resolution
against this practice. This suggestion was followed and hereafter
all work of every kind outside will
be left outside,
The remaining time was given
over to a practice of the new basketball song, which was sung in the
Junior Stunt.
DRAMATICS CLASS T O
APPEAR SATURDAY
State College students have an
important engagement for Saturday
evening, January 15th, for they arc
all invited to the A. IP S. auditorium, where the Dramatics Class
plays will be given at eight o'clock.
"The-Dear Departed," the only
one of the four plays which has not
been written up previously, has
been cast and promises to be very
popular. The part of Mrs. Slater
is taken by Mary Grahn; that of
Air. Slater by John Cassavant; that
of Victoria, their daughter, by Lillian Hopper; that of Mrs. Jordan,
sister-in-law of Mr. Slater, by
Margaret Kirtland; that of Mr.
Jordan by Edniund Osborne; and
that of Abel Merryweather, the
grandfather, by Isadore lireslati.
This is a clever comedy that by a
most amazing ending destroys the
relatives' plans as to Ihe disposal
of the "Dear Departed's" possessions.
'file characters in all the plays
are well chosen. Lillian Hopper is
a very attractive little girl, and
Isadore lireslau does his part as
an old man remarkably well in ihe
"Dear Departed."
Lucile Rouse
as Mrs. Blair and Esther Cramer
as Miss Dyer in "Joint Owner's in
Spain," show that inmates of old
ladies' homes may be most blustering and self-assertive, or very
timid and even given to tears,
"The Will o' the Wisp" has a
very dramatic part which is well
interpreted by Margaret Kirtland.
As the Poet's Wife, a sophisticated,
worldly woman, she is led to death
by the White-Faced Girl, the spirit
of poetry, by means of a fantastic,
fairy dance, which Marjorie Poller
does very, beautifully.
Miss Collins does good character work in
her part as a maid. "A Minuet"
catches the French spirit so well
thai one imagines himself living
again in That Reign of Terror thai
brought to light such brave hearts
as our Marquis and Marchioness.
The College orchestra will provide music for the plays, A harp
accompaniment by Margaret De
Graf will be a feature of "File
Will 'o the Wisp." The class expects to get some lighting apparatus from the Vinccnlian institute
and scenery from the Grand
through the kindness of Mr. Wallace.
Students are admitted on student
lax tickets. Seats for outsiders are
SO and 7$ cents.
G. A. A. F R O L I C
Wasn't il just fine? What! you
weren't to the G. A. A. frolic Saturday night. Well, you missed the
time of your life, ft was just one
round of fun after
another.
Things were set humming by a
basketball game between the A's
and B's. The A's won by a score
of 16-10.
Then we were entertained by a
play entitled "Uncle Tom's Bungalow," written T by Harry Beechnut
Stowc;
st,nt e
manager.
Lela
Cackener. There were four acts,
the first of which was " The floeginer of Uncle Tom " (Ruth Tcfl'O
hv the overseer fMaybelle JochumsenY Tn the next scene we see
Eliza (Ernie Owen) crossing the
Continued on page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 13, 1921
Page Two
State College l?eu>$
Vol. V.
January 13
No. 13
Published weekly, on Thursdays,
during the college year, by the Student Body of the New York State
College for Teachers, at Albany,
New York.
The subscription rate is three
dollars per year. Advertising rates
may be had on application to the
business manager.
Articles, manuscripts, etc, must be
in the hands of the Editor before
Monday of the week of publication.
Editor-in-Chief,
F. Reginald Bruce, '21
Managing Editor,
Florence Stanbro, '21
Business Manager,
Edna Lowerree, '21
Subscription Manager,
Mary Whish, '21
Assistant Business Managers
Ethel Huyck, '22
Alice O'Connor
Associate Editors,
Hope Persons, '22
Louise Persons, '22
Helen Dangremond, '22
Reporters
Vera Nolan, '23
Warren Gray, '23
Eira Williams, '23
ARE YOU UP-TO-DATE?
Along with its policy of criticism
the " News " is also anxious to
give some word of appreciation for
the good things which are being
done in and about State College.
Among the many things which
have attracted our attention is the
bulletin board in the second Moor
corridor at the head of the eastern
stairway.
This bulletin board is under the
direction of the History Department, but it is maintained for the
benelit of all State College students, A committee i.-, appointed
each week to take charge of it, and
this committee posts clippings
taken each day from America's
leading newspapers and telling
about the important events of the
day.
Nothing important misses
the watchful eye of this committee,
and, if you are not up .to date, you
can easily catch up by spending a
few moments of spare time between
classes in reading this bulletin
board. At the same time the committee will ho encouraged in theii
efforts by seeing that they are
actually appreciated by the students as a whole.
RIVALRY
It seems that very nearly everyone is born with the idea that he
must be as good as the other fellow
— if not better. A few of tlie more
fortunate are blessed with the
feeling that success or failure is all
up to fate and not to them. .Most
of us here are believers in the
competitive system, although we
may not care to admit it in public.
Consequently, it is up to ns to
make the best of our misfortune —
to turn it into an advantage,
perhaps.
Class rivalry is open and above
board in this institution, although
it is not always as sportsmanlike as
we might wish.
This form of
rivalry is all right; in fact, it is a
sort of conventional outlet for
lower classman energy that has
not yet felt the influence of concourse with the intellectuals.
Hut personal rivalries are not as
easily explained away. Little remarks derogatory to another's
abilities as a student or worth as a
friend made to an interested person,
whose friendship you want to make
yours rather than your fellow's, are
plain cattiiicss. Fortunately, State
has little of this and none of the
worst of rivalries — "gallery play"
instead of team work.
Rivalry
never carries our people so lar that
the desire to outshine their fellows
gels the upper hand when college
interest is needed.
State is, then, singularly free
from petty rivalries; let's keep her
HOME ECONOMICS
DEPARTMENT
Miss Elizabeth A. Woodward, of
the New York State Department of
Immigrant Education, spoke about
her work in classes for immigrant
women on Tuesday morning, Jan,
4, at 10 o'clock. The talk was
made very interesting by illustrations and was especially enjoyed by
the Home Economic seniors.
Miss Mary G. McCormiek, State
Supervisor of Nutrition Work in
the Schools, will speak Tuesday,
Jan. 11, about the formation of
nutrition classes in the State and
will give some of her plans for developing the work.
All of the
students and members of the
faculty are cordially welcome,
Miss McCormick's talk will he
given in Room 161.
MUSIC CLUB
Music Club will meet Friday
afternoon at 4.15 in Room 111.
The following program will be
•-riven:
Selections, Men's Quartette, T.
Cassavant, J. Cassavant, Grubel,
Rcilley.
Piano Solo, Tiunie Clark, '21.
Reading, Marie Moriarty, '21,
Volcal Solo, Madeline Howell,
'24.
Reading, Hazel Lee, '21.
Selection, Men's Quartette.
BEAT COLGATE!
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiii
Steefel Bros.
Girls Shop
im
II©
Quali'ty'W Mod erate Prices
S C H E D U L E O F E X A M I N A T I O N S , J A N U A R Y , 1921
Conflicts must be reported at the Registrar's Office by Friday,
January 14, at 5 P. M.
MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1921
9. A. M.
Biology 3
English 13
German 8
Government 1
History 2
Home Economics 11
Latin 3
Mathematics 5
Philosophy 1
Spanish 7
Room
ISO
109
210
201-200
Gym
161
110
100
250-260
103
2 P. M.
Education 2
Home Economics
Latin 1
Room
. .Gym
...160
...101
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1921
Chemistry 6A
Commercial Ed. 3
Economics 4
Education 41
English 1A
English IBa
English lBf
250
A
101
110
Gym
Ill
211
German 6
103
History 7
Mathematics 4
200
201
Commercial Ed. 7A
Education 5
Education 31A
English 18
Fine Arts 6
French 7
French 9
Home Economics 19
Latin 6
Phsical Ed, 10
M
211
209
101
208
108
109
161
no
.100
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 1921
Education 1
Mathematics 1
Mathematics 2
Biology 1
Chemistry 1
Commercial Ed. 1
English IBe
Fine Arts 1
French 10
History 4
Physics 6
250-260
Gym
100
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1921
260 Commercial Ed, 10
250 English 16
A French 2
211 French 3
20S Greek 1
207
200
150
Biology 2
Biology 6
Chemistry 3
Fine Arts 5
French 6
German 2
Home Economics 8
Home Economics 12
Mathematics 3
Physics 5
Physics 7
Economics 1
English 2
English 7
Music 1
Philosophy 6
Biology 5
Commercial Ed. 4
Education 8
Education 39A
English IBe
English 3
Government 5
Latin 2
Mathematics 11
FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1921
250 Chemistry 5A
260 Commercial Ed. 2
258 Education 30
203 French 4
108 German 4
210 History 3
158 Home Economics 2
161 Home Economics 17
loo Physics 3
150
150A
250
209
Ill
B
211
101-103
202
110
100
A
Ill
Gym
Gym
110
258
A
260
211
210
250
160
161
150
SATURDAY, JANUARY 29, 1921
101
250
HO
in
209
Education 32
Education 42
English lBb
Fine Arts 3
French 8
History 5
Home Economics 4
Physics 1
Physics 1A
Physiography 3
Spanish 9
MONDAY, JANUARY 31, 1921
250 Economics 5
201 English 6
m English 21
203 English 25
10s History 1A
'.','.'.'.200 Mathematics 10
161 Philosophy 4
...150 Physical Education 9
150A
260
103
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1921
Chemistry 2
250 Chemistry 15
Commercial Education 7
A Commercial Ed. 8
French 1
100 Economics 2
German 1
','103 Education 34
Greek 3
,, 110 Education 35
Music 2a
Aud. German 9
Physical Ed. 13
150A H i s t o r y 13
Home Economics 16
Spanish 10
109
Ill
211
103
201
100
110
10!
250
M
109
208
110
210
200
161
103
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 13, 1921
Page Three
STAHLER'S
Ice Cream and Confectionery
MUSIC
299 Central Avenue
What Is Vacuum?
F T H E traffic policeman did not hold up his hand and control
the automobiles and wagons and people there would be collisions,
confusion, and b u t little progress in a n y direction. His business
is t o direct.
The physicist who tries to obtain a vacuum t h a t is nearly perfect
has a problem somewhat like t h a t of the traffic policeman. Air is
composed of molecules—billions and billions of them flying about
in all directions and often colliding. The physicist's p u m p is designed t o make the molecules travel in one direction—out through
the exhaust. The molecules are much too small to be seen even
with a microscope, b u t the p u m p jogs them along and a t least starts
them in the right direction.
A perfect vacuum would be one in which there is not a single
free molecule.
For over forty years scientists have been trying to p u m p and jog
and herd more molecules out of vessels. There are still in the best
vacuum obtainable more molecules per cubic centimeter than there
are people in the world, in other words, about two billion. Whenever
a new jogging device is invented, it becomes possible to eject a few
million more molecules.
The Research Laboratories of the General Electric C o m p a n y
have spent years in trying to drive more and more molecules of air
from containers. The chief purpose has been to study the effects
obtained, as, for example, the boiling a w a y of metals in a vacuum.
This investigation of high vacua had unexpected results. I t became possible to make better X - r a y t u b e s — b e t t e r because the
X-rays could be controlled; to make the electron tubes now so
essential in long-range wireless communication more efficient and
t r u s t w o r t h y ; and to develop a n entirely new type of incandescent
lamp, one which is filled with a gas and which gives more light t h a n
a n y of the older lamps.
No one can foretell what will be the outcome of research in pure
science. New knowledge, new ideas inevitably are gained. And
sooner or later this new knowledge, these new ideas find a practical
application. For this reason the primary purpose of the Research
Laboratories of the General Electric C o m p a n y is the broadening of
h u m a n knowledge.
G e n e r a l Office
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 1921
9 A. M.
Physical Ed. 11
Spanish 1
Spanish 2
Spanish 5
Room
Ill
100
101
101
2 P. M.
Room
Commercial Ed. 6
211
English 24 '.
ill
French 5
101
Government 9
202
Heme Econ. 5 (H'hold A c . ) . . . . 161
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1921
English lBd
English 20
Home Economics 22
Latin 4
Music 2b
Phvsical Ed. 8
Physical Ed. IS
Ill
101
161
110
Aud.
100
207
Conflicts
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1921
Conflicts
Schenectady, N.Y.
CHEMISTRY CLUB
The next meeting of the Chemistry Club will be held Friday, January 14, at 4 o'clock. John McGregor will present a paper on
artificial flavorings.
At the last meeting of the club
Miss Marjoric lilythc, to gain admittance, presented a paper on
antiseptics.
Miss Blythe, Miss
Frances Olis and M>iss Emma
Deutle were then initiated and welcomed as members of the Chemistry Club. Topics of interest were
then presented from
scientific
magazines, one of which was an
article on Efflorescence, Fluorescence, Phosphorescence and Cold
Light, by John J. Birch, Ph. D„ a
former member of the club.
-:-
Albany, IN. Y.
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472.478 Broadway
Albany, N..Y.
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STATU COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 13, 1921
Page Four
•Tamblyn, Mrs., Rochester, X. Y.
•Thomas, Mary, Geneseo, N. Y.
•Wade, Mabel, No. Tonawanda,
X, Y.
Faculty members present at
Rochester: Dr. Brubacher, Profs,
Decker and Sayles,
The "NEW"
College Shoe
The above represents the type of
shoe that is going to
be worn extensively
by college students
this Pall.
It liu n medium round
toe with ((might Inner
border, broad low heel
andflexibleahnnk.
It hat been
approved by the
.
Nat. Y.W;C,A.
and alio a majority ol the College Dept. of
Physical Kdticiitlon throughout
the country.
For Men and
Woman
McAuliff & Gallahger
22-24 Steabio SI.
Albany, N. Y.
GET-TOGETHER
Continued from page 1.
petise's for the committee.
Will
not every loyal akimmts aid us by
forwarding at once to the. secretary
the names and addresses of all
graduates of S, C. T. whom you
know to lie living or teaching in
this section of the State.
At
present we have only thirty-two
names with accurate addresses.
To have a successful spring meeting we must have many more
names early in 1921, Don't wait
for a personal request I We need
YOL'k supporl and we hope we
have something to offer in return,
the opportunity to renew old
friendships and to become acquainted with the development and
progress of YOUR Alma Mater,
MABEL WADE,
Sec and Trcas, pro temp.,
300 Thompson St., North Tonawauda, N. Y,
(If names have been omitted
from the list of those present at
Rochester please notify the secretary that she may make corrections,) The following are listed
with the secretary; those starred
were present at Rochester, the
others were unable to be present
but wish to attend a later meeting.
* Heard, Beatrice, No. Tonawanda,
X. Y,
, \ •*Beckcr, Grace, Lowville, M. Y.
*]*.urt, Maude C, Lockporl, N. Y.
Burleson, Mary L., Niagara Falls,
N. Y.
Berwald, Edna, Allentown, Pa.
Boals, Mable La Due, Rushville,
N, Y.
•Conner's, F. LTcrrick, No. Tonawanda, N. Y.
*Coniiers, Tean Ames, No, Tonawanda, N. Y.
Clark, Bessie L., Fredonia, N. Y.
*Crist, Margaret M„ Buffalo, N. Y.
•Carson, John, Lockport, N. Y,
•Cooper, fico., Rochester, N. Y, _
Chapman, Laura Bristol, Ovid,
X, Y.
•Dcnnlspn, Arline, Potsdam, N. Y.
Dee, Marguerite, Albion, N. Y.
•Fitzgerald, Stanley, Buffalo, N. Y.
Faucett, Myra, Kenmore, N, Y,
Gilmorc, Janet, Buffalo, N. Y.
•Mfartv, Maude C, Lockport, N. Y,
Tfotick, Ethel M„ Ifambnrgli,
v . Y.
•TTall, Adalinc, Buffalo, N, Y.
*Tennines, Florence, Wellsville,
N. Y,
•Mnssori, Louis, 'No. Tonawanda,
X: Y,
•Malcolm, Grace, Rochester, XL Y,
•Malcolm. Maude. Rochester, N. Y.
•Pepper, Marion, Coming, N, Y.
*Sherer. Joyce, Rochester, N, Y,
•Simmons, Gertrude, Bath. N. Y.
•Swift, E. B (MissV Nunda, N. Y,
•Stocker. Louise V., No. Tonawanda, N. Y.
G, A. A. FROLIC
Continued from page 1.
ice nursned by bloodhound (.Martha
Parry-)-. We held our breath and
waited, as the cakes of ice (,?)
heaved and and groaned beneath
the weight of the huge hound.
Then followed the death of Little
Eva (Queen i-loman) and her
descent into heaven. Helen Walsh
then conducted a mock freshman
gym. class much to our amusement,
The letters and numerals were
awarded by our president, Lela
Cackener,
Those receiving S, C. T. letters
were the members of last year's
1921 championship basketball .team:
Lucille Rouse, Jessie Darling,
Winnie Darling, Frances Lawrence,
Nellie Parkhurst, Bculah Cunningham, Lillian I lopper,
Those receiving 1922 numerals
for the second time were; Lela
Cackener. Helen Walsh, Arline
Worth, Pauline George.
For the first time: Katherine
Merchant, Gladys Lodge.
Those receiving 192.1 numerals
for lite first time were: Mary
Koncelik,
Margaret
II n t chin s,
Evelyn Waugh, Marjorie Mathewson, Martha Bayley.
Letters and numerals were also
awarded Miss Bennett and Miss
Card for their efficient and untiring
efforts.
A lively half hour was spent in
obstacle races and playing games.
The remainder of the evening was
spent in dancing and demonstrations on tlie apparatus.
The " eats " consisted of punch,
wafers and sticks of candy.
Our party was chaperoned by
Miss Phil-lips, Miss Martinez and
Miss Douglas.
Charlea M, Winchester, President
Campbell Carrinston, Secretary
Ernest A . Barvoeta, Vice-President
Edward C. Carrlniiton, Treasurer
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129 Water Street
40 and 42 Maiden Lane
SIGMA N U K A P P A D A N C E
THE
HAMILTON
PRINTING
Tel. 998 Main
CO.
PRODUCERS OF T H E BETTER C L A S S O F
Patrons of the. Sigma Nu Kappa
subscription dance held in the gymnasium on Friday last have pronounced it a decided success.
The affair was well attended and
was characterized by an unusual
ebulliency of spirits which considering the proximity of exams,
must be attributed to the way in
which Scars' Novelty Orchestra
crashed out those " Blues." The
musicians played all last summer
in one of the most fashionable summer resorts at Schroon Lake, and
it is the consensus of opinion that
they lived up to their reputation
admirably. The fact I bat not a
couple sat out a dance bears testimony to their splendid work.
Eddy Osbournc turned away three
couples at the door because tbey
were over eighty and he did not
wish to incur the responsible of
their breaking their legs while
essaying " toddling." Remarkable
how jazz rejuvenates. Baker and
Shorty won the wooden pajamas
for having the. longest hats.
The presence of Mr. and Mrs.
Long and Mr. and Mrs. Candlyn as
chaperones added infinitely lo the
pleasure of the occasion and we feel
fortunate in having obtained them.
AH in all it was a corking success.
BOOKLETS. CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS A N D
DIRECT BY MAIL ADVERTISING
,, (ON „
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v*'
PRINTERS OF THE STATE COLLEQr NEWB
240
HAMILTON
STREET
A L B A N Y . N. Y.
PHONE WEST 2334
EYRES
OSHER'S GOODYEAR SHOE
REPAIR WORKS
2a CENTRAL A V E .
A L B A N Y , N. Y
Mac's Restaurant
Half Fried Chickeni
Wheat Cakea
Oyatera and Clama
Country Sausage
Steaks and Chops
ALWAYS OPEN
295 Central Are.
Eait of Theatre
FLORIST
SAY IT WITH FLOWERS
L A S T B U T N O T LEAST
The Gateway Press
Good Printers
336 Central Are.
Phon* W*U
2037-W
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