S t a t e College N e w... Treaty Referendum Discussion Students Favor Proposition IV IV. No. 15

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S t a t e College News
N E W YORK S T A T E COLLEGE FOR TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF
•m
VOL.
IV. No. 15
ALBANY, N. Y., JANUARY 15,
STATE LOSES TO
ST. LAWRENCE
Stale College lost a hard game
on Saturday night wheii we lost to
St. Lawrence in the last minute of
play by the seorc of 23-20. The
combination
playing
together
Saturday night proved to be the
best that has started this year.
State excelled in passwork but was
unable to score many times after it
had worked the ball under its own
basket.
Uarber excelled for the visitors
while Springmann was the star for
State College. It was due to his
superior work that the ball was
under our basket a good share of
the time. Two of his baskets were
scored by spectacular work on his
part.
One was scored after he
dribbled the entire length of the
court and another was scored from
a difficult angle at the side of the
court, He scored half of the total
points for State. The score follows:
Continued on page 6
POLITICAL SCIENCE
CLUB
1918
n
1920
Treaty Referendum Discussion
Students Favor Proposition IV
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The regular chapel period and
third period of the morning session
on Friday, January 9, were given
over to the presentation of the thicrcollegialc Referendum on the
question of the League of Nations.
The discussion, which was well
presented, was given for the purpose of presenting the different
.-ides of the question and not for
the purpose of spreading propaganda. The vote Tuesday was not
cast as deciding on the merits of
the debate, but on the question presented, The results of lite vote
were scut to the Central Committee
in New York, where the national
result will be tabulated and given
mil for publication.
A college vote taken thus simultaneously and in a uniform ballot
sels forth the opinion of a large
body of impartial but interested
voters in the country which is fairly
representative of the public .sentiment on questions of like national
and international character.
Following is a tabulated result
(if Tuesday's voting:
I'.-ic.
Slu.
Proposition
I.—
4
28
Proposition II.—
I
-IS
Proposition III.—•
12
78
Proposition IV.—
25
261
KAPPA NU FRATERNITY
CONVENTION
PLANS
FOR
JUNIOR
PROM WELL UNDER
WAY
Address by Dr. Brubacher
Number of Bids Limited,
Election of Officers
At a meeting of the Political
Science Club on I'riday, January 9,
the following persons were nominated for the various offices: For
president, J. McCluer, S, Woody,
M, Doty; fur first vice-president,
E. Nicholson, I. lireslaw, L._ Van
Norstrand; second vice-president,
A. Nolan, II. Schwadelson, M.
Whish; secretary, D. Ilalsfead, D.
Mullliolland; reporter, L. Woodruff, G. Bloom, 1'". Mattice. The
following were elected: President,
J. .McCluer; first vice-president, E.
Nicholson; second vice-president,
II. Schwadelson; secretary D. Halstead; reporter, \l, Mattice; Program Committee, F. Nicholson
(chairman ex-oflicio), S. Roody, I.
lireslaw; Membership Committee,
IT. Schwadelson (chairman exofficio), A. Nolan, L. Vedder, M.
Potter, P. Auchanipaugh.
Professors Kirllaud, Hutchinson and
Walker, and Mr. Hidley were
elected as faculty members of the
program and membership committees,
Previous to the election an interesting and spirited discussion of
the League of Nations took place.
No phase of the question was
passed over by the members, all of
whom took some part. The club
was very fortunate in the presence
Continued on page 6
CONSUMERS' LEAGUE
At a meeting of Consumers'
League, January 8, it was decided
to send a delegate to a conference
of the State Association at Utica,
January 12, for increasing membership.
"Five thousand members" is the slogan,
Elizabeth
Makin was elected to represent
State College.
The month of
February will he devoted to a
membership campaign here.
Kappa Nu Fraternity held its annual convention on January 1-4 in
the State College auditorium.
Delegates were present from K. N.
chapters in the following colleges
and universities: Columbia, New
York University, Harvard, Union,
Rochester, Buffalo, Albany Law
School, Rensselaer Polvicchnie Institute, Michigan, Boston, Western
Reserve, Pennsylvania,
On the evening of January 1 a
smoker was held in the gymnasium.
On January 2, beginning at 9 A. M.,
the lirst session was held in the
auditorium.
In the evening the
delegates went in a body to the
Temple Beth Einelh where Dr.
Mayer spoke on " What America
Expects of American College
Men." On January ? the banquet
was held at the Ten Eyck Hotel.
On January 4 I he farewell reception took place.
Though men were present from
I he leading colleges of America, all
expressed
admiral ion for our
stately and beautiful buildings and
their attractive arrangement. The
Harvard delegates were successful
Continued on page 5
JOSEPH HENRY SOCIETY
The regular meeting of the
Joseph Henry Society was held
Thursday, January 8, at 8 P. M., in
Room 1S0-A. Papers were read
by Mr, Masson and Mr. Zucliermim, the subjects being " Liquid
Air and its Properties" and "Perpetual Motion," Interesting and
amusing experiments were explained by each speaker.
Let's
have some more! And incidentally,
a large attendance would be greatly
appreciated, Remember—all that's
necessary to join the society is to
have completed physics course, 1
or LA. Visitors always welcome!
All out for J. If, S. Next meeting
February S,
.'.!! plan., for junior prom on
January 30 are in full swing. The
Ten Eyck ballroom has been hired
and-Zita's orchestra of live pieces
secured.
Helen Goldsmith has
charge of the music; Amy Clubley,
dance orders; and Beatrice Buchanan of the "bids." The other
members on the prom committee
besides Maurice llathorn, chairman, are Margaret Crime, Helen
Chase, Edna Maiieih, Florence
Filch, John McCluer, Theodore
Cassavant, and Florence Stanbro.
Bids are now open to the alumni,
to Myskania, and to the seniors
and sophomores. It is most desirous thai these people sign at
once as the number of bids is limited to 175. The price of bids is
.$,150 and must be paid before
January 27. The committee and
I he class are looking forward to
this being the most successful
event of the year.
NEWMAN CLUB
The informal dance given by the
Newman alumni, January 8, at the
Vincentian Institute, proved to be
one of the most successful social
affairs of the College year. About
125 couples were in attendance.
Louis' Harmony Orchestra furnished delightful music.
Did
everybody have a good time? Ask
them.
A Newman council meeting was
held Sunday evening, January 11,
at the home of Father Dunney.
Plans for the new year were discussed and they will be announced
later. Watch the Newman bulletin
board in the lower hall.
On Monday afternoon at the
regular meeting a delightful program was given. Miss Futterer
read; Marion Haskins, '20, gave a
vocal solo; Elizabeth O'Connel, '20,
a piano solo; Katherinc McGarralian, '21, a violin solo,
$2.00 PER YEAR
INTERESTING REPORT
OF CONFERENCE BY
STATE COLLEGE
DELEGATE
Monday, December 19, at _ 8
o'clock in the evening, Harriet
Holmes, '21; Alida liaflagh, '21;
Eunice Rice, '22; Marion Moore,
'20; Frank Bliss, '21, and Theodore
Cassavant, '21, left Albany on a
special train for \)CA .Moines, l.owa,
where they represented New York
State College at the eighth international Student Volunteer Conference for Foreign Missions.
Traveling on the same train were
delegates from Boston University, '
Weileslev. Ilolyoke, Smith, Yale,
Harvard, Brown, M. I. T , many
small colleges and countless little
normal schools in the Fast. Several rather exciting things happened before we had gone far.
First of all one of the cars just
back of us developed a hot box and
the unfortunate people in that car
were forced to sit up in a day
coach most of the night. For a
long time we were in Ontario,
Canada, — a new experience for
some of us. Here we noticed that
the houses were mostly of brick.
Reluming to the States our lirst
slop was Detroit, which we reached
Tuesday morning.
hi the afternoon we went through Battle
Creek — saw Kellogg's but not
the sanatorium —• and Kalamazoo,
which many of us had thought was
merely a name. We reached Chii cago about nine Tuesday1';evening
where we spent the rest- of the
night jerking around from the 12th
Continued on page 5
DRAMATICS CLASS IN
THREE ONE-ACT PLAYS
Albany High School Auditorium
To-morrow Night
The Dramatic and Arts Association will present the • Dramatics
Class in three one-act plays tomorrow night in the Albany High
School auditorium. The class has
been working hard under the direction of Miss Futterer to make
the plays equal to any that have
ever been presented by this College.
The lirst play on the program
will be a kitchen comedy. It derives its name, " Between the Soup
and the Savory," from the fact that
the action takes place during the
serving of dinner in a well-to-do
English family. The play centers
around the little slavey (Emily
Sccurmanl who listens longingly
to the cook and the maid discussing their "gentlemen friends."
Unable to stand the heartless remarks to her by the maid (Mae
De Rouville) any longer, the little
slavey reads a letter which she
claims was sent to her by her
young man — but to tell the rest
would spoil It. The play is full
of funny speeches, with here and
there a touch of pathos to keep the
Continued on page 6
BEAT COLGATE!
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 15, 1920
State College RODS
Vol. IV
JAN. IS, 1920
No. IS
Published weekly, on Thursdays,
during the college year, by the Student Body of the New York State
College tor Teachers, at Albany,
New York.
The subscription rate ia two dollars per year. Advertising rates
m a y b e had on application to the
Business manager.
Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the Editor before
Saturday of the week preceding
publication.
Editor-in-chief,
Kenneth P. Holben, '20
Managing editor,
Elsie W.Hanbury,'20
Business Manager,
Ellen C. Donahue, '20
Subscription Manager,
Bertha West, '20
Assistant Business Manager,
Edna Lowerree, '21
Associate Editors,
F. Reginald Bruce, '21
Florence Stanbro, '21
Mary E. Whish, *21
Marjorie Potter* '21
Louise Persons, '22
Elisa Rigouard, '22
GREETINGS
If it's not too late here's the
•' News" board wishing everybody
a Happy New Year!
We came
back too late for an issue last
Thursday, but we feel sure the material published here will amply
recompense for last week's loss,
and for the lack of publications
during the next two weeks of
exams. The next number of the
" News" will be the annual junior
issue, to be edited entirely by the
junior members of the board and
published February 5.
In the
number following will be published
the list of new " News" board
members from whom a maximum
of five sophomores will be elected
in May to positions of Associate
Editor for 1920-21. Those who are
trying for these positions should
join Press Club and get busy!
DON'T WORRY
" The fateful time approaches,
The hour is drawing near."
No, wc have been back at College only two weeks, although it
does seem a year when we think
of the " bright prospects " immediately before us. Christmas vacation was so pleasant and so generally opposed to study that the contrast now seems overwhelming.
But, in truth, should we feel that
all pleasure lies behind and only
disaster ahead? Wc have not forgotten everything we ever knew,
and besides we have taken
" exams " before. In fact, vacation
itself has helped to prepare us to be
equal to the occasion, No matter
how we have spent it — all in
pleasure, all in work, or some of
each — we are better prepared because of it! However, if wc have
made a profitable and sensible use
of those days away from College,
so much more will we, conscious of
it or not, reap their real benefit.
During each, semester wc have
small vacations — our. week-ends.
There is some work to be done
then, it, is true, but it is not as intense as through the week. Wc
surely relax, a bit, Remember: it •'J.neii, one by one the victims came,
scared, lrightened, and atraid;
is almost the end of tnis weekl
there is something doing both Fri- ' And many, thought ot earth's past
day and Saturday evening, Give
joys and wished their wills
one or both of them your support
were made.
and don't worry about exams.
i Sonic soared away o'er earth and
sea in wildly wobbling plane;
While others found that Spanish
INTERCLASS DEBATES
wooings oft are made in vain,
Some' used corn Hakes, and even
We think- u word of praise
salt, in ways entirety new;
should be accorded those who have
And others paid the great respect
been responsible for the inaugurato constitutions due,
tion of intcrclass debates. Here is The fortune .teller s cruel truth tu
something which should be entered
many eyes brought teai.,
into with enthusiasm and winch
When 'twas disclosed that e'er they
should find a permanent place in
wed 'twould be, indeed, lung
our College activities.
years.
These debates will be . a great And, so, to briny a little cheer into
factor in promoting intcrclass
these saddened hearts
rivalry. There are many students The seniors gave a Spanish play
who are loyal suppurters of their
with four to take the parts.
classes at all times, but who are un- Schiavone was the lover, and an
able to take an active part in
ardent one, 'tis true;
basketball or other forms of com- Miss Gilford was the one he loved,
netition where certain physical .atit charmiii"' maiden, too.
tributes are essential. Yet some of
Teresa Owens took the part of
these students may be convincing
trim and dainty maid;
talkers, just the oiies to hold a
A father's fond designs Count
place on a debating team. In (he
Caslcllano well portrayed.
iuture they will have a chance to To further
cheer our victims, and
prove their spirit by taking part.
to prove ourselves good hosts,
Moreover, debates will keep us
We let them have a race to see
posted on the important happenwhich one could eat the most.
ings of the day. They will teach
And when, with games and dancus the right way to reason. By
ing, the merry evening closed,
example and practice they will They'd found initiation lots more
teach us some of the essentials of
fun than they supposed,
public speaking. And lastly they
should prove of as great interest to
FEDERAL
DEPARTMENT
the faculty as to llie students and
in that way bring them into closer
OF EDUCATION
relationship with eacli other.
If the interclass debating teams
Widespread interest throughout
are a success, why not select a
the country —especially in pedaleant to represent State College? gogical circles — has been aroused
We could then compete with the by a bill, which is now before Conother colleges having teams and in gress, to establish a department of
tin's way make ourselves hotter education with a secretary in the
known. Wc could make it such an
President's cabinet, and to authorhonor to be one of. those debaters
ize the appropriation of $100,000,000
that there would be keen competi- by the Federal government to ention among all the eligible candi- courage the Stales in the promodates.
tion of education.
'21.
This hill does not mean that the
Federal government proposes to
PEDAGOGUE MATERIAL assume the control and administration of education. Such an attempt
IN
would be clearly unconstitutional,
nor would it be for the best inSubscriptions collected by Friday terest of our public schools. The
Federal government would set up
Photos, snapshots, jokes and standards and show why such
other material which are to go in standards should be accepted, but
the "Fed." must be in the hands the authority of final decision in
of the board by February first. all educational matters would reThe snapshot hounds are con- main in the States, where it is
spicuous this year by their absence. placed by the tenth amendment to
The funny flashlights, the clever the Constitution.
college pictures have not come in.
The establishment of a departAnd what about the jokes? Get ment of education with a secretary
busy, you camera fiends! If you
in the President's cabinet would
know a good story on your room- give to education the recognition
mate write it down and let us have which it justly deserves because of
it. There will be a table in the its vital importance from the standhall for collection of subscriptions point of national welfare. Through
all day Friday. The Original ads. such a department the Federal govfor the Lorey contest must be in ernment could promote education
the hands of the editor-in-chief be- as it has promoted other great infore the first week of exams is terests over which it docs not have
over.
Dr. Hastings, Professor control. Examples of promotion
Saylcs and Miss Ferine will judge without control are found in the
the contest.
Department of Agriculture and the
Department of Labor.
SPANISH CLUB
Oh, come ye youths and maidens
all, and hear me while I tell
Of all the joys of Spanish Club, for
you should know them well.
Last Friday night that dear old
room, familiar to us all,
(Tn other words. "250") was
decked out as for a ball.
Its "educated" atmosphere, was
thoroughly dispelled,
(Tho'
chemical concoctions still
were rather plainly snlellcd.)
The purple and the gold were used
to dim the lights' full'glafe,
Tu keeping with the solemn- fate of'
those who entered there,
MANUAL ARTS CONFERENCE
manual training well prepared in
professional subjects, both in the
general field of education and in
their special field.
Teachers of
technical subjects are in great demand, but notwithstanding this unprecedented scarcity of teachers
and the demand, teacher training
institutions and State .educational
authorities should not lower the
standards even temporarily.
Professor Douglass says that the
general feeling expressed here at
College is in favor of the four
years' course and its value is recognized, but since only two years
are required by the State it is hard
to get men to stay four years; also
considering that the two year men
can demand as high a salary as the
four year men.
JUNIOR MORNING
On Friday morning, December
19, the junior class entertained student assembly with a skit entitled
''After the Slcighridc." The class
marched to the junior section of
chapel to the tune of the 1921 class
song, the marshals, Katherine
Collier and Lillian Hopper, leading
the_ procession with the '21 banner,
The skit, in brief, was enacted as
follows: After the singing of several popular songs by the chorus of
young people who had just returned from a slcighridc, individual
numbers were cleverly worked in.
My fail wy _ Williams
entertained
with a piano solo and Gertrude
Southard with the violin.
The chief fun maker of the morning was an Italian fruit peddler,
"Tony," otherwise known as " Al "
Llrody, His jokes, jazz, etc., were
well received. —;;•••
The skit scored inasmuch as
everyone had the holiday spirit and
was looking forward to just such
a good time as the juniors depicted.
Those taking part were: K. Ball,
Alice Briggs, Catherine McGarrahan, Myfanwy Williams, Gertrude
Southard, Mary Whish and John
McClucr, Hugo Poll, Ted Cassavant. Tom Beniley, James P.ucci
and Al Brody.
!
t
<
X
INFORMAL TEA AT
" Y " HOUSE
An informal tea for the faculty
and members of Y. W. C, A. took
place Saturday afternoon from
three to live o'clock at the " Y "
on Madison avenue. Elsie Kennedy was chairman of the tea committee.
At the tea-table were
Miss Marion S. Van Liew, Miss
Mary E. Cobb, Miss Charlotte
Loeb and Miss Marion Card
Among the members of the
faculty or their families who attended were: Dr. and Mrs. Abram
TC. Brubacher. Dean and Mrs. Harlan II. Horner, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Thompson, Mrs. David Hutchinson, Dean Pierce, Miss E. Pcrine
Dr. Crocsdalc. Mrs. Clarence Hidley and son, Mrs. George Conwell,
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Deyo, Miss
Goldberg, Mrs. Frear, Miss A.
Cushinc, Miss Bessie Harris, Miss
B, Spilsbury, Miss Alice Jewett,
Miss Helen Bennett, Miss J. Jones
and Miss Helen Phillips. 'A large
number of the college Y. W. girls
.were also guests.
Speaking of the high standards
set for .industrial teachers at the
Manual Arts Conference at the
University of Cincinnati, Professor
Douglass, who attended the Conference, slated, that it was declared that college graduation
EXCHANGES
ought to be required for certification to teach manual training in the
high school. Professor Douglass
The " News " is glad to acknowlwas particularly interested in the edge'the
new exchanges:
report of the Committee in Certifi- Hamilton following
Rochester Campus,
cation of Special Teachers, This Newhurgh;Life,
Academy
. Graduate.
committee would have teachers of New Yorker, and Chathamite.
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S T A T E C O L L E G E N E W S , J A N U A R Y 15, 1920
Page 3
GOOD CLOTHING
HATS and SHOES
>oimnl&?fbl&iirit
—
71 Sure St
^^
Allmv
F IT'S MADE OF RUBBER W<$ HAVE IT
Gym Shoes Rubber Footwear
Bathing Caps
Rubber Coats
ALLING RUBBER
451
Motor-generator set mounted on crnno
supplying power for lifting magnet.
Silks, Woolens, Velvets and
Fine Cotton Fabrics
Electricity—
Upstairs Prices
the Master Force in Manufacturing
Eleclrically-lienled
are used in pattern shops
and elsewhere.
CO.
BROADWAY
T
HE marvels of electricity have revolutionized our
manufacturing industries. With belts and pulleys
replaced by electric motors operating automatic—almost
human— machines, many a slow and tedious process has
been eliminated. The factory worker's task of yesterday
is made pleasant by his command of this magic power.
The Crane Company's plant at Chicago—electrical throughout—is n
model of industrial efficiency. Its 10,000 horsepower of driving
energy is brought by three small wires from a distant power plant.
Then, electricity drives the machinery which handles the coal for heating, cuts the steel, sifts the sand and sorts the material—in fact does
everything from scrubbing the floor to winding the clock.
Such an institution io marvelous—superhuman—made thus by the
man-multiplying force of electricity. T h e General Electric Company
has been irutrumental in effecting this evolution. First, by developing
ouccessful electrical generating and transmission apparatus to furnish
economically this modern form of power. Secondly, through many
years of active co-operation with hundreds of manufacturers, it has
j::s3tercd tha art of applying the use of electrical energy to a multitude
of needs. And finally, through branch offices and other distributing
channels, ita producis are made accessible to all.
Courteous treatment and willingness to shou)
goads assured you here
Hewett's Silk Shop
Over Kresgea 5 and 10 cent Store
15-17 N o . Pearl St.
A l b a n y , N . Y.
I STABLISHED IB26
JAMES
MIX
JEWELER
34
SOUTH' PEARL
STREET
Fearey's
for S h o e s
2 3 No. Pearl St.
Cotrell & Leonard
M a k e r s of
CAPS, GOWNS, and Hoods
Broadway, A l b a n y
ORCHIDS
ROSES
EYRES
FLORIST
V
"SAY IT WITH FLOWER
Hauling materials with train operated
by electric automobile motors.
DA WSON'S
259 Central Ave.
FRENCH
,4
fcf*'
CLUB
French Club held its m e e t i n g on
M o n d a y , J a n u a r y 12. T h e purpose
of the m e e t i n g was to n o m i n a t e a
vice-president to replace D o r o t h e a
S c h w a r t z , • w h o h a s b e c o m e president, d u e ' to Madeleine G o n a r d ' s
r e s i g n a t i o n as a result of her
graduation
in J a n u a r y .
Elisa
Kiguoard w a s u n a n i m o u s l y elected
vice-president.
P l a n s for t h e y e a r w e r e discussed and the club i n t e n d s to give
a F r e n c h play in the n e a r future.
Marie: " You k n o w lie j u s t cried
for joy. W h y , the t e a r s were runn i n g down his c h e e k s and down
m i n e too.' 1
J a n e : " Well, all I have to say is
you must have been p r e t t y close
to him to have his t e a r s run down
y o u r checks."
JUNIORS W I N GAME
FROM SENIORS
On Monday afternoon, January
12, the senior and junior girls
played basketball.
The juniors
were atiead from almost the,very
beginning of the game, but the
seniors nut up a stiff light. Fortune seemed to he against them
for the ball could not be kept near
the senior basket for long. At the
end of the first half the score was
10 to 3 in favor of the juniors.
The score at the close of the game
wits 20 to 5 in favor of the juniors.
Seniors — Johnston, c; Mulholland, s, c ; Boline, r. f.; Adriancc,
1. f.; Gonard, r. g..; Alden, I. g,
Juniors—Rouse, c ; Parkhurst,
s, c, I Lawrence, r. f.; J. Darling,
I, f,; W. Darling, r, g,; Cummings,
1, g; Katherine Ball, substitute.
Referee, Miss Bennett, Umpire,
Miss Card.
A London scientist attributes all
human savagery to the iniquitous
habit of eating meat. At the present price of meat, savagery probably is on a sharp decline.
Buzzy: " Sav, you always seem
to have good-looking office girls.
Where do you find them?"
Boddie: " Usually in the rear
office arranging their hair."
" Your husband denies it," said
the doctor, " but isn't it true that
he smokes between meals?"
" No," replied the patient's wife.
" He eats between smokes,"
Wife: " I think that chauffeur
was under the influence of liquor."
Husband: " 1- know that he was.
He gave me back the right change,"
Our idea of ;i hero is the youth
who asks his girl what she wants
for Christmas (or her birthday),
and then buys what he pleases, ,
Men's Furnishings
She
Hat,
EYE
GLASSES
5 6 S O U T H P E A R L STREET
L. G .
SCHNEIBLE
PHARMACY
SCHOOL
SUPPLIES
ON C O L L E G E
TMUTMOOKm
OHOtKKO
OOKNER
Page 4
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY IS, 1920
SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS —JANUARY, 1920
Conf.icts Must Be Reported at the Registrar's Office
Monday, January 19
9 a. in,
Chemistry 6A
Commercial Education 3
Economics 4 . . ,
Education 41
English 1
'
English KM
German 5
History 7
Room
.-.•. ISO
208
250
110
Gym
260
10.1
200
Home Economics 4
p. in.
Monday, January 20
Tuesday, January 27
Room
Education 2
Gym
French 10
;
Industrial Education 13
Latin 1, Sections a, I)
c
Philosophy 1, Section a.
108
158
Ill
110
. 250
, 260
Economics 1
English 2
201
207
Education 5
Education 31A
250
Ill
English 4
Biology 2a
Chemistry 3
Education 40
. . . . 260
11(1
158
Fine A r t s 5
161
French 2
I'rench 6
250
108
German 6
210
Home Economies 1
Home Economics 8
History 8
Mathematics 3
Physics 5
Physics 7
160
A
Gym
201
150
1S0A
Biology 3
,-.
Englisii 10a
English IS
Government 2
History 2
I Ionic Economics 1(1....
Industrial Education 14.
Utiil 3
'
Mathematics 5
Spanish 7
260
III
101
202
iym
A
158
110
201
100
Chemistry 2
Commercial Education 7 . . . .
Greek 3
Music 1
Fine .art's 6
Home Economics 5
Nome Economics 9
161
A
160
I Ionic Economics 19
Latin 6
B
110
| -250
I 260
. . . . . . Gym
101)
Biology 2\
Economies'5
English 6
English 21
250
211
Ill)
207
Commercial Education 7a
English 9
English 20
German 3
Latin 4
Physical Education 8
208
ill
111
110
200
1(10
English 7
English 25
Philosophy 6
Physical Educali. u 4
Spanish 2
260
250
208
158
211
161
Friday, January 30
260
109
Ill
211
French 3
201
German 7
History I
I ii hie Economics II
Mathematics 10
Philosophy 4
Physical Education 9
210
202
A
100
Ill)
108
German 11
210
Greek 2
History 4
Music 5
Physical Education 13
Physics 6
Ill)
201
207
103
150
Chemistry 4
254
208
250
201
161
108
210
A
160
B
Conflicts
Conflicts
Reasonable Fear
A Bad Outlook
" Do you think Bliggius is afraid
of work?"
"Shouldn't be surprised. Anybody who has slighted work as
much as he has sh luldn'l expect
any favors fn in it."
Grandpa —And why don't you
want to go to school to-day?
Johnny —'Cause sister jilted the
schoolmaster last night.
260
210
109
160
250
161
202
A
M
110
209
Chemistry 14
Chemistry IS
Commercial Education 8
Education 34
Education 33
English 8
German 2
;
History 13
Home Economics 16
Physical Education 12
Spanish 10
Saturday, January 24
9 a. m.
Chemistry SA
Chemical Education 2.
Education 30
French 4
German 1
German 4
History 3
_
Home Economics 2
Industrial Education 10, 11
. . . 250
,,. 208
. . . 260
211
103
210
101
160
and
1S8
150
150A
First '2?<: "There's one way I
have it over Washington."
Second '2?i: " I'm your friend,
so I'll listen to it,"
First '2?,: " H e couldn't tell a lie.
I can."
Too Much for Her
Commercial Education 7b
Four-year-old Harold was going
Education 32
away an a visit. His mother had.
Education 42
been giving him final instructions
Fitic Arts 3
in table etiquette and the general
French 5
importance
of being polite.
German 10
His six-year-old sister listened
Home Economics 12
with
increasing
'disdain. Finally,
Home Economics 17
unable to bear it any longer, she
I fome Economics IS
said:
Industrial Education 4B, 7, 8
" Now, mother, if Harold's going
and 9
158
tip there to act i: damn sissy, I'm
Physics 1
ISO
.not
going."—I Ionic Sector.
Physics IA
lit.
Physiography 1
260
Spanish 9
,...:... 100
Steady Flow
Friday, January 23
Biology 5
Commercial Education 4
Education 8 ..."./.
Education 39A
English 3
Fine Arts 7
Government 4
Home Economics 3
,
Industrial Education 1, 2, 3, 5A
Latin 2
Philosophy 2
101
211
103
100
9 a. in.
Thursday, January 22
Biology 1
Chemistry 1
Commercial Education 1
Education II
English 10c
Fine Arts 1
208
Ill
250
103
IK)
ISO
Thursday, January 29
commercial Education 10
English 10c
English 16
Greek I ,,
History 14
Physical Education 3
Wednesday, January 21 ,
12
250
209
.-,.. 101
Wednesday, January 28
Tesday, January 20
Physics 2
Physic 3
250
260
101
103
A
Mathematics 4
Music 2
Education 1 . . .
Mathematics I
Mathematics 2
French 1 ;
Physical Education 11
Spanish 1
Spanish 5
,.,
Biology 6
260
Commercial'Education 67.'.'.,.'. 208
English 10b
211
English 24
, . . , , , , Ill
French 8 ..,.
100
I'rench 9
;• 101
2S0
250
208
161
211
Ill
210
200
160
109
103
" Don't you think Mrs. Gaussip
has a liquid voice?"
" Yes: the trouble is she neglects
to turn;, off the tap,"—Boston
Transcript.
CHEER CONTEST
(.'beer Contest, Jan. .15-Feb. 6.
Hand- ill cheers to Crable or
llolben now!
Judging of cheers by committee,
of three, two faculty and one
student, in Assembly,, Feb. 6.
Cash prizes for three best cheers.
QUERY
Prof's Wife: " Hear, you haven't
kissed me for a long time."
Prof: ".Are you sure? Who is
it . I've been kissing, then?"
There is a story in that woman's
face. (Yes, and she made it up,
too.)
" Arc you fond of swallows?"
" Yes, especially if they are the
kind that go with larks."
Patient Parent: " Well, child,
what on earth's the matter now?"
Young Hopeful (who has been
bathing witli his bigger brother):
" Willy dropt the towel in the water
ayd he's dried me wetter than I
was before."
An Irishman was telling his
friend of a narrow escape in the
war. The Irishman said: " T h e
bullet went into me ch'ist and came
out mc back."
" But," said the friend, " it would
go through your heart and kill
you."
" Mc heart was in me mouth at
the time," said the Irishman,
;
Who is there among our faculty
who is bringing up a David to
the belief that college professors,
must needs nrenare for t'heir future
Lady: " W h y did you take your
abode while still on earth?
boy away from school?"
Grocer: "They were ruining
him. Why, they were teaching
him that sixteen ounces make a
BEAT COLGATE!
pound."
^11
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 15, 1920
WHO'S WHO
Miss Van Mew will visit Delhi
State College of Agriculture the
week of the nineteenth to talk on
Home Economics work. The week
of the twenty-seventh Miss Van
Licw is invited to talk at the Canton State College of Agriculture.,
Omicron Nu will hold an open
meeting Friday, February 0, at
Sydcltini Hall, 390 Madison Avenue.
All students interested arc invited
to attend.
Marianne Mardcnburg, '19, assistan to the director of I Ionic Economics at Amsterdam spent the
week-end recently at Syddtim IIall,
She was a guest at' dinner at the
Practice House.
Miss Genevieve Fisher, federal
agent for the Home Economies
Education for the Federal Hoard at
Washington, I). C, will he a visitor
in the State (he week of January
19. She will he a guest at Stale
College, January 19.
Miss Alda Kelly, who is in charge,
of the vocational work in the Amsterdam schools, was a week-end
guest of Miss Bessie Harris,
Miss Edith Sarver, Superintendent of Home Economics in Schenectady, was a guest of the department last week.
K allien he and Frances Poland,
'IS, visited college this week,
Dr. If. J, LcMaistrc is seriously
ill at her home in St. Davids, Penn,
She is not expected lo resume her
work here this year.
About twenty from the industrial
department arc planning to visit
several industries in the Capitol
District between Monday and
Thursday, January 26-29,
K A P
Bob. Elliott; j.19, visited Albany
recently on his way home for the
holidays.
Announcement has been received
of the birth of a son to Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph Walker.
James A. Walker, MO, was married, January 7, lo Miss Jean
Taylor of Brooklyn.
t N K
The members of Sigma Nil
Kappa enjoyed a (healer parly at
Proctor's Grand on Monday evening following the vacation.
"A a
At the last regular meeting of
Delta Omega the following officers
were elected:
President, Marguerite Ritzer, '20;
Vice-President, Jessie Gifford, '20;
Recording Secretary, Anne Lemka,
'20;
Corresponding
Secretary,
Frances Reeks, '22; Treasurer,
Alida Ballagh, '21: Reporter, Mary
Wliish,. '21.
Bernice Bronncr, MS, announced
her engagement to Mr. Almond
Brockway, MS, of Union during
the holidays,
K N
Kappa Nu welcomes Mary E,
Hays, '22, as a pledge member,
Laura Gorman, '19, was a
visitor at the Lodge during last
week.
u Elizabeth O'Connell, '20, spent
last week-end at her home in
Poughkcepsie.
Jane Schnitzler, '20, and Marion
Raskins, '20, attended the Charity
Ball at Kingston last Friday evening,
Kappa Nu welcomes as its new
house mother Mrs, Mary Childs.
*'
f
H *
The following have been elected
officers of Eta Phi for the next
semester:
President, Florence M, Van Ness,
'20; Vice President, Anna Fortinier, '20; Recording Secretary,
Esther Cramer, '21; Corresponding
Secretary, Helen Lcilzell, '20;
Treasurer, Elizabeth Sherlcy, '21;
Reporter, Helen Van Aken, '22;
Marshal, Georgia Koch, '22.
Helen Selkirk, '21, and Margaret
Meyers, '22. were guests at the
I louse Sunday evening.
Geraldine Murray and Marjorie
Till tie called at the I louse Wednesday afternoon.
SOPHS WIN SECOND
PLACE
The sophs took the under-class
chanipionsnip of the first semester
away from the frosh by defeating
I hem in a close game with a score
of 12 to 10,
In the first half close guarding
was a feature, and neither side
scored heavily. Stewart counted
once from the field, and Dobris
twice from the foul line for the
freshmen, Keenan shot two fouls
for the sophs, milking the score 4
«|; r
to 2 in favor of the Green and
I'si Gamma welcomes into full' White at the end of this period.
In the second half the lead
membership Marjorie Finn, '20.
Miss Phillips has been pledged changed hands several times, One
to honorary membership in I'si minute before the final whistle the
score was lied at 10 all, At this
Gamma,
critical moment Keenan came
Madeline Hartwell spent a week through with a field basket putting
in New York during the Christmas the sophomores ahead, The freshvacation,
men worked hard in an effort to
Dorothy Howell spent hist week- even up, but the Blue and While
end at her home in Highland Falls, defensive held them in check. The
final score was 12 to 1(1 in favor
K A
of the sophs.
Uuib Frear, '21, Mount I lolyoke,
Sophomores
was the guest .,f Marjorie Bryant
Name and Position,
Fb, Fp, Tp.
last week,
Linck, r'f
0
0
0
Harriet Rising, '211, visited col- Keenan, If
3
4 10
lege Friday.
Miller, c
I
0
2
II immelslein, r g ..
(1
I)
0
A E <I>
Sehoenberg, Ig . . . .
0
(I
(I
Goldic Bloom, '2(1, was the guest
of Florence Schuster, '22, al her
home in Kingston.
Freshmen
Bertha Gallup, '21, and Helen
Name and Position,
Fb. Fp. To.
Goldsmith, '21, spent I be week- Stewart, rf
1
(I
2
end in Nassau with Dura Schwadel- Dobris, If
1
4
0
son.
Langdon, c
0
0
0
Jennie Roscngarde, '20 culcr- Riley, rg
1
0
2
tained die girls at lea last week, Myers, Ig
0
0
0
Fiscus, rg
0
0
0
ALPHA EPSILON PHI
CONVENTION
At the Alpha Epsilon Phi convention which look place December
25, 20, 27, 28, the tenth anniversary of the sorority was celebrated.
The convention dance was held at
the Hotel Commodore, the baiitiet, Hotel McAlpin, tea and luncheon at the home of the Grand
Dean, Lillian Hirsch, New York
City. Julia Dobris, '20, Edythe
Sherman, '20, Irene Herman, cx'20, Sarah Rabiner, MS, and Ruth
Greenblalh, '21, were in attendance from Eta chapter, Plans and
arrangements were made for the
coming year.
CHEMISTRY
CLUB
Chemistry Club held its meeting
on January 9. James Bucci gave a
paper on rubber. He gave a short
history of it and I he countries
where it is found. When first discovered no one had any use for it.
Sir Francis Drake saw the Indians
bouncing something. He took it
back to England where, they tried
to make cloth of it but were unsuccessful. Priestly found that it
erased a pencil mark, hence the
name rubber, its original name being catchue, Later England made
use of the material for coating
cloth, being unable to use it for the
cloth itself. Macintosh first discovered this use — hence, the name
of our raincoats. It came to New
England with the pilgrims — who
found that in summer it became
soft and in winter
hardened and
cracked. Good v ear in playing witli
it, tossed it accidently on the stove,
where to his surnrise it hardened
into a mass, He thus became famous in the discovery of vulcanization,
Page 5
overseas. In the afternoon section
conferences on India, China, Japan
and Latin America were held, At
these meetings the needs in the
various countries were presented,
Christian teachers are needed in all
these lauds, Saturday, afternoon
denominational meetings were held
in the different churches,
The people of Des Moines were
most cordial and hospitable and it
did us good to get the western
point of view. New York is really
not nearly as important as Chicago!
The western universities
have a spirit found nowhere in the
East. But western cities are much
dingier than our cities, for in all of
them they burn soft coal.
We started East again Sunday
night on the' Boston Special, We
spent most of Monday in Chicago
where we had a busy day sightseeing. The Union Stock Yards,
Marshall Field's, Moody Institute,
Hull House and the University ol
Chicago were the points of greatest interest. Tuesday morning we.
stopped about fifteen minutes at
Niagara, Ontario, and had a
glimpse of tlic Horseshoe Falls,
the rapids of the Niagara and the
Whirlpool,
The only thing we
slept through was the Mississippi.
After brief stops al Rochester,
Syracuse, Utica and Schenectady
we reached Albany at 8 o'clock
Tuesday night.
We were very
glad In be back home and feeling
thai Ihe task of gelling over Id the
rest of Slate College Ihe inspiration we had received was ton great
for us. The First Wednesday after
midyears we plan to have a joint
meeting of Y. M. C. A. and Y. W.
C. A,, al which a detailed report of
the Conference will be presented.
Everyone conic! We shall try to
make it interesting!
.1
4 10
_ Summary: Score al half time —
KAPPA NU CONVENTION
Freshmen 4; sophomores, 2. RefContinued from page 1
eree—Springmann.
Timekeeper, at Ihe meeting of Professor HutchFoster. Scorer—Scbiavonc. Time inson, who added greatly lo tile enof halves—Fifteen minutes.
lightenment of the members by the
information he supplied with reference lo obscure points in conREPORT OF CONFERENCE
nection with the League,
Continued from page I
The next meeting will be held on
the first Wednesday following exSt. station lo ihe Michigan Central. aminations.
Nicholson, Breslaw
We stood outside and watched the and Louise Van Norstrand are prelights of the city but no more.
paring an extremely interesting
Next morning about eleven program. All students and faculty
o'clock we reached Des Moines. members who arc interested in
Our first impression was of a huge, discussing political, social, and
dingy building with glittering economic nroblems of universal ingolden dome standing on a heap of terest arc urged to attend.
coal and ashes on the bank of a
small river, This was the Slate
A young man entered the village
Capitol! The first thing we did
was lo get registered, — a serious shop and complained to the owner
matter for some of ns who had to that a ham he had purchased there
spend the afternoon in the line a few days before had proved not
which led to the Trouble Bureau. to be good.
"The ham is all right, sir!'' inThe first meeting was most impressive. There seated in the Coliseum sisted the s'hopkeeper.
" No, it isn't," insisted the other.
were 8,000 students, representing
40 nations and 1,000 institutions. "It's bad!"
"How can that he," continued
The Canadians were massed 400
strong in the very front on the t lie shopkeeper, "when it was
main floor. New York was just be- cured only last week?"
hind on the right.
Dr. John R.
The young man reflected a moMolt struck the keynote of the ment and then suggested: "Maybe
conference at the opening session, it's had a relapse."
giving the aim of the Student
Volunteer movement, which is
Rugsy— I put one over on the
'' the evangelization of the world little
wife last night.
in this generation,"
"The old
Cat—
llosi'at?
order has changed," said Dr, Molt,
Bugsy — Well, T came home
" and it is for the students to derather late and the wife found a
termine what shall be the mould of
the new world." Every evening golden hair on my coat sleeve and
there was a splendid meeting in the asked me how it came to he there.
Coliseum. The most outstanding So I told her that T had been talkspeakers were Dr. Mott, who"pre- ing all evening to a man with a hair
sided over all the meetings. Dr. lip.
Robert E. Speer, Sherwood Eddy,
Dr. Zwcmar and Bishop McConHost: "Won't you try a piece of
nell. Their message throughout my wife's ahg'el-cake?"
was the need of purified lives conGuest: "Will it make an angel
secrated to the service of Christ of me?"
whether this service be at home or
Host: "That will depend on the
kind of life vou have led."
Page 6
DRAMATICS CLASS
Lonllliliccl from page I
interest of the audience keyed up
to itic highest point.
Tne second play will be "The
Kitsliiiglu," a tragedy. 'J. here are
some very tense moments in this
sketch. iUyianwy Williams plays
tne part ol the mother whose son
is condemned to death for conspiracy in an uprising' against the
government. Kather than let her
sou dishonor himself by "turning
state's evidence," she prevents her
(latit;iiier-in-law
(Mario
Marry)
troll) aiding him by burning tnc list
ol names of the conspirators.
'the tltircl play is in a light, fantastic vein, The authors of " The
Wonder flat" call it a Harlcc|tiinade, and very aptly did they
name it, The play deals with the
love affair of Harlequin (Mary
Grahn) and Columbine (.Alicia Ballaglij. It is through I'uchinello,
an old peddler (Alyfanwy Williams) that the two are brought
together. To Columbine he gives
a magic slipper which has the
power of attracting love. Columbine finds that he is telling the
truth, for she no sooner puts on
the slipper than the old peddler
begins making violent love to her.
Later he sells Harlequin a wonder
hat which gives the wearer the
power of invisibility, Imagine the
funny situation
when
Pierrot
(Elizabeth Archibald) who professes to despise Columbine irrst
makes love to her and then to her
maid, Margret (Elsie llanbtiry),
when the latter puts on the slipper.
Harlequin, who is invisible, is perplexed and enraged at the state of
affairs.
The trouble he causes
when he takes the hat pin out of
.Margret's lint gives him huge
satisfaction.
finally, the sudden
appearance of I'uchinello puis an
end in the love making much to
the delight of Columbine and
Harlequin, and to the infinite disgust of .Vlargret,
Costumes for the cast of "The
Wonder Mat" are being procured
from Tains, New York, the same
company that furnished the costumes in " The Yellow Jacket."
All the art work is in charge of
Mary McCarthy, '20.
Students who desire reserved
seals may obtain them by presenting their blanket tax cards and paying fifteen cents extra, Sketches
in color of Pierrot, drawn by Alary
McCarthy, will be sold during the
intermissions, This plan met with
such big success last year when
"The Yellow Jacket" was given,
that the committee in charge decided to repeat it. The sketches
will be postcard size, suitable for
stunt books,
SCIENCE CLUB
Continued from page 1
in having their college chosen as
the place for the next convention,
when they will try to outdo Thcta
chapter as hosts.
On the afternoon of January 2
Kappa Xu Fraternity, meeting in
convention in the auditorium, was
addressed by Dr. Brubacher. The
subject of Dr. Brubachcr's discourse was "The Function of the
Fraternity in the New Educational
System," and the pertinence and
timeliness of the topic invested, it
with a personal quality which
brought every word home to the
assembled delegates. The audience, comprising students of all the
leading universities throughout the
countrv and 'graduates in every
walk of life, unanimously agreed
that seldom had they heard a man
with such advanced ideas on the
great educational problem of
American Democracy, The con-
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, JANUARY 15, 1920
ciseness and simplicity which characterized the address made it possible to present the problem, its
solution, and the part of the fraternity in solving it, with a minimum of words ami of time,
Dr. llrubacher said that the educational system of to-day cannot
endure for its fundamentals are incompatible with the ideals of democracy,
It is builded on a
Special Rates to Students
foundation of human weakness, of
selfish desire.
To-day when a
high-school graduate comes to his
instructors for advice, he is told to
176 STATE STREET
.\
ALBANY, N. Y.
adopt that profession or trade
which will bring him the greatest
financial returns, the highest material success, lie is educated to
believe thai his personal welfare
alone is to be considered, and that
bis education is merely a tool '
PRODUCERS OF THE BETTER CLASS OF
wherewith he may secure advantage over his fellow men in the
B
O
O
K
L
E
T
S
, CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS A N D
business of life, When he graduates from college he is informed
D I R E C T BY M A I L A D V E R T I S I N G
that the world is at his feet to be
conquered or lost, according as he
is proficient or unversed in grasping the opportunities which all men
are constantly striving for.
Such ideas strike at the very
PRINTERS OF THE STATE COLLEGE HEWS
heart of democracy, whose platform is built on altruism, brotherhood, and love. Democracy de2 4 0 HAMILTON STREET
ALBANY, N. Y.
mands that every man think for his
own welfare, only after he has conFRANK H.
sidered that of the Slate and his
WILLIAM SPEIDEL
fellows. It requires not competition and advantage but. considera- Confectionery
EVORY & CO.
Periodicals
tion and generosity, A democracy
Cigars and Tobacco
lacking these requirements in its
Printers
educational system may endure for
CENTRAL AVE., Cor. QUAIL ST.
a year or for a century, but the
.'Ml
and
US Heaver S i r a e l
ALBANY, N. Y.
crash will come eventually for it
cannot go on indefinitely.
Specialties of interest to students and teachers.
Thus the selfish principle advo- •'CHO-SECCT INK PELLETS the last word in
cated by our institutions of learn- inks of quality. Convenience and Economy.
ing render vitally necessary radical MULTIPLEX H A M M O N D TYPEWRITERS
Wholesale Grocers
reforms, if our Republic is to be write all languages and all styles of type.
insured against otherwise inevita- Also Drawing Boards and Desk Outline Maps.
ble destruction, Any organization W. A. Choate Seating Co. 42 Hudson Ave.,
Albany, N. Y.
which purposes to foster the fra11-13 Steuben Street
ternal flame in the hearts of men,
which, by precedent and example
PHONE WEST 2334
aims to leach I bat the only true
S. E. MILfLCR
basis for a life is furnished by acts
OSHER'S GOODYEAR SHOE
of altruism and love, vindicates its
Men's Outfitter and Custom Tailor
right to exist and should be aided
REPAIR WORKS
and protected as an instrument for
34-36 MAIDEN LANE
2 8 CENTRAL AVE.
A L B A N Y . N. Y
good in a democracy,
GUSTAVE LOREY
THE HAMILTON PRINTING CO.
OPPENHEIM &Mc£WAN CO., Inc.
ALBANY, N. V.
Good Printers
Beat Colgate
SAY
I T . W I T H
F L O W E R S
The Gateway Press
Ph
2°o37Ww" 336 Central Ave.
STATE COLLEGE LOSES TO
ST, LAWRENCE
Continued from page 1
State College
Players
FB F P T P
Springmann, If
3
4
10
Masson, rf
llathom, c
Poll, Ig
Lobdell, rg
Cassavanl, rf
1
1
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
2
2
2
0
0
6
7
6 20
St. Lawrence
Players
FB FP T P
Barber, rf
,.
S
2 12
Wcllcr, If. . . . . . . . . .
3
1
7
Sheard, c
1
0
2
Atwood, Ig
1
0
2
Reynolds, rg
0
Whittimore, rg
0
DANKER
A Special Offer of 10% Ditcount
to all College Student*
40
AND 4 2
MAIDEN
LANE
0
0
0
3
23
Summary
Score at half time —State College, 11; St. Lawrence, 8. Referee
— Hill. Timekeepers — Ferguson,
H„ and Hofmann. Scorers—-La
Perre and Bliss. Time of Periods
— 20 minutes.
SEGAL'S JEWELRY SHOP
171 Central A T C ,
"OUR
BUSINESS IS GROWING"
KATTREIN
Engraver Printer
Wadding Stationary a
Specialty
45 Maiden Lane,
THE
Albany. N. Y .
FARRINGTON
flinimj Snout
Home Cooked Food
174 S T A T E ST.,
- ALBANY, N. Y.
Stationer
Albany, N. Y.
0
10
Diamonds • Watches • Jewelry
National Simplex Note Book* Coven
and Filler*
Gritting Card* for All Occasion*
SUtioasry -- NSYSII « Eatraviai
Mrs. Leake's Shop
78 Maiden Lane
HORTON & WADE. Inc.
Specialist! in Equipping Complete
Lunch Rooms and Cafeterias
"Everything Under One Hoof"
615 BROADWAY, ALBANY, N. Y.
FOR SALE
One suit of Evening Clothes
One Gown and Hood, Doctor
of Philosophy.
Inquire 851 Myrtle Ave.
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