State College News II No. 19 RECITAL OF WAR POETRY

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State College News
NEW
VORK. S T A T E COLLEGE FOR
ESTABLISHED
VOL.
II
No. 19
RECITAL OF
WAR POETRY
Dr. Thompson, Assisted by Mrs.
James Taafe, Entertains
Promethean
One of tlic most enjoyable as
well as profitable evenings ever
spent by tlie society, was at its
last meeting, Thursday evening of
last week. The entire program
.was in charge of Dr. 11 arotd
Thompson, of the English department, assisted by Mrs. James
Taafe, alto soloist at the First
Presbyterian church, The subject
ol the evening was " War Poetry."
President Margaret Shcvlin presided at the meeting. After announcing that the next meeting of
Promethean would occur on March
seventh, and that election of officers for the second semester would
take place at that time, she introduced Dr. Thompson. By' way of
introduction, Dr. Thompson said
that he did not intend to present a
lecture, but rather wished to
present a few examples of the different types of poetry that the war
has brought out among the Allies.
As a keynote to the whole program, Dr. Thompson read Galsworthy's " Courage." Next followed type poems representing the
spirit of each of the countries on.
this same subject. England was
best represented by Kipling, whose
poetry first gave us the word
" l i n n " in its present usage, Dr.
Einley's poem, " The Red Cross
Spirit Speaks," is an excellent illustration of the American spirit.
After this was read, Mrs. Taafe
sang the selection, as set to music
by Horatio Parker of Yale, Two
French poems, " Vive L'Francc"
and "The Soul of Joan D'Arc,"
were next read. The latter expresses the spirit woman has shown
throughout the war. To further
illustrate this point, Mrs. Taafe
Y.
BY TUB
CLASS O F
TEACHERS
1918
ALBANY, N. Y., FEBRUARY 27,
Professor Risley Addresses
Student Body
Tries Interesting Historical Experiment—William The
Second's Verdun Address
On Friday morning, February
22d, Student Assembly was opened
by Doctor Brubacher. "America "
was sung. Doctor Brubacher then
introduced Professor A. W. Risley,
who had been fittingly chosen to
speak to the student body at the
joint commemoration of Washington's and Lincoln's birthdays,
Professor Risley's subject was
"Made in America." He pleaded
for the celebration of all national
holidays, and urged especially the
study of Lincoln's Gettysburg address each 12th of February.
fie declared that a new emphasis on our Revolution could be
gained from the present experience of Russia with Bolshcviki. He
styled Washington " a very prosperous looking gentleman," saying, " I t is a part of our valuable
inheritance (hat our Revolution
was not left to the lower classes,
that a prosperous looking gentleman with other prosperous ones
like Alexander Hamilton, were our
leaders. We had our Bolsheviki,
soap box orators, radicals desiring
a change, little matter what sort,
the populistic element, but these
were not the class of men to whom
we entrusted the task of forming
an enduring government. Let us
be proud of the things we have,
no longer minimizing the dignity,
conservatism and solid information
of a Washington, nor the constructive financial genius of a
Hamilton."
Mr. Risley then tried the historical experiment of
placing
Continued on page 4
words of William the Second in
Washington's mouth, with the
effect of bringing into bold relief
PUBLIC LECTURES
the difference between the two
men.
"History is generally and
ON DEMOCRACY safely interpreted
from the known,
but the known emerges from obPresident Brubacher has ar- scurity when viewed in the light of
ranged for a series of lectures on history as it was not, but as it
Democracy to be given Fridays at surely might have been. Take
four o'clock in the College • Audi- away from Washington his sound
torium, through the months of common sense and lack of self
March, April and May. They will seeking, place upcurling mustaches
be given by various professors at upon him, set him aloft as a sharer
the college, as follows:
with God of the secrets of the uniMarch 8 —"Democracy and In- verse, fill him with undying and undividual Freedom," Dr. Leonard pitying ambition, and instead of the
W, Richardson.
fatherly admonition and wise adMarch 15—"The Origins of vice of the. Farewell Address, you j
Democracy,"
Professor
David will have the bombast of a WilHutchinson.
liam the Second.
Hear the
March
22 —" Democracy:
A changed Washington, ' You AmeriStudy in Comparative Govern- cans have only one will, and that
ment," Professor Adna W. Risley. is my will; there is only one law,
April s — " T h e Development of and that is my law there is only •
Democracy in the United States," one master in. this country, and
Air. Clarence A. Hidley.
that is I. Whoever opposes me,
April 12 — "Social Democracy," I shall crush to pieces.' The lanProfessor Adam A. Walker.
guage of liberty is far different.
April 10 — "Education in a The real Washington says, ' I hold
Democracy," President A. R. Bru- the maxim no less applicable to
public than private affairs, that
bacher.
April 26— "Utopian Democracy," honesty is always the best policy.'
Honesty is so 'Made in America'
Professor Richmond H. Kirtland.
May 3 — " Democracy and World that it takes the place of necessity
in Germany."
Peace," Dean Harlan H, Horner.
Democracy has become the warWashington's policy
cry of the Allies. America's en- of Considering
neutrality, and the portions of
Continued on Page 4
the Farewell Address which are the
$1.50
1918
present-day basis of non-intervention, Mr. Risley said, " Non-intervention is self determinism, the
right of each people to develop in
its own way without outside interference.
" Viewing the present emphasis
on the personality of rulers, who
shall say that with a man of the
dictator stamp in the highest
office, with a military personage
leading a disaffected army, the
whole background of the Revolution might not have been disregarded? It staggers the imagination to think of Washington as the
forerunner of Napoleon Bonaparte
and of William Hohonzollcrn, so
different from them was his whole
character. Let us glory in our
possession as a national heritage of
the memory of the plain, country
gentleman, who longed for his estates even while in office, and who
rejoiced to go back to his farm,
his horses, his dogs, as soon as release from office came.
"A slight view of history as it
was not makes us glad that our
Father of his Country was neither
a radical nor a 'royalist."
Mr. Risley then regarded Lincoln in the light of present developments, saying that Lincoln's
attitude toward Seward's early advice now assumes a wholly new
aspect. " Seward urged Lincoln
to make foreign war as a cure for
internal dissension, a policy in
favor with foreign rulers from
Frederick the Great through Bismarck, to William the Second.
But apparently this is not the kind
of policy made in America, for
Lincoln never gave it a second
thought. The sole recourse of
Germany was totally foreign to
Lincoln's character and to American genius."
The Gettysburg Address was
lauded for its universality, its
special application to democracy
today — particularly • as Lincoln
spoke in the closing sentence,
"That this government of the
people, by the people, and for the
people shall not perish from the
earth." Mr. Risley, then, by a daring paraphrase of the address emphasized Lincoln's patriotism. "Let
us imagine that the Kaiser is delivering an address at the battlefield of Verdun, spoken with his
customary bombast, irreverence,
and lack of respect for popular
government, It would have been
a physical and psychological impossibility for him to have thought
out one line of an address of the
sort Lincoln gave. Lincoln's was
made in America.
" On . such an occasion as we
have imagined, William the Second
might have spoken thus: 'Twoscore and eight years ago, my ancestors brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in
autocracy and dedicated to the proposition that I am it. Now we are engaged in a great illegal war, testContinued on page 4
PER YEAR
PRATT WINS
FROM STATE
Purple and Gold Five Suffers 34 to
25 Defeat in Hard Fought Game
Superior passwork and shooting
enabled the Pratt Institute quintet
to defeat the defenders of State
College in the Albany High
School gymnasium, Saturday last.
Pratt's victory was a spectacular
one, four of their field baskets
being made from midcourt. The
contest was one of the best ever
seen on the High School court,
and although the home team went
down to defeat it was not until it
had put up the hardest kind of a
fight and displayed a good brand
of basketball.
The First Half
Pratt was the first to score,
Captain Van Leyen scoring; from
the foul line within a minute after
the whistle blew. Fitelson soon
followed witli a field basket, and
" Little " Fitz made the first score
for State College by dropping one
in from the foul line. Both teams
added to their score by baskets
from the penalty line, With the
score 8-3 against State, Fitz came
through with three more points
from the foul line. The Brooklyn
boys then cut loose and scored
six field baskets from different
parts of the court. Barry scored
from midcourt and Fitz soon followed with three more counters
from the foul line, Fitz gave a
Continued on page 3
VARSITY GOES ON NEW
YORK TRIP THIS
WEEK
Purple and Gold to Play Manhattan, Pratt and Stevens
Manager Sutherland will take
his basketball warriors on their
New York trip this week. The
boys will leave Albany early
Thursday noon, and play Manhattan in New York Thursday
night. Coach Maroney predicts a
victory over Manhattan, because
the Manhattan-State College game
played _ here was won by only a
two-point margin. Coach Maroney
deserves great credit for the big
improvement in the team since the
beginning of the season. He has
worked wonders with the available
material at the College. Speaking
of the matter recently, he said,
"They arc the best bunch of fellows I ever handled. They're always fighting and ready to take
any suggestions, and that counts a
whole lot."
Friday night will find the State
College defenders lined up against
Pratt Institute. Previous to their
northern trip, the Pratt five had
won nine straight games.
Captain Fitz and his men will
clash with Stevens Institute Saturday night. The Hoboken quintet
have been meeting with great success this season, having won
eleven straight games.
The trip will certainly be a
trying one, as three games in a
row is_ hard for any team. However, if the team keeps up the
record of its recent northern trip, the
best record made of all trips taken,
the time and effort will have been
well spent.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 27,1918
Page Two
STATE COLLEGE NEWS
February 27,1918
Vol. II
No. 18
Published weekly, on Wednesdays, during the college year, by the
Committee on Publishing a College Weekly Newspaper, New York State
College for Teachers, Albany, N.Y.
The subscription rate is one dollar and a half a year. Advertising
rates may be had on application, Articles, manuscripts, etc., intended
for publication must be in the News Box before Saturdays of the week
preceding publication.
SENIOR EDITORS
Stanley Heason, '18
Kathryn Cole,
Mildred L. McEwan, '18
REPORTERS
Dorothy Banner, '20
Bcrnice Bronner, '19
Edward Springmann, '20
Caroline E. Lipes, '19
Dorothy Wakcrly, '20
Donald Tower, '19
Managing editors of this issue:
Bernice Bronner, '19
Donald Tower, '19
NOTICE
The resignation of Alfred Miller,
'19, has been received and accepted
by the " State College News"
Board. Edward Springmann, '20,
has been elected to act as reporter
of athletic affairs.
NEW PLAN FOR DISTRIBUTION OF THE
" NEWS "
Owing to some dissatisfaction
with the present manner of weekly
distribution of the " News," a new
method is adopted with the current issue. As soon as received
on Wednesdays, the " News " will
be placed on tables outside the
Publication Office.
From this
supply each student may take the
copy he or she is entitled to, without going through the formality of
presenting a blanket tax card. The
Board advances this plan to solve
the present problem, and feels
assured that the individual and
collective honor of the students
will be equal to the occasion.
Faculty copies will be delivered as
usual.
TO CONTRIBUTORS
was sounded at half time, the
Seniors were leading 9-4.
The second half opened with the
Freshmen fighting furiously for
the lead. Field baskets by Rabiner,
Bucci and Hawthorne soon placed
them there by a one point margin,
Dewey Townscnil tied the score by
caging the ball from the foul line.
The Seniors again took the lead
when Dewey scored again from the
foul line. Rabiner tied the score,
making it 11-11, by counting from
the foul line just before the whistle
blew for the second half.
Owing to the fact,that the score
was tied at n all, an extra five
minute period hud to be played.
Sauerbrei brought the Seniors
ahead on a neat one-hand shot
from the side of the court. Rabiner
immediately tied things up again
by scoring a field basket for the
Frosh. Dewey dribbled the length
of.the court and gave the Seniors
a two point lead. The best the
Frosh could do, before the final
whistle sounded, was to score from
the penalty line, making the final
count, Seniors, rs; Frosh, 14.
SENIORS
Fb. Fp. Tp.
Pearlman, rf
o o o
Lobdell, I f . - r g . . . . . . . . . 1 o 2
Walker, c
0 o 0
Townsend, rg.-lf
3 3 9
Sauerbrei, Ig
1 2 4
SENIORS WIN EXTRA
PERIOD CONTEST
Total
S S 15
FROSH
Fb, Fp. Tp.
Rabiner, rf
2 3 7
Link, If
0 o o
Hawthorne, c
2 1 5
Bucci, lg
1 o 2
Storey, rg
0 o o
Total
5 4 [4
Score at half time — Seniors, 9;
Frosh, 4. Referee, Powers. Timekeeper, Hofman. Fouls, Seniors,
8; Frosh, 9.
Frosh Drop to Last Place in
Inter-Class Games
JUNIORS WIN FROM
SOPHS
Monday, the eighteenth, marked
the first big change in the standing of the teams in the inter-class
games. The Frosh met the Seniors
and went down to defeat in the
hardest fought game ever seen on
the court.
The Seniors were the first to
score and they held their lead
throughout the first half. Townsend, Lobdell and Sauerbrei were
responsible for the Senior counts
in this half. Hawthorne, the big
Freshmen center, scored the only
Frosh points, When the whistle
Victory Gives Them First Place
in League
It is requested that anyone handing in articles for publication containing names of present or former
students, shall add after each name
the class numerals of the person.
Owing to lack of space the College Calendar is omitted from this
issue. The Calendar will be found
posted on both bulletin boards.
The Juniors took the lead in the
inter-class league by winning from
the Sophs Wednesday, February
20th.
-•
The Juniors were the first to
score, Masson putting them in the
lead by a field basket. Castallano
made the score 3-0 by caging the
ball from the foul line. Captain
Lobdell evened things up by making a field basket and counting
from the penalty line. Castallano
put the Juniors one point to the
PSI GAMMA WEEK-END
good by scoring another free
throw. Lobdell came through with
Psi Gamma celebrated her 20th
his second field basket p'utting the
Sophs in the lead. During the anniversary the week-end of February
22d. A patriotic dance innext five minutes the ball traveled
back and forth across the floor. troduced the festivities on WashLobdell was the only man that ington's birthday. In the receivscored in this half for the Sophs, ing line were: Nina Johns, presiwhile Masson and Castallano did dent; Lillian King, vice-president;
all the scoring for the Juniors. Miss Nina Farnsworth, Mrs. A. A.
Bill Merchant, Soph forward, was Walker and Miss Eva Wilson.
The alumnae who attended were:
ordered from the game just before
the half ended, for committing Elizabeth McMillan, '08, Esther
four personal fouls. The score at Eveleigh, '15, Laura Smith, Marhalf time was 9-6 in favor of the garet Christ, Lucile Hale, Elizabeth Curran and Olive Horning,
Sophs,
All the active members were
The Juniors came right back at '17.
present.
the Sophs and scored ten points
At 1 o'clock on Saturday a
against two for the Sophs. Masson and Castallano featured for luncheon was served at the Knickthe Juniors while Captain Lobdell erbocker. The table was decorated
in sorority colors, blue and gold,
was the mainstay for the Sophs.
roses forming the center
JUNIORS
Fb. Fp. Tp. yellow
piece.
Masson, If
4 3 n
Toasts
given by Nina
Castallano, rf.-lg
0 5 5 Johns, the were
sorority president; Miss
Whitney, c
o o 0 Jane
of the State College
0 0 0 faculty,Jones
Tobias, rg.-rf..
Miss Elizabeth Curran, '17,
Chessen, lg.-rg
o o 0 Miss
Ruth Patterson, '19, Miss
Miss Doris
Totals
4 8 16 Sally Roody, '20.
SOPHS
Fb. Fp. Tp. Sweet, '18, acted as toastmistress.
The luncheon was enjoyed by 36
Merchant, rf
0 0 0
members of the sorority, including
Carson, If
0 0 0 alumnae
and faculty members.
Lobdell, c
2 5 9
alumnae present were: Mrs.
Hakes, rg
0 o 0 The
Mabel
Headdon,
Miss ElizaFcrgerson, lg
0 o 0 beth McMillan, Troy;
Miss Marjorie
Springmann, rf
r o 2 Vedder, Schenectady;
Florence
Witteweih, Utica; Elizabeth CurTotals
3 5 " ran, Olive Horning, Johnstown;
Score at half time — Sophs, 9; Margaret Christ, Amityvillc; Laura
Juniors, 6.
Referee, Powers. Smith, Manhasset; Lucile Hale,
Scorer, Mildred McEwan.
Coopcrstowii; Helenc Van Ness,
Greenwich. The faculty members
Standing of Teams
were: Mrs. Walker, Mrs. Douglas,
Played Won Lost P. C, Miss Wilson and Miss Jones.
Juniors
3
3
o 1,000
Sophs
3
2
1 .667
Seniors
3
1
2 .333
ALUMNI VISITORS
Frosh
3
0
3 .000
Vacations
on
Washington's
birthday brought several alumni
PHI BETA KAPPA
members back to college over the
MEETING
week-end. Wc were glad to welcome two honor men, both from
The Upper Hudson Association Camp Dcvens: Claude H. Hubof Phi Beta Kappa, of which Dean bard, formerly of the faculty, and
Horner is president, will hold its John Becker, '17, . Other visitors
annual meeting at the College on were: Edward Long, '17, Helen
Saturday evening, March i'6th. A Pratt, '17, Anna Nelson, 17, Milpublic meeting will be held in the dred White, '17, Margaret Christ,
College Auditorium at 8 o'clock '17, Olive Horning, '\y, Marjorie
in the evening, which will be ad- Smith, '17, Thcda Mosher, '16 and
dressed by Professor Albert Bush- Amy Rcxtrew, '16.
nell Hart, of Harvard University,
on the subject " Obstacles to
Peace." Students are invited so STATE COLLEGE OBSERfar as the capacity of the AudiVES UNIVERSAL DAY
torium will permit. Those who
OF PRAYER FOR
are doing major work in history
and in English will find the meetSTUDENTS
ing of special interest.
After the public meeting the
The officers of the World's
annual business meeting of the Student Christian Federation apassociation will be held in the pointed Sunday, February 24th as
rotunda of the main building, and the universal day of prayer for
a reception will be tendered by the students, Our college through the
College to the members and Y. W. C. A. observed this day of
specially invited guests.
prayer by a meeting of the students
in the College Auditorium, Sunday
Maud Rose led the
Both Dr. Brubachcr and Dean afternoon.
Pierce are attending the sessions meeting. Mary Whish sang.
of the N, E, A. Superintendent's
Many college students have anCouncil at Atlantic City this week. swered the cail to arms and some
are " over there" now. Those
Prof. A. A. Walker and Miss students remaining behind must do
Jane Jones made addresses at the all in their power to "keep the
Teachers' Conference at Kingston, home fires burning." It was to
Thursday and Friday of last week. keep our minds open to this fact
that the day of prayer was held, to
pray for the students " over there,"
OFFICIAL NOTICES
and over here, and for all those
who are leaders and teachers of
Juniors are requested to consult students.
the official bulletin board for notice
of appointments with Dr. HathaJOKES FOR THE
way for physical examination.
PEDAGOGUE
Students are requested to take
the seats assigned them in the
Auditorium at the Friday assemPut your contributions to the
bly, and to make no changes with- Joke Department of the Pedagogue
out the permission of Miss Pierce, in the Echo Box.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 27,1918
Cotrell & Leonard
Makers of
CAPS, GOWNS, and Hoods
Broadway, Albany
College Supplie*
Engraved Cards and Booklets
for all occasions
Fine Stationery, Magazines and
Confectionery
Brennan's Stationery Store
Washington and No. Lake Aves.
Near Stat*
College
KYLE ADAMS SPEAKS
CAMOUFLAGE
T h u r s d a y afternoon the Y, W .
girls were treated to fifty minutes
radiation of Kyle Adams' fire and
e n t h u s i a s m . H e r talk was a challenge to t h e y o u n g w o m a n h o o d of
America. She said there was no
need for girls to lament inability
to do their bit, with a khaki uniform to r e w a r d their efforts. Miss
A d a m s s h o w e d t h a t the individual
c o n t r i b u t i o n of each A m e r i c a n girl
is j u s t as valuable and j u s t as
necessary as t h a t of the A m e r i c a n
man. T h e speaker urged unity of
purpose and d e e p e n i n g of p e r s o n a l
consciousness and sincerity.
A
very r o u s i n g climax w a s reached
when Miss A d a m s led the girls in
singing " O v e r T h e r e . " A novel
c h o r u s with the t h e m e " O v e r
H e r e " w a s supplied
by
Miss
Adams.
W e all k n o w that our friend
Billic M c E . has b e c o m e all e x p e r t
dancer.
But w h a t kind of dance
would result in a sprained wrist?
At The
PINE HILLS PHARMACY
1116 Madiion Ave., Cor. Allen St.
You receive
prompt
and courteous
as ufe// ae the beat drugs and
Neckwear
our
Specialty
^ nAUSEN,Jr.
JOHN H.
Cents
Open Eteningi
Furniiher
155 # CENTRAL AVE.
Phone West 2 8 2 3
P. H. RIDER
CLEANSER AND DYER
" T h e Cleaner that Cleans"
10S Central Aye.
IRELAND AND HER
LITERATURE
service
merchandise.
Albany, N. Y.
Agents For
H a r t , Shaffncr (k? M a r x
Clothes
R e g a l Shoes
&<wtir&t>XffcXXmm
John J. Conkey
NEWS DEALER
Cigars, Candy and Stationery
PRINTING and DEVELOPING
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES CAMERA FILMS
2 1 5 Central Ave.
N. Y. Phont We it 3937
At N e w m a n Club m e e t i n g F r i day at 4:10 in .Room 21 r, P r o f e s s o r
J o h n M a h a r will speak on " Ireland
and Her L i t e r a t u r e . "
Professor
Mahar has for m a n y years m a d e a
special .study of the literature and
history of I retail ,.•
GIRLS' BASKETBALL
T h e S o p h o m o r e team won a
second victory from rgar in a fast
g a m e played last T u e s d a y .
The
F r e s h m e n succeeded in m a k i n g
only one score in the first half, but:
picked up in the second half. Mary
Austin as forward, and Winifred
D a r l i n g as guard, did the m o s t
notable
work
for
their
team.
A m o n g the S o p h o m o r e s ,
Ellch
Donohue's sure shots from the
field deserve g r e a t praise.
Miss
Gray was referee.
T h e score at
the close w a s 23-10. T h e line-up
was as follows:
Sophomores — Florence
Holme
and Ellen D o n o h u e , f o r w a r d s ; Lsabcllc J o h n s t o n and Madeline Cummings, c e n t e r s ; Sarah
Adriance
and' M a r g a r e t Returning, g u a r d s .
F r e s h m e n — I s a b e l Neville and
Mary
Austin,
forwards;
Jessie
D a r l i n g and M a r y Grail 11, c e n t e r s ;
Helen O'Brien and Winifred Darling, g u a r d s .
IMPORTANT I
ff
you
have
changed
your
schedules, record these changes on
your card in the office.'
ATTENTION, SENIORS!
Senior Class meeting in auditorium, Friday, at 12:25. Come prepared to order your announcements.
PRICE, SERVICE AND QUALITY PRINTERS
'Printers 0/ Slate College SVjewj
HAMILTON PRINTING
COMPANY
240
ALBANY, N. Y.
HAMILTON STREET
Page Three
LADY WINDERMERE'S
FAN
** *
E a r l c says Bunnie is good-looking when she gets s o r e - — b u t we
think she's sore all the time.
** *
Not c o n t e n t with k n i t t i n g for
soldiers, K a t e Cole is s e n d i n g her
own w e a r i n g apparel to serve in
the aviation d e p a r t m e n t .
** *
Great t h i n g s are c o m i n g in
Publication Office.
Did you
the caps and g o w n s go flying
T u e s d a y ? But watch for the
provements!
the
see
out
im-
** *
W a n t e d by K A P — A new watch
d o g to take the place of L a r r y McMahon, the sleeping sentinel.
Don't forget, March first, Miss
F u t t e r e r will read " Lady Winderm e r e ' s Fan " in the College Auditorium, Tickets are now on sale.
T h e r e are no reserved seats, Get
y o u r tickets now from Margaret
Flynn, Marion Beale, Alida Ballagh, or at the table in the hall,
W e d n e s d a y , T h u r s d a y and Friday.
PRATT WINS
Continued from page I
wonderful exhibition of foul shooting in this half, by caging the ball
for nine straight baskets.
The
score at half time was 21-13 in
favor of Pratt.
State Stages Come Back
Mabel Albee s u g g e s t s that the
study of Christian Science be added
to the curriculum of State College,
T h e State College boys came
back and played a far better game
in the second half, being outscored by the visitors by only one
point.
Nicholson was substituted
at center, for the Purple and Gold,
and the change resulted in a big
i m p r o v e m e n t in the team's playing.
Fit?, and Barry scored six
points between them, and came
within two p o i n t s of tieing the
score.
Van Leyeu and Fitelson
added to the score and the P r a t t
boys gradually drew away from
the h o m e team.
Barry dribbled
half the length of the court and
scored his third field basket of the
g a m e . Van Leycn and Eschholz
followed with m o r e points for the
visitors. Eschholz, the big P r a t t
center, was ordered from the game
for c o m m i t t i n g four personal fouls.
Fitz came t h r o u g h with a field
basket for Stale and Van Leyen
added three m o r e points for P r a t t .
Polt was ordered from the game
for c o m m i t t i n g
four
personals.
B a r r y scored the last field basket
for State, and R o g e r s , a P r a t t substitute, ended the g a m e with a
field goal.
In Psych 1 — W e live only in the
present. T h e logical p r e s e n t is a
geometrical plane dividing past and
future. W e don't live!
Van Leyen and Fitelson, the
fast P r a t t
forwards, scored 26
points between them.
Fitz and
Barry did all the scoring for the
P u r p l e and Gold.
* **
Prof. ^ K.—" Miss Flynii, continue
this discussion."
M a g g i e — " I can't talk today."
Prof. K. — " I t must be painful
for you."
*
*
+
W h a t happened to the scrub
team that it g o t stuck at Castleton,
Larry?
** *
T h e a t t e n t i o n of the J u n i o r s is
called to the fact that this i s . t h e
last T h u r s d a y of the m o n t h . Can
you camouflage P a r k e r ?
** *
W e w d n d c r if personal need is
causing the faculty to a g i t a t e spelling as a r e q u i r e m e n t next year.
** *
Oh, g i r r u l s ! l i a s D e w e y asked
you to sew the n u m b e r on his
basketball j e r s e y ?
** *
** *
PRATT
W h e n the D a y is D o n e
I have eaten a bale
Of spinach and kale,
And I've never raised a row,
I have swallowed a can
Of moistened bran
And I feel like a brindle cow.
1 am t a k i n g a snack
F r o m the old h a y s t a c k
In the e v e n i n g s h a d o w s gray.
And I'm glad, you bet,
At last to g e t
T o the end of a meatless day.
—Ex.
My H o s i e r y
F r o m t h e Pu'blic L e d g e r
( W i t h the usual apologies)
T h e h o u r s I spent on thee, dear
sock,
Are as a s t r i n g of purls to me.
I count them o'er by the weary
clock,
M y hosiery, m y hosiery.
First t w o I knit, then t w o I purl,
And r o u n d the leg I slowly reel;
Now joyful paens to the heavens I
hurl,
I've turned t h e heel.
Oh, k n o t t e d ends that scratch and
burn,
Oh, stitch t h a t dropped, uneven
row —
I kiss each blight and strive at last
to learn
T o reach the toe, s w e e t h e a r t , to
reach the toe.
N a m e . Pos.
Van Leyen, rf
Fitelson, If
Eschholz, c
Meyer, rg.-lg
Davis, lg.-rg
R o g e r s , If
Barr, Ig
Totals
INSTITUTE
Fb, Fp. T p .
6
6 18
4
0
8
2
o
4
0 0 0
r
o
2
1 o
2
0
0
o
14
6
34
STATE COLLEGE
N a m e . Pos.
Fb. Fp. T p .
F i t z g e r a l d , rf
2 13 17
B a r r y , If
4 0
8
Cohen, c
0
0
0
Curtin, r g
0 0 0
Polt, lg
0
0
0
Nicholson, c
0 o
o.
Lichtcnstcin, lg
0
0
0
Totals
6
13
25
S c o r e at half time — P r a t t 2 1 ;
State 13. Referee, Hill.
Scorer,
Van Lobdcll. T i m e r , Ed. Springniann. Fouls, P r a t t , 14; State, 11.
T i m e of periods, 20 minutes.
Milne H i g h Defeats College Frosh
In a p r e l i m i n a r y contest the
Milne High School five defeated
the College F r o s h , the score being
16-7. T h e High School boys were
the first to score, and they were
never in danger of being overtaken.
H a w t h o r n e played a good game
for t h e F r o s h , while Metzger and
M c D o n o u g h s t a r r e d for Milne.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, FEBRUARY 27,1918
Page Four
RECITAL OF WAR POETRY
Continued from page I
sang
the popular song, " M y Boy."
472 to 478 Broadway
The selection, " Wife of Flanders,"
portrays the part that
Hats and Shoes for Men wonderfully
Belgium has played throughout the
past
three
and
one-half years.
Womens Outer and
The next natural division was
poetry describing incidents of the
Under Garments
war. To illustrate this kind,v several
selections were read. Wilfred
•Woman's Footwear, Furs
Gibson's " Between the Lines," and
Robert
W. Service's " Fletirette "
and Fur Coats
were best.
The spirit of peace is always
Fine Qualities — Reasonable Prices
manifest in the minds of people
during wartime. The poetry of this
Leave your orders for Text Books type which has come out during
the present struggle is hardly the
to b e used the next Semester
usual type. Instead of reading any
of this, Dr. Thompson accompanied Mrs, Taafe in a vocal solo,
" Grant Us Peace," a modern revision of a seventeenth century
College Pharmacy
composition.
In closing, Dr. Thompson spoke
Corner of Western and Lake Avenues
of the universal interest in a very
few
masterpieces which have been
Compare our Candies with others and
given to the public. The real
Taste the difference
masterpiece of this period seems to
be the work of Lawrence Binyoun,
an English poet, entitled, " The
Spirit'of England." The poem is
HOME-MADE
into three great moveICE CREAM and CANDIES divided
ments, as follows: " T h e Fourth of
129 Central Avenue
August," " T o Women," and " F o r
the Fallen." Selections from each
M. S. KEENHOLTS
of these were read, and then Dr.
Thompson played the symphony
Groceries,
written by Sir Edward Elgar for
poem. The poem with its
Fruit, Vegetables, etc. the
musical setting is certain to become an immortal classic.
Teas and Coffees a Specialty
Cotrell & Leonard
SCHNEIBLE'S
KRAEMER'S
253 Central Ave.
Telephone
ESSEX LUNCH
The Restaurant favored by
College students
Central Avenue
2 blocks from Robin Street
STUDENTS
For Laundry Work quickly
and well d o n e come t o
CHARLEY JIM
71 Central Ave.
Buy Books for the
Soldiers
W e will deliver books deposited
in our "Soldier Box"
LECTURES ON DEMOCRACY
Continued from Page !
trance into the war focussed the
attention of the civilized world
upon us and upon our governmental ideals. Our Democracy, as
championed by President Wilson,
has been accepted as a worthy
ideal by England, France and
Italy; and Russia is even now
groping about in the darkness of
.revolutionary chaos after this
same Democracy, Even Germany
comes forward with a claim that
she too has heard of Democracy
and even insists that she has made
it part of her system. The world
is fighting for Democracy.
But what is Democracy? Can an
ifjeal of government embrace such
diversity of forms as are represented by the Allies' governments?
The lectures on Democracy by
the State College faculty will try
to answer some of the questions
that promptly arise when we think
of Democracy. The speakers will
try to interpret the various phases
of the subject, and will surely
stimulate our thinking on this
momentous matter.
rather for us to he here dedicated
to the great task remaining before
us — that from these honored
words you take increased devotion
to that task for which I have not
yet given the last full measure of
words; that you here highly resolve that I shall not have spoken
in vain; that this nation, under ME,
shall have a new birth of autocracy; and that government of the
Hohenzollcrns, by the Hohenzollcrns, and for the Potsdam gang,
shall not perish from the earth.'
" Let us thank God at least twice
a year for the blessing of living in
a country whose heroes are Washington and Lincoln, not Frederick
the Great and Bismarck."
Mr. Risley then spoke of the
difficulty of Woodrow Wilson's
present task, "Washington's problem was to make a nation free, Lincoln's to keep a nation intact, But
Wilson must preserve a nation
from a foreign foe, and so manage
its internal affairs that we may be
leaders of foreign thought as we
always have been."
Mr. Risley deplored the wholesale optimism into which so many
of. us have been lulled, and urged
that we "fight the kind of fighting
that is made in America."
In closing, Mr. Risley suggested
that each of us, as he or she enters
our college building, shall salute
the flag that was made in America.
"The stars in that flag stand for
our undivided country, the red for
the blood shed by the boys of yesterday and today, the white for the
purity of our purpose, the blue for
the souls of men like the valiant
Washington and the martyred
Lincoln."
CHEMISTRY CLUB
The next meeting of the Chemistry Club will be held on Friday,
March i, 1018, in Room 250 at 4:15
p. m. The subject for the meeting
will be " Current Events."
Y. W . C. A. N O T E S
Helen Fay, Winifred Magner,
Anne Smythe, Lyra Waterhousc
and Hester Weaver attended the
Student Volunteer Convention at
Elmira.
At the meeting this afternoon
Miss Clark will speak on the establishing of eight weeks' clubs, This
is one of the " b i g " addresses of
the year. Come and bring your
friends.
STUDENTS
If you wish a Really Fine Suit
See
SIDNEY GARBER
TAILOR
235 Central Ave.,
Albany, N. Y.
DR. CALLAHAN
CHIROPODIST
LADIES HAIR DRESSING,
MANICURING
FACIAL MASSAGE.
3 7 N O R T H PEARL ST.
ALBANY, N. Y.
T E L . 2SB3 M A I N
EYRES
Jflamtrfl
I 0 6 STATE ST.
ALBANY. N. Y.
ALBANY DRUG CO.
251 Central Avenue
W e Make Our Ice Cream
W e Make Our Candy
FRESH
EVERY
DAY
Marston & Seaman
Jewelers
20 So. Pearl Street, Albany, N. Y.
Four Hundred College Graduates
Wanted Immediately
for high salaried high school positions
in some of the best schools in the east.
No fee unlets appointed. Write at once'
EMPIRE TEACHERS' AGENCY1
University Building
Syracuse, N, Y
ETA PHI
At the last meeting of Eta Phi
the following officers were installed:
President... .Jennie A. Muhleman
Vice-president.... ..Verna McCann
Kcc. Secretary.. Olive Woodworth
Cor. Secretary.
Pauline Kihnc
Treasurer
Hazel Hengge
Chaplain
Arlien Bcardslcy
Marshal
Helen Leitzell
Reporter
'.. Elizabeth Osborn
C r i t i c . . . . . . . . . . . . F l o r e n c e Lansing
We are glad to welcome Elizabeth Archibold, '20, as a pledge
member.
Theda Mosher, '16 and Anne
Nelson, '17, spent the week-end of
February 22nd at the Eta Phi house.
R. F. CLAPP, Jr.
7 0 No. Pearl St.
Star* and Lark St:
Neckwear, Hosiery, Sh irts,
Sweaters and Gloves
Dawson's Men's Shop
259 Central Ave.
iV«arBX.aA« Avmut
RISLEY ADDRESSES STUDENTS
• Cintiiiued from page I
ing whether that nation or any
nation, so conceived and so dedicated can long be endured. We
are met on a great battlefield of
that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a
final resting place for cannon
fodder. It is altogether fitting and
proper that I should say this.
" ' But, in a larger sense, they
cannot dedicate, they cannot consecrate, they cannot hallow • this
ground. The brave men, living and
dead, who struggled here, have
, consecrated it far less than our
J great power will do. The world
will little note nor long remember
what they did here, but let it dare
to forget what I say here. It is
for us the living, rather, to be
dedicated here to the unfinished
.work which my ancestors have
'thus far so nobly advanced, It is
ALBANY UP-TO-DATE CLOAK MFG. CO.
Manufacturers and Retailers of
Cloaks, Suits, Waists
and
High Grade Furs
63 and 63 % N. Pearl St.,
Albany, N. Y.
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