CHEMICAL HANDLING Postgraduate Induction Safety Training S Burrows P230

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CHEMICAL HANDLING
Postgraduate Induction Safety
Training
S Burrows P230
[email protected]
General remarks
• safe preparation of samples
• safe handling of samples provided from
elsewhere
• safe handling of chemicals
NB specific training – HF handling
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/sci/physics/intranet/healthsafety/hydro/
http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/indg307.htm
http://www.nanolab.ucla.edu/pdf/HF_First_Aid.pdf
Chemical Hazards
Information on hazards:
The COSHH (Control of Substances
Hazardous to Health) sheet (US –
MSDS)
Should be consulted for every chemical
substance which you use
NB – it does not cover all possibilities of
combination with other chemicals, heat
and pressure
Flammable Hazards
oxidising atmosphere + flammable vapour + source of ignition.
Flash Point.
Lowest T at which vapour pressure above liquid is sufficient to form an
ignitable mixture with air near the surface of the liquid. e.g. acetone (-18°
C) or diethyl ether (-45° C).
(Auto-) Ignition Temperature
Minimum T required to initiate self-sustained combustion. Does not require
source of ignition. e.g. diethyl ether (160° C)
Pyrophoric materials
Auto-ignites usually by exothermic reaction with oxygen or water – e.g. fine
metal powders
Reactive Hazards
Oxidising Agents - combustion
Explosives
Peroxides - explode
Reactive mixtures  hazardous product
Corrosive Hazards
• destroy tissue (internal and external)
• e.g. strong acids and bases, dehydrating agents,
halogens; compounds that hydrolyse to acids (e.g.
phosphates) or bases (e.g. caesium salts).
Chemicals Harmful to Health other than
Reactive, Corrosive or Flammable.
• range of toxic attributes and responses, some
of which are not immediately obvious
(e.g.carcinogen; sensitisation)
• ingestion, inhalation, absorption
• extent of exposure important –
amount
- LD50
7000mg/kg of body weight for ethanol
0.02mg/kg for dioxins.
time/frequency
Ordering Hazardous Chemicals
Sample preparation
Sources of information on hazards
•
•
•
•
COSHH or MSDS sheet
literature (preferably more than one source!)
supervisor
safety advisors
MSDS sheets are often available from chemical companies
e.g. Sigma-Aldrich
No information!
If you cannot find information on the
procedure which you wish to carry
out:
• Risk assessment
• appropriate precautions to minimise
risk
Some precautions
•
•
•
•
Fume cupboard (available in certain labs)
gloves (correct type)
safety glasses
face mask (correct type)
Any procedures which cannot be safely
dealt with using the safety equipment
above are likely to require special facilities
and cannot be carried out in Physics
SAMPLE LABELLING
REASONS
1.
2.
3.
SAFETY – we MUST be able to assess the hazards
associated with samples which are in use or stored
in the laboratories.
FUTURE – we NEED to be able to identify samples
exactly if measurements are to be made in future
when “owner” may have left.
DISPOSAL – we MUST be able to tell disposal
contractors what chemicals are present in any
samples which are for disposal.
SAMPLE LABELLING
LABELS
•
must include chemical components
e.g. Na2O-B2O3-SiO2
•
(full composition even better)
e.g. 20Na2O-20B2O3-60SiO2
THIS IS MANDATORY
SAMPLE LABELLING
-
further information on processing/testing
e.g. 1200oC/2h; ND; 29Si NMR
“owner”
e.g. A. Surname
relevant date of manufacture/test
e.g. 12/08/13
Labels must be difficult to detach from
the sample container.
SAMPLE LABELLING
SAMPLE CONTAINERS
These must be suitable for the sample state
and the containment conditions. For example –
plastic self-seal bags do not survive well in
vacuum desiccators and push-fit caps come off
sample tubes!
SAMPLE STORAGE
Hazardous samples must not be handled in offices
(and remember that many materials are harmful in
powder form).
Samples in containers may be stored in offices if
they are inaccessible to others – e.g. in locked
drawer.
Sample storage facilities should be available within
your group area
CHEMICAL STORAGE
There should be designated separate storage
areas for general laboratory chemicals such as
solvents, acids, bases.
Usually an integral part of fume cupboard
structure or metal bins.
SAMPLES IN USE
Material being processed or samples being
characterised must have a warning notice nearby giving
the labelling information above + any hazard data.
YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE
SAFETY OF THE PEOPLE AROUND
YOU AS WELL AS YOUR OWN
CLEAN UP AFTER YOU!!!!
DISPOSAL OF WASTE CHEMICALS
(non-radioactive)
The following procedure should be adopted when disposing of waste
chemicals:
Complete a Chemical Disposal Form (obtainable from stores or the
departmental web-site).
Package and label the waste. Information must include all chemical
constituents of the waste (with proportions if known); the originator of
the waste; and the date of disposal.
Give the waste + form to Alan Burton who will enter the information
into the disposal log and put the waste into store ready for collection.
CHEMICAL DISPOSAL FORM
Complete form and give copy, with material for disposal, to ?????.
SAMPLE LABEL
CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS
FULL CHEMICAL
COMPOSITION (if known)
STATE (liquid/solution/powder/
lumps etc)
SPECIFIC HAZARD if known
(flammable/toxic etc)
ORIGINATOR
GROUP
DATE
CHEMICAL DISPOSAL FORM
Complete form and give copy, with material for disposal, to ??????.
SAMPLE LABEL
Antimony silicate glass Sb60Si40 03/07/05
CHEMICAL CONSTITUENTS
Sb2O3, SiO2, Fe2O3
FULL CHEMICAL
COMPOSITION (if known)
60 mol% Sb2O3 40 mol% SiO2 0.1 mol% Fe2O3
STATE (liquid/solution/powder/
lumps etc)
POWDER AND FRAGMENTS
SPECIFIC HAZARD if known
(flammable/toxic etc)
TOXIC (Sb) AND DUST
ORIGINATOR
A.N.OTHER
GROUP
R101
DATE
06/06/13
WASTE CONTRACTOR’S FORM
Waste Details:
Description of waste
(EWC
Code)
Containers
Chemical/ biological components of
waste and %ages
Physical
Form
Number
Size
Units
Type
List of
Wates
PHSDRID
Comment & Criteria
DISPOSAL OF WASTE CHEMICALS
(non-radioactive)
Solvents:
where these are used regularly in small amounts,
the resulting waste can be accumulated in an
appropriate labelled container (separate for each
solvent) prior to disposal.
DISPOSAL OF WASTE CHEMICALS
(non-radioactive)
Some water soluble/miscible chemicals can be
disposed of to the drains but advice should be
sought on this from supervisor or department
safety officer.
DISPOSAL OF WASTE CHEMICALS
(non-radioactive)
Disposal of waste whose chemical
composition is unknown is extremely
expensive and therefore it is important that
you keep complete and accurate records
and that your samples are labelled with
sufficient detail that their composition is
clear.
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