Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group

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Enclosure #l
Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group
Pacific Northwest Training Working Team
Fiscal Year 1999
Program of Work
1. Conduct 20 to 25 courses during the training year ending in May 1999. (FY 98-99 Training
Ongoing
Season) Coordination done by Redmond Training Center.
2. Revise course offerings, projection of participation, and nomination process for FY 99-00
Training Season. Operations and TWT will both be involved in this process. 2/l 5/99,5/l 5/99
3. Increase information flow/availability to users by developing TWT web page linked to
PNWCG’s page.
2/l/99
4. Develop a trainee identification and mobilization process proposal. Operations and T%VT will
both be involved in this process.
5/l/99
5. Recruit and fill Interior Training Specialist position at Redmond. Establish work priorities for
the position for remainder of year.
4/l/99
6. Assess impacts of the adoption of NWCG decisions in the new 3 lo- 1. Operations and TWT
will both be involved in this process.
Ongoing
7. Design and conduct annual Training Officers Meeting.
5/l 5/99
8. Administer 300 and 400 level NWCG course offerings by Public Education Providers and
Private sector training providers. Develop an audit process for this portion of our progrZW99
9. Develop feasibility study and implementation process for intern/mentor program.
6/l/99
10. Evaluate and implement when feasible the use of new technology for training delivery.
Ongoing
11. Coordinate training needs with other GA’s, assess performance based training needs, analyze
course attendance, cancellations, and track incident assignments for last five years for IACR,
FNSC, and ATGS, AON. (Redmond LATC)
Ongoing
Funding is being requested in the amount of %2,500.00 for a facilitator/secretary to speed
dissemination of information to other teams and to the field units.
Enclosure #2
TO:
Pacific Northwest Coordination Group
FROM:
Chair, Aviation Working Group
SUBJECT: Aviation Safety Issues
The PNWCG Aviation Working Group (AWG) identified the following aviation
safety concerns that require action and direction from PNWCG. We have
enclosed the original hazard identification (SAFECOM’S) which explain the safety
concerns of the following issues;
Issue 1.
Non-Standard Aircraft Call Signs (enclosure 1)
Recommendation: Further define signs within Pacific Northwest as defined in
recommendations from Earl Palmer. (enclosure 1)
Issue 2.
2)
Non-Standard Aviation Initial Radio Contact Procedures. (enclosure
Recommendation: Require Central Washington Interagency Communications
Center to follow standard aviation radio communications procedures. (enclosure
2)
The Aviation Working Group requests PNWCG address these aviation safety
concerns at the earliest opportunity.
Phil Hufstader
Chair, PNWCG Aviation Working Group
r
OCT+-1998
.
583 888 2586
USFS/ELM FRM
89:48
P. 03116
4
SllPECOM
Reported By (Optional)
I
I
Phone S41/[email protected]
IName Ward Monroe
I
AVIATTON SAFETY COMMUNIQUE IOrganization Central OR Fire Mut.
Date 8/m/97(
Redmond Air Ce er
IAddress
.I'E' Mail A d d r e s s W.Monroe&IDOCa -
I
1
IFVENTI
Date -g/&g/s
Damage? Y_ NJ
Local time 1230
Injuries? Y_ NJ
MO Day Yr
24 hour clock
State m
Location ODF Incident at 44 35.1 X 119 30.5. Near J_ohn Day River
Airport, City, Lat/Long, or Fire Name
IflISSIONI Air Attack
Leah~bm?. and Retardant DroD
Type
Pax,Cargo,Recon,Sling,Longline,etc.
Procurement
Contract,
Fleet
Contract,GW, Rental, Fleet ,etc.
Number of Persons Onboard-Special Use? Y_ N_ Haz Mat Onboard? Y-N_
Departure Point
Re_dmond,
OR
Destination
Redmond, OR
lAIRCR+FTl
Manufacturer
(Reg)N##
Owner/Operator
I~~RATIVBI
Model,
Pilot
Please provide a brief explanation of the event.
See attached narrative
ICORRECTIVs ACTZONI
This issue wag addressed by the Regional Aviation Leadership Team on Aug 20.
This issue was assigned to Earl Palmer to write an issue paper co be presented
to PNWCG Aviation Working Group for resolution and action. Excellent
recommendations and heads up hazard identification.
oding: For use of Regional Aviation Safety Manager.
CAUSE
61
171
PHASE
ITI
Form FS 5700-14 (OAS-34)
171
Jan
lii OCCURWCE
96
i;l
131
101
TYPE
jF/
Data Tracking#97-06-068-O-12
r
[email protected]
89:48
USFWELM FfVl
503 888 2586
P. 04/16
Ai? Attack 63F, Lead 67, Airtanker 68 responded to Malheur NF incident #249 at
approximately 1100 hours on 8/18/97. Jumper 732 and Helicopter 6MV were
already on sceire. We arrived on scene, made contact with the IX. for I)249 and
dropped l/2 of the load of retardant from T-68.
I contacted Malheur Dispatch
and asked if they had another fire that could use a half a load of retardant.
Malheur dispatch responded vith a Lat. and Long. for an ODF fire North of our
location. Lead 67, T-68, AA63F proceeded to the new incident. I asked Malheur
Dispatch who the Ground Contact and what radio frequency was being used.
Malheur Dispatch responded with: "Unit 7” is the ground contact, frequency
151.205 TX and RX with a Tone of 146.2.
I svitched the #2 radio in the AA
aircraft to 151.305 and called unit 7 several times without success. By this
time, Lead 67, T-68 and AA63F were all over the ODF Xncident.
The leadplane
and Airtanker wqre making dry runs over the fire, waiting for me to make sure
there were no people on the fireline before we dropped. ,Xnitially, I: was
, unable to make radio contact due to a programming error. After reprogramming
the frequency I had good radio contact with ODF Dispatch and 9602 the I.C.
I then heard a conversation between "9602" and T-68 on ODF. They were
diecussing the drop and the fire was clear to drop on. I then heard a request
from John Day Dispatch, (ODF dispatcher) to T-68 for the Wictorr air-to-air
frequency we were all using because "they vanted CO give it to Unit 7, their
aerial detection aircraft and waa in the vicinity of the fire".
This was the first indication any of us had over the fire that Unit 7 was an
aircraft. We then heard Unit 7 calling on the Victor frequency, I made contact
with the pilot and determined she was 15 miles avay at SSOO feet MSL and was a
Cessna 180. She also indicated she would be returning to the Incident we were
dropping retardant on. We informed her of the altitude of Lead 67 and T-68 of
5000 to 5500, the Air Attack at 9,400 and ask her to call 5 minutes out and
come in at 7,SO0. we completed the drop in tvo’runs, left the fire and
returned to Redmond without seeing Unit 7.
Although Malheur Dispatch should have advised us that Unit 7 was an aircraft,
this potentially serious incident was precipitated by a lack of
standardization. Xn many places in the Northwest Geographic Area, our aerial
detection aircraft are using call signs that may or may not indicate they are
aircraft. Some examples: Recon 1, Air Patrol, Unit 7, Patrol Plane 71 Alpha.
One of the very basic premises of ICS and Interagency Cooperation is common
tertninoloy for the resources. It is my recommendation we establish a standard
radio identifier for all aerial detection aircraft being used in the Northwest
Geographical Area in fact it should be Nation wide that clearly identifies the
resource is or could be an aircraft over a fire or within the vicinity.
CCTT01-1998
.
09:41
503 808 2586
USFS/ELM FfW
0
. .J I .*
MESSAGE SCAN
To
J.PAYNE:Rfi/PH'W
cc
W.BULGER:R6/PNW
From:
Postmark:
Subject:
EARL PALMER:R06F01D06A
Aug 31,97 4:02 PM
CALL
P. 0546
.
FOR JAMES E. PAYNE
.
Delivered: Aug 31,97 4:03 PM
SIGNS
Reference Safecom 97-06-068-o-12 Please find enclosed a sumary of
the current conditions and a proposal to go to NWCG to help solve
this problem. I ran the paper through Ward Monroe. Earl
OCT-pi-1998
.
.
89:41
USFSELM FAM
5 8 3 e8e 2586
cad Sigh utilized within the ICS
On August 18, 1997 Air Attack 63F, Tanker 68, and %ead 67 were working an
Oregon Department of Forestry fire.
Malheur Dispatch had previously given
"Unit 7" as the contact. and it was understood by Air Attack 63F that Unit 7 was
ground based. As the action progressed it was discovered that Unit 7 wadr
actually a reconnaissance aircraft.
With several aircraft converging over a single incident it ia critical to know
what each persons or units position and amigned task is in relation to the
incident. Knowing the assigned task also allows for a pretty good idea of
where they may be on the incident and at what altitude they may be. As an
example; The call efgn "Engine 12" would immediately let you know that you
vouldn't need to worry about an in-air conflict. "Engine 12" should trigger
concern for ground location in relation to retardant drops however. #Copter
l2Z" would trigger the thought that the helicopter most likely would be working
fairly close to the ground and would not likely pose a threat to mid-air
collision for Air Attack, but, would be a concern for Lead 67 and Tanker 68
while on an actual drop run. “Jumper 782 cal sign would let you know that they
could be working the fire from 3000' down to 200' AGL.
"Unit 7" without some other identifying feature transmitted leaves one with the
thought of who, what, and where are you. It now requires time and effort to
determine the who, what, and where of Unit 7. This time could be far better
apent devoted to the assigned task. It is far easier to find a target when you
know it’s approximate altitude and direction.
ICS IIandbook 410-l lists several call signs; Lead, Copter, Tanker; it does not
however define Air Attack, Recon, or Helitanker. The use of these call signs
all clarify the purpose of the aircraft or individual involved.
IC vould be of great value to further define call signs within the Pacific
Northwest and gain support and agreement from our partners. We euggest the
following units or functions to be included.
.
Lead denotes a leadplane, the number identifies which
“LEAb” 61, 67, 69, ETC.
person is piloting the aircraft.
*TANKER 61"
are assigned
Denotes an airplane configured for dropping retardants. Numbers
to individual companies.
"COPTER 61X" or "COPTER 532" Denotes a helicopter; the number is generally the
last three digits of the 2?-number or could be, as used in Region S, the number
assigned to an individual base.
"IIELITANKER 42" Denotes a large helicopter with a drop tank capable of
delivering retardants simular to a large airplane.
"AIR ATTACK 61X" or "AIR ATTACK 61" or VABTN AIR ATTACV Denotes an Air
Tactical Group Supervisor in an aircraft. "61X" takes the identification from
the N-number of the aircraft. m6111 is an individual with the number 61
assigned, simular to a leadplane pilot. 8*Cabinn is the airborne Air Tactical
Group Supervisor assigned to the Cabin fire. Any of these various
F’.86/16
.
.
.* ’ .
.
CKTyal-1998
*
lay:41
USFS/ELM FAM
583 888 2586
identification forms would be acceptable. AEI more Air Attack persons are
trained and assigned, it would be well to assigrr individual numbers.
"AIR RECON 61X" Denotes a person in an aircraft doing reconnaissance,
surveillance, scout, or detection work. The number ie taken from the last
three digits of the aircraft N-number.
P. 87/16
Octal-1998
89:41
583 EBE 2586
USFSELM FRM
P. 88/16
3eported By (Uptiow~
Craig M. Hall
Name:
Phone:
9709385 1325
Region 6 Other:
8/I/98
Organizatioa:
Date:
bate:
Location:
7130198 Loclll
T i m e : 1300
~n;suries;
White Pass Wenatchee NF
4gency
[nvalved:
NO
Region 6
Other:
Other?
Other:
Procurement: Contract
5
Persons
Inboard:
Departure Point:
lumber:
Damage:
State: Washington
Fire, Helitack
ran
No
Special
Use:
Jefferson Helibase
N97HJ
knerloperrtor:
Yes
Hazardous Materials: NO
Destination: Fire
Manufacturer: ~~11
H&jet
384
Model: 2054
Pilot: Pete McNeil
~AJ#,KA’l?‘i% (Pleaseprovide a brief explanattin
of the even&)
LS an initial attack IC on fire 384, I did not have direct communication contact
I Jeff&son
Helibase. I had to use Wenatchee Forest personnel to relay my fire
ornmunication to helibase. It was confusing because the Wenatchee Forest use!
ifExent radio protocal from all other forest, state agencies, and emergency
redical services that I have worked with through out the United States. (Ex:
renatchee states station calling first as opposed to most agencies stating unit
eing called first). I had not been briefed on this forest policy, but I had noticed
iat the Crammer complejc communication unit followed the Wenatcliee
rotocal. I view this nonstandard policy as a serious safety concern. I feel that ir
fire or medical emerge&y vital information could possibly be missed,
Dmpromising safety.
s an initial attack IC on fire 384, I did not have direct communication contact
1 Jefferson Helibase. I had to use Wenatchee Forest personnel to relay my fire
xnmunication to helibase. It was confusing because the Wenatchee Forest uses
ifferent radio protocal from all other forest, state agencies, and emergency
medical services that I have worked with through out the United States. (Ex:
httpY2OS. 173.2.4/safecom/searchone.asp?ID=243
9118198
[email protected]
Y-a
ir - -.--“a 09:42
_‘.V.,
.
.
USFWELM FfW
. a--. --aww”mu
503 EBE 2586 _ _P.O9/16
g-m w-w
OCT+Il-1996
09:42
Tratkfng #: 98-244
Date: 8/I/98
I
Injuries: NO
bed The:
Region 6
Damage: N O *
State: WaShingon
other:
Other: Communications
Fire (Other)
Other:
Procurement:
Special Yes
Use:
PMSOUS
Inboard:
lumber:
P. 10/16
Y
Region 6 Other:
8/l/98
O&llliZMiOIG
Date:
btion: Wenatchee NF
raii
503 808 2586
USFS/ELM FRM
N/A
3wner/Operator: N/A
Manufacturer,: N/A
Hazardous Materials: NO
Model: N/A
pilot: N/A
?ARRA’l~-(Please provide a btief ex#zrratim of the evenk)
Vhile flying the Cleveland and several other fires in central Washington I have
xmd out how co&x&g Wenatchee dispatch is making our communications
ver the fire. They do not seem to und&stand that we (aviation) have to listen
nd talk on multiple radios and that we listen for our call sign in the standard
rder and filter traffic that is not essential to our mission. We don’t need to go
xto this to deeply but I would like to relate a particular sequence of radio trafEc
etween myself, the fire and dispatch. Assigned to the fire were tankers 07,130,
31,133,25,412. Helicopters; 410,412,864, alongwithlead 64 (myself) and
umerous ground contacts. To keep things simple and efficient you listen for
our call sign or for the reply of a call you may have made-standard procedure
i to hear your call si
(thus you are alerted) and then you listen for who is
alling. With Waatc ees
!!F cment procedures they say Wenatchee.... Lead 64....
ow, I do not know if helicopter 864 is calling Wenatchee or there is another
611 sign out there that I am unaware of, or what????? This became particul~
othersome and apparant with helicopter 864 on this &e because his call sign
eing so close to mine. It is unacceptabIe to me to have to deal with this.
tispatch is there for us on the fire. They need to help in making
[email protected] run smooth1 and efficiently. They are cunently contributing
) more congestion on the radyios, causi~~g multiple calls and interruptions of
9/l 8198
OCT+l-1998
89:43
583 EZIE! 2586
USFS/ELM FFIM
P. 1146
the Cleveland and several other fires in central Washington I have :
w co&sing Wenatchee dispatch is making our communication
They do not seem to understand that we (aviation) have to listen
we provide to the folks on
communications
This is the second SAFECOM on same subject. Please read for clarity of the
Safay issues as it is well resented. As noted in SAFECOM 98-243 I too
believe this is unacceptabPe and am placing this issue as the number one
aviation safety hazard in the region. Bill Bulger W&M
http://205 173.2.4kafecom/searchone.asp?ID=244
9/l 8198
I
OCT+l-1998
09:43
USFS/ELM FfVl
583 e8e 2586
P.12/16
Issue: Aircraft Radio Contact Procedures
The obvious safety concerns on this issue are clearly defined in the 2 Safecorn’s enclol;ed.
My additional followup to this issue was to contact the Federal Communications Center (FCC). I was advised
that the Central Washington Interagency Communications center (CWICC) was an FCC lincensed “Aeronautical Multicorn Station”. I explained to the FCC the current CWICC aviation radio contact procedures and the related safety hazrd it presented. I was advised that they felt this was in conflict with Operator License Rules 47
C.F.R Part 13 and they could send a field inspector to CWICC to evaluate the issue. I did not request a field
inspection and felt it could be settled locally. However, I have been unseccessful in my attempts to have
CWICC change to the National Standard.
Bill Bulgq
Forest ‘Service, Regional Aviation Safety Manger
I
CCT,@l-1998
89:44
USFSELM FtVl
503 888 2586
P.
13116
p wireless
Pi3 felecommunlcations
Bureau
’ “. m
AIRCRAFT STATIONS
Most radio stations used in aviation are part of the Aeronautical
Mobile Service, which includes both airborne and land stations, There
are different classes of aeronautical mobile stations:
- Airborne stations, or aircraft stations, are simply those
radios that are used in flight. They may be installed on board a plane,
helicopter, .blimp or even a manned hot-air balloon. Airborne
stations are further defined in the rules as air carrier aircraft
stations, used in aircraft that carry passengers or cargo for
hire; private aircraft stations; and flight test stations and
aviation instructional stations. All airborne stations may
transmit and receive only messages necessary for safe flight
operations. (Aeronautical public service stations are also
airborne stations but they are not part of the aeronautical mobile
service. They are used exactly like public ship stations to carry
messages for passengers or crew members to and from public coast
stations.)
.
- Aeronautical advisory stations, also called unicorn
stations, are land stations used for advising pilots of private
aircraft about local airport conditions. They are not used to
control aircraft in flight.
- Aeronautical multicom stations provide communications
between private aircraft and a ground facility for temporary,
or emergency activkties like cropdusting, livestock
herding, forest firefighting, aerial advertising, parachute
jumping, etc. In Some cases, multicom stations may be
authorized
to serve as u
- Aeronautical enroute stations are used by aircraft owners
or operators for operational control and flight management of
their aircraft. They have access to these stations by cooperative
arrangement, but any pilot with a flight emergency may use
these stations without prior agreement.
- Flight test stations are airbdrne and ground stations used
only to pass information or instructions concerning tests of
aircraft or airborne components.
- Aviation support stations are airborne and ground
stations used only for pilot training, soaring (with gliders)
I
or
OCT-al-199e
89:44
USFSELM FRM
583 eae 25e6
P.14/16
free ballooning.
- Airdrome control stations provide all necessary
communications between an airport control tower and a11 arriving
and departing aircraft. They are used to maintain
an efficient flow of traffic for aircraft taxiing, landing# and
taking off and for all vehicle movement on the airfield. For the
latter purposes, airdrome control stations communicate with
aeronautical utility mobile stations.
- Aeronautical utility mobile stations are installed in
vehicles that provide maintenance, fire and crash protection,
freight handling, or other group support normal.ly under control
tower direction at an airport. They are used for both operational
and emergency communications.
- Aeronautical search and rescue stations are used for
air-to-ground communications during actual or practice search and
rescue operations, or for search and rescue training.
Forfurtherinfionnation, please contact the Private Wireless Division at(202)418-0680 or&nail at
Lastreviewetiupdated: September 18, 1997
vvww.fcc.gov/wtb/aircrftbtml
of2
OCTsBl-1998
09:45
USFS/BLM FRM
583 888 2586
P. 15/16
p Wireless
fel Tekcommunbations
’ I. -
8ureau
GROUND STATIONS
The FCC regulates the Aviation Services in cooperation with the
Aviation Administration. Wherever aviation services are provided in U.S.
territory, both FAA and FCC requirements must be met by anyone who uses
aviation radio, In addition, civil aircraft on international flights az
subject= to international radio regulations intended to safeguard air
travelers worldwide. Flight safety is the primary purpose of all Aviatic
Se-ices.
The Aeronautical Fixed Service is a system of fixed stations used f
point-to-point communications about aviation safety, navigation, or
preparation for flight.
Aeronautical Radionavigation Se-ice
The Aeronautical Radionavigation Service is made up of stations use
for navigation, obstruction warning, instrument landing, and measurement
of altitude and range. Air navigation stations are usually operated by t
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), so technically they are not radic
services regulated by the FCC. The FCC does license some na,vigation stat
however, if the service is needed where the FAA does not provide it. In
cases, the FCC authorizes private operators to provide air navigation
services in strict compliance with FAA requirements.
As in the maritime services, radionavigation stations also include
radiobeacons, and these other aids to air navigation:
.
Glide path stations are directional radiobeacons associated with
instrument landing s)istems used to guide the descent of aircraft
landing.
Marker beacons are transmitters that radiate vertically to provic'
positioning information to aircraft in flight.
Omni-directional range stations transmit signals in all direction
from which aircraft can determine their bearing.
Land Test Stations transmit signals for testing and calibrating a
navigation aids.
Ifyou have any comments or questions about this information, pleasecontactthe Private Wireless Division
of the Wireless Telecommunications Bureau at (202)418-0680 or E-mail at [email protected]~
OCT-,81-1998
89:45
USFS/ELM FAM
583 E88 2 5 8 6
e*vycIrl-
P. 16/16
of a radio station is responsible at all times for the proper operation of the, station, Radio
operators should use the following guidelines to make radio a usefirl tool for safe an& efficient flight:
The licensee
0
0
0
l
l
TUNEBOTH IIWNWI’TTERAND RECEIVERTO THE CORRECT CHAiWELS.
BESURETHE CHANNEL IS CLEAR BEFORE MS-G.
BE BRIEF. TRANSMIT ESSENTIAL MESSAGES ONLY.
SHORTEN OR ELIMINATE TEST CALLS ON THE W OR IN FLIGHT
IDENTIFY TRANSMSSIONS UrITH FCC CALL SIGN OR FAA “N” NUMBER
FCC INFORMATION (FORMS, FEES, RULES)
l
l
l
FCC Form Distribution Center (8W) 418-FORM (3676)
For downloading at _httD://WWW.fcc.pav/formDa~e.html.
FCC Fax-On-Demand system -- calI(202) 418-0177 from the handset of your fax machine, Follow
the recorded instructions to have FC6 Form 404 (document retrieval number 000404) or FCC Form
753 (document retrieval number 000753) sent directly to your fax machine.
FEES
l
.
FCC National Call Center (888) 225-5322
All details concerning radio service eligibility, appkation procedures, operating requikments, and
equipment standards can be found in the FCC Rules. You are not required, however, to cv a copy of the
ruk!L .
Maritime Serivce Rules a7 C.F.R. Part 80
T Operator License Rules 47 C.F.R. Part 132
\
Thexules are adable for a fee from the Govemment Printing Office at (202) 5124803.
please contact the FCC National Call Center toll free at l-888.CAtL-FCC
ail to [email protected]~ov
Last reviewed/updated: November 14,1996
TOD of PaFze
_-._-
. . .._._..
I
11 Aviation and Marine Radio Services 11 WTB HQI.IW._ 11 FCC Home 11
.-.-..c.,
.
.--I
www.fcc.govktb/fctsht4.htmI
TOTQL P. 16
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