Intercalated BSc (IBSc) Review 2010 Review Group Membership September 2010

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LONDON’S GLOBAL UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LIFE AND MEDICAL SCIENCES
September 2010
Intercalated BSc (IBSc) Review 2010
September 2010
Review Group Membership
Dr Brenda Cross, Prof Peter Delves Prof. Michael P. Gilbey (chair), Dr Deborah Gill, Dr Peter Raven,
Dr Hilary Richards, Dr Joe Rosenthal, Dr Richard Tunwell, Prof Chris Yeo, Gaynor Jones
Rebecca Holmes Intercalated BSc Degree Administrator
Summary
A key component of SLMS Strategy 2010-15 is to develop a MBBS programme that provides a
contemporary, integrated, science rich programme designed to meet future health needs and
provide a training specific to the requirements of tomorrow’s doctors who wish to pursue an
academic career and/or who aspire to professional leadership (https://www.ucl.ac.uk/slms/staffstudents/info/strategies/slmsstrategy). The aim is to introduce the first elements of the new
curriculum beginning September 2011 and to achieve full implementation by September 2013.
A vital feature of the revised MBBS programme (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medicalschool/staffstudents/mbbs-review) will be an integrated BSc year that provides students with a strong
foundation in independent learning, critical thinking, scholarly writing and scientific method: a year
of focused study that substantially enhances outcomes not only in the domain of the Doctor as a
Scientist and Scholar, but also the domains of the Doctor as a Professional and the Doctor as a
Practioner (http://www.gmc-uk.org/education/undergraduate/tomorrows_doctors.asp).
Consequently, the IBSc Review group recommends that each integrated BSc Degree Programme that
contributes to the overall MBBS Programme meets the following quality standards:
1. Identifies and articulate its links to the overall MBBS programme
2. Provides students with an integrated BSc experience between years 2 and 3 of the overall 6
year course.
3. Substantially enhances the key generic skills of independent learning, critical thinking,
scholarly writing and scientific method.
4. Provides small group work or tutorial based learning to facilitate the development of critical
thinking and/or critical appraisal skills.
5. Exposes students to other professionals and scientists and, where possible, encourage joint
working and learning to prepare them for the multidisciplinary nature of clinical practice and
research.
1
6. Identifies and articulate its links to UCLPartners academic themes1.
7. Allows sufficient time for students to comply with the overall requirements of the MBBS
programme during the Integrated BSc year (for example maintenance of the portfolio).
8. Provides robust personal tutoring in line with UCL requirements.
9. Consists of 4 course units and provides a compulsory laboratory, field, or literature based
project: the project contributing between 1 and 1.5 course units. Where the project consists
of literature based study this needs to be sufficiently robust to ensure students gain the
appropriate competencies in data analysis and interpretation.
Working with the Medical School Quality Assurance Unit a strategy group will be responsible for
ensuring that all programmes are of excellent quality, are aligned to the needs of The UCL Doctor
and that an appropriate range of BSc Degree Programmes are available.
To cover administrative costs of the IBSc programme each integrated BSc Degree Programme
provider will need to make a contribution to IBSc Programme proportionate to the associated
HEFCEt income.
Integrated BSc Degree Programme providers will be required to complete an annual return to enable
the strategy group to assess the compliance of their programme against the requirements outlined
above. The suggested deadline for full compliance is September 2012 to meet the revised curriculum
implementation date of September 2013. Where quality standards cannot be met by a programme
the strategy group will recommend discontinuation of that programme. While working to maintain
an appropriate breadth of degree programme choice, it is likely, given current financial constraints,
that some of the current IBSc degree programmes will be identified as uneconomic in their current
form. Such programmes will either have to merge with suitable partners, broaden their intake or
discontinue.
Contents
1) Background
1.1 Purpose of the Review
1.2 Terms of Reference
2) General Purpose of IBSc Programme
3) The range of degree programmes appropriate for inclusion in the IBSc Programme
3.1 Number of IBSc Programmes
3.2 Programme Requirements
4) The Timing of the IBSc programme within the MBBS
5) Mechanism for allocating IBSc degree programme student quotas
1
Either the programme’s links to the UCLP emerging research theme areas or the overall themes of:
harnessing academia to effect health gain; improving the health of populations locally, nationally or globally;
illness prevention or the role of primary care/novel service provision.
2
6) Recommendations on the selection process
7) Proposals for the equitable and appropriate allocation of resources for the IBSc programme,
including bench fees and HEFCEt allocations
8) Essential criteria for IBSc programmes within the MBBS course at UCL
9) Proposed strategy for quality management and enhancement (QME) and development of
the IBSc programme
1) Background
The UCL six year MBBS programme aims to produce a UCL Doctor who is: “a highly competent and
scientifically literate clinician, equipped to practise patient-centred medicine in a constantly
changing modern world, with a foundation in the basic medical and social sciences” The IBSc
degree programme is an integral and key component in the education of The UCL Doctor.
During the IBSc year students have an opportunity to study topics in greater depth than during the
other phases of their undergraduate medical studies. It also affords them an opportunity to develop
their skills as a clinician researcher: to become familiar with research literature, scientific methods
and techniques and the current state of thinking in their selected area.
Currently, the degree programme is made up of modules. Modules usually have a value of 0.5, 1.0 or
1.5 course units (CU). A 1.0 CU module has up to 40 hours of lectures and a total work load
(including private reading, preparation of course work and revision) of 200 to 300 hours. Each 0.5,
1.0 and 1.5 CU module has its own assessment components which include an examination and/or
course work. All IBSc degree programmes consist of 4 course units.
A degree programme is defined by its module content: some have CORE MODULES which must be
taken. Presently not all modules are core and therefore it is often possible to take optional modules.
In all such cases the IBSc programme tutor must approve the choice of modules. In addition the
department/division teaching the course approve applications before students join a programme of
study as there may be constraints imposed by prerequisites, the timetable or student numbers.2
The IBSc should provide an excellent foundation for future research work. From the viewpoint of
clinical training and career options, it should be relatively unimportant which particular programme
is chosen; the training given in approaching problems scientifically should be a common feature of
them all.
1.1
Purpose of the Review
The current review was initiated to examine aspects of the IBSc Programme considered crucial to the
delivery of the best possible student experience, to the enhancement of outcomes for medical
graduates in the three domains outlined in Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009 (the Doctor as a Scholar and
2
information source Intercalated BSc Degrees 2010-2011 Guide (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medicalschool/bscibsc/booklet_2010-2011.pdf
3
Scientist, the Doctor as a Practitioner and the Doctor as a Professional)3and to ensure that the IBSc
programme is fully integrated into the undergraduate MBBS programme stream . The IBSc
Programme has the potential to contribute a substantial element to the development of the Doctor
as a Scholar and Scientist domain; a domain that is embedded in all six years of the course.
The review group’s recommendations relating to the aspects of the IBSc programme outlined in the
terms of reference are provided in subsequent sections, including a strategy for quality management
and enhancement, and programme development.
1.2
Terms of Reference (TOR)
1) To review the general purpose of the IBSc programme in the overall MBBS programme
2) To define the range of degree programmes appropriate for inclusion in the IBSc programme
3) To define the optimal timing of the IBSc programme in the overall MBBS programme
4) To make recommendations on how the number of students entering each IBSc programme will be
allocated and managed
5) To make recommendations on the application process
6) To make proposals for the equitable and appropriate allocation of resources for the IBSc
programme, including bench fees and HEFCEt allocations
7) To develop a coherent and integrated strategy for the quality management and the future
development of the IBSc programme
2) General purpose of the IBSc Programme
The purpose of the IBSc Programme, which consists of a number of IBSc Degree Programmes, is to
significantly enhance learning in the MBBS programme. Additionally, the IBSc programme should
provide a suitable preparation for those opting to follow the MBPhD programme.
To achieve these goals IBSc Degree Programmes should:
 encourage the development of the key skills of independent learning, critical thinking,
scientific method, critical writing, laboratory practice and dissertation writing
 provide students with an opportunity to enhance their knowledge in one or all of the
following areas of science: biomedical, social and behavioural
The review group considers that while most IBSc Degree Programmes tend to be robust with respect
increasing the factual knowledge base of students, in some programmes work is required to ensure
further development of skills in the domains of independent learning, critical thinking, scientific
method, critical writing and laboratory practice. Evidence for this view is found in students’ course
work, examination performance and Degree Programme pedagogy. In such cases workshop/tutorial
and laboratory sessions and new methods of assessment should be introduced and the students
ought to be made fully aware of the skills that they should try to develop during their IBSc year.
3
Tomorrows Doctors 2009 - http://www.gmc-uk.org/education/undergraduate/tomorrows_doctors.asp
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Furthermore, it may be appropriate to use the period following the summer examinations in the
preceding academic year to prepare students for their IBSc year.
During the IBSc there must be ample opportunity for students to maintain their overall development
as a doctor, for example maintain their clinical contact and continue their portfolio: this is not a ‘year
out’ of the MBBS programme.
3) The range of degree programmes appropriate for inclusion in the
IBSc Programme
While being mindful of resource limitations, efficiency and quality management and enhancement,
the available programmes should provide a wide range of choice across the subject areas considered
to be appropriate for inclusion in the IBSc Programme. All degree programmes must demonstrate
that they are financially viable and make a contribution to IBSc Programme administrative costs.
3.1
Number of IBSc Programmes
We suggest that a maximum of fifteen IBSc degree programmes, rather than the current twentytwo, may provide an appropriate range of choice while ensuring that a viable number of students
enrol for each programme: college quota is normally 290 Home/EU and 15 overseas students.
Some of the current degree programmes have a history of fewer than ten students enrolled and
therefore they may be uneconomic and consequently either have to discontinue or merge with
other degree programmes. Another strategy would be for degree programmes which have thus far
only been available to MBBS students to offer their programmes or course units to other UCL
students and in doing so satisfy the criterion of “joint working” (see section on Criteria).
Those programmes that currently enrol less than ten students may be uneconomic in the long term
and should be encouraged and supported to increase their student numbers where there is strong
case that the programme is, within the context if the MBBS programme overall, consistent with the
UCL partners/Academic Health Science Centre( AHSC) priorities4.
We consider that it would be appropriate to offer an IBSc in Cancer Biology particularly considering
the development of the new Cancer Institute and the AHSC priorities.
3.2
Programme Requirements
In addition to fulfilling the general purpose of the IBSc degree programme we suggest that each
programme should integrate as far as possible with the emerging academic themes and research
base in UCL partners.
All programmes must offer a compulsory laboratory or literature based research project that is
supervised by an academic expert in the chosen subject area. All students will be required to
demonstrate that they have actively engaged in data analysis (laboratory or literature based). All
projects should contribute 1-1.5 CU to a programme of study.
In accordance with the new MBBS curriculum all students will take an intergrated BSc degree
programme in Year 3 of the 6 year programme (see section below) any programme that cannot
accommodate this criterion will be discontinued.
4
http://www.uclpartners.com/research.php
5
All programmes must include workshop/tutorial based activities to help students develop key skills
in addition to small group or one to one work associated with the project element of the
programme.
Where possible programmes should provide students with exposure to other professionals and
scientists and encourage joint working and learning to prepare them for the multidisciplinary nature
of clinical practice and research.
4) The timing of the IBSc within the MBBS Programme
Currently, although students are encouraged to enter the IBSc programme between Phases 1 and 2,
some students elect to take their IBSc later in the MBBS programme. As the BSC year becomes fully
integrated into the overall MBBS programme all students will complete the integrated BSc in year 3,
The main educational reasons for embedding the IBSc programme within year 3 of the
undergraduate stream of the MBBS programme are to unify the student experience and to maximize
the impact of the IBSc programme on outcomes in the domains of the doctor as a scholar and a
scientist, the doctor as a practitioner and the doctor as a professional5 .
As a relatively small cohort of students entered the MBBS programme in 2009-2010 there will be
sufficient capacity for all undergraduate students to enter the IBSc programme in year 3 while
clearing the “backlog” of students intercalating in later years. Thereafter, all students will join the
IBSc programme only in year 3 i.e., IBSc year 2012-2013 (see appendix 1) and the IBSc will become
the Int BSc from 2013-2014.
5) Mechanism for allocating IBSc degree programme student quotas
It is anticipated that the IBSc programme will need to accommodate approximately 295 Home/
European Union and 15 overseas students when all non-graduate students take their BSc studies in
year 3 of the 6 year MBBS programme. This indicates that if the college quota is not to be exceeded,
few if any external students will be able to join the IBSc programme.
It is recommended that no more external students are admitted to the IBSc from 2011-12 and that
UCL students will not be allowed to take an external IBSc (see appendix 1).
The number of students entering each degree programme will be determined by the programme
capacity, student demand and number of the IBSc degree programmes offered. For the reasons
considered above, we suggest that no fewer than ten students will enter an IBSc programme.
The paradigm shift to commissioning of IBSc means that the number entering each programme will
be a function of: 1) degree programme capacity; 2) the number programmes needed to provide the
required subject range.
Each programme should guarantee a number of places and module options; the easiest way of
achieving this may be to have programmes with fixed module contributions – e.g., no options (ringfenced IBSc places on those programmes open to non MBBS students).
6) Recommendations on the selection process
Overall academic ranking should not be a tool for assessing a student’s suitability for a programme
of study, although achieving a certain level of performance in a relevant Phase 1 module or modules
6
(or other criteria such as having studied a particular A level) should be allowed as a criterion for
selection.
It is recommended that interviewing is not part of the selection process although the personal
statement should remain (see appendix 2).
The IBSc selection procedure timeline is documented in appendix 3
An online selection process should replace the current paper based process (see appendix 2).
Students should express an interest in two courses so that if they are unsuccessful or put on a
waiting list for their 1st choice their reserve choice is promoted. The online system will ensure that
reserve choices are selected. Over past years the majority of students have been accepted onto their
first or second choice IBSc degree programme. It is suggested that if at all possible students should
be allocated an IBSc in a programme of a similar category if they are unsuccessful in their 1 st and 2nd
choices (see appendix 2).
7) Proposals for the equitable and appropriate allocation of resources
for the IBSc programme, including bench fees and HEFCEt allocations
The IBSc Programme funding allocation should be transparent and in the public domain. Once
identified, funding should be equitably distributed across IBSc degree programmes.
Presently, the funding for the delivery of an IBSc Degree Programme is dependent on the number of
students enrolled on the programme and which Faculty or Faculties the staff delivering the
programme are members; e.g., if a programme is run solely by FLS FTEs are billed at the “Science”
rate whereas if it originates solely from FBS FTEs are charged at the “Clinical” rate. We suggest that
the HEFCEt funding allocation is identified and distributed at a single IBSc rate across IBSc
Programmes irrespective of faculty.
It is current practice within FLS based IBSc programmes that a laboratory projects supervisor
receives a bench fee of £300 for each project supervised. It is recognised that this is often an
inadequate amount to fully cover the running costs of the project. Therefore all degree programme
organisers, where appropriate, need to confirm that they have the funds to support laboratory
projects .
Currently HEFCEt allocation goes to the Division running the programme. Where staff from more
than one faculty are involved in delivering the course, the distribution of funds should be
transparent and appropriate with reference to work load. FTEs should be allocated on the basis of
defined duties carried out and the work load allocation attached to such duties.
8) Essential criteria for IBSc programmes within the MBBS course at
UCL
Timing and Selection
The IBSc year must be provided to medical students in year 3 of the 6 year MBBS programme as
highlighted in section 4.
While individual programmes may have certain entry criteria (such as the possession of ‘A’ level
physics or satisfactory results in an individual module of the phase 1 course), overall ranking in
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academic achievement should not be used for allocation of student places. However, an appropriate
level of performance in a relevant area of study may be required to enrol on a particular programme
or course unit (including laboratory based projects).
Programme Orientation and Content
The IBSc is part of the medical programme and programme leads will need to provide induction
session before the start of the year that orientate medical students to:
 the programme
 the skills of independent learning
 the expected learning in relation to the overall goals of the Doctor as Scientist and Scholar
element of the MBBS programme
 make explicit the clinical and/or research relevance of the IBSc year.
The course should provide students with exposure to other professionals and scientists and, where
possible, encourage joint working and learning to prepare them for the multidisciplinary nature of
clinical practice and research.
The programme must clearly address the key generic skills of independent learning, critical thinking,
scholarly writing and scientific method. By the end of the IBSc year, building on prior learning in
phase 1, students must be able to critically appraise the findings of studies reported in the medical
and scientific literature, formulate research questions in biomedical science, psychosocial science or
population science, and design studies or experiments to address the questions, apply findings from
the literature to answer questions raised by specific clinical problems and understand the ethical and
governance issues involved in medical research.
The programmes need to identify and articulate their links to the MBBS programme overall
and where relevant the UCLPartners academic themes5.
The programme needs to allow sufficient time for students to comply with the overall requirements
of the MBBS course during the iBSc year (for example maintenance of the portfolio and Early Patient
Contact).
Teaching methods
The IBSc programme must be able to provide small group work or tutorial sessions beyond those
associated with the project to facilitate the development of critical thinking and/or critical appraisal
skills.
IBSc programmes must be able to provide robust personal tutoring
IBSc programmes must consist of 4 course units and provide a compulsory laboratory, field, or
literature based project. The project must contribute between 1 and 1.5 course units.
Where the project consists of literature based study this needs to be sufficiently robust to ensure
students gain the appropriate competencies outlined in criteria 5 above.
5
Either the programme’s links to the UCLP emerging research theme areas or the overall themes of:
harnessing academia to effect health gain; improving the health of populations locally, nationally or globally;
illness prevention or the role of primary care/novel service provision.
8
9) Proposed Strategy for quality management and enhancement (QME)
and development of the IBSc programme 2010-2015

From January 2011 UCL will neither customarily accept external applications to the IBSc
Programme nor customarily permit UCL students to leave the IBSc Programme to study at
external institutions

From September 2012 the IBSc programme will run exclusively within year 3 of the 6 year
MBBS programme

The name Integrated BSc will adopted from September 2013
The key features of the proposed structure to achieve quality management and enhancement are
outlined in Fig. 1. The IBSc Steering Committee is established and is responsible for overseeing and
monitoring the IBSc programme (http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medicalschool/organisationalstructures/1011-MBBS-2-Committees-June-10.pdf).
.
To ensure that all IBSc degree programmes are fit for purpose an IBSc strategy group (Sub Dean IBSc,
all MBBS Curriculum Sub Deans, FLS Faculty Tutor) will be established and work with the IBSc
Steering Committee to:

Oversee the annual review that will monitor programme quality and alignment with
required MBBS programme outcomes.

Provide feedback to degree programme organisers and in cases where programmes have
not met the required essential criteria explain the action required to become compliant and
the timeline. For the degree programme to remain in the IBSc portfolio the degree
programme tutor will be required to produce an action plan that will need to be endorsed by
the IBSc strategy group.

Commission new IBSc degree programmes/modules and/or discontinue established degree
programmes/modules as indicated following review .

Ensure that number of IBSc degree programmes offered provide suitable student choice
over the range of programmes deemed to be appropriate while being mindful of resource
limitations.
As part of the monitoring process an IBSc Programme student staff committee will be established
and all students will complete a questionnaire concerning their IBSc experience: this questionnaire
will supplement degree programme specific feedback.
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FIG. 1
Objectives for April 2011

Each IBSc Degree Management Group will either provide evidence that their programme
meets the essential criteria for IBSc programmes or where there is non-compliance provide
details of planned changes, an indicative timeline for changes and any possible barriers to
implementation (see IBSc Degree programme Return at end of this document).

The IBSc Steering Committee and IBSc Strategy Group will then endorse the IBSc Degree
Programme, approve the planned changes and timeline or provide feedback on the rejected
action plan. If it is considered that the degree programme could meet the criteria every
effort will be made to assist the degree programme organisers to successfully address issues
of concern with a view to approval.
Full compliance required by September 2012

Degree programmes will be required to become fully compliant by September 2012 for
inclusion in the IntBSc programme academic year 2013-14.
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Appendix 1
Intercalated BSc Policy
From 2010-11 all undergraduate students entering the MBBS course will be expected to intercalate after
nd
successful completion of the 2 year of their programme. This will be stated in the Medical School prospectus
and on the Intercalated BSc webpage;
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medicalschool/bsc-ibsc
The Intercalated BSc is compulsory for all MBBS Students unless they entered the programme as UK
graduate (holding a BSc/BA or higher qualification)
All non-graduate UCL medical students must therefore select their choice of BSc programme to during the 2
year of the MBBS programme and Intercalate before entering Phase 2.
nd
The IBSc classification will be assessed using a weighting of 1:1:6 (Year 1: Year 2 : IBSc year) for both Internal
and external students (from 2010 entry to the IBSc year)
1. Graduate MBBS Students (UK & Overseas)
Graduates holding an overseas BSc/BA or higher qualification must consult Dr B A Cross by February preceding the upcoming Intercalated BSc Year, should they wish to request an exemption from the Intercalated
BSc year.
MBBS students who are UK Graduates and who would like to do an Intercalated BSc or apply to do an MSc
during the ‘Intercalated year’ should contact Dr B A Cross to discuss the matter by February preceding the
upcoming Intercalated BSc Year.
2. Permission to Intercalate externally
Students are expected to intercalate at UCL however in special circumstances students can request permission
to intercalate at an external UK university.
Permission to Intercalate externally must be requested from Dr B A Cross.
Failure to secure a place externally will mean the student must intercalate at UCL and may be allocated an IBSc
by the IBSc admissions Tutor if the application process has closed.
3. Interruptions (After Phase 1 and during Intercalated BSc Year)
Students who interrupt during their intercalated BSc year must return to their IBSc year before entering the
next phase of the programme (if an exemption is required this should be discussed with Dr B A Cross)
Students cannot be interrupted from study retrospectively.
nd
Students who interrupt after the 2 year of the MBBS programme will be due to intercalate upon returning to
the next academic year. Interrupted students must engage in the Intercalated BSc application process*. Failure
to apply will result in the student being allocated a place on an Intercalated BSc course.
*Students interrupting due to personal or medical reasons will be consulted by Dr B A Cross on an individual
basis.
4. Withdrawing from IBSc examinations
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Students who withdraw from examinations during their IBSc year must complete their outstanding
examinations the following academic year either as a part-time student or whilst the student is enrolled in
Phase 2 Year 1 and no later. Students must consult Dr Peter Raven before entering Phase 2 to arrange for
study time to be granted alongside their current timetable. A suspension of regulations will need to be sought
from UCL to permit concurrent registration.
Students cannot be withdrawn from examinations retrospectively.
Students cannot apply for deferred assessment (in the current or next academic year); withdrawals from
examinations will only be made in exceptional circumstances.
5. Withdrawing from an IBSc course
Should a student wish to withdraw completely from the IBSc year they must consult their IBSc course tutor and
Dr B A Cross to discuss the matter. If considered the appropriate action, Dr B A Cross will instigate the
paperwork and issue the student with further instructions regarding their progress.
Students cannot be withdrawn from an IBSc course retrospectively.
6. Requesting an Exemption
Exemptions from the Intercalated BSc year will only be considered on the following basis:
If the student is experiencing severe financial difficulty (Student or Sponsor) documentary evidence to
be provided.
The student’s academic ability is not deemed suitable by Dr B A Cross
Other personal circumstances deemed appropriate for exemption by Dr B A Cross
External Students
From January 2011 UCL will no longer accept applications to intercalate from students at external institutions.
A note will be placed on the IBSc website.
March 2010 Dr Brenda Cross
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Appendix 2
Recommendations for the Application Process. Prepared by Dr Brenda Cross 21/6/10
Intercalated BSc booklet to be available online only.
An online application process should replace the current paper based process.
Discussions have already taken place with Management Systems who feel it would be viable and beneficial to
move the IBSc applications to an online system.
Applications will still require the following:




Personal details
Yr 1 Results
Personal statements
Reference
st
nd
Students should still select a 1 and 2 choice of IBSc. Currently approximately 90% of students Phase 1
st
nd
students who apply are placed on their 1 or 2 choice. Decreasing the number of IBSc’s available and therefore
increasing the quota in each course will mean that this will still be true and possibly a higher percentage will
st
nd
receive their 1 or 2 choice.
It is suggested that students should be allocated an IBSc in a programme of a similar category if they are
st
nd
unsuccessful in their 1 and 2 choices (Subject to remaining quota). Students will be informed of this procedure
in the Intercalated BSc booklet. Individual requests are likely to be received and these will be discussed at the
discretion of the IBSc Admissions tutor Dr Cross.
The following categories have been identified.
Group A
Group B
Group C
Anatomy & Developmental Biology
Clinical Sciences
History of Medicine
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Child Health
International Health
Human Genetic/Genetics
Medical Physics &
Bioengineering
Medical Anthropology
Immunology & Cell Pathology
Infection
Orthopaedic Science
Molecular Medicine
Psychology
Primary Health Care
Neuroscience
Pharmacology
Speech Science and
Communication
Physiology & Pharmacology
Surgical Sciences
Philosophy Medicine & Society
Physiology
It is recommended that ‘formal’ interviewing is not part of the admissions process. Tutors may need to place
students in laboratories and some students may have lots of contact with patients, therefore it may be reasonable
for tutors to meet with the applicants before they make their final decision. To be reviewed once the final IBSc list
has been decided.
The personal statement will remain as it is viewed as a valuable assessment method. It is suggested that course
tutors produce a list of desired criteria/ personal attributes required of their IBSc students to be available in the
intercalated BSc booklet: applicants can then address the criteria in their personal statements. Students not
meeting or addressing the criteria would therefore be able to clearly see why they have been unsuccessful.
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Quota
It is recommended that initially the total Home/Eu quota be split equally between the groups, (depending on
whether projects can be allocated for this number of students) Adjustment to quota can then be made once
applications have been received and popularity of the courses has been identified.
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Appendix 3
IBSc Application Process
Oct/Nov
Tutors amend IBSc prospectus entry, submitted to RH
November
IBSc steering committee (Amendments to application
process, quota's set deadline, inform tutors of programme
amendment date May 31st Module Amendment date June
30th PIQ 31st Dec)
Nov/Dec
IBSc prospectus with Print room
End Dec
IBSc prospectus available on Line
Jan
IBSc application form available online for UCL student and
by request for external applicants
Jan
IBSc fair
March 1st Week
IBSc application deadline, Applications logged and
Photocopied by RH and distributed to relevant
departments
Mid-March
List of those who have applied to intercalate to be sent to
Phase 1 & 2 admin leads to help with year lists and
timetabling
March onwards
Departments recommend offers, signed off by BC, issued
by RH (offers are conditional on passing current year of
study at 1st attempt)
March onwards
Decisions logged and 2nd choice applications sent onto
departments
May onwards
Documents from external applicants received and chased
Last Week May
Phase 1 exam board - results to be obtained from Phase 1
ELO
End May/Mid -June IBSc exam boards - results to be returned by ELO to
Rebecca/Rebecca to chase
June
Updated list of students expected to intercalate to be sent
Phase 1 & 2 admin
1st wk June
Steering committee meeting to discuss any unplaced
students and to identify places for them.
End September
Student commence IBSc Programme
IBSc Tutors RH
RH BC IBSc Tutors
RH
RH
RH
RH BC
RH
RH
IBSc Tutors RH BC
RH
RH
RH
RH
RH
RH BC IBSc Tutors
15
Appendix 4
APRIL Annual IBSc Degree programme Return
Self assessment of compliance with essential criteria
(see “Essential Criteria for IBSc Programmes within the MBBS programme” in Intercalated BSc (IBSc) Review and Strategy Document 2010)
Category
REQUIREMENT
Financial
Viability
The Degree Programme
must be financially
viable
Timing and
Selection
The IBSc year must be
provided to medical
students exclusively in
year 3 of the 6 year
MBBS undergraduate
programme (from 201213).
1
2
Self assessment
statement on
compliance
Details of changes
planned or areas
under review
Indicative timeline for
implementation of
planned changes or
review
Challenges to
implementation
Evidence used to
verify extent of
compliance (name
specific
documents)
Overall ranking in
academic achievement is
16
not used for allocation
of student places on
programme or on
modules
Programme
Orientation
and Content
Induction Session
Provided
3
4
Provides students with
exposure to other
professionals and
scientist.
5
Clearly addresses the
key generic skills of
independent learning,
critical thinking,
scholarly writing and
scientific method.
Identify links with
UCLP/ASHC
6
7
Provides sufficient time
for students to maintain
clinical contact (e.g.,
17
maintenance of
portfolio)
Teaching
Methods
8
Provides small group
work or tutorial sessions
to facilitate the
development of high
level skills such as critical
thinking.
9
Provides robust personal
tutoring in line with the
requirements of the
MBBS course overall
10
Consists of 4 course
units and provides a
compulsory laboratory,
field, or literature based
project. The project
must contribute
between 1 and 1.5
course units.
11
Literature based project
is sufficiently robust to
ensure students gain the
18
appropriate
competencies outlined
under criteria 5 in
Essential Criteria
Document
Quality
management
and
Enhancement
12
Degree Programme
annual return completed
providing Degree
Programme and Module
Mark statistics
13
Response to student
feedback from
questionnaires and SSCC
19
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