ASP Admission Criteria Overview

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ASP Admission Criteria Overview
Minimum Criteria
Year
2007
2008
2009
2010
WGPA
2.4
2.3
2.5
2.5
SAT (CR+M)
900
900
800
900
ACT (Comp.)
19
19
18
19
Target Enrollment
150
160
180
120
SAT (CR+M)
920
926
859
933
ACT (Comp.)
18.6
19.6
17.8
19.5
Applicant Pool
532
497
586
410
SAT (CR+M)
921
924
859
933
ACT (Comp.)
18.6
19.3
17.8
19.5
Admit Pool
490
446
542
379
SAT (CR+M)
924
923
871
931
ACT (Comp.)
19.1
19.5
18
19
Enrolled
160
152
179
112
Actual Applicant Pool
Year
2007
2008
2009
2010
WGPA
2.74
2.95
3.16
2.90
Actual Admit Pool
Year
2007
2008
2009
2010
WGPA
2.74
2.94
3.16
2.88
Actual Enrolled
Year
2007
2008
2009
2010
WGPA
2.77
2.91
3.04
2.85
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Fall-to-Fall Retention Rate
62.59%
67.11%
76.05%
TBD
Appendix A
Overview of ASP Collaboration with Other Campus Offices and Programs
The following is a list and brief description of the various offices that the ASP Coordinator works
with each year to administer the program:
Office of Admission: coordinates concerning admission criteria, number of students admitted,
admission letters and communication with students, and students enrolling in the program
New Student Orientation: collaborates regarding ASP orientation dates, schedule,
programming, check-in procedures, parent workshops, and overall details, including use of ASP
orientation fee for funding
Advising Center: collaborates closely regarding student issues and concerns, conducts
training for advisors regarding student evaluation tools and materials, coordinates regarding
ASP orientation session content, advises regarding student course scheduling, collaborates on
updating ASP CatWalk, and consults about academic standing procedures for ASP students
Residential Living: consults regarding selection of summer residence hall, selection and hiring
of ASP resident staff, programming and activity schedule, staff training and retreat, student
concerns, student conduct issues, and day-to-day operations during summer session;
coordinates regarding summer conference schedule and potential conflicts
Financial Aid: collaborates regarding summer financial aid distribution, awards, and missing
student information
Registrar’s Office: communicates about course scheduling, classroom selections, establishing
parts of term for ASP summer session, grading, 5th week grade reporting, and academic
standing procedures for ASP students
Student Support Services and Disability Services: communicates regarding student use of
resources and eligibility
Academic Departments: collaborate regarding selection of faculty, scheduling of course
sections, faculty responsibilities and student issues, and hiring of graduate teaching assistants
Dining Services: communicates regarding summer schedule, services, and programming
University Center: coordinates for use of space, programming, and activities; collaborates with
Last Minute Productions for joint activities
Base Camp Cullowhee: coordinates for planning of summer outdoor programs and activities
Intramurals Office: collaborates to plan and implement ASP intramural programs and activities
Student Accounts: collaborates regarding payment deadlines and procedures for summer
session, tuition and housing deposits, student billing, and resident staff payroll deduction
procedures
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix B, page 1
Service Learning: collaborates on selection of service projects for summer and coordinating
dates, locations, and implementation, also coordinates training with faculty and staff
Health Services: communicates regarding mandatory student health insurance requirements
for the summer session, billing, and immunizations
Student and Community Ethics: collaborates on revising ASP Participation Agreement,
establishing and handling ASP conduct violation procedures, ASP orientation session content,
and conducting Alcohol Wise assessments
Catamount Bookstore: coordinates regarding course textbook orders, program supplies, and
scheduling for students to pick up books
Student Employment: consults regarding establishing positions and hiring procedures for ASP
program assistants, peer mentors, and Supplemental Instruction leaders
Leadership Programs: establish LEAD course and curriculum for training peer mentors;
coordinate regarding summer programs
Parking Services: establish procedures for ASP student parking and obtaining permits
One Stop: coordinate regarding services during opening of ASP summer session as well as
student billing questions and assistance
CatCard Office: establish procedures to scanning CatCards to record student attendance for
required ASP summer workshops and events
Class TIPS: coordinate regarding student workshops, programs, and support
Catamount Tutoring Center: collaborate regarding selection, hiring, training, and supervison
of Supplemental Instruction Leaders for ASP summer classes; communicate regarding specific
student tutoring needs and use of resources during academic year
Writing Center: collaborate regarding selection, hiring, training, and supervision of graduate
teaching assistants/writing tutors to teach COUN 140: College Success Seminar; consults
regarding course curriculum and requirements
Provost/Summer School Office: coordinates regarding funding and use of ASP account
Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs: coordinates regarding funding from student fees
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix B, page 2
Western Carolina University
Division of Enrollment Management
Interim Provost
Dr. Linda Stanford
Senior Associate Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs
Dr. Fred Hinson
Academic Success
Program
Advising
Disability Services
Financial Aid
David Goss
Dr. Lance Alexis
Trina Orr
Janina C. DeHart
OneStop Student
Service Center
Registrar
Student Support
Services
Executive
Assistant
Suzanne Baker
Dina Towey
Larry Hammer
Mike Razdrh
 Oversees the planning and
coordination of all program
activities and implementation of requirements
 Collaborates with academic
departments and other campus offices in administration
of the program
 Provides individual support
to students, as needed
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix C
Academic Success Program Coordinator
Role: To serve as the primary administrator and coordinator for the Academic Success
Program in the Division of Enrollment Management.
Competencies: Position requires a master’s degree in a field closely related to human
development. Preference will be given to candidates with degrees in counseling, student
development, or related field and experience in academic support services. 3 - 5 years
experience in academic advising and program coordination, implementation, and evaluation
preferred.
Duties:
Administrative
 Oversee the planning and coordination of all program activities and implementation of
requirements
 Collaborate with Office of Admission regarding student admission procedures, admission
status, and follow up
 Maintain student admit information and data
 Participate in recruiting initiatives, such as Open House and Western On Tour
 Collaborate with Orientation to schedule and plan ASP session for students and parents,
including registration process and distribution of information
 Develop, coordinate, and oversee Parents as Partners sessions for ASP orientation
session
 Collaborate with Advising Center and Student Support Services regarding advisor
assignments, orientation schedule, and advising roles
 Provide ongoing consultation with Advising Center and Student Support Services to
develop and monitor case-management model of advising for addressing student needs
and critical issues
 Maintain progress reporting system to identify student issues throughout the first year;
work closely with the Advising Center and Student Support Services regarding follow up
with students
 Develop training manual and materials for all ASP faculty and staff
 Provide information to faculty and staff concerning expectations and guidelines
 Plan and oversee all ASP staff and faculty trainings
 Plan and oversee summer ASP closing session and awards ceremony
 Enforce program requirements & assist with disciplinary procedures, actions, and follow
through in consultation with the Department of Student Community Ethics
 Select student assessment instruments (such as the College Student Inventory,
Academic Hope Scale, etc.) and train advisors in effectively using the data in student
appointments
 Develop and oversee assessment plan and evaluation activities in coordination with the
Office of Institutional Planning & Effectiveness
 Maintain data on student performance, retention, and progress towards graduation
 Oversee ASP budget and expenditures
 Assist with RA selection and training
 Oversee the application and selection process for peer mentors
 Provide training and supervision for peer mentors, including teaching leadership course
and handling payroll issues
 Responsible for overall ASP office operations
 Maintain program website
 Develop and maintain office database and other computer applications
 Oversee and maintain budget operations and processes
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix D, page 1
Academic
 Maintain collaboration with academic departments to coordinate selection of faculty and
scheduling of courses
 Work with faculty to set up course pairings and to promote collaboration for creating and
sustaining the Summer Academic Themes
 Oversee course building and scheduling
 Develop training schedule and resources for faculty
 Review course syllabi and work with faculty to maintain consistency
 Work with instructors to coordinate and plan class field trips
 Plan and coordinate student study hall schedule, including staff supervision
 Coordinate with Writing Center to develop COUN 140 curriculum for the summer and to
establish writing tutor schedule and training
 Coordinate with the Catamount Academic Tutoring (CAT) Center regarding
implementation and oversight of Supplemental Instruction (SI) program for ASP, including
hiring and training SI leaders
 Collaborate with Center for Service Learning to schedule and coordinate projects and
provide information to faculty and staff
 Coordinate with Class TIPS regarding workshops and other support for ASP students
with regard to computer and technology issues
 Teach section of LC 101: College Success Seminar each spring for ASP students who
are placed on Academic Probation at the end of the fall semester
 Plan and coordinate career exploration and development activities and programs
Programming
 Collaborate with Department of Residential Living for program planning and
implementation
 Work closely with resident staff to plan and coordinate all ASP student activities and
programs for summer and academic year
 Work with resident staff to plan student development sessions for summer and academic
year
 Collaborate with BaseCamp Cullowhee to schedule and plan events and group building
activities
 Coordinate with campus offices regarding use of space, resources, and services (UC,
FPAC, Ramsey, catering, etc.) for all ASP events and programs
 Prepare and maintain calendar of events, activities, and programs
 Schedule vehicles, drivers, and supervision for all off-campus events
 Coordinate with faculty and staff to schedule guest speakers and presenters
Miscellaneous
 Serve as a member of the First-Year Experience Cabinet which establishes
communication and coordination of initiatives with first-year students
 Serve on the Provost’s Administrative Council
 Communicate with parents, students, faculty, and staff to provide program information
 Prepare information and materials for prospective students and parents
 Provide supervision to student workers, including graduate student interns
 Provide intervention with individual student issues as needed
 Coordinate ordering of promotional materials and other office supplies and educational
materials
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix D, page 2
Janina Cauley DeHart
54 Waxwing Way
Whittier, NC 28789
Phone: 828-226-0785 cell; 828-227-2217 wk.
Email: [email protected]
Education
Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Subject Area: Anthropology/Native American Studies
18 Hours of Graduate Coursework
May 2009
Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Degree: Community Counseling
Master of Science
December 1997
University of North Carolina at Pembroke, Pembroke, NC
Major: American Indian Studies; Minor: Social Welfare
Bachelor of Arts
May 1995
Work Experience
Academic Success Program Coordinator
October 2008 – Present
Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Academic Success Program (ASP)
 Oversee the planning and implementation of all program components including programs, activities, and
requirements
 Collaborate with Residential Living for planning & implementation
 Collaborate with Admissions regarding student admission status, admission procedures, and follow up
 Collaborate with other campus offices and programs such as Orientation, Base Camp Cullowhee,
Service Learning, University Center, Academic Success Centers, etc.
 Work with academic departments to schedule classes and faculty
 Provide training and oversight to approximately 40 ASP faculty and staff
 Developed and conduct Parents as Partner workshops during Orientation session
 Participate in recruiting initiatives, such as Open House and Western On Tour
 Provide information to participants and parents before arrival at ASP (i.e. development of website,
publications, etc.)
 Maintain data on student performance, retention, and progress towards graduation
 Hold orientation meeting(s) for ASP students and parents
 Conduct weekly case management meetings with faculty & staff during summer term
 Enforce program requirements and assist with disciplinary procedures, actions, and follow through
 Oversee ASP budget and expenditures
 Select and provide training and supervision for ASP Peer Mentors
 Provide continuing support to individual students as needed and refer students to appropriate resources
(Student Support Services, Career Center, Counseling Services, etc.)
Academic Recovery Program & Readmission Process (this role was moved to Director of Advising in
Spring 2010)
 Coordinated support for readmitted students in academic difficulty
 Oversaw readmission processes for readmitted students
Program Coordinator
April 2003 – September 2008
Advising Center, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Academic Success Program
 Oversaw the planning and implementation of all activities and related programming for the Academic
Success Program
 Served as primary Academic Advisor to Summer ASP students
 Taught classes for ASP students in fall semester
Learning Contract Program
 Coordinated and scheduled LC 101: College Success Seminar classes
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix E, page 1
 Recruited instructors and facilitated instructor development meetings and check-in sessions
 Provided consultation with instructors regarding student issues and interventions
 Enforced requirements and met with individual students regarding absences, program requirements,
specific issues, and follow up
 Assisted with disciplinary actions and decisions resulting from Learning Contract violations
 Evaluated program and assisted in changing and further developing policies and requirements
 Consulted with other schools, offices, and staff to design and implemented the Learning Contract
Program
Early Alert System
 Provided overall supervision and coordination of the Early Alert System
 Provided consultation to faculty and staff regarding use of the system and making referrals
 Provided training to Academic Advisors and Resident Directors concerning follow up of referrals
 Served as a member of the Case Management Team and assisted in reviewing cases for follow up
 Evaluated program and assisted in changing and further developing policies and procedures
 Consulted with other schools, offices, and staff to design and implement the Early Alert System
Academic Probation and Suspension
 Served as a resource to university community to provide clarification for academic probation &
suspension policies
 Revised letters and information sheets for Academic Probation, Academic Suspension, and Learning
Contracts at the end of each academic term
 Assisted with coordinating deadlines and correspondence with Registrar’s office, Appeals Board, and
other offices
 Oversaw suspension appeal procedures and provided appeals statistical data to the Appeals Board
 Served on the Appeals Board as Advising Center representative
 Served a primary role in revising the Academic Probation and Academic Suspension policies for the
university
 Initiated the development of readmission procedures for students returning to the university who are not
in good academic standing
Academic Advisor
April 2001 – March 2003
Advising Center, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
 Provided academic advising and other assistance to approximately 225 – 250 students per year.
 Addressed parent concerns regarding student academic performance and other issues.
 Taught sections of COUN 140: College Study Techniques, USI 130: University Experience, and LC 101:
College Success Seminar.
 Coordinated the Summer Academic Success Program (ASP) in conjunction with the Residential Living,
Admissions, Continuing Education and Summer School offices.
 Worked extensively with developing the Learning Contract Program and LC 101: College Success
Seminar.
 Led orientation sessions for students and parents. Served on the Orientation Planning Committee and
the Director of Orientation Programs search committee.
Qualla Boundary Coordinator
April 1999 – March 2001
Mountain Mediation Services, Cherokee, NC
 Coordinated conflict resolution services and mediation programs for the Qualla Boundary and Swain
County.
 Served as Chairperson of Advisory Committees on the Qualla Boundary and in Swain County.
 Maintained community relations and developed referral sources.
 Coordinated and facilitated life skills programs for court-involved youth and their family members.
 Provided training and consultation to local schools in the areas of conflict resolution and peer mediation.
 Supervised a Truancy Mediation Program for schools in Cherokee and Swain County.
 Assisted with grant writing and program management.
AmeriCorps*VISTA Service Member
Mountain Mediation Services, Sylva and Cherokee, NC
 Maintained operations of the Jackson County office and started the Cherokee office.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
1998 – 1999
Appendix E, page 2



Scheduled mediations in Jackson County and the Qualla Boundary. Mediated, performed intakes, and
assisted with MMS court procedures in Jackson, Haywood, and Swain Counties and on the Qualla
Boundary.
Worked with refining case management techniques and developing community referral procedures.
Promoted MMS services and programs to the community.
Other Experience
Counselor Intern
Unity Regional Youth Treatment Center, Cherokee, NC
Program Director
Camp Mundo Vista, Asheboro, NC
Fall 1997
Summer 1997
Career Counselor, Practicum
Career Services Center, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Spring 1997
Graduate Assistant
Student Support Services, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
1996 – 1997
Resident Manager
North Carolina Center for the Advancement of Teaching (NCCAT)
1996
1995 – 1996
Intern
Baptist Student Center, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Instructor, COUN 140: College Study Techniques
Department of Human Services, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
Summer Youth Worker
Navajo Reservation, New Mexico and Arizona
1995
Summer 1994
Teaching Experience
Instructor, LEAD 142: Peer Education in Leadership, Various terms since 2007
Designed and taught a leadership course to train and supervise students serving as Peer Mentors for
the Academic Success Program. Also provided supervision for graduate teaching assistants who
taught the course during various terms.
Instructor, LC 101: College Success Seminar, Various terms since 2003
Designed and taught course for students on academic probation to help them improve their strategies
for success in college. Currently teach specific sections for ASP students each spring.
Instructor, ANTH 493: Topics – Native American Images, Fall 2009
Designed and taught course to address stereotypes of Native Americans in various formats of media
and popular culture. Course was offered as credit for Anthropology majors and was used as an option
for the Upper Level Perspective category of Liberal Studies.
Assistant, ANTH 573: Contemporary Cherokee Culture and Society, Fall 2008
Assisted with class and presented on topics including stages of prehistory and Cherokee culture.
Assistant, ANTH 120: Comparative Cultural Systems, Summer 2008
Assisted with class and presented on topics including Native American religion and culture.
Instructor, COUN 230: Introduction to Peer Helping, Various terms; 2006 - 2007
Designed and taught course to train and supervise students serving as Peer Mentors for the Academic
Success Program.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix E, page 3
Instructor, USI 130: University Experience, Various terms; 2005 - 2007
Taught course for freshmen and students in the Academic Success Program to assist with their
successful transition to college.
Instructor, COUN 140: College Study Techniques, Various terms; 2001 - 2005
Taught course for students in the Academic Success Program to assist with their successful transition to
college and improving their study habits.
Presentations
2009 NACADA National Annual Conference. Grin and bear it? Contemplating customer service.
San Antonio, TX. October, 2009. Co-Presenter.
2008 NACADA Region 3 Conference. Grin and bear it? Contemplating customer service.
Columbia, SC. May, 2008. Co-Presenter.
2008 NC College Access Conference. Partnering of Western Carolina University and Southwestern
Community College for academic success: A summer bridge program. Co-Presenter.
2007 NCCCFA Conference. Partnering for academic success: A collaborative effort between WCU &
SCC. Co-Presenter.
2007 WCU Faculty Enrichment and Education Day. Empowering students in academic difficulty.
Cullowhee, NC. February, 2007. Presenter.
Professional Activities & Accomplishments
National Certified Counselor (NCC), 1998 – Present
National Academic Advising Association (NACADA), Member, 2001 – Present
NACADA National, Regional, and State Conferences, Attendee, 2001 – Present
NACADA Leadership
 North Carolina State Liaison, 2008 – 2010
 Region 3 Steering Committee Member, 2005 – 2010
 Region 3 Conference Chair, 2007
On Course Facilitator Workshop, Participant, 2005
On Course Ambassador, 2005 – Present
WCU Student Affairs Collaboration Award, Co-recipient, 2006
WCU Faculty Enrichment and Education Day, Committee Member, 2007 – 2009
Henry Lewis Suggs Award of Excellence, Selection Committee Member, 2006 – Present
WCU Council on Undergraduate Early Experiences, Member, 2007 - 2009
Digali’i: Native American Student Organization, Advisor, 2008 – Present
WCU Transition Course Committee, Member, 2009 - Present
WCU University Advising Council, Member, 2009 - Present
American Indian Women of Proud Nations, Host Committee Member, 2010
WCU First-Year Cabinet, Member, 2010 - Present
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix E, page 4
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix F
2010 Summer Academic Themes
Students have the opportunity to choose from a variety of academic themes. Each theme consists of
three courses which are grouped together. This allows the instructors to work together to relate the
classes and provide a collaborative learning experience.
Cultures: Past and Present
ANTH 120: Comparative Cultural Systems; Anne Rogers
ENGL 190: First Year Seminar; Murat Yazan
COUN 140: College Study Techniques; Rain Newcomb
Students will examine aspects of culture including kinship, religion, economic systems, political structure,
warfare, agriculture, and art with an emphasis on the Cherokee Indians. The class will include field
experiences in the local area, such as visits to the Museum of the Cherokee Indian and former Cherokee
town sites.
Mind Over Matter
PSY 150: General Psychology; Terry Sloan
ENGL 190: First Year Seminar; Julia McLeod
COUN 140: College Study Techniques; Brandon Robinson
Students will explore human behavior as it applies to themselves, their families and friends, as well as our
culture. They will be introduced to research of many concepts of psychology, including: how humans
develop, how humans behave in social situations, how humans choose mates, psychological disorders of
humans, and gender differences. Each student will complete a personal case study during the course.
Society and You
SOC 103: Human Society; Nathan Dollar
ENGL 190: First Year Seminar; Joy Jansen
COUN 140: College Study Techniques; Alan Wray
Students will develop a basic knowledge of the social world and their place in it. Central sociological
concepts, theories, and methodologies are the focus of class discussions, group work, and projects.
Each of these will present students with an opportunity to apply what they are learning to the social world
around them, thus developing their sociological imagination.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix G
2010 ASP Classes
CRN
50447
50448
50449
50450
50451
50452
SUBJ
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
ENGL
CRSE
190
190
190
190
190
190
SEQ
80
81
82
83
84
85
CLS DAYS
MTWRF
MTWRF
MTWRF
MTWRF
MTWRF
MTWRF
START
10:15AM
08:30AM
10:15AM
08:30AM
10:15AM
08:30AM
END
11:45AM
10:00AM
11:45AM
10:00AM
11:45AM
10:00AM
BLDG ROOM
CO 203
CO 203
CO 103
CO 103
CO 104
CO 104
INSTRUCTOR
Murat Yazan
Murat Yazan
Joy Jansen
Joy Jansen
Julia McLeod
Julia McLeod
CRN
50663
50664
50665
50666
50667
50668
SUBJ
ANTH
ANTH
SOC
SOC
PSY
PSY
CRSE
120
120
103
103
150
150
SC
80
81
82
83
84
85
CLS DAYS
MTWRF
MTWRF
MTWRF
MTWRF
MTWRF
MTWRF
START
8:30AM
10:15AM
8:30AM
10:15AM
8:30AM
10:15AM
END
10:00AM
11:45AM
10:00AM
11:45AM
10:00AM
11:45AM
BLDG ROOM
CO 303
CO 303
CO 301
CO 301
KL 339
KL 339
INSTRUCTOR
Anne Rogers
Anne Rogers
Nathan Dollar
Nathan Dollar
Terry Sloan
Terry Sloan
CRN
50465
50466
50467
50468
50469
50470
SUBJ
COUN
COUN
COUN
COUN
COUN
COUN
CRSE
140
140
140
140
140
140
SEQ
80
81
82
83
84
85
CLS DAYS START
END
BLDG ROOM
TR
02:45PM 04:15PM KL 264
TR
01:00PM 02:30PM KL 264
TR
02:45PM 04:15PM KL 265
TR
01:00PM 02:30PM KL 265
TR
02:45PM 04:15PM KL 338
TR
01:00PM 02:30PM KL 338
INSTRUCTOR
Rain Newcomb
Rain Newcomb
Alan Wray
Alan Wray
Brandon Robinson
Brandon Robinson
CRN
50669
50670
SUBJ
SH
SH
CRSE
130
130
SEQ
80
81
INSTRUCTOR
Marshall Cannon
Colin Wiseman
50671
50672
SH
SH
130
130
82
83
50673
50674
SH
SH
130
130
84
85
CLS DAYS
MTWR
MW
TR
MTWR
MW
TR
MTWR
MW
TR
START
01:00PM
01:00PM
02:45PM
01:00PM
01:00PM
02:45PM
01:00PM
01:00PM
02:45PM
Academic Success Program Review 2010
END
02:30PM
02:30PM
04:15PM
02:30PM
02:30PM
04:15PM
02:30PM
02:30PM
04:15PM
BLDG ROOM
CO 203
CO 104
CO 104
KL 117
KL 339
KL 339
CO 301
CO 303
CO 303
Alexis Cuthbertson
Scott Lundgren
Lee Roddick
Caleb Chandler
SI LEADERS
Seth Sherrin
Andrea Sloan
Ruth Hudson
SI Sessions
MTWR CO 103
MW KL 111
TR KL 112
MW CO 102
TR CO 204
Appendix H
Student Name:
Student ID:
ASP Group:
1
Academic Advisor:
2010 Summer Course Schedule
CRN
SUBJ
CRSE
SC
TITLE
CLASS
DAYS
START
END
BLDG
RM
INSTRUCTOR
50447
ENGL
190
80
First Year
Seminar in
Literature
MTWRF
10:15A
11:45A
CO 203
Murat Yazan
50663
ANTH
120
80
Comparative
Cultural
Systems
MTWRF
08:30A
10:00A
CO 303
Anne Rogers
50465
COUN
140
80
College
Success
Seminar
TR
02:45P
04:15P
KL 264
Rain
Newcomb
50669
SH
130
80
Study Hall
MTWR
01:00P
02:30P
CO 203
Marshall
Cannon
WCU
101
Catamount
Basics
F
1:00P
2:30P
UC
Theater
Janina DeHart
100
What’s
H.O.T.
(Happening
on Tuesday)
T
7:00P
8:00P
UC
Theater
Brian Boyer &
Kim Hardaway
RL
M=Monday; T=Tuesday; W=Wednesday; R=Thursday; F=Friday
CO=Coulter; KL=Killian
Notes:
Monday, July 5
th
Monday, July 12
Independence Day Holiday – No Classes Meet
th
Wednesday, July 28
Service Learning Project (TBA)
th
Class Field Trip (TBA)
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix I
Overview of ASP Course Progression
2007 ASP Courses
Summer
ENGL 101
EDRD 150 (based on SAT verbal score)
Liberal Studies: PSY 150, BA 133, SOC 103 (for those not in EDRD)
USI 130
Fall
ENGL 102 (paired ASP sections)
USI 140 (paired ASP sections)
2008 ASP Courses
Summer
ENGL 190
EDRD 150 (based on SAT verbal score)
Liberal Studies: PSY 150, BA 133, ANTH 120, or SOC 103 (for those not in EDRD)
COUN 140
Fall
USI 140
ENGL 101 (non-specific sections)
2009 ASP Courses
Summer
ENGL 190
EDRD 150 (based on SAT verbal score)
Liberal Studies: PSY 150 or ANTH 120 (for those not in EDRD)
COUN 140
Fall
ENGL 101 (non-specific sections)
Students should be enrolled in a WCU transition course (USI 130 or LEAD 143) or marching band
2010 ASP Courses
Summer
ENGL 190
Liberal Studies: PSY 150, ANTH 120, SOC 103
COUN 140
Fall
ENGL 101 (non-specific sections)
Students have the option to choose one of the LEAD 143 Western Carolina PEAKS themed courses
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix J
WESTERN CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Academic Success Program
Participation Agreement
Carefully read the following agreement. Write your initials in the space at the left of each line to indicate that you understand
and will comply with each of the following policies and then sign and complete all information requested.
I understand that I must complete my high school classes with satisfactory grades and pass all courses listed as Minimum Admissions
Requirement course units. If I fail any of these classes, I will not be able to attend Western Carolina University.
I understand that my participation in the Academic Success Program requires a commitment for my first academic year at WCU
(Summer 2010-Spring 2011).
I agree to begin the Academic Success Program in the 2010 Summer Session and understand that the program will start with move-in
on Sunday, June 27, 2010.
I understand that I am required to register for and participate in the ASP WCU Orientation program on June 27th & 28th.
I will attend classes June 29 – August 6, 2010. [Note: July 5th is an observed holiday and no classes will meet on that day.]
I will be required to complete seven credit hours that will include ENGL 190; a Liberal Studies course; and COUN 140. I must
successfully complete each of these courses and be in good academic standing (2.0 GPA or higher) in order to continue at Western
Carolina University for the 2010 Fall Semester.
I understand that I will continue in the Academic Success Program in the 2010-2011 academic year. I must meet the regular
academic standards of the University to continue enrollment.
If qualified, I agree to enroll in and participate in the Student Support Services program.
I understand that progress reports of my performance in each of my classes will be sent to each of my instructors throughout my
participation in ASP (summer – spring). The purpose of these reports will be to track my academic progress and identify any areas
of assistance I might need.
I will make sure that my WCU email address is active and will check my email on a daily basis.
I will notify my advisor in the event of an emergency, difficulty with classes, housing conflicts, or any other problem that may arise.
I will not use alcohol or illegal drugs in violation of the WCU Student Code of Conduct. I understand that the use of such substances
will result in immediate disciplinary action through the WCU Office of Student Community Ethics and may result in my dismissal
from the Academic Success Program and Western Carolina University.
I will not display disrespectful or disruptive behavior at any time within the WCU community, including classes, seminars,
workshops, tutoring sessions, advising sessions, study hall sessions, campus events, and student housing.
_____ I understand that I will be required to observe quiet hours in the residence hall from 10:00 pm – 8:00 am on Sunday – Thursday nights
and from 12:00 midnight – 12:00 noon on Fridays and Saturdays.
_____ I agree to comply with the WCU Student Code of Conduct, which is published on the university web page and available in hard copy
in the University Center and at the OneStop. I understand that any violation of the Student Code of Conduct may result in
disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal from Western Carolina University.
In order to fulfill my academic responsibilities during the Academic Success Program, I will not be employed during the summer
term.
I understand that fall enrollment is conditional on compliance with all Academic Success Program policies during the summer term.
By signing this agreement, I agree to successfully complete the remainder of my high school program as well as be a willing participant in
the Academic Success Program. I understand that the goal of the Academic Success Program is to provide the support and encouragement
necessary for me to be a successful Western Carolina University student.
Student Full Name (print):
Name you prefer:
Mailing Address:
Student’s Cell Phone:
Home Phone:
Student’s Email:
Student Signature
Date
Parent (or Legal Guardian) Name (print):
Phone (please identify cell, work, etc.):
Parent’s Email:
Parent (or Legal Guardian) Signature
Date
Please print, complete, and return by mail to:
Academic Success Program; 214 Killian Annex, WCU; Cullowhee, NC 28723.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix K
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix L
ASP Academic Progress Report
Student's Name:
Course:
Section:
Poor
Average
Good
Excellent
Attendance
Class Participation
Homework/Projects
Quiz(s) & Exam(s)
Grade to Date:
A
B
C
D
F
No Grade Assigned
Comments:
Instructor/Professor:
Date:
Phone:
Email:
Submit Report
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Reset
Appendix M
Components of the Academic Success Program
Summer Components

Orientation & Parents as Partners Workshop

Summer Academic Theme

Resident staff

Meetings with Academic Advisor (at least two times)

Service Learning Project

Class Field Trip

Study Hall

Supplemental Instruction for Liberal Studies paired courses (optional)

Weekly Programs and Workshops (What’s HOT, Catamount Basics, etc.)

Intramural Program

Special Activities & Events (rafting, hiking, trips, etc.)
First Year Components

Western PEAKS (living and learning experience in Scott and Walker Halls)

Continue relationship with Academic Advisor (at least three times in the
fall and at least once at the beginning of the spring)

Option of Western PEAKS leadership course (2 hour credit)

Peer Mentor (fall semester only)

Academic Progress Reports (fall and spring)

COUN 150: Career & Major Exploration (encouraged for undeclared
students in spring semester)
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix N
UNC – Tomorrow Initiatives Feedback Report
Table 2. Access Initiatives B. Our Citizens and Their Future Access to Higher Education: UNC should increase access to higher education for all
North Carolinians, particularly for underserved regions, underrepresented populations, and non-traditional students.
To address the projected demand for higher education among North Carolinians, WCU will utilize an educational extension model to provide
programming and services to non-traditional, underserved, and place-bound students; and increase the main campus capacity.
Initiative
B.6: Expand support for
the Academic Success
Program (ASP)





Key Strategies
Integrate curriculum and
co-curriculum
Align with Liberal Studies
Program
Incorporate QEP learning
goals
Provide peer mentoring
Implement case
management model of
advising
Key Descriptors of
Success
 Improved retention of
underprepared students
 Increased matriculation
of underprepared
students
 Improved learning and
development of ASP
student
Key Barriers/Obstacles
 Lack of full funding for
summer semester
Responsible
Unit/Department
Office of the
Provost, Division of
Enrollment
Management,
Division of Student
Affairs
Implementation
Timeline
Continuous
Status as of Fall 2010:
 The lack of full funding has been resolved because ASP now receives all tuition money from ASP summer courses and some student fee money from Student Affairs and Orientation.
 The program underwent changes in 2007 to expand the program to a full first-year experience for the students. As part of these changes, a peer mentor program has been established in the fall semester.
The peer mentors serve as role models and resources for current ASP students. The mentors are trained by taking a one-hour credit Leadership course.
 From 2007 - 2009, ASP offered a combination of courses which included two non-Liberal Studies courses (EDRD 150 and COUN 140). In 2010, changes were made so that all students take two Liberal
Studies courses and the one-hour credit COUN 140 course. This transition back to a full Liberal Studies and transition course curriculum should better assist students with their transition to the fall semester.
 ASP continues to incorporate QEP learning goals in which all students participate in a service learning project and a class field trip during the summer session. Workshops also reinforce QEP principles and
include a series of guest speakers who speak about the many opportunities on campus. During the summer session, the students also engage in a variety of activities and programs to familiarize them with
campus and the local community.
 A case-management model of advising is utilized during the summer session and through the school year. During the summer session, faculty and staff meet together each week to discuss student
concerns. The advisors also meet individually with each student during the summer session and throughout the school year. The ASP Coordinator conducts progress reporting and works closely with the
advisors for follow up with the students. Additionally, the ASP Coordinator also monitors and meets individually with students who are most at risk.
 Retention information has been compiled on each group of ASP students. Fall-to-fall retention rates for the first-year of each group are as follows: 2007 – 62.33%; 2008 – 66.89%; 2009 – 76.79%.
 The current group for 2010 has a summer-to-fall retention rate of 96.42%. However, their average summer GPA is much lower than the previous groups (2.880 as compared to 3.169, 3.399, and 3.406
respectively). This drop in GPA is most likely related to removing the EDRD 150 course from the curriculum and an adjustment in admission requirements for 2010. The average weighted high school GPA
for the 2010 group is 2.83 as compared to 3.03 for 2009.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix O
Comparison of Academic Success Program and Quality Enhancement Plan Outcomes
ASP Learning Outcomes
QEP Learning Outcomes
Identify and utilize various communication methods to
understand and convey information appropriately and
effectively.
Communicate effectively and responsibly
Utilize strategies to strengthen personal, academic, and
professional skills and behaviors in making a successful
transition through their first year at WCU.
Solve complex problems
Individually and collaboratively utilize appropriate campus
resources, academic policies, and student programs to
become active participants in their experience at WCU.
Integrate information from a variety of contexts
Exhibit clear, sound reasoning as they develop goals and
plans which reflect their purpose and values as engaged
learners.
Clarify and act on purpose and values
Participate in service learning experiences and
co-curricular activities aimed at developing their social
skills and providing opportunities for learning about the
campus and surrounding community.
Practice civic engagement
ASP learning outcomes derived from QEP general learning outcomes.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix P
ASP Electronic Portfolio Assessment Rubric
Student will…
E-Portfolio Number: __________________
First
Reader
(out of 4)
Portfolio demonstrates…
Identify and utilize various communication
methods to understand and convey
information appropriately and effectively.
Selection and use of a variety of artifacts
that demonstrate clear and professional
communication.
Utilize strategies to strengthen personal,
academic, and professional skills and behaviors
in making a successful transition through their
first year at WCU.
Individually and collaboratively utilize
appropriate campus resources, academic
policies, and student programs to become
active participants in their experience at WCU.
Exhibits evidence of engaged learning
activities through use of appropriate
academic tools and skill sets.
Exhibit clear, sound reasoning as they develop
goals and plans which reflect their purpose and
values as engaged learners.
Reflection and clear focus in identifying short
term and long term goals and specific
strategies needed to successfully accomplish
goals.
Reflection and clear understanding of their
role as a responsible citizen through civic
engagement programs and activities, on and
off campus, as an integrated intentional
learner.
Participate in service learning experiences and
co-curricular activities aimed at developing
their social skills and providing opportunities
for learning about the campus and surrounding
community.
Second
Reader
(out of 4)
Total
Exhibits a variety of active participation with
various campus programs and activities as an
engaged learner.
Total Scores (out of 20)
Scale
No Score: 0
Emerging
A score of zero
designates projects
and/or content that
cannot be viewed or
assessed.
Student is just beginning
to emerge as an
integrated intentional
learner, researcher,
analyzer, synthesizer,
and Student but does
not yet meet all
assignment expectations.
Student recognizes that
information is available
through a variety of
sources, gathers
information relevant to
problem, and offers
available or prescribed
solutions.
Scoring
1
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Developing
Student is developing
toward expectancy level
at meeting assignment
expectations as an
integrated intentional
learner, researcher,
analyzer, synthesizer,
and Student. Student
identifies assignment
requirements, integrates
information from a
variety of sources,
conveys basic
information,
demonstrates
competency with
mechanical skills and
final proofreading.
2
Achieving
Student functions at
expectancy level by
meeting assignment
requirements as an
integrated intentional
learner, researcher,
analyzer, synthesizer,
and student. Student
integrates information
from a variety of
information sources
through critical inquiry,
develops strategies, and
evaluates and improves
writing through revision.
3
Exemplary
Student functions at a
superior level by
exceeding assignment
expectations as an
integrated intentional
learner, researcher,
analyzer, synthesizer,
and Student. Student
makes choices, selects
appropriate information
by evaluating quality and
credibility of sources,
evaluates the quality and
credibility of information,
and articulates viable
solutions to intended
audience appropriately
and respectfully.
4
Appendix Q
Name:
Academic Hope Scale
Please take a moment to think about your schooling or education. Once you have this area of your life in
mind, read each item and insert the number (from 1 to 8) that best fits you.
1) Definitely False 2) Mostly False 3) Somewhat False 4) Slightly False
5) Slightly True 6) Somewhat True 7) Mostly True 8) Definitely True
___ 1. I can think of many ways to make good grades.
___ 2. I actively pursue my educational goals.
___ 3. I have many academic goals.
___ 4. I am motivated to do well in school.
___ 5. I can think of specific ways to do well in my classes.
___ 6. I take classes that are challenging to me.
___ 7. I know of many strategies I can use to succeed in my classes.
___ 8. Thinking about pursuing my goals in school fills me with energy.
___ 9. The educational goals I have set for myself are clear and well defined.
Shorey, H.S., & Snyder, C.R. (2004) Development and Validation of the Domain Hope Scale Revised. Unpublished manuscript,
University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix R
CSI Information used by Academic Advisors and ASP Coordinator in following up with
students.
©2009 Noel-Levitz, Inc. • RMS Advisor’s Guide
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix S, page 1
CSI Information given to students and discussed during summer advising appointments.
©2009 Noel-Levitz, Inc. • RMS Advisor’s Guide
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix S, page 2
CSI Information given to students and discussed during summer advising appointments.
©2009 Noel-Levitz, Inc. • RMS Advisor’s Guide
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix S, page 3
CSI Information given to students and discussed during summer advising appointments.
©2009 Noel-Levitz, Inc. • RMS Advisor’s Guide
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix S, page 4
Academic Success Program
Reference Form
Directions to Student:
Please complete the top section of this form by providing your name and signature. Give this form to two (2) of
your current or recent teachers, one of whom should be an English (or Composition) teacher. Ask your
teachers to provide a reference letter for you using the information requested below as a guideline and return it,
along with this form, to the address below.
I give permission for my teacher to provide a reference letter including the following information to the Academic
Success Program (ASP) at Western Carolina University. I understand that this information will be used by ASP
faculty and staff to assist me with my transition to WCU and to help provide me with a successful college experience.
Student Name (print):
Student Signature:
Date:
***************************************************************************************************
Dear Educator:
The above named student has accepted an opportunity to enroll in the Academic Success Program (ASP) at Western
Carolina University. ASP is an opportunity for students to begin their college experience early and to prepare them for
success in college and beyond. This program, which begins in the summer, is designed to provide a complete first-year
experience to students and to help them develop skills to make their college career more successful. It helps motivate
students to set higher goals in school and in life and helps hold students accountable for demonstrating attitudes and
behaviors that coincide with reaching their goals.
In an effort to provide effective support to this student in his/her transition to college, we are requesting that you
provide a letter of reference that will assist us in working with the student to help ensure his/her success. In your letter,
please comment on your experience with this student and also provide the following information:
 What do you see as this student’s greatest strengths, both academically and personally?
 As an educator, what challenges do you believe this student might experience in his/her overall transition to
college?
 What things have you observed that motivate this student? What is he/she most passionate about
...academically? ...personally?
 What issues, as far as you are aware, could impact this student’s academic success in college?
 What suggestions do you have for this student in order to adapt to the demands of college level reading and
writing?
 Is there any additional information or feedback that you would like to provide about this student?
May we share your letter with the student? (Check one)
Yes
No
Educator Name (print):
Educator Signature:
Date:
Thank you for your time and support of this student in their college experience!
If you have any questions, please contact Janina C. DeHart, ASP Coordinator
at 828-227-2217 or [email protected]
Please mail your letter of reference, along with this form, in a signed and sealed envelope to:
Academic Success Program
ATTN: Reference Form
Advising Center, WCU
214 Killian Annex
Cullowhee, NC 28723
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix T
2010 ASP Summer Evaluation
We hope you had an educational and fun-filled summer. We would like your input and feedback
so that we can continue to make ASP as successful as possible. Thank you for taking the time to
complete this evaluation. You are not required to put your name on this evaluation.
Thank you,
Janina DeHart, Brian Boyer, and Kim Hardaway
Please circle the number that matches your answer:
Not
Applicable
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
ASP & Orientation check-in at Brown
1
2
3
4
5
Residence Hall Check-in at Buchanan
1
2
3
4
5
Opening Weekend:
1
2
3
4
5
Not
Applicable
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Twilight Movie Marathon
1
2
3
4
5
Asheville Tourists Baseball Game & Fireworks
1
2
3
4
5
East LaPorte Recreation Area
1
2
3
4
5
Hiking & Waterfalls trip
1
2
3
4
5
Smores & Ghost Stories/Road to Nowhere
1
2
3
4
5
Whitewater Rafting
1
2
3
4
5
Bowling at Franklin Lanes
1
2
3
4
5
Gatlinburg Experience/Ripley’s Aquarium
1
2
3
4
5
Tubing at Deep Creek
1
2
3
4
5
Camping Trip
1
2
3
4
5
Mall & Movie in Asheville
1
2
3
4
5
Disc Golf
1
2
3
4
5
ASP Clue
1
2
3
4
5
Mall Of Georgia
1
2
3
4
5
What’s HOT Programs (Tuesdays nights)
1
2
3
4
5
ASP Intramurals (Monday & Wednesday nights)
1
2
3
4
5
Ice Cream Social on Sunday evening, June 27th
Activities and Programs:
1
2
3
4
5
Not
Applicable
Poor
Fair
Good
Excellent
Summer Class Schedule (times, etc.)
1
2
3
4
5
Study Hall
1
2
3
4
5
Service Learning Experience
1
2
3
4
5
Class Field Trip
1
2
3
4
5
Meetings with Academic Advisor
1
2
3
4
5
Catamount Basics Programs (Friday afternoons)
Academics and Support:
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix U, page 1
Please help us plan for next year by answering the following questions.
1) I am glad that I participated in the ASP summer session.
True
False
2) Being in summer classes has helped me feel confident about starting college this fall.
True
False
3) I believe that the summer session has helped to prepare me to be successful in college.
True
False
4) I would recommend this program to other students.
True
False
5) What did you like best about the summer session?
6) What did you like least about the summer session?
Please write any additional comments on your overall experience this summer or give your
suggestions below. We value your input!
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix U, page 2
Student Responses on Summer Program Evaluations
Percentage of Good/Excellent Responses to the following Academics & Support:
2007
2008
2009
2010
Summer Class Schedule
67.21%
79.25%
84.00%
51.00%
Study Hall
32.74%
73.27%
60.27%
44.79%
Service Learning Experience
70.71%
77.22%
82.67%
69.70%
N/A
81.19%
85.23%
74.00%
84.75%
81.90%
82.00%
81.63%
2007
2008
2009
2010
I am glad that I participated in the summer session.
98.66%
94.50%
99.31%
92.16%
Being in summer classes has helped me feel confident about starting college this fall.
98.66%
98.17%
98.61%
95.05%
I believe that the summer session has helped to prepare me to be successful in college.
98.66%
98.17%
97.92%
93.07%
I would recommend this program to other students.
95.30%
94.50%
98.61%
92.16%
Class Field Trip
Meetings with Faculty Mentor (2007 - 2009) or Academic Advisor (2010)
Percentage of Students who responded favorably to the following statements:
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix V
Yearly Retention Rates By Cohort for First-time Full-time Honors Students, Regular Admits, & ASP*
# Years from Cohort
Cohort Term
#
Retention
Cohort
Retained
Rate
Fall 2007
2,034
100.00%
Freshmen
1,399
100.00%
New Student
1,259
100.00%
Honors Program
125
100.00%
Regular
987
100.00%
Academic Success Program
147
100.00%
Fall 2008
1,966
100.00%
Freshmen
1,478
100.00%
New Student
1,224
100.00%
Honors Program
166
100.00%
Regular
909
100.00%
Academic Success Program
149
100.00%
Fall 2009
2,328
100.00%
Freshmen
1,829
100.00%
New Student
1,555
100.00%
Honors Program
169
100.00%
Regular
1,220
100.00%
Academic Success Program
167
100.00%
#
Retained
1,416
980
897
107
698
92
1,382
1,048
932
155
677
100
1,657
1,286
1,146
146
874
127
1.0
Retention
Rate
69.65%
70.05%
71.25%
85.60%
70.72%
62.59%
70.30%
70.91%
76.14%
93.37%
74.48%
67.11%
71.21%
70.35%
73.75%
86.39%
71.70%
76.05%
Average Average HS Average
ACT
Rank
HS GPA
Average
First Year
WCU GPA
#
Retained
1,783
1,216
1,106
112
866
128
1,757
1,322
1,113
162
821
130
2,036
1,600
1,368
154
1,061
154
0.5
Retention
Rate
87.66%
86.92%
87.85%
89.60%
87.74%
87.07%
89.37%
89.45%
90.93%
97.59%
90.32%
87.25%
87.49%
87.53%
88.03%
91.12%
87.04%
92.22%
#
Retained
1,394
921
846
101
663
82
1,388
1,050
896
154
651
91
—
—
—
—
—
—
1.5
Retention
Rate
68.57%
65.83%
67.20%
80.80%
67.17%
55.78%
70.60%
71.04%
73.20%
92.77%
71.62%
61.07%
—
—
—
—
—
—
#
Retained
1,074
822
755
92
595
68
1,119
915
825
149
597
79
—
—
—
—
—
—
2.0
Retention
Rate
52.88%
58.76%
59.97%
73.60%
60.28%
46.26%
56.92%
61.91%
67.40%
89.76%
65.68%
53.02%
—
—
—
—
—
—
#
Retained
989
795
729
91
573
65
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
2.5
Retention
Rate
48.70%
56.83%
57.90%
72.80%
58.05%
44.22%
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
#
Retained
806
728
677
84
534
59
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
3.0
Retention
Rate
39.68%
52.04%
53.77%
67.20%
54.10%
40.14%
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Student Descriptives By Cohort*
Entry Year
2007-2008
Honors Program
Regular
Academic Success Program
2008-2007
Honors Program
Regular
Academic Success Program
2009-2010
Honors Program
Regular
Academic Success Program
Average
SAT
Verbal
Average
SAT Math
630
495
464
634
512
482
27
20
18
84.3
63.92
38.56
3.81
3.04
2.78
3.250
2.960
1.850
595
504
470
606
518
486
26
21
19
88.31
65.85
45.17
3.91
2.99
2.95
3.560
3.110
1.990
622
506
447
615
520
460
26
21
18
87.77
64.31
49.69
4.26
3.45
3.06
3.480
2.920
2.240
*Data provided by the WCU Office of Institutional Planning and Effectiveness
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix W
Supplemental Instruction (SI) Summary Report for the
Catamount Academic Tutoring (CAT) Center
Summer 2010
Compiled by Chesney Reich, CAT Center Director
Overview
The Academic Success Program (ASP) paired with the Catamount Academic Tutoring (CAT)
Center to offer Supplemental Instruction in three liberal studies classes during the 2010 Summer
ASP program (June 29 – August 6, 2010). Three SI Leaders were selected to work with two
sections each of PSY 150 (General Psychology), ANTH 120 (Comparative Cultural Systems)
and SOC 103 (Human Society). The selection process, which included a written application and
interview, was completed in April 2010. Interviews were conducted by the CAT Center Director
with input from the ASP Director and SI faculty.
SI Leaders participated in ASP Staff training (including a review of FERPA regulations) led by
the ASP Director on June 24, 2010. SI Leader training was facilitated by the CAT Center
Director via an intensive 1 ½ day training on June 25 and 28, and in weekly one-hour meetings
for the duration of the summer program. Each leader was paid a total of $3,000, using student
wage funds from the ASP budget. Training time, room/board, and a meal allowance were
included in the Leaders’ compensation.
A total of 110 students were enrolled in PSY 150, ANTH 120, and SOC 103, and 106 students
participated in SI Sessions. (Note: Two students withdrew from the university during the first
week of the program and did not participate in any SI sessions; therefore, they have not been
included in this data.) SI Leaders held an average of 12 sessions during the 5 ½ week summer
term, and the average attendance in each session was 13 (see Appendix A: Overview of SI
Participation). SI Sessions were held at the same time as a 1.5-hour, mandatory study hall for
ASP students, and the students could choose to attend either the study hall (in which they were
required to study independently) or an SI session. Because each SI Leader was working with two
sections of the same class, Monday and/or Wednesday SI sessions were designated as
“combined” SI sessions in which students from both sections were invited to attend, and on
Tuesdays and/or Thursdays, Leaders held separate sessions for each section of the class (see
Appendix B: SI Leader Schedule). On several occasions, Leaders held additional SI sessions
outside of the study hall time for students who wanted an extra review before upcoming tests.
Data Collection
SI Leaders administered beginning-of-semester surveys to all students in their classes during the
first week of the summer session, and they administered end-of-semester surveys during the last
week of classes. Students were asked to respond to one of two forms of the end-of-semester
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix X, page 1
survey, depending on whether or not they had participated in any SI sessions. The compiled
results of these surveys are included in Appendix C: Beginning and End-of-Semester SI Survey
Results. In addition to student evaluations of the SI program, SI faculty also were asked to
complete evaluations of their SI Leaders, and the Leaders completed self assessments during the
last week of the summer term.
Final grades in the liberal studies courses were collected for all students who completed ASP and
were compared with information students reported on their beginning and end-of-semester
surveys (see Appendix D: Expected, Preferred, and Actual Grade Comparisons from Beginning
to End of Semester). All ASP students (110) completed beginning-of-semester surveys, and 103
students completed end-of-semester surveys; however, nine students in SOC 103 who completed
end-of-semester surveys did not include the identifying information requested on their surveys,
so it was not possible to compare the results of their beginning and end-of-semester surveys with
their final grades for Sociology.
Results and Conclusions
Participation in SI sessions was relatively high (96% participation rate) for the liberal studies
classes, and students’ decisions to attend SI may have been influenced by their ability to choose
between SI and study hall. Final grade distribution for these classes also was high (<1% D, F,
W), and a report of the grade distributions for these classes is included in Appendix E: SI Course
Grades by Number of Sessions Attended.
The majority of students (59%) who participated in SI attended between 1 and 4 sessions, and
the majority of students (55%) who earned an A in their liberal studies class (either SOC 103,
ANTH 120, or PSY 150) attended between 5 and 8 SI sessions. The average number of sessions
attended by students who earned an A was 5.75. Students who earned an A or A- in their liberal
studies class attended SI Sessions at a slightly higher rate (5.75 sessions) than students who
earned final grades of B (4.03 sessions), C (3.46 sessions) or D (4 sessions). There is a linear
correlation between the average sessions attended and the average grade (2.0, 3.0, 4.0), with a
correlation coefficient of 0.93. Students’ grades increased by 0.794 for each increase of 1 in the
average number of sessions (see Appendix D: SI Course Grades by Number of Sessions
Attended).
Student Feedback
Student feedback about the SI program was extremely positive. On end-of-semester surveys:



90% of participants agreed that SI Leaders were able to effectively answer their questions
about course content.
86% agreed that they would use SI again if it was offered in other classes in which they
were enrolled.
84% agreed that they would recommend SI to other students.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix X, page 2


60% of students reported that one of the reasons they decided to attend SI sessions was
that they had heard positive comments about SI from other students.
94% of SI participants said they expected to earn an A or B in their liberal studies courses
at the end of the summer session, but only 47% of those students said they would have
expected to earn an A or B in the course had they not participated in SI (see Appendix D:
Expected, Preferred, and Actual Grade Comparisons from Beginning to End of Semester)
SI participants also were asked to indicate how the SI Sessions had helped them. Ninety-three
percent of survey respondents provided examples of how SI had benefitted them, and some of
the recurring responses included:




Increased confidence
Improved study skills
Reinforced the importance of regular course review outside of class
Improved performance on exams
When asked to provide suggestions about how future SI Sessions could be improved, recurring
suggestions included:





Offer more SI Sessions during the semester
Provide SI in more classes, including English
Ensure that SI Leaders can maintain control over large-group sessions
Provide more structure in SI Sessions
Promote more student participation in SI
The compiled responses to these open-ended survey questions are included in Appendix C:
Beginning and End-of-Semester SI Survey Results.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix X, page 3
ANTH120_80_81
PSY150_84_85
SOC103_82_83
Totals:
37
33
40
110
16
10
10
36
Academic Success Program Review 2010
170
145
147
462
10.6
14.5
14.7
13.27
2.98
3.16
2.65
2.93
37
33
39
109
100%
100%
98%
99%
0
0
1
1
0
0
2%
1%
27
20
20
67
73%
61%
50%
61%
2.98
3.17
2.66
2.9367
Avg Course Grade:
Non-Participants
% of SI
Participants
Performing Above
Class Average
Avg Course Grade:
Participants
# SI Participants
Performing Above
Class Average
% D, F, W Grades
# D, F, W Grades
% A, B, C Grades
# A, B, C Grades
Course Avg
0
2
2
4
Avg Attndnce Per
Session
Total Attndnce: All
Sessions
37
31
38
106
# of SI NonParticipants
# SI Participants
# of SI Sessns
# Enrolled
Appendix A: Overview of SI Participation
Summer 2010
N/A
3
2.5
2.75
SI Summary Report: Appendix A
Appendix B: SI Leader Schedule
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
8:00 AM
:15
:30
:45
9:00 AM
CLASS
CLASS
CLASS
:15
:30
:45
10:00 AM
:15
:30
:45
CLASS
CLASS
CLASS
11:00 AM
:15
:30
:45
12:00 PM
:15
Seth's ASP Staff Meeting - Ruth's ASP Staff Meeting Killian Annex 225
Killian Annex 225
:30
:45
1:00 PM
:15
:30
SI Sessions: Either
SI Sessions -- All sections
:45 SI Sessions -- All sections
Tuesday or Thursday
2:00 PM
:15
:30
:45
3:00 PM
:15
SI Sessions: Either
:30
Tuesday or Thursday
:45
4:00 PM
:15
:30
:45
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Thursday
Friday
CLASS
CLASS
CLASS
CLASS
Andrea's ASP Staff
Meeting - Killian Annex
225
SI Leaders Meet w/
Chesney for Debrief &
Planning - CO 102
SI Sessions: Either
Tuesday or Thursday
SI Sessions: Either
Tuesday or Thursday
SI Summary Report: Appendix B
Appendix C: Beginning- and End-of-Semester Supplemental Instruction Survey
Results
Summer 2010: Psy150, Anth120, Soc103
Beginning-of-Semester Supplemental Instruction Surveys
Total Number of Surveys: 110
Very
1. How likely is it that you will attend SI for this course?
Likely
Likely
Number of responses:
42
54
% of total:
38%
49%
2. What grade do you expect to make in this course?
Number of responses:
% of total:
3. What grade do you want to make in this course?
Number of responses:
% of total:
Neutral
14
13%
Not
Likely
0
Very
Unlikely
0
A
B
C
D
F
83
75%
25
23%
2
2%
0
0
A
B
C
D
F
109
99%
1
1%
0
0
0
End-of-Semester Supplemental Instruction Surveys: Non-Participants
Total Number of Surveys: 2
1. WHAT WERE YOUR REASONS FOR NOT ATTENDING SI? (Check all that
apply)
I did not think the sessions would be helpful.
I intended to go, but there was always something more important that I needed to
do with my time.
I was doing well in the class and did not need to attend.
I prefer to study alone.
I did not know about the SI sessions.
2. PLEASE CIRCLE THE RESPONSE THAT MOST
CLOSELY CORRESPONDS TO YOUR
AGREEMENT/DISAGREEMENT WITH EACH
STATEMENT ABOUT SI
SI was well publicized in this class.
I would attend SI Sessions if they were offered in my future
classes.
Strongly
Agree
Agree
1
1
Number of
Responses:
1
0
1
2
0
Neutral
Disagree
Strongly
No
Disagree Response
2
End-of-Semester Supplemental Instruction Surveys: Participants
Total Number of Surveys: 103
1. WHAT WERE YOUR REASONS FOR ATTENDING SI? (Check all that apply)
I didn't understand a particular topic.
I wanted feedback on how well I understood the material.
I was falling behind in class.
I didn't perform well on exams.
I heard positive comments about SI from other students.
Others:
Good study habits
Extra study
Number of
Responses:
% of
Students:
46
58
14
36
62
45%
56%
14%
35%
60%
Wanted to know the material well.
Needed help studying
We had an exam the next day.
It's a useful study tool.
Because I wanted to stay ahead in class
Get a better grade
Seth made it easy to understand
Help in learning the material well.
Extra help in class
I like the studying
2. WHAT GRADE DO YOU EXPECT TO EARN IN THIS
COURSE?
Number of responses:
% of total
3. WHAT DO YOU THINK YOUR FINAL GRADE WOULD
HAVE BEEN IF YOU HAD NOT ATTENDED SI?
Number of responses:
% of total
4. PLEASE CIRCLE THE RESPONSE THAT MOST
CLOSELY CORRESPONDS TO YOUR
AGREEMENT/DISAGREEMENT WITH EACH
STATEMENT ABOUT SI
I would recommend SI to others.
As a result of SI, I have learned study skills and strategies
that will help me perform better in other classes.
SI was well publicized in this class.
Participating in SI has made me more confident in my ability
to do well at the University.
My grades improved because of SI.
I will use SI again if it is offered in other classes that I am
taking.
4. PLEASE CIRCLE THE RESPONSE THAT MOST
CLOSELY CORRESPONDS TO YOUR
AGREEMENT/DISAGREEMENT WITH EACH
STATEMENT ABOUT SI (Continued)
The SI Leader was able to effectively lead discussions on
important concepts covered in class.
Helped study on the exam
I wanted to study for an exam
prepare for tests
Seize an opportunity
Wanted to do better in class.
Wanted to try it
I wanted to review the material to be sure I had taken
accurate notes
A
B
C
D
F
35
34%
62
60%
6
6%
0
0
A
B
C
D
F
10
10%
35
34%
49
48%
6
6%
3
3%
Strongly
Agree
Agree
Neutral
Disagree
59
28
84% Strongly
Agree/Agree
12
1
2
38
24
8
2
55
39
91% Strongly
Agree/Agree
6
3
42
18
7
1
40
32
70% Strongly
Agree/Agree
17
10
3
53
10
3
1
31
Strongly
No
Disagree Response
1
67% Strongly
Agree/Agree
35
75% Strongly
Agree/Agree
36
1
86% Strongly
Agree/Agree
Strongly
Agree
Agree
Neutral
Disagree
50
32
12
6
Strongly
No
Disagree Response
2
1
The SI Leader was able to effectively lead discussions on
important concepts covered in class.
The SI Leader was able to effectively answer questions
about course content.
The SI Leader presented useful tools (handouts,
worksheets, practice tests, etc) for understanding and
organizing course content.
The SI Leader created a welcoming environment for
students.
80% Strongly
Agree/Agree
57
36
9
1
12
4
3
14
4
1
90% Strongly
Agree/Agree
58
25
81% Strongly
Agree/Agree
59
25
82% Strongly
Agree/Agree
How have the SI Sessions helped you?
Build confidence in the academic setting.
Helping me with a practice test when I did not understand.
It was an opportunity for me to understand the material.
SI helped me to understand the material.
Helped me do better on my exams and my final.
It allowed me to interact with material with others outside of class.
With the tests.
It has helped me find useful study tricks for tests.
They helped me prepare for my weekly tests.
Overall comprehension.
Test taking, studying.
Test study guides helped me improve on exams.
I went from a 36 because of not going to an 82 when I did.
I learned more with her in chapters I was confused about.
Helped me recognize more thing and understand better.
They helped me get backup material in what I learned.
Not too much.
Raised my grade.
With going back over the material.
Improved study skills
Pre-tests and discussing the material before the tests.
Extra practice of topics covered in class.
The SI sessions helped me develop study skills for the tests.
Gave me info on stuff that I didn't really know.
Taught me how to study.
With useful study tools (handouts, worksheets, practice tests)
Helped me better understand the material.
They've helped engage student action.
Review games help me to become more familiar with the material.
Just helped me memorize the material
They helped me in whatever I misunderstood in sociology.
It helped me understand the material better.
Reviewing information on tests.
Different ways to study.
It helped me prepare for the test. And made me ensure that I knew what I was talking about.
It has helped me to better understand the material and get better grades on the tests.
It has helped me in understanding the material better.
The actual information and ways to remember the info was useful.
They helped me better understand the material in this course.
Understand the material in different ways to do better on the test.
1
It helped me do better on my exam.
They made me aware of what was on the exams.
They didn't help me much, if any, because it was not lead effectively.
It helped hammer in course material.
The SI sessions have given me a large amount of ways to study.
In remembering things.
Reviewing terms helped me significantly on the exam. Practice makes perfect.
Honestly, SI didn't help me very much. Too many people talking and couldn't understand.
I am a tactile learner and we played several games that helped me retain complicated concepts from class.
They have not helped me at all, but that was because of the SI leader.
They did not really help me.
By extra reviews for exams.
Re-learn the material that was reviewed the earliest and went over each part of the chapter.
I only went to one session and it did not help much.
They haven't.
The sessions have helped me realize that studying outside of class in important.
They have helped me prior to studying so I knew the content and comfortable with the material.
They haven't.
The repetition of course material helped keep the knowledge already attained.
The class was not under control.
Providing a collective review.
Provided extremely helpful information on topics I wasn't sure about.
I was able to better understand the material on the exams. I also learned helpful study tips.
Learned study techniques and more productive study habits.
They helped me understand the material better.
It helped me understand the class material better which has corresponded with my grades.
They have helped me because they reinstated information that was learned.
They helped me learn the material.
The repetition helps me perform better on tests.
They've helped me by making me confident that I knew the material.
Understand and review the material.
They helped me out on tests.
Seth is a very good leader, he taught me leadership skills along with study habits and test taking strategies.
Reinforcing what I learned in class to remember on a test.
The session gave me a better way to learn. I have learned more fun ways to study. Also got a better grade.
They helped me review the material better.
Seth stayed up all night with us working on reports, studying, and helping us improve.
Anything I missed in class I can learn in SI and the study guides given from SI are fantastic.
Beat the vocabulary in with continuous repetition through games.
They improved my exam scores and knowledge in the class.
Helped with course study and how it related to society as a whole.
It has helped me study and do better on tests.
They have been helpful study sessions.
I attended about 4 SI sessions and all of them helped me.
It helped me with study skills.
They were so helpful for studying. Group studying really helped me on the test.
Gave and explained with terms related in the class that were on the study guide.
Helped me prepare for test and if I understand the material.
It helped me remember things.
Yes, it helps me understand what I missed in class.
Helps me better learn the class material.
Helped me study for my exams and have a better understanding of the subject.
Learned vocab.
It gave me helpful term definitions for exams.
The SI sessions reinforced my knowledge about the course, allowing me to do better on exams.
How could future SI Sessions be improved?
More interaction games.
It doesn't need improvement.
Having more SI sessions.
Have it regularly.
I think they are fine now.
More SI sessions.
More meeting times.
Better ways of meeting up and showing up for SI when absolutely needed.
Help the kids before the exam!
Some better activities like the poker game.
More encouraged.
Be consistent.
I thought they were good :)
Make it a little more interesting.
Longer time.
Having it before every test.
I think they are good.
More games.
Teach students how to study for test material.
More of them.
If we could actually go over test questions instead of her questions.
More organization and less distractions.
Be more controlled.
More students attending.
If more people paid attention because sometimes people would talk too much.
Have more control over the class.
More time and more control by the SI.
Actually learn how to study. It was more memorization.
I l like it when the SI sessions are small, so possibly keep them with a minimum number of people.
I think if they were held everyday it would definitely help me.
Organization and urging other students to participate and actually care.
More convenient.
Maybe play more games.
More orderly and in controlled, maybe without different classes in it.
Teacher being able to control the class.
More control over the students. Playing Jeopardy was awesome; I think games should be utilized more.
I think everyone was perfect.
Better SI leaders and have it be more serious.
Keep SI, have more SI leaders. Set maximum number of attendants per session, i.e. keep size to approximately 10 students at
most per session. When it was a small group, it was very helpful. Too many people made it hard to concentrate and focus.
Maybe smaller groups.
More handouts and worksheets to do outside of SI.
Make sure the leader is actually willing to help the students.
By doing something other than play games, some people don’t learn that way. Have a worksheet or something.
By getting more people involved.
It's fine now.
Explain the answers instead of just answering them.
Hiring an SI that actually enjoys being there for the summer and helping people out
Maybe more structure like a classroom.
Maybe have it a little longer, I feel like an hour and 30 minutes wasn't enough.
Better structure.
More game show involvement.
The class was very uncontained.
More handouts and worksheets.
I think they should be longer and offered more often.
Maybe a few more vocabulary games.
I don't think they could. Maybe last longer, time wise.
My SI was great and wouldn't change it.
More handouts.
More handouts.
Less talking.
I don't think any improvements need to be made. It worked perfectly for me and others as well.
Think it is already fine, no need to improve.
Add more time.
Maybe have them more often, and also incorporate more games!!! They help a lot for visual learning.
There's not much to improve on.
It was perfect. It couldn't get any better.
Maybe be a little more structured.
SI in every class, ESPECIALLY English.
Have more of them.
The biggest problem with SI is the inconsistency of student attendance, can't change that.
Make them available more often.
Use some more involved learning games or activities to incorporate the class material.
More fun activities!
Maybe a bit more organized
Maybe a little bit more publicity would increase the attendance numbers.
I really thought it was awesome.
Nothing more that can be improved.
More involvement.
More SI sessions.
Calmer environment.
Good the way it is.
More information.
More hands-on.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
SI Summary Report: Appendix C
Appendix D: Expected, Preferred, and Actual Grade
Comparisons from Beginning to End of Semester
Total Responses: 94*
Beginning-of-Semester
Survey:
What grade do you expect
to make in this course?
A
B
C
70 (74%)
22 (23%)
2 (2%)
What grade do you want to
make in this course?
93 (99%)
End-of-Semester Survey:
What grade do you expect
to make in this course?
What do you think your
final grade would have
been if you had not
attended SI?
Actual Final Grades:
D
F
D
F
4 (4%)
3 (3%)
1 (1%)
A
B
C
35 (37%)
53 (56%)
6 (6%)
10 (11%)
18 (19%)
34 (36%)
54 (57%)
43 (46%)
22 (23%)
*103 students completed end-of-semester surveys, but nine students in SOC 103 did
not include identifying information on their surveys; therefore, it was not possible to
compare the results of their beginning and end-of-semester surveys with their final
grades for Sociology
Academic Success Program Review 2010
SI Summary Report: Appendix D
Appendix E: SI Course Grades by Number of Sessions Attended: Summer 2010
Average Attendance by Grade
Number of Students
Avg. Sessions Attended
Final Grade
A, AB+, B, BC+, C, CD
20
61
28
1
5.75
4.03
3.46
4
Total:
110
4.31
Combined Grade Comparison for All Subjects: Participants
# Sessions # Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
Attended Final Grade: A Final Grade: B Final Grade: C Final Grade: D Final Grade: F Final Grade: W
0
1-4
5-8
9 - 12
13 - 16
Total:
6
11
3
0
20 (18%)
3
39
16
2
1
61 (55%)
1
19
8
0
0
28 (25%)
1
0
0
0
1 (1%)
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Total
4 (4%)
65 (59%)
35 (32%)
5 (5%)
1 (1%)
110
ANTH 120 80 & 81
# Sessions # Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
Attended Final Grade: A Final Grade: B Final Grade: C Final Grade: D Final Grade: F Final Grade: W
0
1-4
5-8
9 - 12
13 - 16
Total:
1
2
1
4
19
6
1
1
27
4
2
6
0
0
0
Total
0
24
10
2
1
37
PSY 150 84 & 85
# Sessions # Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
Attended Final Grade: A Final Grade: B Final Grade: C Final Grade: D Final Grade: F Final Grade: W
0
1-4
5-8
9 - 12
13 - 16
Total:
3
5
1
9
2
11
8
2
1
21
3
0
0
0
Total
2
16
14
1
0
33
SOC 103 82 & 83
# Sessions # Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
# Studts w/
Attended Final Grade: A Final Grade: B Final Grade: C Final Grade: D Final Grade: F Final Grade: W
0
1-4
5-8
9 - 12
13 - 16
Total:
2
4
1
1
9
2
1
1
13
5
1
7
13
19
1
Academic Success Program Review 2010
0
0
Total
2
25
11
2
0
40
SI Summary Report: Appendix E
Major Themes and Areas for Improvement
Academic Success Program
Summer 2007
The following list provides descriptions of areas for improvement that were
identified after the initial summer that the program was expanded. The current
status has been provided for each of the suggestions that were made to address
the issues.
Overall need for adequate planning and preparation: This had a far-reaching impact
on the organization and implementation of all aspects of the program.
Suggestion: Have all planning and structures in place by the end of the fall semester so
that the spring semester can be used for training faculty and staff. This way everyone
will know what is expected, how things will be implemented, and will have time to work
together to coordinate courses, activities, and projects. This will also eliminate hasty,
last minute decisions and will allow us to provide information to prospective students in a
timely manner.
Status: Since 2007 was the first year of the reorganization of the program, there were
several factors which created issues with a smooth implementation, namely a lack of
funding and a delay in admitting students. Due to this situation, the bulk of planning for
the year began in late March. This created a great deal of stress, frustration, and a very
limited time for training staff and faculty. With increasing support and collaboration over
the last three years, we have been able to operate on a year-round time table which
provides adequate planning and preparation time for the program.
Need adequate staff for administering program: A majority of the load of preparing
for the program fell to only a handful of people, this created excessive stress and strain
and resulted in very low efficiency in preparation and implementation.
Suggestion: The above suggestion would also help in relieving this issue; however,
additional positions are needed, especially if the program is going to continue to be
expanded. Dr. Hinson will meet with the current program coordinator and other
administrators to discuss using newly approved state funds to provide additional
positions and to improve structure and support for to the program.
Status: At the time of the program expansion, there were state funds being offered to
selected institutions and we were under the impression that WCU would receive some of
this funding. However, this did not occur. The original proposal for expanding the
program to serve approximately 300 students called for a full-time director, two
academic advisors, and an administrative support position. Since no funding was
received, these additional positions could not be added. The number of students was
reduced by half, but the program has been operating with only a program coordinator
and a student worker, with an occasional graduate student intern. Although this lack of
staffing support has resulted in some creative solutions to make program administration
possible, it is far from optimal and still creates a significant strain on the current staff.
Need to evaluate structure of courses that the students with <500 verbal SAT are
required to take: Using a verbal SAT score of 500 as the cut-off for the EDRD 150
course seemed very appropriate. It was very evident that a majority of the students in
the EDRD sections lacked basic skills necessary for competent college writing as
compared to the students in the Liberal Studies sections. Therefore, there was concern
about these students taking ENGL 101 concurrently with the EDRD course, especially in
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix Y, page 1
an abbreviated summer format. Many of the instructors are worried about these
students’ ability to handle ENGL 102 in the fall and subsequent college writing
assignments.
Suggestion: The general consensus among the ENGL and EDRD faculty, as well as
the writing tutors, is that these students need to wait and take ENGL 101 in the fall, so
that they can receive the full benefit of the entire semester to develop their writing skills.
It would be best if these students could do EDRD in the summer along with some other
course, possibly by creating another ENGL class, so that they can receive the attention
needed to help them develop the basic skills that will be essential to their college writing
assignments.
Status: After 2007, we began using the ENGL 190: First Year Seminar in Literature
course to replace the ENGL 101 course in the summer. This allows the instructors to
still focus on reading and writing skills, but allows greater flexibility than the rigorous
structure of the ENGL 101 course. The ASP students all take ENGL 101 in the fall
semester so that they can maintain consistency from one term to the next. In 2008, we
used specific sections of ENGL 101 in the fall paired with a college transition course.
We found this model to be ineffective and made adjustments for the following years. In
2010, we also shifted away from using the EDRD class and now all ASP students take
ENGL 190 and a Liberal Studies perspective course during the summer, in addition to
the college success course.
Need for the faculty and staff to work together to coordinate intended outcomes
and to provide consistency between courses, activities, programming, etc.: There
was a general feeling among the various instructors that there was a lack of
communication and coordination in the course pairings. The instructors were only able
to meet together a couple of times, if at all, to try and discuss their plans for the courses.
This did not allow enough time for planning or true collaboration about course objectives.
There was also widespread discontent among staff because of various requirements not
being made clear.
Suggestion: Attention should be paid to faculty who are selected to teach the ASP
students during the summer. All instructors should be paid accordingly and also given
time to plan ahead and work together in preparing to teach during the summer. The
Faculty Center should be on board during the fall to help develop training sessions for
faculty during the spring. There should also be a common manual for all ASP faculty
and staff, so that expectations are clear and provide a consistent point of reference
regarding program policies and requirements.
Status: In 2008, we created an ASP Faculty & Staff Manual to outline program
information, expectations, and requirements. We also implemented a full-day faculty
and staff training during the spring semester with specific time devoted to allowing the
paired course instructors to collaborate together. This model has worked extremely well,
as long as faculty and staff are able to attend and follow up with each other prior to the
summer session. Additionally, with the creation of the funding through ASP tuition and
fees, the faculty contracts are coordinated by the ASP Coordinator, the academic
departments, and the summer school office so that faculty can be compensated for the
additional workload and commitment that ASP requires. Although the Faculty Center
was involved briefly with the training session in 2008, there has been no further
involvement.
Need for summer resident staff to have additional training and support: Due to the
expansion of the program and the additional demands on the resident staff, there is a
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix Y, page 2
need to evaluate changes in the traditional structure of these positions as they relate to
ASP.
Suggestion: Summer resident staff for ASP should not be required to pay for their
rooms or meal plans. They should not take classes during the summer session and
should be informed of expectations and job duties when selected for the positions during
the spring semester. They should also receive additional training during the spring
semester, so that they are ready to begin work when they arrive for the summer session.
Status: Since 2007, substantial collaboration has taken place with the Department of
Residential Living to make adjustments to the ASP resident staff positions. With the
assistance of the ASP Resident Director, we were able to negotiate an increase in pay to
include funding for paying their room and board, and we have worked with Student
Accounts and the Payroll Office in establishing payroll deduction for these staff so that
they are not required to pay those charges prior to beginning work. We also made
adjustments to the job requirements so that they do not take classes, because their job
duties expanded to include supervising study halls in the afternoons and assisting with
class functions, such as service learning projects and field trips, in addition to attending
weekly faculty and staff meetings. We have also implemented a staff training retreat
which takes place prior to the end of the spring semester. This allows the staff to have
valuable time together for team-bonding activities, training, and planning activities and
events for the program.
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix Y, page 3
ASP Budget Overview
ASP Coordinator (funded through state position under Enrollment Management)
Salary
$40,060.00
Benefits (23%)
$9,213.80
Total ASP Coordinator Salary & Benefits:
$49,273.80
Total Revenues:
08-09
$9,800.00
$11,950.00
$12,170.00
$33,920.00
Revenue
Summer Tuition from ASP courses
Student Affairs
ASP Orientation Fee
09-10
$147,205.00
$12,000.00
$14,678.00
$173,883.00
10-11
$94,080.00
$10,000.00
$7,215.00
$111,295.00
09-10
$88,900.00
10-11
$48,600.00
$9,959.47
$24,845.00
$6,769.49
$3,783.34
$12,659.34
$30,630.00
$5,300.00
$3,000.00
$6,363.00
$12,074.40
$20,180.19
$9,846.40
$11,185.67
$33,219.54
$15,305.97
$172,443.33
$4,059.90
$107,799.30
Expenses
Account
115010
Title
EPA Academic Salary (faculty, graduate teaching assistants)
135050
151010
154070
2000BP
Student Regular Wages (student worker, graduate assistant, supplemental instruction leaders, peer mentors)
Social Security
TIAA Optional Retirement (summer faculty benefits)
Purchased Services Pool (printing, phone, motorpool expenses, postage, etc.)
Purchased Contracted Services Pool (UC, facilities, BaseCamp Cullowhee, student activities, catering, conference
travel and meals, etc.)
Supplies Pool (program supplies, educational supplies, office supplies, computer purchases, staff training materials
and related costs, orientation materials, awards, appreciation gifts, school spirit items, etc.)
Total Expenses:
2100BP
3000BP
08-09
$2,975.66
Note: 2010 - 2011 budget shows estimated salary lines for the remainder of the year and actual costs to-date for 2000-3000BP account lines
Academic Success Program Review 2010
Appendix Z
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