Western Carolina University College of Health and Human Sciences

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Western Carolina University
College of Health and Human Sciences
School of Health Sciences
Quality Enhancement Plan for Recreational Therapy B. S. Degree
Program Contact:
Peg Connolly, Ph.D., LRT/CTRS
Associate Professor and Director of Recreational Therapy
School of Health Sciences
828.227.2481
[email protected]
Unit/Time Frame Covered by the Plan: 2007 to present
In 2007, the Recreational Therapy B.S. Degree program was selected as one of the first four pilot
programs to implement the WCU Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) on campus. This document represents
the Final QEP Plan for Recreational Therapy based on planning documents submitted in 2008 and 2009.
Since 2007, the Recreational Therapy Plan has undergone several developmental changes resulting in this
final plan.
Great strides have been made in the continued improvement of the recreational therapy
educational program for WCU undergraduate students. While the first year of implementation focused on
a gap analysis of the curriculum, the second year has on curriculum refinement and improvements,
implementation of a new admission process for students who wish to declare the major, and coordination
of teaching and learning activities to the QEP goals from freshman through senior year.
This final QEP Plan for Recreational Therapy (RT) was completed after receiving feedback from
the QEP Assessment Committee. Based on this assessment feedback, final revisions were made to the
program mission, refinement of the integration of the QEP objectives/assessments into the overall
program assessment plan, clearer articulation of program outcomes/assessment methods, and clear
presentation of capture points for QEP outcomes assessment. Additionally, the curriculum map for RT
has been revised to reflect which QEP outcomes are included in each course.
Mission of the Recreational Therapy Program
The Recreational Therapy Program at WCU, a nationally recognized curriculum, provides an
engaging, service-based environment wherein students collaborate with faculty to become intentional,
life-long learners who develop the knowledge, skills and abilities for competent practice.
Unique strengths of the Recreational Therapy (RT) Program at WCU are:

Students complete specialized recreational therapy coursework in
 Geriatrics
 Behavioral Health
 Physical Rehabilitation
 Adventure Based Recreational Therapy

Significant investment in student academic success, personal and professional development, and
skill acquisition
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 1

Strong encouragement for student development of professional identity as evidenced by activity
of campus Recreational Therapy Association, student and faculty attendance and participation at state and
national annual meetings and conferences, and stated expectations in student handbook

Full commitment to the University Quality Enhancement Program (QEP) with designation of two
service learning courses (RTH 360 RT for Older Adults and RTH 470 Adventure Based RT) and service
learning integration into two other courses (RTH 200 Foundations of RT and RTH 405 Behavioral Health
in RT.

Development of a comprehensive model of student assessment beyond basic outcome data that
includes the use of trend analysis.

Inclusion of professional portfolio requirement as a means of tracking student development and
achievement.

Well-designed curriculum that is aligned with national guidelines (ATRA and NCTRC)

Utilization of national certification exam pass rates and evaluation report to monitor student
performance and modify current course offerings.
The WCU Recreational Therapy Curriculum is one of the academic degree programs in the
School of Health Sciences, College of Health and Human Sciences. The mission of the College of Health
and Human Sciences is to offer quality education for a variety of professional careers. In fulfilling this
role, the college provides undergraduate and graduate educational programs in Cullowhee and Asheville.
The faculty of the college engages in instruction, research, and service. The primary activity of the faculty
of the college is teaching. Quality undergraduate and graduate education is provided for a diverse student
population through student-faculty involvement, which promotes creativity and critical thinking.
Complementary faculty activities include providing individualized student advisement, service,
continuing education opportunities, maintaining currency in areas of expertise, active involvement in
professional organizations, and scholarly activities including research, creative activities, presentations,
and publications.
The mission of the recreational therapy curriculum is linked to and is a reflection of both the
mission of the College of Health and Human Sciences and the teaching and learning goals that constitute
the central mission of Western Carolina University, to create a community of scholarship in which the
activities of its members are consistent with the highest standards of knowledge and practice in their
disciplines.
Recreational Therapy Goals & Objectives
The overall goal of the WCU RT B.S. Degree Program is “To prepare competent entry-level
recreational therapists in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior)
learning domains.” This goal is accomplished in several ways through specific objectives followed by
the Program.
QEP Outcomes: Within the QEP, WCU has established five overall learning outcomes for students.
These are core skills, behaviors and outcomes that are central to student development as integrated and
intentional learners. These five core skills and behaviors are integrated throughout recreational therapy
courses and liberal studies courses at the university. Therefore, students are accomplishing the following
skills and behaviors within their educational program in recreational therapy:
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 2
1. Integrates Information From a Variety of Contexts: students will make connections between
personal interest and abilities, liberal studies, your major, general electives and experiential
learning opportunities and other co-curricular activities and relate the implications/value of these
connections to 'real world' scenarios.
2. Solves Complex Problems: students will identify the dimensions of complex issues or problems,
analyze and evaluate multiple sources of information/data, apply knowledge and decision-making
processes to new questions or issues, and reflects on the implications of their solution/decision.
3. Communicate Effectively And Responsibly: students will convey complex information in a
variety of formats and contexts, identify intended audience and communicate appropriately and
respectfully.
4. Practice Civic Engagement: students will identify their roles and responsibilities as engaged
citizens by considering the public policies that affect their choices and actions, by recognizing
commonalities and interdependence of diverse views/values, and by acting responsibly to
positively affect public policy.
5. Clarify And Act On Purpose And Values: students will examine the values that influence their
own decision making processes, take responsibility for their own learning and develop in a
manner consistent with academic integrity and their own goals and aspirations, intentionally use
knowledge gained from learning experiences to make informed judgments about their future
plans, and bring those plans into action.
RT Educational Learning Outcomes: The specific learning objectives for recreational therapy majors
are:
1. Educational Objective #1: Recreational therapy majors develop foundational knowledge for
professional practice.
 Student outcome in foundational knowledge for recreational therapy practice— The student
applies principles related to recreation, leisure, and play behavior, human growth and
development across the lifespan, and principles of anatomy, physiology and kinesiology,
applying human behavioral change principles to clients from a variety of populations
including cognitive, physical, mental, and emotional disabling conditions and illness in either
group or individual interactions, with awareness of current legislation, relevant guidelines and
standards.
 Educational experiences for attaining goal
 Lecture/discussion courses
 Service learning/delivery
 Creative projects
 Research projects
RTH 200, 350, 360, 370, 405, 417
COUN 325, 430, HSCC 220, PSY 470,
BIOL 291, BIOL 292, PE 423
RTH 360, 405, 470
RTH 350, 417, 370
RTH 350, 405, 417
2. Educational Objective #2: Recreational therapy majors develop professional skills to practice
in service delivery.
 Student outcomes — Students demonstrate the ability to assess, plan, implement, evaluate,
and document appropriate recreational therapy services based individual client needs in a
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 3
variety of healthcare settings and to do so adhering to Standards of Practice and the Code of
Ethics.
 Educational experiences for attaining goal
 Lecture/discussion courses
 Service delivery projects
 Clinical internship
RTH 350, 352, 360, 370, 401,405, 417, 470
RTH 360, 405, 470
RTH 484/485
3. Educational Goal #3: Recreational therapy majors develop the ability to organize
professional services for clients.
 Student outcomes — Student demonstrate the application of sound organizational and
administrative skills for the practice of therapeutic recreation including budgeting, fiscal and
facility management, continuous quality improvement, documentation, evaluation, and are
able to work as a functioning member of the interdisciplinary healthcare treatment team.
 Educational experiences for attaining goal
 Lecture/discussion courses
 Group projects
 Clinical internship
RTH 352, 360, 370, 401,405, 417, 470
RTH 417
RTH 484/485
4. Educational Goal #4: Recreational therapy majors acquire the skills necessary to participate as
a practicing professional in the advancement of the profession.

Student outcomes — Students engage in professional organizations, prepare a professional
resume and portfolio, are able to apply for national certification prior to graduation, and have
the ability to gain state licensure and apply for a professional position upon receipt of the
baccalaureate degree.

Educational experiences for attaining goal
 Lecture/discussion courses
RTH 395, 417, 484, 485
The QEP Plan
Admission: A revised admission and application process was instituted as a result of involvement
in the WCU QEP from 2007 to 2009. The new RTH admission requirements and process were approved
for implementation during fall 2009. The admission process allows students to apply for admission to the
major at any time after becoming a student at WCU Admission to the recreational therapy Bachelor of
Science degree requires completion of the application for new majors. The recreational therapy admission
application includes development of a strategic plan for undergraduate studies in recreational therapy,
submission of a reflective essay on why the applicant is choosing to study recreational therapy, and
completion of the recreational therapy pre-admission knowledge assessment. Application to the program
does not assure acceptance. Students admitted to the program must earn a grade of C or better in each
RTH course in the major and must maintain an overall GPA of 2.50 to remain in the program.
Advising: Academic advising is a critical component of the undergraduate RT program. As stated above,
a strategic plan is required as part of the admission and application process. As soon as a student declares
an interest in a major in recreational therapy they are admitted to the pre-recreational therapy (PREC)
major until their application is accepted and they are admitted to the recreational therapy major.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 4
Pre-recreational therapy majors follow a set admission pattern. These admission activities
include preparation of an application to the major, submission of the admission essay to clarify their
values for entering the major, development of a strategic plan for their undergraduate studies in the major,
and finally acceptance. These activities may be preceded or follow the completion of the RT competency
pretest, which occurs during the RTH 200 course (Foundations of Recreational Therapy).
Upon admission, each student is assigned an advisor of one of the RTH faculty. Not only may
they note a preference for this assignment, but they may also request a switch to a different advisor at any
time. Each advisor meets with his or her advisees at least once each semester for pre-registration
advising, review of the student’s strategic plan, and discussions on career goals and intentions for the
capstone internship. During these sessions, the advisor follows the Degree Audit Report carefully and
documents on the Advising Plan the courses to be taken by the student. Each student signs this course
plan, and a copy is placed in his or her file.
In addition to these meetings each fall and spring semester, the student also signs technical
standards each year during the fall semester. The review of these standards takes place in each advising
session before the student signs these. They are also placed in the student’s advising folder. Students are
not given their alternate pin until they complete a face-to-face advising session and the technical
standards are signed for that semester.
The student’s development of a strategic plan is a key element of the QEP as it defines the
student’s intentions for their studies based on each individual’s career goals, values and aspirations and
the opportunity to develop specialized skills. The Strategic Planning form (Appendix A) suggests several
areas for engagement and involvement in conjunction with undergraduate degree requirements and the
advisor guides each student to develop at least three goals in three areas/strategies with targeted
completion dates. The student’s strategic plan is revised as needed to meet the goals. A significant portion
of areas and strategies address the WCU Outcome – Practice Civic Engagement through involvement in
the student Recreational Therapy Association at WCU, the state or national professional organizations,
and attendance at professional conferences. Professional civic engagement generally happens through
membership in professional organizations and the goal of the RT Program is to engage students in these
professional opportunities prior to graduation.
The RT Advisor also plays a key role in directing the undergraduate experience and the student’s
preparation for and selection of a capstone experience in their clinical internship. The RT intern
experience involves completion of 12 hours of academic credit in RTH 484 and RTH 485 which require
completion of fourteen weeks, and 560 hours of full-time experience in actual RT practice under the
direct supervision of a certified/licensed recreational therapist. Throughout the undergraduate experience,
students are asked at each formal advising session about their interests in various RT settings and service
to various populations. Advisor use these interests to guide the student to additional curricular coursework
and co-curricular experiences that aid the student in reaching their personal educational goals.
In order to confirm the quality of RT advising, students have been given the opportunity to
evaluate advising periodically.
Curriculum: From 2007 to 2010, the several revisions and improvements were made to the curriculum in
terms of courses, sequencing of learning activities, and the measurement of learning outcomes. A
curriculum map was employed to structure the curriculum to cover recreational therapy accreditation and
credentialing standards, appropriate sequencing of knowledge, application of appropriate learning
activities, and integration of the five WCU QEP Outcomes.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 5
The curriculum map for RT has been reviewed by two external review teams (Provost’s Program
Review and the Committee for the Accreditation of Recreational Therapy Education) and it has been
judged to be very comprehensive and a model for other RT curricula.
The final version of the RT Curriculum Map appears in Appendix B. This curriculum map is
reviewed and revised as needed on an annual basis to assure the currency of curriculum learning
objectives, activities, and learning outcomes. By coordinating faculty efforts in teaching, providing
learning activities, and evaluation of student outcomes, RT students are assured that all educational
requirements are followed in their studies. Gaps and overlaps in the educational program have been
eliminated and a higher quality curriculum is experienced by students.
The general sequence of learning and completing the course of study in recreational therapy
involves a progression through ten recreational therapy courses. Each course contains a specified
opportunity for student engagement. Some engagement experiences are in direct practice for recreational
therapy and some involve the student in structured learning activities (e.g., professional poster session or
portfolio development, etc.). Each course directly addresses specific RT educational objectives as
previously outlined and incorporates an emphasis on the five WCU learning outcomes. Table 1 depicts an
overview of the RT required coursework along with associated engagement activities, RT educational
objectives and WCU learning outcomes.
Outcomes Assessment:
The most important effort in outcomes assessment is to plan for the capture of key learning points
and outcomes. The RT Program has a plan for student acquisition of RT and WCU learning outcomes
incorporated into the curriculum map (appendix B).
The RT Curriculum Mapping-Outcomes Assessment table in Appendix C includes WCU learning
outcomes, their values and links to specific RT coursework and learning assignments. This table allows
for a visual analysis of outcomes and values. Of the five WCU learning outcomes, the greatest emphasis
in the RT curriculum is in four of the five learning outcomes. The weakest area of capture is in
―practicing civic engagement‖. Practicing civic engagement is covered outside the classroom with
informal learning through student involvement in co-curricular activities. However, further consideration
will be made to providing opportunities for enhancing this outcome area in the future.
A complete matrix of RT Learning Outcomes appears in Appendix D. In this matrix, the RT
courses and learning activities through which students acquire the skills and knowledge identified in the 5
WCU Learning Outcomes are delineated.
Learning outcomes in both RT and the five WCU learning outcomes are assessed at many capture
points throughout the curriculum. First, a RT Competency Assessment instrument which measures
abilities for RT practice and evaluation of the acquisition of the 5 WCU Learning Outcomes was
implemented at three points in the curriculum for undergraduate self-assessment:
1. RTH 200 Foundations of RT (pre-test)
2. RTH 395 Pre-Internship Seminar (pre-internship test)
3. RTH 485 RT Clinical Internship (post-internship test)
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 6
Required RT Course
RTH 200 Foundations of Rec Therapy
RTH 352 RT Processes & Techniques
(PREQ: RTH 200)
RTH 350 Rec Therapy for Persons
with Physical Disabilities (PREQ:
RTH 200, 352, major in RT)
RTH 360 RT for Older Adults (PREQ:
RTH 200, 352, major in RT)
 Official Service Learning Course
RTH 370 Methods of RT (PREQ:
RTH 200, 352)
RTH 395 Pre-Intern Seminar (PREQ:
RTH 200, 352, major in RT)
RTH 401 Client Assessment in RT
(PREQ: RTH 200, 352)
RTH 405 RT for Behavioral Health
(PREQ: RTH 200, 352, major in RT)
Engagement Included
Service to adults with dev. disab.
and civic engagement in RTA
Development of comprehensive
client treatment plan via study of
case studies and evidence-based
resources.
Conduct accessibility survey in
local community
RTH 417 Administration of RT
Services (PREQ: RTH 200, 352)
Develop evidence based plan and
marketing project for selected RT
agencies
RTH 470 Adventure Based RT
(PREQ: RTH 200, 352, major in RT)
 Official Service Learning Course
RTH 484 Clinical Internship in RT
(PREQ: RTH 350, 352, 360, 370, 395,
401, 405, 417, ―C‖ in all RTH courses
and permission of instructor)
RTH 485 Clinical Internship in RT
(PREQ: RTH 350, 352, 360, 370, 395,
401, 405, 417, ―C‖ in all RTH courses
and permission of instructor)
Provide group interventions for
youth at risk
#1 foundational knowledge for practice
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 organize professional services for clients
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 organize professional services for clients
#4 acquire skills to participate as practicing
professional
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 organize professional services for clients
#1 foundational knowledge for practice
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 organize professional services for clients
#1 foundational knowledge for practice
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 ability to organize professional services
#4 acquire skills as practicing professional
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 organize professional services for clients
Capstone experience, full semester
in clinical setting under direct
supervision of a certified/licensed
RT
Capstone experience, full semester
in clinical setting under direct
supervision of a certified/licensed
RT
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 organize professional services for clients
#4 acquire skills to participate as practicing
professional
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 organize professional services for clients
#4 acquire skills to participate as practicing
professional
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Service to nursing home residents
and residents with dementia
Table 1
RT Educational Objective
#1 foundational knowledge for professional
practice
#1 foundational knowledge for professional
practice
#2 professional skills to practice
#3 organize professional services for clients
#1 foundational knowledge for practice
Research, prepare, deliver poster
on RT modality or intervention
Portfolio
Assess two clients
Shadow professional and clients in
psychiatric substance abuse center
WCU Learning Outcomes
 Practice civic engagement
 Clarify purpose and values
 Solve complex problems
 Integrate info from variety of contexts
 Practice civic engagement
 Integrate info from variety of contexts
 Clarify purpose and values








 Communicate effectively/ responsibly
 Clarify purpose and values







Integrate info from variety of contexts
Communicate effectively/ responsibly
Solve complex problems
Integrate info from variety of contexts
Communicate effectively/ responsibly
Solve complex problems
Clarify purpose and values
 Solve complex problems
 Communicate effectively/ responsibly
Solve complex problems
Integrate info from variety of contexts
Communicate effectively/ responsibly
Clarify purpose and values
Solves complex problems
Integrate info from variety of contexts
Communicate effectively/ responsibly
Clarify purpose and values
Page 7
Additionally, internship supervisors complete the RT Competency Assessment for each
supervised student within two weeks after the end of the capstone internship experience in RT.
Supervisors are certified/licensed RT professionals and they rate RT majors on both the abilities for RT
practice linked to the program’s educational objectives and the WCU learning outcomes. Additionally,
supervisors rate students on job skills relevant to the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation
Certification and the American Therapeutic Recreation Association performance expectations for practice
skills in RT.
Data collection on these learning outcomes measured on the RT Competency Assessment show a
progress development of the abilities for RT practice from entry to the program through completion of the
capstone internship. Preliminary ratings of supervisors, shows a positive correlation between student selfassessments and the supervisors’ ratings of student abilities, acquisition of learning outcomes, and
performance expectations in RT practice skills.
Rubrics documenting student acquisition of the five WCU learning outcomes have been
developed for key assignments in RT coursework. Rubrics include the following courses, learning
activities, and relevant WCU learning outcomes:
RT Course
RTH 352 Processes and
Techniques in RT
RTH 405 Behavioral Health in RT
Learning Activity
Development of comprehensive client
treatment plan via study of case studies
and evidence-based resources.
Development of comprehensive client
case study and treatment plan after
working with a client over a 12 week
period and reviewing medical records
Professional Poster Development and
Presentation
Professional Portfolio of RT Skills and
Abilities
Client Diagnostic Project
RTH 417 Administration of RT
Services
Evidence based program development
and marketing plan for an RT agency
RTH 360 RT for Older Adults
RTH 370 Methods of RT
RTH 395 Pre-Intern Seminar
WCU Learning Outcome
Solve complex problems
Integrate information from a variety
of contexts
Communicate effectively/
responsibly
Clarify purpose and values
Integrate information from a variety
of contexts
Solve complex problems
Further rubrics will be targeted for development throughout the implementation of the RT QEP
Plan.
A major culminating experience for students is the development of a Professional Portfolio
capturing key artifacts that demonstrate the student’s acquisitions of learning outcomes, personal values
and career goals during RTH 395 Pre-Intern Seminar. The WCU Electronic Briefcase will be employed to
assist students in the collection and display of their personal portfolios beginning in fall 2011. The
Portfolio demonstrates the student’s ability to displays evidence of ability to organize a professional
document establishing professional identity, evidence of knowledge of recreational therapy principles and
practice, evidence of practical experiences with clients, and the ability to present themselves and their RT
experiences. Students develop reflections on specific artifacts relevant to the philosophy, ethics and
practice skills for recreational therapy (i.e., assessment, planning, implementation and evaluation) as well
as their personal reflections of their accomplishments in each of the five WCU learning outcomes. Each
portfolio is a personal reflection of the values and purpose of the student in their undergraduate RT
degree. As a method of publicly acclaiming this purpose and these values, students deliver a formal
presentation of their accomplishments throughout their undergraduate studies, as well their future goals
and intentions for their career. This educational learning activity is one of the most important experiences
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 8
the student undergoes to integrate their learning and demonstrate their intentionality in pursuing their
personal educational and career goals.
Finally, RT majors have many opportunities for Co-Curricular Engagement. A primary vehicle
for RT student engagement is the student organization the Recreational Therapy Association (RTA).
Through involvement in the RTA, students assume a variety of leadership roles to establish a professional
organization that focuses on education related to professional issues articulated by national, state, and
regional RT organizations, development and promotion of programs related to RT within the WCU
community and surrounding area, and promoting public awareness of the benefits of using recreational
and other activities as forms of active treatment and their roles in establishing and maintaining a balanced
lifestyle. Each semester students plan educational sessions for their peers on RT issues, raise funds for
attending professional conferences, and join together as peers preparing for their involvement in the
health care industry. This co-curricular opportunity is the greatest opportunity for students to practice
civic engagement and to fully engage in the process of civic involvement.
Annual Assessment of Outcomes
Each year, the program will document learning outcomes according to the four educational
objectives and the five WCU undergraduate outcomes. Data will be collected and analyzed on overall
self-perceived competency for practice and externally by clinical supervisors at the conclusion of the
capstone internship. The plan involves implementing and evaluating the RT Curriculum Mapping –
Learning Outcomes and the RT Program Matrix of Learning Outcomes. Each year the faculty reviews the
RT Program Curriculum Map, Map of Learning outcomes and Matrix to assure that the program is
implemented as planned and that student outcomes are measured and monitored.
The RT Program Curriculum Map provides a plan for addressing the knowledge, skills and
abilities outlined by the Committee for the Accreditation of Recreational Therapy Education (CARTE),
the NCTRC Job Analysis and the WCU Undergraduate Learning Outcomes. Knowledge for practice is
best measured through the NCTRC national certification exam. This standardized national exam measures
knowledge in the four areas defined as educational goals and student learning outcomes for the RT. The
RT Competency Assessment measures abilities for practice CARTE, competence for NCTRC National
Job Analysis Skill Areas, and achievement of the WCU Learning Outcomes.
Students are eligible to sit for the national certification exam at the completion of coursework and
during or prior to the senior clinical internship. Students self-evaluate their competence on the RT
Competency Assessment at three points during their studies: during the first RT course (RTH 200
Foundations), prior to the senior internship within RTH 395 (Pre-intern seminar), and during the last
week of the senior clinical internship (within RTH 485). RT clinical internship supervisors also rate
students on a supervisory form of the RT Competency Assessment adding external evaluator ratings of
student competence.
The WCU learning objectives are measured within both the student and supervisor ratings on the
RT Competency Assessment, on class rubrics for specified assignments, and through student reflective
statements within their senior portfolio documents.
Finally, students complete an exit survey during their senior clinical internship, which is typically
the final course completed. The RT Curriculum Exit survey provides a vehicle through which the student
evaluates the overall educational preparation she/he received at WCU, including perceived utility of each
course in the curriculum and the effectiveness of the advising process.
Through these various evaluative tools, data on student learning outcomes is collected as the
student progresses through their undergraduate studies in the program. Data is reported each year in the
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 9
Annual Program Assessment Report which is managed by the WCU Office of Institutional Planning and
Effectiveness.
Summary and Conclusions
Overall, the Recreational Therapy B.S. Degree Program continues to evolve and to provide the
opportunity for quality undergraduate education in the field. The RT program incorporates the spirit and
principles of the WCU QEP for a holistic approach to providing recreational therapy majors with a
synthesized learning experience focused on engagement and individualization.
During the past two years, the program has undergone two external reviews (WCU Provost’s
Program Review and beta site accreditation evaluation from the Committee for the Accreditation of
Recreational Therapy Education of the Commission for the Accreditation of Allied Health Education
Programs). The results of both external review reports indicate that the WCU RT Program is meeting or
exceeding all academic standards for this field and that this program is a national model for other RT
educational programs.
No plan is ever finalized or refined to the point of perfection and so is the RT QEP Plan an
instrument of development and adaptation to meet the needs of our key constituents: the WCU
undergraduate student majoring in RT. Overtime, it is expected that better means of delivering curriculum
instruction, more appropriate learning activities, and more accurate methods of measuring learning
outcomes will be developed and implemented as the Recreational Therapy B.S. Degree Program strives to
be the best model of enhanced, high quality education for our students.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 10
Appendix A: RT Admission Process: Student Strategic Plan
This is a planning form for your undergraduate studies in RT. You may select from several activities and special emphasis area that are based
specifically on your individual educational and career goals. The number one aspect on an application for an internship or job that employers are
looking for is engagement and involvement, the second is being able to work with other people cooperatively, and the third aspect is the
professional writing ability.
Student Name:
Date Completed:
Areas/Strategies
Write Professional Goals in at least 3 Areas
Planned Completion Date
(Semester target date)
Recreational Therapy Association - RTA (students should
be members of the RT student association)
Develop a Specialty Areas (i.e., Child Life, Aquatic
Therapy, Outdoor Adventure, Dance, etc. This is like a minor
area of study related to Recreational Therapy. Count on
completing 6-15 hours of study in one of the above areas.)
Certifications (i.e., First Aid, CPR, Pet Partners/Pet Assisted
Therapy, Fitness Trainer, etc.)
Professional Organization Student Membership (i.e.,
American Therapeutic Recreation Association, North
Carolina Recreational Therapy Association, etc.)
Attend Conferences (i.e., NCRTA Fall Conference [Sept. or
Oct. each year], NCRTA Student Professional Issues
Conference [Feb. each year], etc.)
Service Learning Experiences (i.e., Webster Enterprises,
etc.)
Summer jobs in Recreational Therapy
Study Abroad
Date of Review/Update:
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Date of Review/Update:
Date of Review/Update:
Date of Review/Update:
Date of Review/Update:
Page 11
Appendix B: RT Curriculum Map: RT Competencies, Learning Activities, and Student RT and WCU Learning Outcomes
RTH 200 Foundations of Recreational Therapy
CARTE Competencies
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Learning Activities
Student Outcomes
Knowledge of:
Foundational Knowledge
 Reflective
1. Ability to define
1.1.1
historical foundations/ evolution of RT profession
1. Theories of play, recreation and leisure
Paper: ―Why I
historical foundations,
1.1.2
philosophical concepts/definitions of RT and implications 2. Social psychological aspects of play, recreation and leisure
Chose To
concepts and
for service delivery.
3. Diversity factors (e.g., social, cultural, educational, language,
Study RT‖
definitions, and role of
1.1.3
health care and human service systems and the role and
spiritual, financial, age, attitude, geography) (all RT courses)
 RT Resource
RT
function of RT and allied disciplines within each
8. Concepts and models of health and human services (e.g.,
Guide
2. Skill in applying the
1.1.4
the role of RT in relation to allied disciplines and the
medical model, community model, education model, psychosocial
 Disability
principles of the RT
basis for collaboration with patient care services.
rehabilitation model, health and wellness model, person-centered
Awareness
process
1.1.5
personal and societal attitudes related to health, illness
model, Inter-national Classification of Functioning) (also RTH
Paper
3. Ability to communicate
and disability.
417)
 Co-curricular
the purpose, techniques
1.1.6
RT service delivery models and practice settings.
9. Cognition and related impairments (e.g., dementia, traumatic
Reflection
and effectiveness of RT
1.1.7
the RT process: assessment, treatment planning,
brain injury, developmental/learning disabilities) (also RTH 350)
based on
to colleagues,
implementation and evaluation.
11. Senses and related impairments (e.g., vision, hearing) (also
Involvement in
consumers, and the
1.1.8
the concepts of health, habilitation, rehabilitation,
RTH 350)
RT Service
public.
treatment, wellness, prevention and evidence-based
13. Normalization, inclusion, and least restrictive environment
Learning
4. Ability to analyze,
practice as related to RT practice.
14. Architectural barriers and accessibility
Programs: RT
evaluate and apply
1.1.9
the role and responsibilities of levels of personnel
15. Societal attitudes (e.g., stereotypes)
Practice
models of practice in
providing RT services
19. Principles of behavioral change (e.g., self-efficacy theory,
Reflection and
various settings.
1.1.10
1.1.11
1.1.12
1.1.13
1.1.14
1.1.15
1.1.16
1.1.17
1.1.18
1.1.19
1.1.20
1.1.21
1.1.22
the role and responsibilities of a RT working as an
integral part of the interdisciplinary treatment process.
the theories and principles of therapeutic/helping
relationships.
the RT’s role as an advocate for client's rights.
principles and processes of interdisciplinary treatment
teams.
the development and purpose of RT professional
organizations at the local, state, and national levels.
RT standards of practice and ethical codes
current ethical issues in health care and human services.
professional credentialing requirements and processes
registration, certification, licensure
agency accreditation processes applicable to RT services
personal responsibility for continuing professional
education and of appropriate resources.
principles of the normalization, inclusion, self-determination, social
role valorization, empowerment and personal autonomy.
issues/influences shaping the future of RT
skill in applying the principles of the RT process in individual and
group treatment programs service delivery.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
experiential learning model) (all)
Practice of Recreational Therapy
20. Concepts of RT (e.g., holistic approach, recreative experience,
special/adaptive recreation, inclusive recreation, using recreation
as a treatment modality) (all)
21. Models of RT service delivery
22. Practice settings (e.g., hospital, long-term care, community
recreation, correctional facilities)
23. Standards of practice for the RT profession (in depth in RTH
417)
24. Code of ethics in the RT field and accepted ethical practices
with respect to culture, social, spiritual, and ethnic differences (in
depth in RTH 417)
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
52. Role and function of other health and human service
professions and of interdisciplinary approaches (all)
Advancement of the Profession
64. Professionalism: professional behavior and professional
development (all – in depth focus in RTH 395)
66. Advocacy for persons served (also RTH 350)
71. Professional associations and organizations (all)


RT Civic
Engagement in
RTA
RT
Competency
and WCU
Learning
Outcomes
Assessment
Pre-Test
Two exams,
short answer
and essay
WCU Outcomes:
 Practice civic
engagement
 Clarify and act on
purpose and values
Page 12
CARTE Competencies
RTH 350 Recreational Therapy for People with Physical Disabilities
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Learning Activities
Knowledge of:
1.2.2 evidence-based recreational therapy/therapeutic recreation assessment
instruments used to determine physical, cognitive, emotional, and social
functioning of patients/clients
1.2.3 the evidence of problems and limitations for the specific medical,
psychiatric or other disabling conditions being treated
1.2.8 the nature and function of documentation procedures and systems related to
client assessment.
1.2.9 goals and mission of the various service settings as determinants for
assessment procedures and protocols.
1.3.2 the scope of practice of RT for treatment/program planning.
1.3.5 assistive techniques and devices to facilitate appropriate treatment
interventions.
1.4.1 goals and mission of the institution/agency/organization as determinants
for treatment/program intervention.
1.4.2 principles underlying the therapeutic/helping process, with emphasis
upon interaction between the RT and the patient/client.
1.4.7 evidence-based treatment interventions/programs typically used to reach
treatment outcomes for specific medical, psychiatric or other disabling
conditions
Foundational Knowledge
3. Diversity factors (e.g., social, cultural,
educational, language, spiritual, financial, age,
attitude, geography)
9. Cognition and related impairments (e.g.,
dementia, TBI, developmental/learning disabilities)
10. Anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology and
related impairments (e.g., impairments in
musculoskeletal system, nervous system,
circulatory system, respiratory system, endocrine
and metabolic disorders, infectious diseases)
11. Senses and related impairments (e.g., vision,
hearing) (introduced RTH 200)
14. Architectural barriers and accessibility
(introduced RTH 200)
16. Legislation (e.g., Americans with Disabilities
Act, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act,
Older Americans Act) (also 417)
19. Principles of behavioral change (e.g., selfefficacy theory, experiential learning model)
Skill in:
1.3.7 constructing treatment plans that incorporate patient/client strengths,
resources and preferences.
1.3.10 integrating systematic methods of patient/client evaluation and program
evaluation into treatment/program plans.
1.4.9 establishing an effective therapeutic/helping relationship.
1.4.10 designing evidence-based treatment interventions to implement the
individual treatment plan of the patient/client.
1.4.15 using a variety of facilitation techniques, such as social skills training,
cognitive learning theories or behavioral theories, etc., to reach treatment
outcomes.
Disabling Conditions:
1.8.25 Knowledge of medical/disabling conditions, disorders, impairments
affecting physical, cognitive, emotional, social functioning across the lifespan
1.8.26 Knowledge of the following disabling conditions: prevalence, etiology,
dx criteria, pathology/symptomatology, recommended course of tx, prognosis
1.8.27 Knowledge of the bio-psycho-social impact of disabling conditions/
disabilities on health status, self-concept, quality of life & functional
independence in life activities.
Practice of Recreational Therapy
25. Impact of impairment and/or treatment on the
person served (e.g., side effects of medications,
medical precautions)
30. Functional skills testing for assessment
36. Cognitive assessment (e.g., memory, problem
solving, attention span, orientation, safety
awareness)
38. Physical assessment (e.g., fitness, motor skills)
46. Activity modifications (e.g., assistive
techniques, technology and adaptive devices, rule
changes)
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
1.
Accessibility
Survey by ADA
Guidelines
2. Grand Rounds
Paper/Team
Projects- for
each diagnostic
group assigned
the student will
research and
write: diagnostic
and disease
description; the
disability and
functioning
issues;
rehabilitation
and general
indications;
evidence-based
research on
treatment for the
diagnostic group;
and recreational
therapy
interventions:
 5 dx groups
 one
individual
student
project
3. Two exams,
short answer
and essay
1.
2.
3.
4.
Student Outcomes
Ability to define the concepts
of health/wellness/habilitation/
rehabilitation, RT role/
responsibilities in physical
medicine, processes of
interdisciplinary treatment
teams, related legislation,
principles of normalization,
inclusion and selfdetermination, activity
modification principles for
adaptation to the needs of the
individual patient.
Ability to define the evidencebased treatment interventions
used to reach outcomes in
physical rehabilitation.
Ability to develop and
implement treatment
interventions consistent with
evidence-based practice and
patient preferences to achieve
functional outcomes.
Ability to effectively use a
variety of assistive techniques,
devices and equipment to meet
patient needs.
WCU Outcomes:
 Integrates information from
a variety of contexts
 Practice civic engagement
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
None
Advancement of the Profession
66. Advocacy for persons served
Page 13
RTH 352 Principles and Processes of Recreational Therapy
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Learning Activities
CARTE Competencies
Knowledge of:
1.3.1 the components of a comprehensive treatment/program
plan as required by regulatory agencies and professional
standards of practice
1.3.2 the scope of practice of RT for treatment/program
planning.
1.3.3 the systems approach to program planning and service
delivery.
1.3.4 documentation procedures relevant to the processes of
treatment and discharge planning.
1.3.5 assistive techniques and devices to facilitate appropriate
treatment interventions.
1.3.6 resources available to the recreational therapist in planning
and implementing services.
1.6.2 formative and summative methods and resources used to
evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of RT services.
1.6.4 methods for interpreting pt/client progress and outcomes
as a basis for program evaluation.
Skill in:
1.3.7 constructing treatment plans that incorporate patient/client
strengths, resources and preferences.
1.3.8 designing discharge/transition plans relevant to
patient/client resources, support systems and needs
1.3.9 activity and task analysis
1.3.10 integrating systematic methods of patient/client
evaluation and program evaluation into treatment/program
plans.
1.6.6 designing and using a variety of evaluation methods to
analyze client/pt outcomes and the effectiveness of the
treatment interventions
Foundational Knowledge
3. Diversity factors (e.g., social, cultural, educational,
language, spiritual, financial, age, attitude, geography)
1.
Practice of Recreational Therapy
20. Concepts of RT (e.g., holistic approach, recreative
experience, special/adaptive recreation, inclusive recreation,
using recreation as a treatment modality)
21. Models of RT service delivery (e.g., Leisure Ability
model, Health Protection/Health Promotion model, TR Service
Delivery model)
41. Documentation of assessment, progress/functional status,
discharge/transition plan of person served
43. Purpose and techniques of activity/task analysis
44. Leisure education/counseling
45. Selection of programs, activities and interventions to
achieve the assessed needs of the person served
46. Activity modifications (e.g., assistive techniques,
technology and adaptive devices, rule changes)

Organization of RT Service
49. Program design relative to population served
50. Type of service delivery systems (e.g., health, leisure
services, education and human services)
51. Methods of writing measurable goals and behavioral
objectives
52. Role and function of other health and human service
professions and of interdisciplinary approaches
53. Documentation procedures for program account-ability,
and payment for services
54. Methods for interpretation of progress notes, observations,
& assessment results of the person served
55. Evaluating agency or RT Service program
56. Quality improvement guidelines and techniques (e.g.,
utilization review, risk management, peer re-view, outcome
monitoring)
57. Components of agency/RT Service plan of operation
2.




Knowledge
quizzes
Treatment Plan
(5 phase):
Understanding a
DRG
Writing an
assessment
summary
Understanding
efficacy research
Writing a tx plan
with goals,
objectives,
interventions
Writing progress
notes and a
discharge plan
Student Outcomes
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Ability to define
components of
comprehensive treatment
programs, systems
approach to program
planning, documentation
procedures.
Skill in constructing treatment
plans that incorporate
patient/client strengths,
resources and preferences.
Skill in designing
discharge/transition plans
relevant to patient/client
resources, support systems and
needs
Skill in activity and task
analysis.
Skill in integrating systematic
methods of patient/client
evaluation and program
evaluation into
treatment/program plans.
WCU Outcome:
 Solves complex problems
Advancement of the Profession
68. Professional standards and ethical guidelines pertaining to
the RT profession
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 14
RTH 360 Recreational Therapy for Older Adults – SLC (Service Learning Course)
CARTE Competencies
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Learning Activities
Knowledge of:
Foundational Knowledge
1.2.2 evidence-based RT assessment instruments used
3. Diversity factors (e.g., social, cultural,
to determine physical, cognitive, emotional and social
educational, language, spiritual, financial, age,
functioning of patients
attitude, geography)
1.2.3 the evidence of problems and limitations for the
17. Relevant guidelines and standards (e.g., federal
specific medical, psychiatric or other disabling
and state regulatory agencies)
conditions being treated
19. Principles of behavioral change (e.g., self1.2.8 the nature and function of documentation
efficacy theory, experiential learning model)
procedures and systems related to client assessment
1.2.9 the goals and mission of various service settings as Practice of Recreational Therapy
determinants for assessment procedures and protocols
20. Concepts of RT (e.g., holistic approach,
1.3.2 the scope and practice of RT for
recreative experience, special/adaptive recreation,
treatment/program planning
inclusive recreation, using recreation as a treatment
1.3.5 assistive techniques and devices to facilitate
modality)
appropriate treatment interventions
22. Practice settings (e.g., hospital, long-term care,
1.4.1 goals and mission of the institution/agency/organization
community
as
recreation, correctional facilities)
determinants for treatment/program intervention
23. Standards of practice for the RT profession
1.4.2 principles underlying the therapeutic helping
24. Code of ethics in the RT field and accepted
process, with emphasis upon interaction between the
ethical practices with respect to culture, social,
RT and the patient
spiritual, and ethnic differences
1.4.7 evidence-based treatment interventions/programs 25. Impact of impairment and/or treatment on the
typically used to reach treatment outcomes for specific
person served (e.g., side effects of medications,
medical, psychiatric or other disabling conditions
medical precautions)
Skill in:
32. Other inventories and questionnaires (e.g.,
1.3.7 constructing treatment plans that incorporate
standardized rating systems, developmental
patient strengths, resources and preferences
screening tests, MDS, FIM, GAF)
1.3.10 integrating systematic methods of patient
33. Other sources of assessment data (e.g., records
evaluation and program evaluation into
or charts, staff, support system)
treatment/program plans
45. Selection of programs, activities and
1.4.9 establishing an effective therapeutic/helping
interventions to achieve the assessed needs of the
relationship
person served
1.4.10 designing evidence-based treatment interventions to
implement the individual treatment plan of the patient
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
1.4.15 using a variety of facilitation techniques, such as 51. Methods of writing measurable goals and
social skills training, cognitive learning theories or
behavioral objectives
behavioral theories, etc., to reach treatment outcomes
1.6.6 designing and using a variety of evaluation
Advancement of the Profession
methods to analyze patient/client outcomes and the
64. Professionalism: professional behavior and
effectiveness of the treatment interventions
professional development
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
1.
Personal Reflection
on Aging and
Dementia
2. Clinical Training in
HIPPA, Universal
Precautions,
Clinical Behaviors,
Elder Abuse
3. Resident Case
Study
incorporating MDS
Assessment Tool,
Pre- and Post-test
on Farrington
Leisure History,
and WHO Quality
of Life Assessment
4. Resident Care Plan
5. Report of
Application of Two
Evidence Based
Protocol
Interventions for
Dementia and Two
Brain Fitness
Interventions
6. Log and Reflection
of 18 Service
Learning Hours at
a Nursing Home
7. Two 50 question,
objective exams
Student Outcomes
Ability to define the role and
responsibilities of the RT in
geriatrics, processes of
interdisciplinary treatment
teams in rehabilitation,
legislation related to
geriatrics, adjustment or
activity modification
principles for adaptation to
the needs of the individual
patient/client.
2. Ability to develop and/or
select and implement
treatment interventions
appropriate to the goals and
objectives and consistent with
evidence-based practice and
patient/client preferences to
achieve optimal functional
outcomes for patients/clients
in geriatrics.
3. Ability to effectively use a
variety of assistive techniques,
devices and equipment to
meet patient/client needs
4. Skill in applying techniques
of evidence-based practice to
recreational therapy in
geriatrics.
1.
WCU Outcomes:
 Integrates information
from a variety of contexts
 Clarify and act on purpose
and values
Page 15
CARTE Competencies
Knowledge of:
1.4.1 goals and mission of the institution/agency/organization as
determinants for treatment/program intervention.
1.4.2 principles underlying the therapeutic/helping process, with
emphasis upon interaction between the RT and the patient/client.
1.4.3 the role of the RT as a member of the interdisciplinary
treatment team.
1.4.4 counseling theories and their relevance to specific
interventions.
1.4.5 individual and group leadership and helping theories and
techniques.
1.4.6 adjustment or activity modification principles for adaptation
to the needs of the individual patient/client.
1.4.7 evidence-based treatment interventions/programs typically
used to reach treatment outcomes for specific medical, psychiatric
or other disabling conditions
1.4.8 legal and ethical ramifications of treatment service delivery.
Skill in:
1.4.9 establishing an effective therapeutic/helping relationship.
1.4.10 designing evidence-based treatment interventions to
implement the individual treatment plan of the patient/client.
1.4.11 effective oral and written communication
1.4.12 applying individual and group leadership/helping
techniques.
1.4.13 assisting the patient/client to process the treatment
intervention, thereby enhancing self-awareness and formulating
conclusions relevant to treatment goals and objectives.
1.4.14 facilitating a variety of evidence-based treatment
interventions or modalities, such as games, exercise, community
reintegration, etc., to reach treatment outcomes.
1.4.15 using a variety of facilitation techniques, such as social
skills training, cognitive learning theories or behavioral theories,
etc., to reach treatment outcomes.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
RTH 370 Methods of Recreational Therapy
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Foundational Knowledge
3. Diversity factors (e.g., social, cultural, educational,
language, spiritual, financial, age, attitude, geography)
19. Principles of behavioral change (e.g., self-efficacy
theory, experiential learning model)
Practice of Recreational Therapy
25. Impact of impairment and/or treatment on the
person served (e.g., side effects of medications,
medical precautions)
45. Selection of programs, activities and interventions
to achieve the assessed needs of the person served
46. Activity modifications (e.g., assistive techniques,
technology and adaptive devices, rule changes)
47. Modalities and/or interventions (e.g., Recreational
Therapy activities, leisure skill development,
assertiveness training, stress management, social
skills, community reintegration)
48. Facilitation techniques and/or approaches (e.g.,
behavior management, counseling skills)
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
51. Methods of writing measurable goals and
behavioral objectives
52. Role and function of other health and human
service professions and of interdisciplinary
approaches
Advancement of the Profession
64. Professionalism: professional behavior and
professional development
69. Public relations, promotion and marketing of the
RT profession
Learning Activities
 Treatment
Protocol
 HeartMath
Personal
Development
and
Application
with Mock
Client
 Design and
Lead a
Modality with
Peer Review
 Modality
Poster with
Literature
Review and
Professional
Presentation
 Two Exams,
Combination
objective and
Short Answer
Student Outcomes
1. Skill in establishing an effective
therapeutic relationship
2. Skill in designing evidencebased treatment to implement
the individual treatment plan of
the patient/client.
3. Skill in applying individual and
group leadership/helping
techniques
4. Skill assisting the patient to
process the treatment
intervention, enhancing selfawareness relevant to treatment
goals and objectives.
5. Skill in using a variety of
facilitation techniques to reach
treatment outcomes.
6. Ability to effectively use a
variety of assistive techniques,
devices and equipment to meet
patient needs
7. Ability to apply behavior
management strategies and
helping techniques.
WCU Outcome:
 Communicates effectively
and responsibly
Page 16
CARTE Competencies
1.1.17 Knowledge of professional credentialing
requirements and processes: registration, certification,
and licensure.
1.1.19 Knowledge of personal responsibility for
continuing professional education and of appropriate
resources.
RTH 395 Pre-Intern Seminar
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Foundational Knowledge
None
Practice of Recreational Therapy
20. Concepts of RT (e.g., holistic approach,
recreative experience, special/adaptive
recreation, inclusive recreation, using recreation
as a treatment modality)
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
52. Role and function of other health and human
service professions and of interdisciplinary
approaches
Advancement of the Profession
64. Professionalism: professional behavior and
professional development
65. Requirements for RT credentialing (e.g.,
certification, recertification, licensure)
68. Professional standards and ethical guidelines
pertaining to the RT profession
71. Professional associations and organizations
72. Partnership between higher education and
direct service providers to provide internships
and to produce, understand and interpret research
for advancement of the RT profession
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Learning Activities
1. Resume
2. Letters of
Application for
Senior Clinical
Internship
3. Internship
Interviews with
Licensed
Recreational
Therapists
4. Cumulative
Professional
Portfolio
5. Portfolio
Presentation
6. 25 item
objective exam
7. Complete
Criminal
Background
Check
8. Secure
Professional
Liability
Insurance
9. RT
Competency
and WCU
Learning
Outcomes
Assessment
Pre-Internship
1.
2.
Student Outcomes
Ability to use standards of
practice and ethical codes in
directing interactions with
patients/clients and
colleagues and in the design
and implementation of RT
Services
Ability to secure a placement
for the capstone clinical
internship experience in
recreational therapy.
WCU Outcome:
 Clarify and act on purpose
and values
Page 17
CARTE Competencies
RTH 401 Client Assessment in Recreational Therapy (Changed to RTH 401)
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Learning Activities
Knowledge of:
1.2.1 psychometric properties of tests and measurements.
1.2.2 evidence-based RT assessment instruments used to determine
physical, cognitive, emotional, and social functioning of
patients/clients
1.2.3 the evidence of problems and limitations for the specific
medical, psychiatric or other disabling conditions being treated
1.2.4 the impact of limitations in physical, cognitive, social and
emotional functioning upon independence in life activities including
work/school, self-maintenance and leisure
1.2.5 evidence-based assessment instruments from other health care
disciplines that may be relevant to recreational therapy practice.
1.2.6 the World Health Organization's (WHO) International
Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a
method of assessing individual functioning and the impact of activity
limitations and restrictions to participation in life activities,
independence, satisfaction and quality of life.
1.2.7 interviewing stages and strategies
1.2.8 the nature and function of documentation procedures and
systems related to client assessment.
1.2.9 goals and mission of the various service settings as
determinants for assessment procedures and protocols.
1.6.2 formative and summative methods and resources used to
evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of recreational therapy
services.
1.6.4 methods for interpreting client/patient progress and outcomes
as a basis for program evaluation.
Skill in:
1.2.10 defining and measuring a variety of functional behaviors
relevant to specific disabling conditions and to the practice of RT
1.2.11 the use of behavioral observations.
1.2.12 the use of a variety of standardized and non-standardized
instruments, batteries and rating systems.
1.2.13 the use of functional performance testing.
1.2.14 the use of rapid assessment instruments (RAI) and their
application to RT practice.
1.2.15 gathering and use of relevant information from records, charts,
family, significant others, and other professionals.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Foundational Knowledge
3. Diversity factors (e.g., social, cultural, educational,
language, spiritual, financial, age, attitude, geography)
19. Principles of behavioral change (e.g., self-efficacy
theory, experiential learning model)
Practice of Recreational Therapy
20. Concepts of RT (e.g., holistic approach, recreative
experience, special/adaptive recreation, inclusive recreation,
using recreation as a treatment modality)
26. Criteria for selection and/or development of assessment
(e.g., purpose, reliability, validity, practicality, availability)
27. Implementation of assessment
28. Behavioral observations related to assessment
29. Interview techniques for assessment
30. Functional skills testing for assessment
31. Current RT/leisure assessment instruments
32. Other inventories and questionnaires (e.g., standardized
rating systems, dev. screening tests, MDS, FIM, GAF)
33. Other sources of assessment data (e.g., records or charts,
staff, support system)
34. Interpretation of assessment and record of person served
35. Sensory assessment (e.g., vision, hearing, tactile)
36. Cognitive assessment (e.g., memory, problem solving,
attention span, orientation, safety awareness)
37. Social assessment (e.g., communication/interactive
skills, relationships)
38. Physical assessment (e.g., fitness, motor skills function)
39. Affective assessment (e.g., attitude toward self,
expression)
40. Leisure assessment (e.g., barriers, interests, values,
patterns/skills, knowledge)
41. Documentation of assessment, progress/functional
status, discharge/transition plan of person served (e.g.,
SOAP, FIM) (also in RTH 352)
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
53. Documentation procedures for program accountability,
and payment for services
54. Methods for interpretation of progress notes,
observations, and assessment results of the person served
1.
Self-Administered
Assessment:
Perceived Stress
Scale with review of
instrument
psychometrics,
application to RT,
and personal
reflection.
2. Self-Administered
Assessment: WHO
Quality of Life
BREF with review
of instrument
psychometrics,
application to RT
and personal
reflection.
3. Assessment of a
Client With
Freetime Boredom
Scale, Development
of treatment goals,
and emphasis on
observation Skills
4. Assessment Case
Study of a specific
problem, application
of a battery of 3
assessment tools,
and Treatment Plan
with emphasis on
Interviewing Skills
5. Two 50 question,
objective exams
Student Outcomes
1. Ability to determine the
need for further
assessment(s)
2. Ability to conduct a
systematic interview
3. Ability to select the
appropriate assessment
instrument(s) for a
selected patient/client.
4. Ability to analyze,
interpret and incorporate
assessment findings on a
patient/client and develop
functional outcome goals
in an individualized
treatment plan
WCU Outcomes:
 Integrates information
from a variety of contexts
 Communicates
effectively and responsibly
Page 18
CARTE Competencies
Knowledge of:
1.2.2 evidence-based recreational therapy/therapeutic recreation
assessment instruments used to determine physical, cognitive,
emotional, and social functioning of patients/clients
1.2.3 the evidence of problems and limitations for the specific
medical, psychiatric or other disabling conditions being treated
1.2.8 the nature and function of documentation procedures and
systems related to client assessment.
1.2.9 goals and mission of the various service settings as
determinants for assessment procedures and protocols.
1.3.2 the scope of practice of RT for treatment/program planning.
1.3.5 assistive techniques and devices to facilitate appropriate
treatment interventions.
1.4.1 goals and mission of the institution/agency/organization as
determinants for treatment/program intervention.
1.4.2 principles underlying the therapeutic/helping process, with
emphasis upon interaction between the RT and the patient/client.
1.4.7 evidence-based treatment interventions/programs typically
used to reach treatment outcomes for specific medical,
psychiatric or other disabling conditions
Skill in:
1.3.7 constructing treatment plans that incorporate patient/client
strengths, resources and preferences.
1.3.10 integrating systematic methods of patient/client evaluation
and program evaluation into treatment/program plans.
1.4.9 establishing an effective therapeutic/helping relationship.
1.4.10 designing evidence-based treatment interventions to
implement the individual treatment plan of the patient/client.
1.4.13 assisting the patient/client to process the treatment
intervention, thereby enhancing self-awareness and formulating
conclusions relevant to treatment goals and objectives.
1.4.15 using a variety of facilitation techniques, such as social
skills training, cognitive learning theories or behavioral theories,
etc., to reach treatment outcomes.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
RTH 405 Recreational Therapy in Behavioral Health
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Learning Activities
Foundational Knowledge
 Paper on Mental
3. Diversity factors (e.g., social, cultural,
Health Diagnostic
educational, language, spiritual, financial, age,
Group with
attitude, geography)
Literature Review
9. Cognition and related impairments (e.g., dementia,
and Current
TBI, developmental/learning disabilities)
Treatment
10. Anatomy, physiology, and kinesiology and
Strategies
related impairments (e.g., impairments in
 Paper on a major
musculoskeletal system, nervous system, circulatory
theory Used in
system, respiratory system, endocrine and metabolic
Mental Health
disorders, infectious diseases)
with Research
16. Legislation (e.g., Americans with Disabilities
Review,
Act, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act,
Evidence, and
Older Americans Act) (also 417)
Application to RT
19. Principles of behavioral change (e.g., selfServices
efficacy theory, experiential learning model)
 Group Reflections
on Lab
Practice of Recreational Therapy
Experiences
25. Impact of impairment and/or treatment on the
 Evaluation of RT
person served (e.g., side effects of medications,
Interventions for
medical precautions)
Behavioral Health
30. Functional skills testing for assessment
 Three Exams,
36. Cognitive assessment (e.g., memory, problem
Combined Short
solving, attention span, orientation, safety
Answer and
awareness)
Essay
38. Physical assessment (e.g., fitness, motor skills)
46. Activity modifications (e.g., assistive techniques,
technology and adaptive devices, rule changes)
Student Outcomes
 Ability to define the concepts
of
health/wellness/habilitation/r
ehabilitation, RT
role/responsibilities in
behavioral health, processes
of interdisciplinary treatment
teams, related legislation,
principles of normalization,
inclusion and selfdetermination, activity
modification principles for
adaptation to the needs of the
individual patient.
 Ability to define the evidencebased treatment interventions
used to reach outcomes in
behavioral health.
 Ability to develop and
implement treatment
interventions consistent with
evidence-based practice and
patient preferences to achieve
functional outcomes.
 Ability to effectively use a
variety of assistive
techniques, devices and
equipment to meet patient
needs.
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
None
Advancement of the Profession
66. Advocacy for persons served
WCU Outcomes:
 Integrates information
from a variety of contexts
 Solves complex problems
 Communicates effectively
and responsibly
Page 19
CARTE Competencies
Knowledge of
1.7.1 organization and delivery of health care and human
services.
1.7.2 position design, classification, recruitment,
orientation/training, supervision and performance
management of personnel as an integrated human resource
system.
1.7.3 techniques of financing, budgeting, cost accounting,
rate setting and fiscal accountability.
1.7.4 governmental, professional, agency, and accreditation
standards and regulations
1.7.5 the principles and practices of promotions, public
relations, and marketing.
1.7.6 practices of managing resources including personnel,
facilities, supplies, and equipment.
1.7.7 principles and requirements for safety and risk
management.
1.7.8 facility planning processes
1.7.9 strategic planning processes
1.7.10 legal requirements pertaining to delivery of health
care and human services and recreational therapy.
1.6.2 formative and summative methods and resources used
to evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of recreational
therapy services.
1.6.3 documentation procedures for program planning,
accountability, and payment of service.
Skill in:
1.7.11 using computers for managing information and data
1.7.12 applying ethical and conduct standards to practice
1.7.13 practicing safety, emergency, infection control and
risk management procedures
1.7.14 scheduling, time management, and prioritization of
tasks and decisions
1.7.15 managing productivity and labor resources.
16. Skill in providing clinical supervision and education to
staff and students
1.7.16 applying techniques of evidence-based practice to
recreational therapy practice
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
RTH 417 Administration of Recreational Therapy Services
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Foundational Knowledge
3. Diversity factors (e.g., social, cultural, educational, language, spiritual,
financial, age, attitude, geography)
8. Concepts and models of health and human services (e.g., medical model,
community model, education model, psychosocial rehabilitation model, health and
wellness model, person-centered model, ICF)
17. Relevant guidelines and standards (e.g., federal and state regulatory agencies)
Practice of Recreational Therapy
22. Practice settings (e.g., hospital, long-term care, community recreation, etc.)
23. Standards of practice for the RT profession
24. Code of ethics in the RT field and accepted ethical practices with respect to
culture, social, spiritual, and ethnic differences
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
53. Documentation procedures for program accountability, and payment for
services
57. Components of agency or RT Service plan of operation
58. Personnel, intern, and volunteer supervision and management
59. Payment system (e.g., managed care, PPO, private contract, Medicare,
Medicaid, DRG)
60. Facility and equipment management
61. Budgeting and fiscal responsibility
Advancement of the Profession
62. Historical development of RT
63. Accreditation standards and regulations (e.g., JCAHO, CARF, CMS)
64. Professionalism: professional behavior and professional development
65. Requirements for RT credentialing (e.g., cert., recertification, licensure)
66. Advocacy for persons served
67. Legislation and regulations pertaining to RT
68. Professional standards and ethical guidelines pertaining to the RT profession
69. Public relations, promotion and marketing of the RT profession
70. Methods, resources and references for maintaining and upgrading professional
competencies
71. Professional associations and organizations
72. Partnership between higher education and direct service providers to provide
internships and produce, understand and interpret research for advancement of RT
73. Value of continuing education and in-service training for the advancement of
the RT profession
Learning
Activities
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Senior
Professional
Philosophy
Position
Paper
Ethics Case
Study
EvidenceBased
Practice
Search
Program
Development
and
Marketing
Project
Two 50 Item,
Objective
Exams
Student Outcomes
1. Skill in using
computers/systems for
managing information
and data
2. Skill in applying ethical
and conduct standards
to practice
3. Skill in practicing
safety, emergency,
infection control and
risk management
procedures
4. Skill in scheduling, time
management, and
prioritization of tasks
and decisions
5. Skill in applying
techniques of evidencebased practice to
recreational therapy
practice.
6. Ability to balance cost
and quality to provide
necessary and effective
RT services.
WCU Outcomes:
 Solves complex
problems
 Clarify and act on
purpose and values
Page 20
RTH 470 Adventure- Based Recreational Therapy – SLC (Service Learning Course)
CARTE Competencies
NCTRC Knowledge Domains
Learning Activities
Knowledge of:
Foundational Knowledge
 Research Article
1.1.9 the role and responsibilities of levels of personnel providing
9. Cognition and related impairments (e.g.,
Review on
RT services.
dementia, traumatic brain injury,
Adventure Based
1.1.20 principles of normalization, inclusion, self-determination,
developmental/learning disabilities)
Interventions
social role valorization, empowerment and personal autonomy
18. Principles of group interaction, leadership,  Outdoor Adventure
1.2.3 the evidence of problems and limitations for the specific
and safety
Project
medical, psychiatric or other disabling conditions being treated
19. Principles of behavioral change (e.g., selfDemonstrating
1.2.4 the impact of limitations in physical, cognitive, social and
efficacy theory, experiential learning model)
Competence in
emotional functioning upon independence in life activities
Intervention Skills
including work/ school, self-maintenance and leisure
Practice of Recreational Therapy
 Co-curricular
1.3.6 resources available to the RT in planning and implement
45. Selection of programs, activities and
Reflection on
services
interventions to achieve the assessed needs of
Service Learning
1.4.1 goals and mission of the institution/agency/organization as
the person served
with Youth and
determinants for treatment/ program intervention
46. Activity modifications (e.g., assistive
Adolescents served
1.4.2 principles underlying the therapeutic/ helping process, with
techniques, technology and adaptive devices,
by SOAR
emphasis upon interaction between the RT and the patient/ client
rule changes)
 Acquisition of
1.4.5 individual and group leadership and helping theories and
47. Modalities and/or interventions (e.g.,
Adventure Based
techniques
Recreational Therapy activities, leisure skill
Skills (Belay
1.4.6 adjustment or activity modification principles for adaptation
development, assertiveness training, stress
Certification,
to the needs of the individual patient/ client
management, social skills, community
Challenge Course,
1.4.7 evidence-based treatment interventions/ programs typically
reintegration)
Overnight/Weekend
used to reach treatment outcomes for specific medical, psychiatric
48. Facilitation techniques and/or approaches
Adventure
or other disabling conditions
(e.g., behavior management, counseling skills)
Experience
1.4.8 legal and ethical ramification of treatment service delivery
 Final,
Organization of Recreational Therapy Service
Comprehensive
Skill in:
52. Role and function of other health and
Exam (Combination
1.4.9 establishing an effective therapeutic/ helping relationship
human service professions and of
of Objective, Short
1.4.11 effective oral and written communication
interdisciplinary approaches
Answer, and Essay)
Skill in applying individual and group leadership/ helping
techniques
1.4.13 assisting the patient/ client to process the treatment
intervention, thereby enhancing self-awareness and formulating
conclusions relevant to treatment goals and objectives.
1.4.14 facilitating a variety of evidence-based treatment
interventions or modalities, such as games, exercise, community
reintegration, etc. to reach treatment outcomes.
1.4.15 using a variety of facilitation techniques, such as social
skills training, cognitive learning theories or behavioral theories,
etc., to reach treatment outcomes
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
60. Facility and equipment management
Advancement of the Profession
64. Professionalism: professional behavior
and professional development
71. Professional associations and
organizations
Student Outcomes
Skill in assisting the
patient/client to process the
treatment intervention,
thereby enhancing selfawareness and formulating
conclusions relevant to
treatment goals and
objectives.
2. Skill in using a variety of
facilitation techniques,
such as social skills
training, cognitive learning
theories or behavioral
theories, etc., to reach
treatment outcomes.
3. Ability to select adventurebased treatment
interventions/programs
according to diagnosis, age,
cultural, socioeconomic
factors, and patient/client
preferences to treat
problems and limitations
associated with specific
medical, psychiatric or
other disabling conditions.
1.
WCU Outcomes:
 Communicates
effectively and responsibly
 Clarify and act on
purpose and values
Page 21
RTH 484 and RTH 485 Clinical Internship in Recreational Therapy
CARTE Competencies
NCTRC Knowledge
Learning Activities
Foundations:
 Ability to communicate the purpose, techniques and effectiveness of RT to colleagues, consumers, …
 Ability to analyze, evaluate and apply models of practice in various settings.
 Ability to use standards of practice and ethical codes in directing interactions with clients and colleagues
and in the design and implementation of RT Services
 Ability to comply with professional credentialing standards.
 Ability to comply with agency or institutional clinical privileging and/or competency requirements.
 Ability to evaluate personal practice skills; seek resources to continually improve practice skills; and
incorporate enhanced knowledge and skill into daily practice.
Client Assessment:
 Ability to determine the need for further assessment(s).
 Ability to determine and document the appropriateness of a referral for RT services.
 Ability to involve clients/patients, families and their significant others in the assessment process.
 Ability to conduct a systematic interview.
 Ability to select the appropriate assessment instrument(s) for a selected patient/client.
 Ability to analyze, interpret and incorporate assessment and evidence-based practice findings in client
data base to develop functional outcome goals to be included in an individualized treatment plan.
 Ability to document assessment findings and review findings and implications for treatment with…
 Ability to assess the need for assistive technologies and devices to maximize functional abilities and
independence in life activities.
Planning:
 Ability to involve client, family and significant others, as appropriate, in the design of the treatment plan.
 Ability to systematically apply assessment, quality improvement and evidence-based practice data in
designing the treatment plan.
 Ability to communicate and document the treatment plan to the patient/client, family, significant others,
and all members of the treatment team.
 Ability to apply accreditation, regulatory and therapeutic recreation standards of practice in the
development, implementation, and evaluation of treatment plans/programs.
 Ability to develop and use interdisciplinary collaboration in the design and implementation of tx plans.
 Ability to select evidence-based treatment interventions/programs according to diagnosis, age, cultural,
socioeconomic factors, and client preferences to treat problems associated with specific medical,
psychiatric or other disabling conditions.
 Ability to design and plan evidence-based treatment interventions/programs, protocols, guidelines and
pathways, including such factors as contra indications, precautions, accommodations and adaptations, to
improve physical, cognitive, social or emotional functioning of patients/clients.
 Ability to select appropriate treatment interventions/programs, including such factors as type, frequency,
duration and intensity, to achieve stated goals and outcomes.
 Ability to use evidence-based treatment interventions/programs, protocols, guidelines, and pathways and
facilitation techniques to accomplish desired outcomes
 Ability to write functional outcome goals, and other forms of documentation related to treatment design.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Possesses knowledge in all
domains and demonstrates
skills of recreational therapy
in practice for a minimum
of 12 weeks and 480 hours
of clinical internship under
direct supervision of a
licensed and certified
recreational therapist






Reflective Bimonthly reports (7)
Client Case Study
Clinical
Intervention
Annotated
Bibliography of
Professional
Literature
Reflective Log
detailing each day
of practice
RT Competency
and WCU Learning
Outcomes
Assessment PostInternship
Outcomes
All abilities in
RT Practice.
WCU Outcomes:
 Integrates
information from
a variety of
contexts
 Solves complex
problems
Communicates
effectively and
responsibly
 Clarify and act
on purpose and
values
Page 22
Implementing:
 Ability to develop and/or select and implement treatment interventions appropriate to the goals and
objectives and consistent with evidence-based practice and patient/client preferences to achieve optimal
functional outcomes for patients/clients.
 Ability to effectively involve client, family and significant others in implementing treatment
interventions.
 Ability to apply knowledge of the effects of pharmaceutical agents on health/behavior of clients in tx.
 Ability to apply knowledge of multicultural considerations when implementing treatment.
 Ability to effectively use a variety of assistive techniques, devices and equipment to meet client needs.
 Ability to modify or discontinue treatment interventions, as appropriate in adapting to changing
conditions in the patient/client or treatment environment.
 Ability to apply behavior management strategies and helping techniques.
 Ability to document patient's/client's response to interventions.
Evaluating:
 Ability to evaluate the recreational therapy program for effectiveness and efficiency.
 Ability to interpret data, to modify treatment interventions and programs and to formulate
recommendations for continued patient/client treatment or aftercare.
 Ability to use treatment/program evaluation data and research to develop protocols, guidelines and
pathways to achieve effective client outcomes on a predictable and consistent basis.
 Ability to involve clients and significant others in the reassessment of functioning and progress related to
the individualized treatment/program plan, plans for discharge and aftercare, and intervention/program
evaluation.
 Ability to use program evaluation and applied research techniques to demonstrate program/service
accountability.
Managing:
 Ability to apply knowledge of theory, techniques, and quality improvement to managing service delivery.
 Ability to balance cost and quality to provide necessary and effective evidence-based care.
 Ability to manage and use scientific, technological and patient/client information to assess and adapt
physical/environmental barriers to optimize patient/client independence in life activities.
 Ability to manage the practice of recreational therapy within legal and ethical requirements of health care,
the agency and the profession.
 Ability to collaborate with administrators and allied disciplines regarding the delivery and
management of recreational therapy services provided to patients/clients.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 23
Appendix C: Recreational Therapy Curriculum Mapping-Outcomes Assessment
Outcomes, Values, and Links to Specific Assignments
RTH 200
WCU Learning Foundations
Outcomes
Integrate
information
from a variety of
contexts
Solve complex
problems
Communicate
effectively and
responsibly
Practice civic
engagement
Clarify and act
on purpose and
values





0
0
RTH 350
Phys Dis
RTH 352 RTH 360 RTH 370 RTH 395
Proc/Tech
Older
Adults
Methods
4
2
4
3
Grand Rounds
Project
Tx Plan
Project
Med Record
Rev./Case
Study
Protocol
3
0
0
0
Pre-Intern
0
0
RTH 401
RTH 405
RTH 417
RTH 470
Client Assess
Behavioral
Health
Admin
Adventure
3
3
0
Assessment
Case Study
Tx Theory
Paper
0
Tx. Plan
0
0
0
0
4
0
1
2
RTA
ADA Access
Survey
1
0
Portfolio
0
0
0
0
2
0
Aging
Reflection
4
Annot. Bib
Protocol
4
4
4
Devel. &
Marketing
Project
Service
Learning
SOAR
Case Study
0
3
Group
Intervention
0
0
0
4
0
0
Portfolio
0
2
2
0
4
4
Service
Learning
SOAR
Tx Team
In-service
0
0
4
4
4
Ethics Case
Skills
Self-eval
Journal
Value 0 – Outcome is not addressed at all
Value 1 – Outcome is introduced; students are expected to have minimal understanding
Value 2 – Outcomes is reintroduced and further developed; students are expected to have a limited working knowledge of the outcome.
Value 3 – Outcome is reinforced; students should be able to demonstrate a thorough understanding of the outcome.
Value 4 – Outcome is substantially reinforced and developed; students should demonstrate a thorough understanding and ability to apply the knowledge
(or skill) identified in the outcome.
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Total
Intern
Ment. Hlth
Diagnostic
Report
Client Assess.
Poster
RTH
484/485
Page 24
19
17
17
3
19
Appendix D: Recreational Therapy Program Matrix of Learning Outcomes
The matrix below identifies the courses and learning activities through which RT students acquire the skills and knowledge identified in the 5
WCU Learning Outcomes.
Course/
Experience/Activity
Course/
Experience/Activity
Course/
Experience/Activity
Integrates
information from a
variety of contexts
RTH 350 RT/Phys
Dis: Grand Rounds
RTH 352 Processes:
Treatment Plan
Project
RTH 360 RT/Older
Adults: Case Study
Project
RTH 401 Client
Assessment: Case
Study
Solves complex
problems
RTH 352
Processes:
Treatment Plan
Project
RTH 405 Behavioral
Health: Mental
Health Diagnostic
Report
RTH 417 Admin.:
Program
Development and
Marketing Project
RTH 470
Adventure: Service
Learning w/Youth
at Risk
Communicates
effectively and
responsibly
RTH 370 Methods:
Professional Poster
Presentation
RTH 401 Client
Assessment:
Assessment Results
to 2 Clients
RTH 405
Behavioral Health:
Group
Interventions and
Processing
RTH 470
Adventure: Service
Learning w/Youth
at Risk
Practice civic
engagement
RTH 200
Foundations:
Student
Participation in
RTA
RTH 395 PreIntern Seminar:
Professional
Portfolio
RTH 350 RT/Phys
Dis: ADA
Accessibility Study
in the Region
RTH 417 Admin.:
Ethics Problem and
Case Study
RTH 470
Adventure:
Development of
Outdoor and
Adventure Skills
Intended Outcome
Clarify and act on
purpose and values
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
RTH 360 RT/Older
Adults: Personal
Reflections on
Aging
Course/
Experience/Activity
Course/
Experience/Activity
RTH 405
Behavioral Health:
Treatment Theory
Paper
Course/
Experience/Activity
RTH 484/485 Clinical
Internship: Annotated
Bibliography for
Diagnostic Group and
Develop Treatment
Protocol for a Diagnostic
Group
RTH 484/485 Clinical
Internship: Case study
(assessment, planning,
implementation and
evaluation of client
services in the clinical
setting.
RTH 484/485 Clinical
Internship: Participate on
clinical treatment team and
deliver clinical in-service
training
RTH 484/485 Clinical
Internship: Complete
self-evaluation, RT
competency assessment,
maintain daily journal of
clinical experiences and
growth
Page 25
RT QEP Plan, April 2011
Page 26
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