Kutztown University of Pennsylvania Kutztown, Pennsylvania Department: Secondary Education

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Kutztown University of Pennsylvania
Kutztown, Pennsylvania
Department: Secondary Education
EDU 564 Foundation of the Middle Level Learner
3 semester hours, 3 credit hours
Spring Semester 2007
January 26, February 2, February 23, March 22, April 5 and April 25
Saturdays from 8-12
Blackboard Discussion Board
Dr. Theres M. Stahler
236 Beekey Education Center
I.
[email protected]
610.683-4761
Course Description
The past three decades have witnessed tremendous reform in
middle level education and more restructuring is in progress. This
course examines the physical, emotional, intellectual, and moral
development of the middle level learner and the corresponding
implications for school organization. This course attempts to provide an
integrated look at the middle level learner in the school setting. This
Foundation course will utilize current research on middle level learners
as it applies to the middle level practitioner
II.
Course Rationale
There has been a national movement to transform the junior
high school/middle school into a place where young adolescents are
involved in instruction that is appropriate based on their cognitive,
emotional, and physical needs. Publication of documents such as:
Turning Points: Preparing American Youth for the 21st Century: The
Report of the Task Force on Education of Young Adolescents and
Transitions by the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development and
the more recent Turning Points 2000: Educating Adolescents in the
21st Century along with the explosive growth of the National Middle
School Association have helped to explore the education of learners
between the ages of ten and fifteen. It is critical that educators utilize
the recommendations contained in the middle level literature. Unless
institutions that prepare teachers are committed to preparing teachers,
specifically, for middle level schools, the middle school will experience
the same fate as its predecessor, the junior high school
NCATE/NMSA Standards Addressed
Standard 1 Young Adolescent Development Middle level teacher candidates
understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young
adolescent development, and they provide opportunities that support student
development and learning.
Knowledge Middle level teacher candidates:
1. Understand the major concepts, principles, and theories of young adolescent
development – intellectual, physical, social, emotional, and moral.
2. Understand the range of individual differences of all young adolescents and the
implications of these differences for teaching and learning.
3. Know a variety of teaching/learning strategies that take into consideration and
capitalize upon the developmental characteristics of all young adolescents.
4. Understand the implications of young adolescent development for school
organization and components of successful middle level programs and schools. 5.
Understand issues of young adolescent health and sexuality.
6. Understand the interrelationships among the characteristics and needs of all
young adolescents.
7. Understand that the development of all young adolescents occurs in the context of
classrooms, families, peer groups, communities and society.
8. Are knowledgeable about how the media portrays young adolescents and
comprehend the implications of these portraits.
UNACCEPTABLE
Middle level candidates fail to show acceptable levels of knowledge of the concepts,
principles, theories and research about young adolescent development. They fail to
provide all young adolescents with learning opportunities that are developmentally
responsive, socially equitable, and academically rigorous.
ACCEPTABLE
Middle level candidates demonstrate knowledge of the concepts, principles, theories
and research about young adolescent development. They use this knowledge to
provide all young adolescents with learning opportunities that are developmentally
responsive, socially equitable, and academically rigorous.
TARGET
Middle level candidates demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the concepts,
principles, theories and research about young adolescent development. They use
this knowledge to provide all young adolescents with learning opportunities that are
developmentally responsive, socially equitable, and academically rigorous.
Dispositions
Middle level teacher candidates:
1. Are positive and enthusiastic about all young adolescents.
2. Respect and appreciate the range of individual developmental differences of all
young adolescents.
3. Hold high, realistic expectations for the learning and behavior of all young
adolescents.
4. Believe that all young adolescents can learn and accept responsibility to help
them do so.
5. Are enthusiastic about being positive role models, coaches, and mentors for all
young adolescents.
6. Believe that diversity among all young adolescents is an asset.
7. Believe that their role includes helping all young adolescents develop to their full
potential.
UNACCEPTABLE
Middle level candidates fail to demonstrate positive orientations toward teaching
young adolescents. They do not believe that all young adolescents can learn and do
not accept the responsibility to help them do so.
ACCEPTABLE
Middle level candidates are positive about teaching young adolescents and develop
positive relationship with them. They believe that all young adolescents can learn and
accept the responsibility to help them do so.
TARGET
Middle level candidates develop close, mutually respectful relationships with all
young adolescents that support their intellectual, ethical, and social growth.
Performances
Middle level teacher candidates:
1. Establish close, mutually respectful relationships with all young adolescents that
support their intellectual, ethical, and social growth.
2. Create learning opportunities that reflect an understanding of the development of
all young adolescent learners.
3. Create positive, productive learning environments where developmental
differences are respected and supported, and individual potential is encouraged. 4.
Make decisions about curriculum and resources that reflect an understanding of
young adolescent development.
5. Use developmentally responsive instructional strategies.
6. Use multiple assessments that are developmentally appropriate for young
adolescent learners.
7. Engage young adolescents in activities related to their interpersonal, community,
and societal responsibilities.
8. Create and maintain supportive learning environments that promote the healthy
development of all young adolescents.
9. Deal effectively with societal changes, including the portrait of young adolescents
in the media, which impact the healthy development of young adolescents.
10. Respond positively to the diversity found in young adolescents and use that
diversity in planning and implementing curriculum and instruction.
UNACCEPTABLE
Middle level candidates fail to create and maintain supportive learning environments
that promote the healthy development of all young adolescents. They lack
enthusiasm and a desire to respond positively to the diversity found in young
adolescents. They fail to use young adolescent diversity in planning and
implementing curriculum and instruction.
ACCEPTABLE
Middle level candidates create and maintain supportive learning environments that
promote the healthy development of all young adolescents. They respond positively
to the diversity found in young adolescents and use that diversity in planning and
implementing curriculum and instruction.
TARGET
Middle level candidates create and maintain supportive learning environments that
promote the healthy development of all young adolescents. They respond positively
to the diversity found in young adolescents and use that diversity in planning and
implementing curriculum and instruction.
III.
Course Objectives
A.
B.
C.
Students will demonstrate in writing and discussion an
understanding of the cognitive, emotional, physical, and
social characteristics of the middle level learner.
Students will read and discuss the current research
concerning young adolescent development.
Student will research and write about one aspect of
young adolescent development.
IV.
Course Content
A.
Characteristics of young adolescents.
1.
Physical development
a.
Onset of puberty
b.
Gender differences
c.
Problems in development
d.
Educational implications
2.
Social-emotional development
a.
Personality development
b.
Peer group
c.
The role of the family
d.
Educational implications
3.
Cognitive development
a.
Brain growth theory
b.
Formal operations
c.
Educational implications
4.
Moral development
a.
Values education
b.
Peer pressure
V.
Course Outline
January 26
A.
Adolescent Development
 Course Overview

What were you doing when you were 13?
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Young Adolescence-then and now
 Wonder Years v Middle School
Confessions
 Kevin v Orlando
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Theorists that will influence our thinking about young
adolescents:
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Stanley Hall, Sigmund Freud, Anna Freud,
Erik Erickson, James Marcia, Jean Piaget,
Robert Selman, Lev Vygotsky, Albert
Bandura, Robert Havighurst, Kurt Lewin,
and Margaret Mead
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
On Being Thirteen
Voices for the Middle
On the Cusp
Listening to the Voices of Young
Adolescents
Research Summary: Young Adolescent Developmental
Characteristics
Jigsaw
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
Case Studies Approach

Blackboard Assignment - Reflect on the first
class. Respond to “Things Could Always be
Worse” and “ A Torn Adolescence.” Discus the
young adolescent development issues the case
study highlights.
February 2
B.
Young Adolescent Physical Development
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Adolescent Diversity: Socioeconomic Status and
Ethnicity
America’s Changing Ethnic Make-up
Socioeconomic Status
Minority Adolescents
Native American Adolescents
Immigrants and Refugees
Acculturation
Body Issues
Sexual Maturation and Physical Growth
Biochemical Basis of Puberty
The Pituitary Hormones
The Female Sex Hormones
The Male Sex Hormones
The Adrenal Glands
Sex Hormone Regulation
Male Sex Organs
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Female Sex Organs
The Menstrual Cycle
Menstrual Concerns
Male Primary & Secondary Sexual Characteristics
Female Primary & Secondary Sex Characteristics
Growth in Height and Weight
Other Physical Sex Differences
Health Decisions
Body Image
Body Types and Ideals
Early vs. Late Maturation
Off-time Maturation
Obesity
Contributors to Overweight
Anorexia Nervosa
Bulimia
Common Nutritional Deficiencies
Exercise
Sleep
Acne
Blackboard Assignment: Read and respond to Case Studies: “The
Missing H” and “Adolescence and the Nerdy Underdeveloped Female.”
February 23
C.
Young Adolescent Social Development
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Self-Concept, Identity, Ethnicity, and Gender
Self-Concept and Self-Esteem
The Four Dimensions of the Self
Having a Good Self-Concept
Developing a Positive Self-Concept
Changes in Self-Concept
Identity: Erikson’s Seven Conflicts
Critique of Marcia
Ethnic Identity
Sex and Gender
Cognitive-Developmental Theories
Societal Influences
Androgeny
Gender and Identity
The Need for Friends
Loneliness
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Family and Peer Relationships
Early Adolescent Friendships
Friendship Activities
Popularity
Shyness
Psychosocial Development
Adolescent Love
Adolescent Society, Culture, and Subculture
In-School Subsystems
Religion
Popularity in Boys
Popularity in Girls
Athletics
Leading crowd
High grades
Right family
Gender Differences
Extremist Subcultures
Telephones
Slang
Music
Genres
Antisocial Music
Suicide
Motivations for Suicide: Depression
Juvenile Delinquency
Environmental Causes of Delinquency
Interpersonal Causes of Delinquency
Personal Causes of Delinquency
Gangs
The Correctional System
Restorative Justice Movement
Prevention of Delinquency
Adolescent Drug Use
Compulsive Use
Prevention and Treatment
Tobacco and Smoking
March 8
D.
Young Adolescent Moral Development
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The Development of Moral Values
Piaget and Moral Development
Kohlberg’s Levels of Moral Development
Criticisms of Kohlberg
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Gender Differences in Moral Reasoning
The Social-Cognitive Domain Approach
Prosocial Behavior
Family Factors in Moral Learning
Peer Influences on Moral Behavior
Religion
Televisions Influence on Morality
Moral Education
April 5
E.
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Young Adolescent Cognitive Development
New Approaches to Cognitive Development
Current vs. Older Research
Information Processing
Changes during Adolescence
Higher-Order Thought Processes
Decision Making
Brain Development
Sternberg’s Theory of Intelligence
Gardner’s Frames of Mind
Intelligence Tests
Factors Influencing Results
Limitations of IQ Tests
Achievement Tests
April 25
F.
Adolescent Development and the School Setting
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G.
Education and School
Trends in U.S. Education
Alternative Forms of Education
No Child Left Behind Act
Middle Schools
Successful Middle Schools
Curriculum
Dropping Out
Research Summaries
Five Core Assessments
Attendance
Each member of the class is expected to attend each of the six class
meetings.
Participation
The course materials including the Case studies are posted on
Blackboard. Each member of the class will be expected to respond to
the assigned case studies. These responses are intended to create a
discussion around young adolescent development. While there is no
minimum number of responses or minimum length to the responses,
every person in the class is expected to respond to each case study
and the responses should indicate an understanding and reference to
the theories and theorists presented in class.
Case Study
Each member of the class will write a case study describing their
middle years. The case study should discuss cognitive, social, moral
and physical development. Use details and try to use quotes and
dialog to make your case study come alive.
Research Project
Choose a topic related to young adolescence and analyze the current
thinking about that topic. Write a 6-8-page paper discussing what you
have found.
Final Exam
Synthesize your research paper into a newspaper article that would be
of interest to the general public. Post this article on Backboard so
everyone in the class has access to it and might disseminate it to their
constituents.
For example: If your research explored appropriate
grouping strategies for young adolescent learners, your article might
read ”Young Adolescents Learn More in Heterogeneous Groups. “
This short article should condense your analysis of the research into a
page or two.
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http://www.middleweb.com
http://www.nmsa.org
http://www.mgforum.org
First Class
1.
Introduction to the Course
Go over the syllabus
The word adolescence means to grow or to
grow to maturity
The word puberty means to grow hair.
2.
When did you become a young adolescent?
What was the world like?
3.
When did you know you were an adult?
4.
Power points on Chapter 1
5.
Video on Teen Confessions
Stephanie
Orlando
Eddie
Jesse
Christian
Amanda
Take a test about development
For next week
Complete the handout
Read Chapter 1 of the text.
5.
5.
6.
Wonder
Years
You
Physical Growth
Knowledge of Drugs
and Alcohol
Groups
Relationship with
Teachers
Families
Heroes/Heroines
Ideas about Sex
Friends
After-school
Activities
2008
On Being 13
What did you want for your birthday when you were 13?
What did you get for your birthday when you were 13?
Who were your friends?
Describe them.
Describe a typical school day.
Describe a typical weekend.
What did you look like?
Clothing? Hair? Size?
Who were your role models?
What gained them this status?
Were you a thinker/player/protester?
Were you all of these/none of these?
How did you learn about sex?
Was it an awakening or did you know always?
What was happening in the world?
Were you aware of current events?
Who do you remember from 7th grade?
What makes them memorable?
How did your family fit into who you were?
What was their role?
What rituals were a part of your upbringing?
Are these rituals part of your life today?
How are you different than you were when you were 13?
How are you similar to whom you were when you were 13?
How is the world different than it was when you were 13?
How is the world the same as it was when you were 13?
When was the first time you earned your own money?
How did you earn it?
What was your biggest problem when you were 13?
How did you resolve it?
When was the first time you ”went out” with anyone?
Do you remember who it was?
What did you love when you were 13?
What did you hate when you were 13?
Add a question
1.
Attendance and Participation
This class will be interactive and so attending class
prepared to discuss the case studies is essential to the
quality of the class. This will constitute one fourth of the
class grade.
2.
Personal Case study
Write a case study describing an aspect of your own
adolescent experience. There will be opportunities to
rewrite this assignment.
This will constitute one fourth of the class grade.
3.
Research Paper
Research a topic that you find particularly important or
interesting.
4.
Final Exam
Final Project due at the final exam date
Write a 2-3 page newspaper article about your research.
The Four Primary Parenting
Styles
Controlling
Undemanding
Warm
Authoritative Permissive
parents
parents
Cold
Authoritarian Uninvolved
parents
parents
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