DEPARTMENT OF ____Secondary Education___________ KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY

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KUTZTOWN UNIVERSITY
KUTZTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA
COE COURSE SYLLABUS TEMPLATE
DEPARTMENT OF ____Secondary Education___________
Suggested Course Prefix(es) and Number Level: ____________SEU 410________________
I. Course Description: Course Prefix, Number and Title
This course will provide the post baccalaureate and graduate, preservice science teacher with
strategies necessary to promote effective, creative, and scholarly science instruction. Major
emphasis will be placed on providing the necessary background to develop, research techniques in
specific science disciplines, science course design, science instructional units, and lessons.
Instructional activities will be aimed at promoting the scientific literacy of their students. Preservice
teachers will gain insights into methods of effective communication and interaction with students,
utilization of technology for laboratory research and reference, and methods of evaluating student
achievement. Science process skills as well as content will be strongly emphasized.
II.
Instructor Information
Dr. Joseph S. Elias
Office 239
Beekey Education Center
Hours: T and H 12:00 to 1:30
T 5:00 to 6:00
Phone: (610) 683-4762 office
(610) 298-3282 home
[email protected]
III.
Course Rationale:
The education of future science teachers is challenging in the sense that there are instructional
strategies somewhat unique to science teaching. Preservice teachers in science must become
familiar with such techniques as teaching science through inquiry, conducting laboratory
investigations, presenting appropriate science demonstrations, promoting safety in the laboratory,
coordinating science projects, conducting field experiences, presenting lectures and leading
discussions.
Teacher candidates must be kept abreast of rapidly changing events in science and concern
themselves with the effects of technology on society. This translates into science teachers having the
unique responsibility of encouraging the development of an enlightened society; cognizant of the
ramifications scientific research has upon its members.
IV. Course Objectives/ Student Learning Outcomes
A.
Relationship to Standards
Course Objectives/ Student Learning Outcomes
PDE
SPA(NSTA)
INTASC
1,2,3,4,5,
6,7,8,9,10
5,8
1,2,3,5,6,
9,
4,7,10
2,3,4,5,
8,10
2,3,4,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,
6,7,8,9
1
9
1,2,3,4,5,
8,9
1,2,3,4,5,
8,9
1,5,6,7
1,2,3,4,5,
6,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,
6,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,
8,9
1,2,3,4,5,
8,9
9
1,9
1,2,3,4,5,
8,9
1,2,3,4,5,
6,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,
6,7,8,9
1,2,3,4,5,
6,7,8,9,10
The student will be able to:

Develop a statement of Educational Philosophy
1,2,3


Teach a non content reflective teaching
Write a performance-based instructional lesson
2
1,2,3

Write two science literature review paper
 Pedagological content in science
 Review of an instructional strategy in
science
Developing a safety plan for the science laboratory
Teach a technology-based lesson
1
1,2,3

Teach two concept lesson
1. Subject specific lecture
2. Science laboratory
Write assignments developed from the National
Standards
Teach five lessons in the 2 week field experience

Pass the Laboratory Safety Series Tests
1,2,3

Design a research based series of lessons at an
appropriate grade level
Create a Science Unit Plan
1





V.
1,3
1
1
1,2,3
1,2
1,2,3,4,5,
6,7,8,9
1,5,6,7
Assessment
Assessment of each student’s level of accomplishment will reference to the course objectives will be
based upon a subset of the following.












Statement of Educational Philosophy
Reflective teaching
Performance-based instructional lesson
Review of literature
Developing a safety plan for the science laboratory
Technology-based lesson
Concept lessons (at least one will be videotaped)
Assignments developed from the National Standards
2 week field experience
Passing the Laboratory Safety Series Tests
Research series
Unit Plan - due in the second last week of the semester
A.
Core Assignment
1.
Description of core assignment:



Reflective Teaching Lesson- The instructor presents a topic to the candidate and the
candidate presents this lesson to the rest of the class. A Learner Satisfaction Form is
also distributed for feedback and reflection.
Process Lesson Planning--The teacher candidates are expected to create two lesson
plans. The science process lesson is intended to teach the teacher candidate the
fundamental role that science instruction has in the development of both basic
thinking and reasoning skills.
a. The first lesson is designed to demonstrate the candidate’s ability to formulate
a lesson plan emphasizing such skills as observing, classifying, communicating,
measuring, predicting, and inferring within the framework of science content.
b. The second process lesson is intended to demonstrate the teacher candidate’s
ability to formulate a lesson plan where multiply thinking and reasoning skills
are deployed in solving complex science problems. Areas of focus include
identifying and controlling variables, formulating and testing hypotheses,
interpreting data, defining operationally, experimenting, and constructing
models.
Thematic Unit Plan- The teacher candidates will be creating an integrated,
multidisciplinary thematic unit. This unit can be done by an individual or a group.
The candidate will be given the Guidelines for a Thematic Unit handout (See
Attachment D). This handout focuses on the written report and what must be in
the written document submitted. In addition to creating the actual unit, the
candidate or group will also do an oral presentation on an aspect of the unit. A four
point rubric will be distributed for help in the discussion of the lesson.
The teacher candidate will create an integrated, science thematic unit. This unit can be done by an
individual or a group. The candidate will be given the Guidelines for a Thematic Unit handout. This handout
focuses on the written report and what must be in the written document submitted. In addition to creating the
actual unit, the candidate or group will also do an oral presentation on an aspect of the unit. A four point rubric
will be distributed for help in the discussion of the presentation.
This assessment piece aligns with the NSTA standards (Standards 1,2,3,5, and 8):
Standard 1:
Standard 2:
Standard 3:
Standard 5:
Standard 8:
Content
Nature of Science
Inquiry
General Skills of Teaching
Assessment
Scoring: The thematic unit is scored on a 100 point system which focuses on having the following parts of the unit
in place:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Cover Page
Table of Contents
Instructional Goals
Content Outline
Instructional Plan/List of Summaries
A summative Assessment Tool with a Rubric
Detailed Lesson/Activity
8. Glossary
9. Resources
10. Appendix
The total number of points is weighted for each section. 90% or above is an “A” grade. 80% up to the 90% is a “B”
grade. 70% up to the 80% is a “C” grade. A minimum grade of a 75% is considered acceptable, with 90% being
target.
2.
Rubric (3 column-format) Target- Acceptable – Unacceptable
Target
The unit plan is well
written with all sections
meeting or exceeding
recommended guidelines.
a.
Acceptable
The unit plan is complete
and contains all
information in an
acceptable format.
Unacceptable
The unit plan is
substandard with parts
either missing or
incomplete. Little
evidence of acceptable
preparation.
Grading Policies:
Grades in science methods are based on several criteria. You will receive a grade for
your concept lessons. This “grade” comes in the way of an evaluation of your
performance. You will receive a grade for performance in the two-week field
experience. This grade is based on the written commentary of your “cooperating
teacher” and the written product of your experience. You will be graded on the quality
of your research series. This grade is based on your ability to develop a series of events
in a grade appropriate setting that lend themselves to the essence of ‘constructivist
science instruction.’ You will be graded on your instructional unit plan. This is a lengthy
and important assignment. It goes to level of preparation and ability to organize your
ideas around your instructional objectives. You will also be graded on your final
examination, which is comprehensive and calls for insights into lesson planning and
instructional strategies among other points. Equally important is intelligent participation
and preparedness. At this point in your academic program, you are engaged in the
professional semester. Professionalism is paramount. I expect you to attend classes as
you would your teaching assignment. I expect you to be actively involved in discussion.
Your opinions are important to me. It is time for you to step forward and gradually move
into a leadership position. You will be the educational leader in your classroom.
C.
Assignments








Statement of Educational Philosophy
Reflective teaching
Performance-based instructional lesson
Review of literature
Lexicons
Technology-based lesson
Concept lesson to be videotaped
Assignments developed from the National Standards



VI.
Research series
2 week field experience
Unit Plan - due in the second last week of the semester.
Course Outline
a.
The effective teacher
i. Defining issues
ii. Educational philosophy
b. National and PA State Standards/curricular issues
i. Discussions on integration into lessons and unit design
ii. Curricular issues in science
c. Cognition/Learning Theory
i. Constructivist learning
ii. Grade level instructional design
iii. Inquiry in science
d. Professional journal article abstracts
i. Articles for review
ii. Ideas for instruction
e. Developing instructional objectives
f. Lesson Planning
i. Process lessons in science
ii. Standards based science instruction
g. Non-content-reflective
i. Matching instructional methods with instructional objectives
ii. Peer review techniques
h. Content specific
i. 15 minute mini lesson
ii. Self evaluation and peer evaluation
i. Interdisciplinary
i. Middle level instructional design
ii. Matching state standards across the curriculum
j. Science laboratory
i. Laboratory techniques
ii. Safety issues
iii. Inquiry and research design
k. Technology-based lessons
i. Effective use of the media
ii. Technology in the laboratory and the field
l. Assessing student understanding of science
i. Effective assessment
ii. Laboratory assessments
m. Instructional Unit
i. Planning and preparing for teaching
ii. Developing organizations skill
n. Models for effective science instruction
i. Discussions of instructional strategies
ii. Reflections of the two week field experience
VII.
VIII.
Tentative Schedule
a. Week one: discussion of the ‘effective science teacher’ and educational philosophy
b. Week two: Lesson plan writing
c. Week Three: development of science process lessons in an outdoor setting and teaching process
lessons
d. Week four: development of science process lessons in an outdoor setting and teaching process
lessons
e. Week five: development of science lessons using technology and teaching technology lessons
f. Week six: development of science lessons using technology and teaching technology lessons
g. Week seven: development of reflective teaching lessons and teaching reflective lessons
h. Week eight: development of reflective teaching lessons and teaching reflective lessons
i. Week nine: development of reflective teaching lessons and teaching reflective lessons
j. Week ten: two week field experience
k. Week eleven: two week field experience
l. Week twelve: development of content lesson and teaching content lesson
m. Week thirteen: development of content lesson and teaching content lesson
n. Week fourteen: development of research series and present
o. Week fifteen: unit plan presentations
p. Week sixteen: final examination
Other Policies
A.
Accommodations
Any student who has a need for accommodation based on the impact of a disability should
privately contact the Director, Office of Service to Americans with Disabilities to discuss the
specific situation as soon as possible. Contact the Director at 610-683-4108 in the Stratton
Administration Building to coordinate reasonable accommodations
B.
Academic Honesty
Any acts of academic dishonesty by students, such as plagiarism on written papers or cheating on
exams, threaten to undermine the educational and ethical goals of the University for its students.
Such violations are of the utmost seriousness. The goal of the following policy and procedures is
to promote a climate of academic honesty for all individuals at the University (The Key, p. 47).
C.
Attendance Policies



Excuses for Extended Absences from Classes
Students assume the responsibility for notifying their professors when they are expecting to
be absent from class for an extended period of time, generally a week or more, because of
illness, accidents, or emergencies. Students who will be absent from class for an extended
period may contact the Vice President for Student Services and Campus Life at 610-683-4020
for assistance in notifying professors. Medical complications or other circumstances that
require extended absences may also be handled by the Vice President for Student Services
and Campus Life. (The Key, p. 30).
Attendance is required for all class sessions.
IX.
Instructional Resources
Barba, Robertta H., Science in the Multicultural Classroom. Boston. Allyn and Bacon Publishers, 2003.
Bullough, Robert V., Becoming A Student of Teaching. New York. Garland Publishing, 2002
Brandwien, Paul and Evelyn Marhalt. A Sourcebook for the Biological Sciences. New York: Harcourt Brace
Jovanovich Publishers, 1986.
Champagne, Audrey and Leslie E. Haring. Science Teaching. American Association For the Advancement of Science.
Washington DC, 2000.
Collette, Alfred T. and Eugene L Chiappetta. Science Instruction in the Middle and Secondary Schools. Columbus,
Ohio: Merrill Publishing Co. 2000.
Cothron, Julia, Ronald N. Giese, Students and Research. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall\Hunt Publishing Co., 2003.
Cummings, Carol. Managing to Teach. Edmonds, Washington: Teaching, Inc. 1985.
Elias, Joseph S. Science Terms Made Easy: A Lexicon of Scientific Terms and Their Root Language Origins.
Greenwood Pub. Group. Westport, Connecticut, London, England. 2006.
Gabel, Dorothy. Handbook of Research on Science Teaching and Learning. New York. MacMillan, 1994. National
Science Teachers Association Project
Kim, Eugene and Richard Kellough. A Resource Guide for Secondary Teaching, Planning for Competence. New
York: Macmillan Publishing Co., 1987.
Marchuk, William N., A Life Science Lexicon. Wm. C. Brown Publishers, 1992.
Martin, Ralph E. Jr., Teaching Science for All Children. Boston. Allyn and Bacon Publishers, 1994.
National Research Council, National Science Education Standards. Washington DC. National Academy Press, Latest
Edition.
Tolman, Marvin. Discovering Elementary Science. Boston. Allyn and Bacon Publishers, 2002.
Trowbridge, L.W., Bybee, R., Teaching Secondary School Sciences: Strategies for Developing Scientific Literacy.
Englewood Cliffs. Merrill, Prentice Hall Publishers. Latest Edition
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