GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK 2014-2015

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GRADUATE
STUDENT
HANDBOOK
Last updated 7/14/15
2014-2015
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This publication is for informational purposes only and is offered to you as an introduction to Drexel University and to the
policies and regulations that will guide you to your degree.
Policies outlined in this handbook are those specific to the PhD, doctoral and master’s programs and complement, but do not
replace, the policies listed on the Provost’s website (http://www.drexel.edu/provost/policies/). Also, every graduate student is
responsible for being aware of the policies, regulations, and procedures of his or her department or program. This handbook
is not intended as a substitute for frequent meetings between the student and the department faculty and staff, and especially
with the Department Graduate Advisor, Supervising Professor, and/or appropriate Graduate Advisory Committee.
Please note: Policies and courses listed in this handbook are subject to change. Check the University Provost’s website and
with the Office of Graduate Studies for the most up-to-date information. Students are bound by those that are extant at the
time that they matriculate into their degree programs. Readmitted students are bound by the requirements in place at the time
of readmission, unless an exception has been granted by the respective department and the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate
Studies.
Disclaimer: The facts and figures quoted are obtained from other university sources and though every attempt was made to check for
accuracy, you should not rely upon them. It is also acknowledged that some segments of this handbook have been culled from some of
the university’s departmental/program handbooks with the approval of their program advisors.
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Introduction to Drexel University ............................................................................................................................... 8
History .................................................................................................................................................................................. 8
University Mission Statement .............................................................................................................................................. 8
Schools and Colleges .......................................................................................................................................................................... 8
University Enrollment ......................................................................................................................................................... 8
Drexel University Today ..................................................................................................................................................... 8
Faculty: Dedication and Excellence ..................................................................................................................................... 9
Drexel Students .................................................................................................................................................................9
Drexel University PhD, Doctoral and Master’s Programs (Except Those in the School of Law and the
College of Medicine)................................................................................................................................................... 11
The Office of Graduate Studies............................................................................................................................... 11
Classification of Students .......................................................................................................................................... 12
Matriculated Students ........................................................................................................................................... 12
Non-Matriculated Status .................................................................................................................................... 12
The Graduate Advisor and Plan of Study ................................................................................................................................... 13
Advisor ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 13
Plan of Study .......................................................................................................................................................... 13
Required Courses .............................................................................................................................................................. 13
Elective Courses................................................................................................................................................................. 13
Registration ........................................................................................................................................................................ 13
Graduate Student Policies .............................................................................................................................. 14
Continuous Enrollment ...................................................................................................................................................... 14
Enrollment Status .................................................................................................................................................. 14
Credit Limits ...................................................................................................................................................................... 14
Adding/Dropping/Withdrawal from a Course .........................................................................................................................15
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Retroactive changes to course registration records .......................................................................................................... 15
Withdrawal from the University ......................................................................................................................... 15
Readmission to the University ............................................................................................................................ 15
Leave of Absence ................................................................................................................................................................ 15
Length of Study /Time to Completion ................................................................................................................................. 16
Change in Matriculation and Program Status ....................................................................................................... 16
Grading System .................................................................................................................................................................. 17
Final Grades ................................................................................................................................................................................17
Temporary Grades .......................................................................................................................................................................18
Auditing Grades...........................................................................................................................................................................18
Grade Changes-Statute of Limitations ............................................................................................................................... 18
Course Repeat Policy .....................................................................................................................................................19
External Transfer Credit ...................................................................................................................................................19
Course Waivers .................................................................................................................................................................. 19
Loss of Matriculation Status: Probation or Dismissal ...................................................................................................... 19
Grade Appeals .................................................................................................................................................................... 20
Other Grievances ............................................................................................................................................................... 21
Application for Graduation ................................................................................................................................... 21
Degree Requirements ......................................................................................................................................................... 21
Graduation Requirements .................................................................................................................................................. 21
The Doctoral Degree ....................................................................................................................................... 23
Program Requirements ...................................................................................................................................................... 23
Doctoral Student Leave ...............................................................................................................................................................23
Program Forms ................................................................................................................................................................. 23
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Course Requirements ......................................................................................................................................................... 23
Supervising Professor Appointment .................................................................................................................................. 25
Finding a Supervising Professor (SP) ................................................................................................................................ 25
What a Supervising Professor Expects .............................................................................................................................. 25
What you should expect..................................................................................................................................................... 26
Other Things to Consider ....................................................................................................................................... 26
Changing a Supervising Professor ............................................................................................................................................26
Achieving Candidacy and Meeting the Degree Requirements ................................................................................. 27
Admission to Candidacy ........................................................................................................................................ 27
Candidacy Examining Committee...................................................................................................................................... 27
Scheduling the Candidacy Exam ........................................................................................................................... 27
Examination Results ....................................................................................................................................................................27
Doctoral Candidate Status ..................................................................................................................................... 28
Registration Requirements after attainment of Doctoral Candidacy ............................................................................. 28
Special Registration Exemption from Full Time Status ..................................................................................................... 28
Dissertation Research Credits .......................................................................................................................................... 29
Selection of a Dissertation Advisory Committee .......................................................................................................................29
Dissertation Advisory Committee Chair ................................................................................................................ 29
Dissertation Proposal ....................................................................................................................................................... 30
Maintaining Contact with your Dissertation Advisory Committee ........................................................................................ 30
Annual Review of Doctoral Students (PH.D. and Doctoral Degree) ................................................................................ 30
Changes to Your Dissertation Advisory Committee or Dissertation Proposal ................................................................. 30
In Absentia Status ..........................................................................................................................................................30
Scheduling the Final Oral Dissertation Defense............................................................................................................... 30
Final Oral Dissertation Defense Examination..........................................................................................................................31
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Final Completion Form .................................................................................................................................................... 32
Award of a Master’s Degree to Doctoral Students .................................................................................................................... 32
Master’s Degree ......................................................................................................................................................... 33
Program Requirements …………………… .................................................................................................................. 33
Master’s Thesis ........................................................................................................................................................................... 33
Dual Master’s Degree ........................................................................................................................................................ 33
Second Master’s Degree .................................................................................................................................................... 33
Graduate Co-Op Program (GCP) Requirements ............................................................................................................... 33
Guidelines and Regulations for Academic Units on Graduate Student Advising and Supervision .............................35
Assignment of Advisors, Supervisors and Committees ....................................................................................................... 35
Program ............................................................................................................................................................................. 35
Responsibilities .................................................................................................................................................................. 36
Quality of Supervision and Teaching .............................................................................................................................. 37
Graduate Student Honor Code .......................................................................................................................................... 37
Graduate Student Association (GSA) ...................................................................................................................................38
Awards and Competitions ......................................................................................................................................... 39
Commencement Day Awards ........................................................................................................................................ 39
Outstanding Master’s Awards............................................................................................................................................ 39
Outstanding Dissertation Awards ................................................................................................................................ 40
Great Promise Doctoral Awards ……… ........................................................................................................................ 42
Graduate Student Day Awards .......................................................................................................................................... 43
Research Awards .................................................................................................................................................................... 43
Teaching Assistant Excellence Awards ............................................................................................................................. 44
Travel Subsidy Awards ..................................................................................................................................................... 46
Domestic Travel Subsidy ……….…………………..…………………………………………………………………………. 46
International Travel Awards (ITA) for Faculty and Graduate Students ................................................................. 46
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Higher Education Advocate Travel Award ……………………………………………………………………………… 46
Orientation, Workshops and Training .................................................................................................................................48
Drexel Fellowships Office Workshops ............................................................................................................................... 48
Graduate Student Orientation……………………………………………………………………………………………... 48
Teaching Assistant (TA) Preparation Course: EDUC 775…………………………………………………. .................. 48
The Teaching Assistant Certificate (TAC)………………………..……………………………………………………….. 48
The Teaching Portfolio……………………………………………..………………………………………………………... 49
Academic and Financial Support ......................................................................................................................................... 50
Health Insurance Subsidy ................................................................................................................................................... 50
Dissertation Fellowship..................................................................................................................................................... 50
Emergency Loan Fund ................................................................................................................................................... 51
Retention Support ............................................................................................................................................................... 51
Writing Assistance .............................................................................................................................................................. 51
Statistics Assistance............................................................................................................................................................ 51
Placement Assistance ......................................................................................................................................................... 51
Parental Accommodation Fellowships ...................................................................................................................... 51
External Graduate Student Forums ..................................................................................................................................... 53
Survival Guide for International Graduate Students ........................................................................................................ 53
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INTRODUCTION TO DREXEL UNIVERSITY
History
In the closing decades of the nineteenth century, Philadelphia financier and philanthropist Anthony J. Drexel envisioned an
institution of higher learning uniquely suited to the needs of a rapidly growing industrial society and of the young men and
women seeking their place in it. In 1891, he realized his vision with the establishment of the Drexel Institute of Art, Science and
Industry.
In founding the Institute, Anthony J. Drexel launched a tradition of innovation, which today is carried on by Drexel University.
Although distinguished by decades of growth and change from Mr. Drexel's Institute of Art, Science and Industry, the University
remains faithful to his vision. Its greatly expanded enrollment, campus and curriculum reflect a history of responsiveness to
societal and individual needs, which Mr. Drexel sought to address in his day.
University Mission Statement
Drexel University fulfills our founder’s vision of preparing each new generation of students for productive professional and civic
lives while also focusing our collective expertise on solving society’s greatest problems. Drexel is an academically comprehensive
and globally engaged urban research university, dedicated to advancing knowledge and society and to providing every student
with a valuable, rigorous, experiential, technology-infused education, enriched by the nation’s premier co-operative education
program.
Schools and Colleges
Drexel University is comprised of the following schools and colleges:
College of Arts and Sciences
Bennett S. LeBow College of Business
School of Education
College of Engineering
Drexel University College of Medicine
College of Nursing and Health Professions
School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems
School of Public Health
Pennoni Honors College
The College of Information Science and Technology
School of Law
Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts & Design
Richard C. Goodwin College of Professional Studies
Charles D. Close School of Entrepreneurship
University Enrollment
Undergraduate (full-time): 13,572
Graduate and Professional: 9,162
Medicine: 1,072
Law: 140
Drexel University Today
Today, Drexel continues to build upon strengths in the fields of science and engineering, preparing professionals for leadership in
our global technological community through studies in a broad range of disciplines. All of the University's academic programs
enjoy the highest level of accreditation appropriate to their respective disciplines.
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In April 2002, Drexel's mission, services, and opportunities expanded further when MCP Hahnemann Un i ve rs it y, a major
Philadelphia health sciences institution, became Drexel University College of Medicine, College of Nursing and Health
Professions, and School of Public Health. This historic event extended the resources of Drexel and led to many productive
synergies in teaching and research. In 2006, Drexel became the first major research university to open a new law school in 25
years. The School of Law at Drexel University is one of only two law schools to follow a cooperative model.
In 2010, John A. Fry became Drexel University’s 14th president. Fry set forth a vision that will ultimately transform Drexel into
what he has termed the “modern urban university of the future”—an institution that will harness both its long-established and
still-emerging strengths to serve its students, its neighborhood, its city and the nation. Under Fry’s leadership, Drexel aims to set
a new standard for co-operative education, transform its online and hybrid offerings, and become a powerful force for economic
development in the Greater Philadelphia region.
In May 2011, the University established an affiliation with one of Philadelphia’s most storied institutions, the Academy of
Natural Sciences. These historic events have extended the resources of Drexel and led to many productive synergies in teaching
and research.
Drexel University enrolls more than 25,000 full- and part-time students (fall 2012), served by more than 1,400 full- time and parttime faculty in 14 colleges and schools. Its College of Medicine has more than 700 full-time and part-time faculty. Drexel is
headquartered in the University City area of Philadelphia and educates students at three campuses in the city, several satellite
sites including the new Center for Graduate Studies in Sacramento, Calif., and online through its for-profit division, Drexel
Online. The University's record of success to date promises an auspicious future and testifies to the genius of Anthony J. Drexel's
vision, which has shaped the growth of the institution since its inception.
Faculty: Dedication and Excellence
The depth of experience and achievement and outstanding level of dedication of Drexel University’s faculty is perhaps the most
distinctive asset of Drexel. Committed to excellence in scholarship and research as well as teaching, Drexel faculty members have
won numerous honors and awards. There is a full-time equivalent of 1,525 faculty members. Of this cohort, 95 percent hold a
Ph.D. or appropriate terminal degree; 43 percent of the faculty are women; and 7 percent are from underrepresented minority
groups. 64 percent of the tenured and tenure-track faculty are tenured. In addition to an average class load of 6 credits per term,
faculty serve on numerous s c ho ol , college and University committees. The Faculty Senate is the principal instrument of
faculty involvement in governance, and its members are elected by the faculty. The student to faculty ratio is 10 to 1.
Drexel Students
Students are attracted to Drexel because of its vibrancy, its creative spirit, the pace and relevance of its classes, and the real-world
pragmatism of its nationally renowned program in cooperative education. They are also attracted to the ethos that marks the
Drexel student, and that is the spirit of the University. Drexel students are extraordinary people, marked by wide-ranging and
grounded intelligence, diversity of background and interests, independence of mind, courage, creativity, optimism, engagement,
and hard work. They represent a broad range of cultures and backgrounds, unified by the drive and imagination with which they
approach their work and their lives.
Undergraduates
The current undergraduate student body (full-time and part-time) numbered more than 14,200 at the commencement
of the fall term of 2012, with the majority of students from the Mid-Atlantic States. As Drexel’s national reputation
g r o ws , students across the United States are demonstrating i n c r e a s i n g interest in the University.
Undergraduate applications to Drexel have increased nearly eight-fold in the past 15 years with 41,126 in fall 2012.
Fall 2012 brought more than 3,000 first-year undergraduate students. The range of quantitative reasoning and reading
comprehension SAT scores of the 2012 freshman class was 540-640 with an average high school GPA of 3.6.
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Four hundred entering Honors freshmen boast a combined median SAT score of nearly 1365, with a high school GPA of
3.8.
Graduate and Professional Students
Drexel enrolls approximately 9,162 graduate and professional students from 50 U.S. states and 129 foreign countries.
Nearly thirteen percent of graduate students are international students. Drexel offers 75 master’s programs, over 30
doctoral programs, over 45 graduate-level certificate programs, a doctor of medicine and a juris doctor.
Alumni
Drexel has more than 125,000 living alumni throughout the world. Because the size of the entering classes has increased
dramatically over the years, 28 percent of the current alumni base is from the classes of 1998-2008. Drexel alumni
contribute to the University in remarkable ways, as both volunteers and donors. In fiscal year 2008, more than 14,000
alumni made financial contributions to the University. The Drexel 100 is the University’s alumni hall of fame. Every
two years, the Drexel community bestows this highest level of alumni recognition on a small, select group of graduates
whose lifetime achievements have brought great honor to Drexel University and the Drexel University College of
Medicine.
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DREXEL UNIVERSITY PHD, DOCTORAL AND MASTER’S PROGRAMS
(EXCEPT THOSE IN THE DREXEL UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW AND THE
COLLEGE OF MEDICINE)
The Officeof Graduate Studies
Mission: The Office of Graduate Studies [OGS] aims to implement best practices that will advance graduate education at Drexel.
It provides academic leadership to the graduate community and furnishes prospective and current graduate students
with information on university resources, programs and services.
The administration of graduate studies is a coordinated responsibility of the Provost's Office - through the Office of Graduate
Studies - and the academic deans, graduate advisors and department heads of the various colleges and schools. Each department
or school that grants graduate degrees has a graduate advisor or committee whose functions include the review of admission
applications and the initial advising of students.
Office of Graduate Studies
3141 Chestnut Street, Randell 240
Philadelphia, PA 19104
Phone: 215.895.0366
Fax: 215.895.0495
www.drexel.edu/graduatestudies
Office hours are 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday
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CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS
Matriculated Students
I. Full matriculation, granted to a student who meets all admission requirements such as at least 3.00 in their
undergraduate or graduate GPA from an approved, accredited school, acceptable Graduate Record Examination (GRE)
scores and strong reference letters.
II. Provisional matriculation, which may be granted to a student when the department feels they show potential for success
but their undergraduate or previous graduate work does not meet regular admission requirements, or when they do not
have sufficient background in their chosen fields. The provisional classification allows a student to prove his or her
ability by taking up to 12 credits of courses within his or her discipline or chosen by his or her departmental graduate
advisor. If the student attains a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 at the end of that period and fulfills all conditions
stipulated in their provisional application, he or she may petition to the Office of Graduate Studies to be transferred
into full matriculated status. This is achieved by completing the change-of-status form available online. Credit earned as
a provisional degree student may be accepted toward the degree only on recommendation of the student's graduate
advisor. Inability to complete the requirements wi l l result in dismissal from the graduate program. Note: Some
programs do not grant provisional matriculation.
III.
Certificate students are those taking course work to earn advanced certificates in program concentrations.
Non-Matriculated Status
If a student fails to meet the standards of the academic department for acceptance as a matriculated student or wishes to take
graduate coursework for professional growth, the program may petition the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies to admit
the applicant as a non-matriculated student.
Graduate students may remain in this temporary status while the required credentials are obtained until they complete 12 credits.
Students who wish to achieve a graduate degree must matriculate into a degree-granting program as soon as possible but no later
than the completion of 12 credits. To accomplish this, the student must complete a Non-Matriculation to Matriculation Request
Form. Non-matriculated students who do not wish to receive a graduate degree are welcome to remain in this non-degree status
indefinitely. Be advised, however, that degrees are not conferred from this status. Should non-matriculated students later desire to
apply for full matriculation, only courses that are included in a departmental degree program, up to 15 credits, may be
transferable.
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THE GRADUATE ADVISOR AND PLAN OF STUDY
Advisor
All graduate students have a departmental graduate advisor and/or a supervising professor (if on a research/thesis track). The
advisor(s) will act as the student's curriculum advisor, mentor, and, if appropriate, research advisor who will assist the student in
getting started in the degree program with the student’s Plan of Study.
Students are encouraged to keep in close contact with their advisor(s) so the stages of coursework and research progression are
clear and well known to all involved. Should a student experience academic or other difficulty, he or she should contact his or her
advisors(s).
Plan of Study
All students should file a plan of study with the appropriate department as early as possible but no later than the start of the
second term of study. The plan of study is prepared by the student in consultation with his or her supervising professor or
graduate advisors, and should record all courses taken and to be taken to satisfy degree requirements. Students are expected to
make satisfactory progress by keeping pace with the plan of study so established.
Courses in a Major Field
The major field is the program in which a student specializes. Courses in a major field are the courses offered by a program in the
field of that degree. Courses in a major field may include both required and elective courses.
Required Courses
Required courses are the courses specifically identified by a program that students must take to fulfill the requirements for a
specific degree.
Elective Courses
These are the non-required courses that students may take for a specific degree program. Elective courses may be inside or
outside the major field.
Registration
Registration for courses takes place at announced dates prior to the start of each quarter/term. All active graduate students and
newly accepted students will have access to the scheduling booklet online. At this time students can register via BannerWeb
(http://one.drexel.edu) for all regular courses, seminars and research.
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GRADUATE STUDENT POLICIES
Continuous Enrollment
All graduate students are required to register each term (excluding summer/vacation sessions, unless they intend to complete
their final degree requirements during these periods) in order to continue to be degree candidates, unless they have requested and
have received a formal leave of absence approved by the Office of Graduate Studies. Informal leave of absence arrangements are
not acceptable and will not be honored retroactively.
Graduate students who do not register for a term (excluding summer/vacation sessions) and are not on leave of absence will be
subject to termination and be dropped from the rolls. Reinstatement to matriculated status for students who are administratively
withdrawn will require petition to, and action by the Department Graduate Advisor and the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate
Studies. Such students will be treated as new applicants requesting admission with advanced standing. They will be required to
file a new application and pay the application fee.
Enrollment Status
Full-time students in any quarter must enroll in courses that total at least 9 credit hours. Graduate students are considered to be
full time students for the academic year when they are full-time students for 3 quarters of the academic year, nominally these
quarters are Fall, Winter and Spring.
Students meeting full time enrollment for three quarters in the academic year are not required to register for the fourth quarter
(Summer term) to maintain full time status.
All other graduate students are considered part-time.
International students on F-1 or J-1 visas should normally be registered full-time to meet their visa requirements; please contact
International Student and Scholars Services for clarification.
Graduate Quarter Registration Enrollment Classifications:
Less than half-time status: 0.0 to 4.49 credits Halftime status: 4.5 to 5.99 credits
Three-quarter-time status: 6 to 8.99 credits Fulltime status: 9 or more credits
For purposes of Federal Student Loan Deferment, all graduate students must be classified as enrolled for half-time status (4.5 to
5.99 credits). If you have questions about how your registration affects your financial aid, please contact Drexel Central.
Credit Limits
A student may register for a maximum of 15 credits per term, of which no more than 9 may be research. A student needs to be
registered for at least 9 credits to be considered as having full time status.
A student in receipt of a full-time teaching or research assistantship is expected to dedicate 20 hours per week at the assigned
work. Full-time graduate co-op students are expected to work 40 hours per week at their co-op employment. Such co-op students
can enroll for no more than 5 academic course credits.
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Non-matriculated students can register for no more than 9 credits per term.
Adding/Dropping/Withdrawal from a Course
A course may be added or dropped during the Drop/Add period (the first two weeks of any quarter) online via BannerWeb. If the
Drop/Add is performed by the end of the Drop/Add period, no record of the registration for the dropped course will appear on
the student's transcript. No course can be added after the official Drop/Add period.
If a drop or add is requested (because of extenuating circumstances) after the Drop/Add period and before the end of the seventh
week, the student must complete and submit an official Course Add/Drop form to the Graduate Studies Office. If the course is to
be dropped, a "W" will appear on the student's transcript and tuition fees will be charged.
If the student is only taking one course, then dropping or withdrawal from the course is considered to be a withdrawal from the
university.
Retroactive changes to course registration records
Course drops, withdrawals, or adds are to occur by calendar deadlines according to policy. Requests for retroactive actions
related to course registration, including late drops, withdrawals, or adds for previous terms or the current term, are not permitted
unless there are extenuating circumstances. To ensure compliance with all University and regulatory policies, all such requests
with supporting evidence must be submitted in a timely manner to the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs for review and
final approval.
Withdrawal from the University
Graduate students wishing to withdraw from the University should seek advice from their departmental graduate advisors and
their research supervisors, as appropriate. Those whose circumstances require withdrawal should complete the University
Withdrawal Form and submit it the Office of Graduate Studies. Refunds of tuition and fees are processed by the Student
Receivables section of the Comptroller's Office in accordance with the University's official tuition refund policy.
Readmission to the University
Graduate students who have withdrawn from the university or who have not been enrolled for more than four continuous terms
must seek readmission to the University to resume their studies. This process is equivalent to a new application to enroll in the
program. Master's level students can request readmission from their departmental Graduate Advisor. Doctoral students must
submit an Application for Readmission with the Graduate Advisor and Supervising Professor (if one is already appointed)
before forwarding it to the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval.
Leave of Absence
Graduate students wishing to take a leave of absence from the University (for reasons of 1) military service, 2) serious illness 3)
parental leave or 4) another reason deemed adequate for interrupting graduate studies) should seek advice from their
departmental graduate advisors and supervising professors (if any). Graduate students must submit a request in writing with the
approval of their departmental Graduate Advisor and Supervising Professor (if there is one) to the Office of Graduate Studies.
The Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies will give the final approval. The leave cannot exceed one year. Leave of absence
request forms may be obtained online.
Any financial obligations incurred are not waived by a leave of absence. Students who are receiving stipends will have these
suspended during their leaves. Continuous registration requirements will not apply while the student is on approved leave.
Furthermore, a leave of absence does not extend the time limits allowed for completion of degree. Students on F-1 or J-1 visas
must consult with the Office of International Student and Scholar Services before requesting a leave.
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At the end of a Leave of Absence
At least 30 days prior to the conclusion of a leave of absence, the student must submit a written request to the
Supervising Professor (if there is one) and the program graduate advisor stating his/her desire to renew the leave for
another period or the intent to be reinstated. If renewal is requested, it must then be endorsed and submitted to the
Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies for final approval.
If reinstatement is requested, the program will inform the Office of Graduate Studies in writing whether it supports or
does not support the student's return based on whether or not the student has met the program's conditions for
reinstatement, if any. If reinstatement is requested, any financial liabilities and other conditions of reinstatement must
be completed. The conditions of reinstatement are decided at the beginning of the leave of absence by the Office of
Graduate Studies or by the program in which the student is conducting his/her major work.
After approval, reinstatement will be effective on the first day of the following term, during which time the student
must be registered. A student who neither applies for reinstatement nor requests renewal of the leave of absence after
the expiration of the leave of absence will be dropped from the rolls.
Length of Study/Time to Completion
University policy states that students who enter doctoral graduate study at the post-master's or post-baccalaureate level must
complete their studies for their graduate degree(s) within seven years after initial graduate registration. Those who receive a
Master's degree in the same program from Drexel University and then convert to a doctoral program are permitted five years
after registration at the doctoral level to complete the Ph.D. degree. For master’s degree programs, the time to completion is 5
years after matriculation. (Some programs that combine study for a graduate degree and a professional degree or certification
may be exempt from these time requirements. Thus, it is 10 years for the MD/PhD program and for the PhD/JD in Clinical
Psychology.)
In unusual circumstances, a student who finds that these time requirements are inadequate must discuss this with his or her
advisor. Together they may request an extension before the end of a student's stated time limit. A student requesting an extension
should work with his or her advisors to develop a plan of study and a time line for completion. All formal extension requests must
give a reasonable time for completion with an accompanying revised plan of study. Should an extension be required, the student
should be aware that all courses will be reviewed for timeliness; some earlier coursework may have to be repeated.
Extension requests for master’s students must be forwarded, after approval by the supervising professors (if on a research or
thesis track) and the department graduate advisors, to the Office of Graduate Studies, which will make the final decision.
Extension requests for doctoral students must be forwarded, after approval by the supervising professors and the department
graduate advisors, to the Office of Graduate Studies, which will make the final decision.
The effective starting date for determining the length of study is the date of matriculation. Time limits continue to run even
during a leave of absence. Exceptions to the time limit are subject to appeal through the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate
Studies. The student’s program must support the request.
Change in Matriculation and Program Status
For students changing to a different degree level within a program or between programs which are at the same degree level or
below, the program graduate advisors involved must submit a Change of Curriculum and Status Form and a new plan of study
to the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval.
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When changing degrees (from PhD to MS or MS to PhD) the student is held to the requirements that are in effect for that degree
at the time of degree change and not at the time of original matriculation.
Students wishing to change from a master's degree to a doctoral degree program must have completed one year in the master's
program before requesting the change. All requests for change of matriculation status from a master’s to a doctoral degree, or vice
versa must be approved by the Program Graduate Advisor and the Office of Graduate Studies. Students who change programs or
change from non-matriculated to matriculated status will have course credits applied to their new program of study according to
the departmental guidelines.
Grading System
Grade
Quality Points
Comment
A+
4.00
Superior performance
A
4.00
A-
3.67
B+
3.33
B
3.00
B-
2.67
C+
2.33
C
2.00
C-
1.67
D+
1.33
D
1.00
F
0.00
Creditable performance
Satisfactory performance
Unsatisfactory performance
Failure
W
Withdrawn
AUD
Audit
CR
Satisfactory
NCR
Unsatisfactory
NGR
No grade reported
INP
In progress
INC
Incomplete
Final Grades
Permanent/final grades are awarded in one of two ways.
1.
Some courses are graded on a letter grade system (A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, or F). These grades have
numerical quality point weights. Grades below B in required core courses taken in the major field and grades
below C in all other graduate courses in the student’s Plan of Study are not recognized as passing grades and their
credits are not considered to be earned credits in clearing a student for graduation. All permanent grades with
quality point weights count in the computation of the student’s cumulative grade point average.
2.
Some courses are graded CR = Satisfactory or NCR = Unsatisfactory (where no credits are earned); CR and NCR
grades do not have a corresponding numerical quality point weight and are not included in quality point average
calculations. CR/NCR grades are used typically for research-type courses (theses, dissertations, practicums, coops). A grade of CR (Credit) indicates that the course was passed at the level of B or higher. A grade of NCR (No
Credit) indicates work was unsatisfactory and the credits will not count toward degree requirements.
17
Temporary Grades
If an instructor does not report a grade for a student, an automatic notation of NGR is recorded. This is not a grade, but a
temporary indicator that requires prompt resolution leading either to the removal of the course from the student's record or to
the assignment of a grade. If a final grade is not reported by the end of the next calendar term, an administrative grade of "F" will
be recorded on the student's transcript. It will be calculated as a failure in the student's GPA and is then considered a permanent
grade. Students are urged to check their records each term and follow up when required.
In the case of thesis work or a special list of sequential courses, a temporary grade of "INP" (In Progress) can be recorded on the
student's transcript for each such course; these grades must eventually be replaced by "CR"/"NCR" or a letter grade. When a letter
grade is assigned, it will be included as the grade for all courses in the sequence; previous grades of "INP" will be replaced with a
letter grade and the grade point average will be recalculated. If a grade of CR/NCR is awarded, no recalculation will take place.
At the discretion of an instructor, the grade of "INC" (Incomplete) may be reported in place of a grade for any course in which
the instructor deems that the work has not been completed and that the student can complete the work within an agreed-upon
amount of time (which must be in accordance with University policy and the statute of limitations governing grade changes). A
grade of "INC" may be entered for a student at the time grades are submitted for the course. The conditions and terms for the
completion of the course are at the discretion of the instructor and are to be mutually agreed upon by the instructor and the
student and noted in the petition for an “INC” form to be filed with the Office of Graduate Studies. If the grade is not submitted
within one year, the "INC" will turn into an "F" on the student's record and will be reflected in the student's GPA. The grade of
"F" will be considered a permanent grade unless there are extenuating circumstances.
Auditing Grades
The Audit Option provides students the opportunity of attending a course, that carries no credit and no standard letter grade.
Participation in the course will be evidenced by the "AUD" grade designation on the transcript. The "AUD" grade designation
does not affect a student's GPA. The Audit designation must be added by the end of the drop/add period.
I.
Courses taken using the Audit Option are not counted in clearance for graduation (please reference the
Granting of Degrees policy); thus major requirements cannot be taken using the Audit Option.
II.
The credits hours for courses taken using this option count toward the maximum term credits allotted to full-time
students for their program of study though not in deciding their full-time status. All graduate students will be billed for
the audited course on a per-credit basis.
III.
Due to pedagogical or other considerations, some courses may not be audited.
IV.
In order to take a course using the Audit Option students must secure approval from both the instructor and their
V.
Students may not change the option to Audit courses or petition to take these courses for credit after the close of the
Graduate Advisor before the close of the course adjustment period.
course adjustment period.
VI.
VII.
Students are not eligible to register for online courses using the Audit Option.
Instructors will not be able to assign a grade during grade submission for students electing this option.
VIII.
Students electing this option will receive an automatic grade of "AUD".
IX.
Courses taken with the audit option cannot later on be taken for credit.
Grade Changes-Statute of Limitations
Grades appearing on a student's academic record may not be changed after one calendar year from the end of the term in which
the grade was received. Exceptions due to extenuating circumstances require approval of the head/academic dean of the
department offering the course and the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies. Final grades appearing on a student's
academic transcript cannot be changed after the graduation date. Changes requested to correct administrative errors require the
approval of the University Registrar.
18
Course Repeat Policy
Graduate students may repeat up to a total of two courses, which are being applied to their degree, and for which they have
received grades below B in required core courses taken in the major field and grades below C in all other graduate courses in the
student’s Plan of Study. Courses may be repeated only once. Both grades earned for a course will remain on the student's record;
both will be used in the GPA calculation.
External Transfer Credit
This policy applies to PhD, doctoral and masters students transferring from an external institution or current students that take a
course at another institution with prior permission from the student’s academic program. Acceptance of transfer credit from
approved, accredited institutions is often dependent on the pertinence of the work to the degree program being pursued.
Coursework that lies outside the scope of the degree program is not necessarily applicable for degree credit. The request for
acceptance of credits taken prior to matriculation in a graduate program at Drexel University must be made at the time of
application for admission to the program and the courses must be explicitly indicated in the Transfer-of- Credit Form.
Students must provide an official transcript as evidence that the credits to be transferred are for graduate level courses. Such
transfer credit will not be featured in the computation of the student’s grade point average.
The usual time a course from another institution may be valid for transfer is 5 years from the completion of the course until the
time of matriculation.
Graduate transfer credit must be approved by the graduate advisor of the program in which the student is enrolled and will be
subject to the following restrictions:
At least 30 graduate term credits (equivalent to 20 semester credits) of any master's degree program must be taken at Drexel.
Similarly, for students admitted in post-baccalaureate status to a doctoral program, at least 75 graduate term credits of the degree
must be taken at Drexel. Those with post-master’s status must take at least 45 credits at Drexel.
All transfer credit must have a grade of B (3.00) or better.
After matriculation, a student who wants to take a course off campus should submit a course syllabus to his or her Drexel
graduate advisor to have it pre-approved. If the course can be included in the plan of study, the student may take the course off
campus; if the grade is B or better, the student should submit the transcript to the graduate advisors for final approval. No
graduate credit will be allowed for correspondence or extension work.
Course Waivers
A course taken on a graduate level at another accredited graduate institution may be accepted in lieu of a required course (subject
to external credit transfer restrictions) with the approval of the course director and program graduate advisor as well as the
Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies. The course grade will not feature in the cumulative GPA computation.
Loss of Matriculation Status: Probation or Dismissal
Students who meet admissions standards and are accepted into a graduate program whether as regular students or as students
from the university’s accelerated programs can lose matriculation status due to poor academic performance, failure to
continuously enroll , failure to submit and adhere to a graduate studies plan or failure to meet the time to completion of the
degree.
Continuation in graduate studies requires satisfactory progress toward a graduate degree. Evidence of such progress includes
maintenance of a minimum 3.00 cumulative grade point average (in the student’ program of study) each term (individual
19
departments may set higher standards for determining satisfactory progress). The progress of each student is reviewed each term.
Failure to maintain the 3.00/departmental minimum cu m u l at i v e GPA will result in placement on pr ob a t i on . Any
student on pr oba t i on m u s t no t onl y achieve a 3.00/departmental minimum cumulative average within two successive
terms following the term in which the deficiency occurred, but must also maintain at least a 3.00/departmental minimum
term average in any term in which he or she is on probation. Failure to meet either of these requirements will subject the
student to dismissal at the discretion of the Associate Vice Provost of Graduate Studies. Graduate students must have a
minimum 3 .0 0 cumulative GPA in their program of study and an overall cumulative GPA of 2.8 in order to graduate (again,
departments may set higher standards for graduation). The computation of the cumulative GPA to determine academic standing
is based on permanent grades and on hours registered each term.
Students who are on probation cannot be offered an “INC” grade. In addition, any “NGR” grade entered into the record for a student on
probation must be converted into a regular grade by the end of the first week of the quarter in which the student is back in school.
Grade Appeals
The grade appeals policy applies only to questions of student evaluation in a course. Where the issue involves a matter of
professional assessment or judgment as e.g. of the grade for a paper or report, the student has to present incontrovertible evidence
that the grade awarded was biased and not in line with University policy.
To challenge any grade awarded or action taken by the instructor, the student must initiate an appeal in writing within 2 weeks of
the decision or action in question.
If it is against a grade, the written appeal should be sent to the instructor who awarded the grade. It is anticipated that the
following steps will be followed.
1.
The instructor and the student shall mutually attempt to resolve the appeal within five working days from the receipt of
the appeal.
2.
An appeal not resolved at Step 1 shall be referred in writing by the student within five working days after the
completion of Step 1 to the head of the department t h at offered the course. If there is a departmental a p p e a l s
committee, the problem shall be referred directly to it. The department head or the departmental appeals committee
shall normally submit a written response to the student within 10 working days following receipt of the written
statement of the problem. A copy of this response shall also be provided to the instructor.
3.
If no mutually satisfactory decision has been reached at Step 2, any aggrieved party may submit a written appeal to the
dean of the college or school in which the problem originated. Such an appeal shall be made within five working days
20
following the receipt of the written response of the department head or the departmental appeals committee. The dean
shall investigate the problem as presented in the written documentation, review the recommendation and provide, in
writing, a proposal for the solution of the problem within 10 working days following its referral.
Steps 1 through 3 can be treated informally if both the student and the instructor agree to it. If no official complaint is filed, no
final record will be kept.
4.
If the problem is not mutually resolved by Step 3, the aggrieved party may file an official appeal with the Associate
Vice Provost for Graduate Studies whose decision is final.
Decision & Record
A written statement of the decision and relevant materials shall be placed in the student’s academic file in the Office of Graduate
Studies
Other Grievances
Drexel University encourages open student-faculty communication and discussion in order to avoid problems between student and
faculty. However, when an academic dispute (such as one arising from the mentoring relationship between the supervising
professor and the student or program termination) does occur, it is recommended that the aggrieved party seeks the counsel of the
Program Graduate Advisor and, if need be, the Program Head and College Dean (if appropriate) to have them try to effect a
resolution. Failing that any student may seek help or advice informally by contacting the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate
Affairs. If no official complaint is filed, no record will be kept.
If the grievance cannot be resolved informally, any involved party can ask to take it officially to the Associate Vice Provost for
Graduate Studies whose decision is final.
Non-academic grievances are within the purview of the Office of Student Affairs, the Office of Human Resources or other
appropriate administrative office.
Application for Graduation
Students who expect to graduate must apply for their degree no later than the specified deadlines on the Drexel Central website.
Students who do not complete their requirements in their expected graduation quarter must submit a new application in the
next quarter they anticipate graduating. Degrees earned during any term will be awarded at the end of that term after all grades
have been submitted. Commencement is held once a year, in June. The statute of limitations applies to the award of degrees as
well so an application beyond a year after a student fulfills the requirements of the degree will not be entertained.
Degree Requirements
No earned credit completed ten years or more before the intended graduation date may be applied to a degree program at Drexel
University, unless approved by the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies.
Graduation Requirements
The following conditions must be met in order for a student to receive a degree:
•
•
•
An application for degree form must be filed via DrexelOne no later than the deadlines specified in the academic calendar.
The number of term credits required for the program or major in which the student is enrolled must be completed. The
minimum number of term credits varies by program, but in no program is the minimum fewer than 180 credits.
All specific course requirements for the program or major in which the student is enrolled must be completed.
•
A GPA of 3.0 or higher for all coursework undertaken at Drexel University must have been earned.
•
At least half the professional courses required for the student’s specific program or major must be completed at Drexel. A
21
minimum of 45 quarter credits must be completed at Drexel. The senior year must be spent at Drexel unless the academic
dean of the college or director of the school in which the student is enrolled waives this requirement.
•
A student must be matriculated in his or her college or school during the last term in which coursework is taken (i.e. must
be enrolled for at least 1 credit in the term of completion).
•
All grades for required courses must be submitted to the Office of the University Registrar. No student will be approved
for a degree while a grade for any course on the academic record remains outstanding.
•
A student must receive final academic clearance from their College/Department representative for graduation. Doctoral
and PhD students must also receive final approval from the Office of Graduate Studies.
A Completion Form must be filed with the Office of Graduate Studies before the first day of final exam week for the
term a student plans to graduate.
If a thesis or dissertation is involved, it must be typed in accordance with specifications contained in the "Thesis
Manual" updated annually, a copy of which may be obtained online; the student is responsible for transmitting all required
copies to the library for binding and/or archiving.
A student must satisfy all financial obligations to the University in order to receive their diploma.
If for any reason a student does not meet all requirements for graduation that student cannot graduate until the term in
which all requirements are met.
If a student completes all requirements for graduation in any term prior to the spring term, the degree will be awarded in
the term in which the requirements are met.
The name on a student's diploma must match their name on their academic record. A student can change their name but it
must be done before the last day of classes in the respective term in which their degree is awarded.
•
•
•
•
•
•
22
THE DOCTORAL DEGREE
Program Requirements
The Doctor of Philosophy and the professional doctorate degree represent high levels of scholarly achievement both in the
classroom and in independent study and research. A minimum of 90 credits are required. While the master’s degree is not
necessarily a prerequisite, it may count for 45 credits of the 90. The 45 or more credits of postmaster’s work usually consist of a
combination of course requirements and research/dissertation work. A dissertation is required; and must be based on original
research and clearly demonstrate the candidate's ability to work at the frontiers of the field. In addition, all doctoral students are
required by the University to take and pass a candidacy/qualifying exam and dissertation defense. The format and content of
these exams are determined by the department, as are the requirements for other "examinations," such as a qualifying
(preliminary) exam or proposal defense.
Residency Requirements
Full-time residency of at least one academic year (three consecutive full-time terms) is required for the doctoral degree.
You should check with your academic department for specific requirements.
Doctoral Student Leave
Doctoral students are allowed approved leave for the observance of traditional and religious holidays. All requests for any other
leave must be made to and approved by the Program graduate advisor and the student’s supervising professor (if any) prior to the
start date of the leave. Any leave beyond two weeks (ten working days) must be approved, in addition, by the Office of Graduate
Studies. If a student takes an unapproved leave, his/her stipend /health insurance and other funding may be suspended.
Program Forms
The Office of Graduate Studies is the repository for all official doctoral student files. As such, it tracks the progress of all doctoral
students through a series of required forms. This office requires all doctoral students and supervisory faculty to report, via
required doctoral forms and at appropriate times:
•
Plan of Study and Supervising Professor Appointment (Form D-1),
•
Results of the Candidacy Exam (Forms D-2 and D-2A),
•
Dissertation Advisory Committee and Dissertation Proposal (Forms D-3 and D-3A),
•
Annual Review (Form D-3B),
•
Final Oral Examination (dissertation defense) Committee and date (Form D-4),
•
Results of the Final Oral Examination (Form D-5),
•
Completion Form
Each of these forms represents a step toward candidacy and graduation. All forms must be approved by the supervising
professor, graduate advisors, and appropriate committee members with final approval granted by the Office of Graduate Studies.
Course Requirements
The Graduate Advisor (and Supervising Professor, if appropriate) will assist the student in choosing coursework necessary to
allow them to meet departmental standards and requirements. The plan of study, incorporating all courses and research credits,
will be formulated; after approval is received from the student's Graduate Advisor (and Supervising Professor), the details of the
Official Plan of Study as well as the identity of your Supervising Professor are to be placed in the D-1 Form which should be filed
with the Office of Graduate Studies for final approval. The D-1 Form must be completed and approved before the end of the
third term of the program (typically the Spring Term, Year 1). Under extenuating circumstances, the Associate Vice Provost for
Graduate Studies can extend the deadline with the Graduate Advisor serving as the interim Supervising Professor.
23
Supervising Professor Appointment
During the first year of graduate study, you are expected to familiarize yourself with the research and scholarly interests of the
faculty members in your home department an d other departments, the latter if your interests are multidisciplinary. It is
recommended that your Supervising Professor [SP] be appointed as soon as possible but no later than the end of the third term of
the first year of your studies at Drexel. The SP(s) is/are to be officially appointed via the Form D-1, which must be filed with the
Office of Graduate Studies.
Finding a Supervising Professor (SP)
Some of our academic programs may recommend a SP to you upon your arrival while others have a rotation schedule to
introduce you to possible supervising professors with a mutual selection occurring at the end of the rotation period while others
will leave it to you to find one on your own. Whatever the process, it is a doctoral student's responsibility to arrange association
with a supervising professor with similar research and scholarly interests, with whom he or she will be able to work and who will
accept the advisory responsibility. The supervising professor will help the student to formulate an academic plan of study and will
guide the student's scholarly and research efforts. Because the appointment of a supervising professor is so vital to a student's
success, the appointment of this individual should be made after much consideration and forethought. Here are some things to
keep in mind as you go through the process.
1.
Be proactive- do some research on your potential advisors.
a.
What are they doing?
b.
How productive are they?
c.
How successful are they at graduating Ph.D.s?
d.
What is their standing with other faculty?
e.
What do their students say about them?
i.
2.
Are they well funded?
ii.
Accessible and easy to talk to?
iii.
Supportive?
iv.
Empathetic?
v.
Shows good work-life balance?
vi.
Has good values?
vii.
Energetic?
Prepare a portfolio of yourself. This should include:
3.
a.
Resume or Curriculum Vita
b.
Undergraduate Transcript
c.
Recommendation Letters
d.
Publications
e.
Personal Statement
Make an appointment to visit the potential SP in person. Remember it’s an interview.
a.
Express your interest and knowledge of their work
b.
Leverage knowledge of common interests, acquaintances’ or colleagues.
c.
Request an opportunity to work with them-volunteer if necessary.
What a Supervising Professor Expects
The role of the SP is multifaceted. The SP is one of the most important resources available to you as a student of Drexel
University. The SP is primarily there to assist you in determining the course of your research studies. Thus he/she expects the
following:
25
o
o
o
o
o
o
A student
A student
A student
A student
A student
A student
who is dedicated to the process
who can pass the qualifying the exam
who learns quickly and produces quality work
who can operate independently and work collaboratively.
who is adaptable.
who is honest.
What you should expect
o
o
o
o
o
o
A Supervising Professor that can support you and your work
A Supervising Professor that is available to you
A Supervising Professor whose work is (or can be) recognized
A Supervising Professor who will act as your advocate
A Supervising Professor that will prepare you for the next stage of your career.
Most importantly, a Supervising Professor that can assist you in navigating the various phases of the doctoral process
and beyond in a reasonable period of time.
In addition to the standard criteria (e.g. research interests, funding), consider interpersonal qualities. How well do you and the
potential advisor interrelate? How efficiently do the two of you communicate? How well are you able to exchange ideas?
Other Things to Consider
An important component of many of Drexel’s doctoral programs is the presence of Research Groups/Teams/Centers. The SP you
choose often serves as a “parent” to such a group. This group can be made up of:
•
Technicians
•
Undergraduates
•
Graduates (Master’s and doctoral)
•
Post Doctorates
•
Visiting Professors
There can be advantages and disadvantages to joining any Research family, therefore, it is important for the student to gauge
what is a good fit. If you choose a supervising professor who heads such a group, you will be expected to work within the group
and develop dissertation research as an extension of the existing focus of the group. It is important to make your goals known
early.
Talk to the graduate students already in the lab about how they get along with their advisor. Is he/she a good advisor? Fair?
Involved? Constructively critical? Does he/she supply any funding? Can move you to be passionate about research?
Changing a Supervising Professor
So you’ve finally chosen an advisor and now you feel the relationship has not worked out. What can you do?
•
Look before you leap. Consider where it is you will go before you leave.
•
Talk to your Advisor and be as honest as you can be about your feelings. It is generally good practice to leave on a
positive note when possible.
•
Clear a path to your new situation. Beware of political fallout from the move. It happens.
Once you have decided on a change and found a replacement, file a revised Form D-1 immediately.
26
ACHIEVING CANDIDACY AND MEETING THE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
Admission to Candidacy
Admission to doctoral candidacy is a prerequisite to receiving your doctoral degree. To qualify for doctoral candidacy, you must
have been continuously enrolled in your academic program for a minimum of six months. In addition, you must complete all
course work requirements with a cumulative average of 3.00 or better (some departmental s t anda rds may be higher) and
successfully pass all parts of the candidacy/qualifying examination.
Thus, Drexel’s Doctoral Programs consist of two distinct phases:
Pre-Candidacy
During the pre-candidacy phase, the student completes the required course work included in the Plan of Study,
preliminary examinations, and any requirements imposed by the student’s specific Department or Program. Each
student is required to pass a comprehensive examination administered by a candidacy committee. The examination
may include the preparation and defense of the dissertation proposal.
Candidacy
The candidacy phase comprises the preparation and defense of the dissertation proposal (if this is not part of the
comprehensive examination), the doctoral dissertation, and the final defense of the dissertation.
You do not become a doctoral candidate (or enter the candidacy phase) until you have passed the candidacy exam and
accumulated 45 credits at Drexel (post-baccalaureate students), or 15 credits (post-master’s students). In general, it is expected
that you will take the candidacy exam after successful completion of at least one year of graduate course work at Drexel but prior
to the end of the second year of your matriculation in the doctoral program. The purpose of the candidacy exam is to determine
your ability and achievement at this point, particularly with regard to leadership and self-motivation; to ascertain your
understanding of the fundamental concepts and ideas pertinent to the field of endeavor; and to detect any deficiencies in your
background that may need further attention. The structure of the exam is largely determined by each department and it can be a
written or an oral form. In some cases it will require both. Responsibility for the exams lies with the program and the Candidacy
Examining Committee.
Candidacy Examining Committee
Because doctoral candidacy status should ordinarily be accomplished no later than the summer following your second year, it will
be necessary for you to begin recruiting faculty for your Candidacy Examining Committee well before then unless the program
mandates its membership for you. In either case, the Committee must consist of at least five members, three of whom must be
currently tenured or tenure-track Drexel faculty members in your department with one, who is in your major area, serving as the
Chair or Co-chair. At least two of the committee members must be from outside your major area. At least one of the committee
members must be from outside your department. Full-time, non-tenure track Research Faculty and, if approved by the Associate
Vice Provost for Graduate Studies, someone from outside the University is eligible to serve on the Candidacy Examining
Committee, including as Co-chair. In the case of doctoral programs such as the EdD and DrPH, the membership requirement
can be modified to two faculty from the tenured, tenure track, Research or Clinical ranks in the student’s major area with the
third from outside the student’s area of interest. If approved by the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies, someone
from outside the University is eligible to serve as that third member.
Scheduling the Candidacy Exam
The scheduled date of the examination should be decided by your examining committee or your program and should occur no
later than the summer following your second year.
Examination Results
Results of the examination are reported to the department and Office of Graduate Studies by the Committee Chair (or Co-chairs)
and each Committee member via Forms D-2 and D-2A: Reports on Candidacy Examination. These forms must be returned to
the Office of Graduate Studies by the Committee Chair (or one of the Co-chairs) within 48 hours of the exam.
27
Passed Examination
You will have passed the Candidacy Examination if you have the unanimous approval of the Candidacy Examining
Committee (if properly constituted). In the absence of a unanimous vote within the Committee to pass the candidate,
the Chair (or one of the Co-chairs) should consult with the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies for a final
determination.
Failed Examination
In the event of the student failing the doctoral candidacy examination, the program may authorize a retake if this is
permitted by departmental policy. A second failure results in forfeiture of degree eligibility. Up to the conclusion of the
second attempt, the student must observe continuous registration regulations.
Doctoral Candidate Status
Students are said to have attained doctoral candidate (DC) status when they have passed their candidacy exams and have
accumulated at least:
•
•
45 credits (for post baccalaureate students)
15 credits (for postmaster’s students)
All programs must have a Plan of Study which will allow their doctoral students to attain Doctoral Candidate Status within the
first 2 years of the program.
The student’s Reports on Candidacy Exam (Form D2 and Form D2A) to the Office of Graduate Studies will trigger a
determination of a doctoral student’s candidacy status.
Registration Requirements after attainment of Doctoral Candidacy
Once you have successfully passed your candidacy exams and become a doctoral candidate, you must register for at least 1 credit
for at least 3 terms of each academic year until you complete your degree. International students as well as students with financial
aid obligations may be required to register for the full 9 credits each term so as to maintain full time status. It is at this point that
you should begin to register for research or dissertation credits.
Once you have successfully attained Doctoral Candidacy (DC) status, you are charged tuition for one credit unit per quarter
beginning the quarter after you have successfully passed the exam. You are permitted to register for up to 9 credit units without
incurring additional tuition charges provided these are for courses in your approved plan of study.
Special Registration Exemption from Full Time Status
All Doctoral Candidates (with DC status) are considered to be full time upon enrollment for 1 credit hour in any quarter though
they are encouraged to sign up for 9 credits to satisfy Financial Aid and Student Visa Requirements.
With the approval of The Office of Graduate Studies, Pre-Doctoral candidates (who are full-time RAs/TAs) may qualify for an
exemption from the full time 9 credit per quarter requirement. This exemption will allow a minimum of 6 credits in any quarter.
A request for exemption, accompanied by an approved Plan of Study (with details of the commitment made to the teaching or
research assistantship i.e. hours expected, etc), must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies by the end of web registration
for the quarter in which the exemption is being requested. If the request is for more than one quarter but no more than three
quarters (the exemption period cannot exceed three quarters), the corresponding Plan of Study must extend over the period of
the request.
With the approval of the Office of Graduate Studies, graduate students in the College of Nursing and Health Professions may be
eligible for exemption from the full time 9 credits per quarter requirement while participating in clinical rotations which require
at least 20 hours per week participation. During the web registration period, the student’s academic department must submit a
28
Request for Exemption Form for the academic year in which the exemption(s) are being requested. This form is made available
on the Graduate Studies website during the first two weeks of classes each quarter.
Dissertation Research Credits
After successful completion of the candidacy exam, you must register for dissertation research credits. These requirements are
subject to change at the discretion of the department and/or Graduate Studies office depending upon your academic record. You
will typically sign up for 9 credits of dissertation research per quarter, as this is what is required to maintain full-time status.
However, as a benefit of attaining candidacy, students are charged for only 1 credit.
Selection of a Dissertation Advisory Committee
The goal of the Dissertation Advisory Committee is to ensure that your proposed research goes as planned and that the results
will be worthy of the doctoral degree. This committee can be different from your candidacy exam committee (see previous
section) but commonly the composition is the same. This committee consists of experts knowledgeable in your particular field of
study and whose expertise may be beneficial to you in performing the research proposed. These members can assist you with
research direction and technical challenges, and will oversee your progress until the research is complete.
The committee must consist of at least five members for a PhD student, at least three of whom must be currently tenured or
tenure track Drexel faculty members. At least two of the committee members must be from outside your primary specialization
area. At least one of the committee members must be from outside the student’s department, preferably from outside the
university. Members from outside the university must be approved by the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies. Just like
full time non-tenure track Research Faculty, who are also eligible to serve on the Dissertation Advisory Committee, they can also cochair the Committee. In the case of a student in a doctoral program such as the DPT, the DrNP and the DrPH, the committee can
be comprised of three voting members. Two voting members must be graduate faculty (tenured, tenure track, Research or
Clinical) from the same department/program as the student's discipline and one voting member must be from a department
other than that of the major field or from outside the University. Members from outside the University must be approved by the
Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies.
Dissertation Advisory Committee Chair
Your supervising professor will serve in the role of Dissertation Advisory Committee Chair and assume an expanded role, or your
program may mandate someone else. The Chair’s responsibilities include working with the supervising professor in:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Helping you to select and improve your dissertation topic, and assisting in narrowing your focus.
Helping you to formulate a long-term strategy for the research and writing of the dissertation, including a reasonable
timetable and tentative completion date.
Working out a mutually agreeable meeting schedule to consult and critique your work.
Assist you in selecting faculty members to serve on the dissertation committee (see next section).
Make sure everyone on the committee is familiar with their role and those of the Chair and/or Co-Chair.
Monitor how closely and frequently members other than the Chair(s) engage with your work and who should be in
regular contact.
Work with you to schedule and plan for committee meetings, taking into account the norms of the department or
program.
Help to resolve communication or draft review problems with other committee members in a reasonable amount of
time, coach you about how to proceed, or intervene directly if the problem is severe. If all efforts fail, encourage the
student to consider finding a replacement.
Take responsibility for dealing with conflicts among committee members. (e.g., personal conflict and intellectual
disputes that can create roadblocks for you).
Seek timely progress reports from the student.
To formalize the selection of your Dissertation Chair and Advisory Committee, you must file Form D-3: Appointment of the
Dissertation/Thesis Advisory Committee with the Graduate Studies Office, no later than 6 months after successfully completing
the candidacy/qualifying exam.
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Dissertation Proposal
In addition to selecting your Dissertation Chair and Advisory Committee, you must write a dissertation proposal. Some
departments may require this as part of the Candidacy Exam.
The dissertation proposal marks the official beginning of your doctoral research and the dissertation itself. The purpose of the
dissertation proposal is primarily for you to begin to isolate and formulate a particular problem or a small set of related problems
whose solution is important to the research community and is significant enough to merit being called doctoral research.
The acceptance of your Dissertation Proposal by your Dissertation Advisory Committee is formalized by completion of Form D3A: Approval of Dissertation Proposal and submission of a copy of the proposal to the Graduate Studies Office for final approval.
This step should be completed at the time of submission of Form 3 or very soon after.
Maintaining Contact with your Dissertation Advisory Committee
After its formation and approval of your dissertation proposal, you will periodically be informing your Advisory Committee
about your progress; the suggested interval is every 6 months. The Advisory Committee members should always know what you
are working on and you should know what the committee thinks about your progress. The goal of maintaining close ties with the
Advisory Committee is to avoid major surprises at your final dissertation defense.
Annual Review of Doctoral Students (Ph.D. and Doctoral Degree)
Each year, by no later than the anniversary of the filing of Form D-3A, a review of the progress of the student must be held by the
Dissertation Advisory Committee. A minimum of 3 members (including the Chair and co-Chair, if there is one) must be
involved.
These meetings, either one-on-one between you and the 3 or more members or in a group meeting, in combination with the
proposal, are intended to help you consider the broader concepts on which the thesis research is based, to assist in focusing your
thoughts on the research problem, and to clarify any questions that the committee may have concerning the approach and the
progress made.
At the conclusion of the review, the Dissertation Advisory Committee can recommend one of three actions through Form D-3B:
•
•
•
The student should be allowed to continue in the program without restriction.
The Committee judges the student’s performance to be unsatisfactory but that it had redeeming features. The student
should be allowed to continue in the program subject to closer supervision and the results of a second review within 6
months. Deficiencies to be rectified must be shared with the student.
The Committee judges the student's performance to be unsatisfactory, and this being at least the second such instance,
recommends termination at the end of the quarter.
Changes to Your Dissertation Advisory Committee or Dissertation Proposal
Any changes to the composition of your Dissertation Advisory Committee and/or major portions of your dissertation proposal
must be formalized by the submission of a new Form D-3 and/or Form D-3A.
In Absentia Status
Doctoral Candidates who have completed residency requirements and will not be using campus facilities, but may occasionally
consult with their Supervising Professor, may request in absentia status. Such requests must be approved by the Supervising
Professor and Graduate Advisor, with final approval granted by the Office of Graduate Studies. Doctoral Candidates in absentia
must register for one credit each term they are in this status. Doctoral Candidates may not be considered in absentia during the
terms in which they take their candidacy exams, defend their dissertations, and complete their programs.
Scheduling the Final Oral Dissertation Defense
Selecting a Dissertation Defense Committee
It is primarily your responsibility to form a Final Oral Defense Dissertation committee. It is recommended that the committee
membership should be the same as that of your Dissertation Advisory Committee; it must consist of at least five members, at least
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three of whom must be currently tenured or tenure-track Drexel faculty members. At least two of the committee members must
be from outside of your primary specialization area. At least one of the committee members must be from outside your
department, preferably from outside the university. Members from outside the university must be approved by the Associate Vice
Provost for Graduate Studies. Full--time non-tenure track Research Faculty will also be eligible to serve on the Final Oral Defense
Committee, even as the Committee Chair. At least four weeks prior to the final defense of the dissertation, you must file Form D4: Ph.D. FINAL ORAL DEFENSE COMMITTEE APPOINTMENT AND SCHEDULE with the Office of Graduate Studies for
final approval. In the case of a student in a doctoral program such as the DPT, the DrNP and the DrPH, the committee can be
comprised of three voting members. Two voting members must be graduate faculty (tenured, tenure track, Research or Clinical)
from the same department/program as the student's discipline and one voting member must be from a department other than
that of the major field or from outside the University. Members from outside the University must be approved by the Associate
Vice Provost for Graduate Studies.
A candidate may not present for the final dissertation defense until the approval of the supervising advisor and the major
program advisor is secured.
The examination specifics will then be included in the appropriate weekly schedule of oral examinations which is published on
the Graduate Studies website.
All students must be registered for a minimum of one credit unit in any term in which they schedule their defense of dissertation.
International Students must have full time status at all times to meet visa requirements.
Final Oral Dissertation Defense Examination
What to expect:
When the steps outlined in each of the previous sections are completed, the candidate will prepare for the Final Oral Defense of
the Dissertation. A dissertation is required of every candidate for the doctoral degree and must bear on the candidate's major
area of study, show evidence of his or her ability to do independent research, and be approved by the candidate's doctoral
committee. A draft of the dissertation must be submitted to each member of the doctoral committee at least two weeks before the
final examination. Usually, this examination constitutes an open defense of your dissertation. However, the Final Exam
Committee is always free to raise any questions it may wish.
Because students are allowed to invite qualified non-Drexel faculty to serve on their committees, it may happen that the defense
must be held without all members physically present. This would include the case where a Drexel faculty member might be
temporarily out of town when the meeting is scheduled. Under these circumstances, at least three of the committee members –
including the chair and co-chair if there is one - must be in attendance with the student during the defense. The long distance
member(s) must receive all presentation materials and the dissertation at least two weeks prior to the defense date and they must
be allowed to participate fully in the final examination via webcam, videoconference or teleconference.
The defense is a conference between you (the candidate) and the Dissertation Committee. Upon completion of the Oral Defense,
you may be advised to make revisions to the dissertation based on the suggestions of the committee. The certification of
successful completion is when no more than one dissenting vote is cast within the Dissertation Committee. The dissenting vote
cannot be that of the supervising professor or Chair/co-Chair. Successfully passing the Oral Defense is formalized by the
submission of Form D-5: Report of the Final Oral Defense Committee to the Office of Graduate Studies. This is to be done by the
Committee Chair (or co-Chair) within 48 hours of the exam. Signatures of all committee members must appear on the completed
Form D-5; under the conditions specified above when not all members can be present at the defense, faxed copies are acceptable.
**Should a student fail the final dissertation defense, the student is entitled to a retake (though some program rules may forbid this). It is
expected that this retake if allowed will occur no later than 6 months after the original exam. A student who fails the retake will be dismissed
from the university.
The following are some things to remember as you prepare for your presentation:
•
You have already written your dissertation and no one knows it better than you. You should be prepared to defend
your dissertation from many different viewpoints. This is the culmination of all of your hard work.
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•
•
•
•
•
Relax, you’ve spent many years working to this point, run through your defense a few times, but don’t overdo it.
If you are still on edge about your defense, run it by a few classmates. They can be a valuable resource and quite possibly
pick up on a mistake you did not catch. In addition, the criticism can sometimes be helpful.
You know the information you present in your dissertation and you can pick out the most interesting facts from your
work. Keep it to a logical sequence (remember this will be a factor if the committee sends your dissertation back for
revision).
Your dissertation defense presentation should be not too long and not too short. Your dissertation has already been
written and the committee is already familiar with the details. Find the middle and stick to it.
Follow the structure strictly!
Final Completion Form
All doctoral dissertations must conform to University format requirements as stipulated in the Thesis Manual (updated
annually). Thus, one of the final steps for the degree includes getting the University Library to validate the format of the
dissertation. Because the university participates in the Survey of Earned Doctorates run by the National Science Foundation, the
student must complete two surveys: the Drexel PhD/Doctoral Exit Survey (online) and the Survey of Earned Doctorates for the
current year.
Award of a Master’s Degree to Doctoral Students
All doctoral students who do not already have a master’s degree in their area of study may, with the approval of their program
department, apply for such a degree when they complete the requirements for it. The application must be made in the quarter in
which the student is eligible. The degree cannot be awarded retroactively.
32
MASTER’S DEGREE
Program Requirements
To complete a master's degree, students are expected to complete at least 45 credits of graduate work as defined in an established
plan of study or otherwise accepted by the department as part of an approved master's program (some departments have higher
credit requirements). Detailed guidelines can be found in the program’s policies and procedures manual or in the Graduate
Catalog.
Master’s Thesis
A thesis may be required, depending on the department's program criteria, and may vary in scope from department to
department. Although a student in a thesis program may register for thesis credits without limit, no more than 9 thesis credits
may be counted toward a master's degree. Students should consult early with their advisors to ascertain departmental and college
policies pertinent to their programs. If the master's thesis is to be placed in the library, the format must be reviewed and approved
as part of the graduation requirements. Students should consult the Thesis Manual for format and completion requirements.
Dual Master’s Degree
Graduate students already enrolled in a master's degree program at Drexel have the opportunity, through the dual master's
program, to work simultaneously on two master's degrees and to receive both upon graduation. To be eligible, graduate students
must be currently working on their first degree when requesting admission to the second. They must obtain approval from the
graduate advisors of both programs and work out a plan of study encompassing coursework and/or research (thesis) credits for
both degrees. Students may transfer as many as 15 credits from one program to the other, usually in the form of electives, and are
therefore required to complete a minimum of 60 graduate credits to complete a dual master's degree program (the actual credit
total may be higher, depending on each department's requirements). Transfer of credits from one program to another will depend
on the programs.
The dual master's student must complete the Graduate Dual Degree Form and obtain approvals from both graduate advisors.
Final approval is granted by the Office of Graduate Studies. The student is then registered in both majors simultaneously. Upon
graduation, the student must file two degree applications via their DrexelOne.
Second Master’s Degree
Students with a previously completed master's degree from Drexel University may pursue a second master's degree in a different
major without going through the admission process again. A student who has already completed a master's degree at Drexel may
transfer up to 15 credits from the first into the second master's degree program, depending on departmental requirements in the
new major, and may therefore complete the second master's degree with a minimum of 30 new graduate credits. Readmission
into the second master's degree program is requested through the new departmental graduate advisors.
Graduate Co-Op Program (GCP) Requirements
For the moment, only a number of programs (MS, MBA, BS/MS, LeBow College of Business, MS; College of Engineering;
MS, Biomedical Engineering, School of Biomedical Engineering, Science, and Health Systems, MS, Food Science, Goodwin
College) participate. Available as a special “co-op” track, which may entail more time to completion for the degree, GCP
enables students to accept paid positions in their career fields (i.e. go out on co-op) for up to six months during their degree
program. These 6 months can either be the Summer-Fall or Fall-Winter quarters.
For all GCP students, full-time employment during co-op is considered an integral part of their educational process; therefore,
they will retain their student status during the six-month period.
Eligibility
Students accepted into a master’s program that offers the co-op track can be admitted provisionally to the GCP by
requesting for it at the start of the degree program. Confirmation to continue in the program must be sought from the
Office of Graduate Studies when the student has earned a minimum of 24 credits but no more than 34 credits before
going out on co-op. For International students there is an additional requirement that they are at least 9 months into
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their degree program. Admission to some GCP programs can also be granted by the Office of Graduate Studies to any
student who was not provisionally admitted to the program. Students seeking continuation and students applying for
admission who were not provisionally admitted must file a completed Application for Admission/Continuation into
the GCP Program. Students should obtain the required signatures and submit the appropriate forms directly to the
Office of Graduate Studies. A detailed plan of study together with a proposed project to be completed during co-op
must accompany the form.
Beyond the credit and time requirements, the criteria for admission into and continuation in the program include
satisfactory academic progress (CGPA of at least 3.00, higher for some programs) and adherence to a schedule that will
lead to the student completing all degree requirements only after at least a final quarter back on campus. International
students, whose primary language is not English, must also demonstrate business-usage English proficiency to the
Graduate Co-op Coordinator. Any student who has gone out on co-op is not entitled to a quarter off upon return to
school.
A student can withdraw from the GCP by filing the GCP Withdrawal Form at any time before going out on co-op, but
not during, unless they are laid off involuntarily (or for health or other acceptable reasons) and all efforts to find a
replacement position have failed. Also, no student may seek to re-enter the GCP Program after withdrawing from it.
Additional Stipulations
When a student in the co-op track receives and then accepts an employment offer, that student will be required to
enroll in a three-credit CR/NCR GCP course for each three-month period of their employment. Before the three- or
six-month employment opportunity begins, the student will be assigned to a faculty advisor who will supervise the GCP
courses. The faculty advisor will work with him/her throughout the GCP experience and assist the student to develop a
project that reflects that work experience. Although the student will not attend class for the GCP courses, he/she is
required to maintain regular contact with the faculty advisor. At the end of each quarter out on co-op the student will
submit a written report of the project to the faculty advisor and receive a grade based on their efforts. Every GCP
student must have a passing grade in each of the GCP courses. It is left to the discretion of the student’s department to
decide on what a student must do to make up a failing GCP grade. The GCP courses will not be included in grade point
average calculations.
For any student who is officially enrolled in the Graduate Co-op Program, 3 credit units per quarter will constitute full
time status during the periods in which the student is engaged in full time Co-op.
The student must obtain and keep their health insurance and immunizations current to participate in the GCP.
The student should meet with their Graduate Co-op Coordinator to discuss their interest as early as three months prior
to the anticipated co-op start date. This will ensure that there is ample time for the student to understand the program,
discuss their career objectives, review/amend their résumé, conduct practice interviews, and, if necessary, schedule
language testing. The student should consult the GCP Calendar for more details. Simultaneously, the student should
also meet with their graduate advisor to check on the enrollment procedures for the co-op track.
During the co-op portion of any program, students will be billed for 3 credit hours at the appropriate credit hour rate
for the GCP course (COOP 501 or COOP 601). Students are allowed to take an extra academic course each quarter
while on co-op. Any such course will be charged at the appropriate credit hour rate.
34
GUIDELINES AND REGULATIONS FOR ACADEMIC UNITS ON GRADUATE
STUDENT ADVISING AND SUPERVISION
The general guidelines suggested below are meant to encourage units to examine their graduate programs and to specify their
own policies and procedures. These guidelines are directed primarily towards doctoral programs but will, in part, be appropriate
for master’s (with-thesis) programs as well.
Each academic unit should have explicitly stated policies and procedures regarding the advising and supervising of graduate
students, as well as established means for informing students of procedures and deadlines (e.g., orientation sessions, handbooks)
and mechanisms for addressing complaints. Academic units should ensure that their policies and procedures are consistent with
those of the Graduate Studies Office. For their part, graduate students are responsible for informing themselves of these policies
and procedures.
Assignment of Advisors, Supervisors and Committees
i.
Each unit should designate a member (or members) of the academic staff (usually the graduate program director)
to monitor the progress of students throughout the graduate program, to ensure that all conditions of admission
and requirements are fulfilled, to provide students with information on their program, their progress through it,
sources of and policies on financial support, and to advise them how to resolve problems which may arise during
their program.
ii.
As soon as possible, students should have a supervisor who has competence in the student's proposed area of
research, and a program or thesis committee. Although procedures and timetables for choosing supervisors and
committees may vary across programs, they should be consistent within a particular program and should be made
clear to incoming students.
iii.
Thesis supervisors must be chosen from academic staff in tenure track positions. Non-tenure t r ack Research
Faculty and those without a University affiliation who have been approved by the Graduate Studies Office to serve
on Dissertation Advisory Committees may not act as supervisors but in exceptional cases may be co-supervisors.
Emeritus Professors may co-supervise students. In the case of supervision, the academic unit in question must
ensure continuity of appropriate supervision of their graduate students.
Program
i.
Early in their program, students should be informed of the phases through which they must pass towards the
achievement of the graduate degree, the approximate amount of time each phase should take, the criteria for its
successful completion, and any deadlines relating to these phases.
ii.
It is important that students are made aware of whatever courses are required to complete their programs, that
these courses are available, and that they relate to students’ proposed areas of research or to the development of
related areas of scholarship.
iii.
Where relevant, students should also be informed early in their program of language requirements or
comprehensive examinations. The guidelines, criteria and procedures for comprehensive examinations must be
explicit and consistently applied in each program. Academic units should consider the rationale for language and
comprehensive examinations and how they relate to the objectives of the graduate program.
iv.
Every effort should be taken to ensure that students choose, as soon as possible, realistic and appropriate areas of
research commensurate with degree requirements.
v.
There must be clear procedures established in every unit by which students receive guidance and constructive
criticism on their progress on a regular basis through the program (e.g., regular meetings and/or email
35
communication with supervisors and committees, attendance at research seminars, quarterly or annual reviews of
student progress). In addition to regular meetings between the student and supervisor or advisory/thesis
committee, each unit must establish a procedure to provide feedback to thesis students regarding their research
progress. At least annually, there must be a meeting between the student, supervisor and at least two other
members of the advisory/thesis committee or, in the case where there is no such advisory/thesis committee, there
must be a meeting between the supervisor and a departmental representative, at which objectives for the upcoming
year are established and the prior year’s research progress recorded and evaluated. A written record of such
meetings must include the signature of the student, supervisor, and the advisory/thesis committee members or a
departmental representative, and a copy of this record must be submitted to the Graduate Studies Office to be
retained in the student’s personal file. In the case where the student does not make expected progress, the advisory
or thesis committee or, in the case where there is no such advisory or thesis committee, the student, supervisor and
a departmental representative must meet once more during the subsequent six months to review progress and if
appropriate to set new objectives. On the occasion of a second unsatisfactory progress report, the student may be
required to withdraw from the program of study.
vi.
Students should be made aware of the cost of living in Philadelphia and of sources of financial support (e.g.,
teaching or research assistantships, fellowships) and of the facilities available to them (e.g., study space,
computers).
vii.
Students should receive guidance and encouragement in areas relating to their growth in scholarship, professional
development and career planning. Examples may include, where appropriate, reporting research, writing abstracts,
preparing papers for conference presentation or for publication, writing grant and fellowship applications,
conducting a job search, and preparing for job interviews.
viii.
Units should be sensitive to special academic needs and concerns that may arise in the case of certain students,
such as international students or students who undertake graduate studies after a long absence from university.
Responsibilities
i.
Each unit should clearly identify the student's supervisory needs at each phase and the means by which these needs
will be met. Some functions will be fulfilled by the Head, some by the graduate program director, some by the
supervisor and some by the committee. Each unit should clearly identify the specific responsibilities of each of
these, as well as the responsibilities of students themselves. Each unit should consider the availability of student
support, research facilities, space and availability of potential supervisors in determining the number of students
admitted into the program.
ii.
Some examples of the responsibilities of the graduate program director are to be knowledgeable about program
requirements, the composition of committees, the procedures for comprehensive and oral defense examinations,
and other policies relating to graduate studies; to maintain a dossier on each student's progress; and to be sensitive
to graduation deadlines and students' career plans.
iii.
Some examples of the responsibilities of a supervisor are to uphold and transmit to students the highest
professional and ethical standards of research and/or scholarship; to provide guidance in all phases of the student’s
research; to meet with their students regularly; to provide prompt feedback when work is submitted including
drafts of the thesis; to clarify expectations regarding collaborative work, authorship, publication and conference
presentations.
iv.
Some examples of the responsibilities of the students are to inform themselves of program requirements and
deadlines; to work within these deadlines; to communicate regularly with the supervisor and committee; and to
submit progress reports to the supervisor and committee.
v.
The Head of the unit should ensure that procedures are in place to address serious disagreements that may arise,
for example, between a student and a supervisor or between a supervisor and committee members. Such
procedures should involve a neutral mediator who will ensure that all sides of a dispute are heard before any
36
decision is made. Only as a last resort should the matter be brought to the Hearing Board of the Graduate Studies
Office.
Quality of Supervision and Teaching
i.
Academic units, the Graduate Studies Office and the Center for Academic Excellence should consider ways to
assess and improve the quality of supervision and to help new supervisors, e.g., through workshops or mentoring
models. Procedures for monitoring the quality of graduate student supervision and for providing constructive
feedback for supervisors should be developed.
ii.
Graduate supervision should be recognized as an integral part of the academic responsibility of an academic unit
and should be considered in the allocation of workload, as should the teaching of graduate courses.
iii.
Academic units should establish criteria of excellence in supervision and graduate teaching appropriate to their
disciplines and should suitably reward those who meet these criteria, e.g., in decisions concerning tenure and
promotion, or merit pay awards.
iv.
The maximum number of students under the direction of a single supervisor should be consistent with the ability
of the supervisor to provide quality supervision, taking into account the workload of the supervisor and norms of
the discipline.
v.
Procedures should be established for ensuring continuity in supervision when a student is separated from a
supervisor - for example, when the supervisor takes a sabbatical leave, retires from Drexel or changes universities
or when the student leaves to complete field work or takes a job before submitting a thesis.
Graduate Student Honor Code
At New Graduate Student Orientation and other appropriate occasions, Drexel’s Graduate Student Honor Code is read aloud and
the students are asked to pledge to uphold it. In its entirety, the code states:
As a Drexel University graduate student and aware of its mission, I commit myself to excellence in research, teaching and service. In
furtherance of that aim and because I understand that my actions affect all members of the Drexel community and my profession, I
pledge to conduct myself with the highest integrity, honor and respect in all my endeavors.
Graduate students are expected to keep its message uppermost in their minds in everything that they do as members of the Drexel
community.
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GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION (GSA)
All graduate students are members of the Graduate Student Association (GSA) and are encouraged to participate in its activities.
The GSA is the governing body for all graduate student associations and has an active board and officers (elected yearly),
comprised of graduate students from different disciplines within the University. In order to become active in the governing
board, students should contact any of GSA’s current members or attend the association’s meetings.
The overall purpose of the GSA is to promote communication, understanding and intellectual stimulation among graduate
students, the University, and the community at large. As representatives of the graduate student body, the GSA’s main concerns
are those that affect graduate students and their scholarly and professional development at Drexel. The GSA participates on
University committees and plans educational and social functions that allow students from the various disciplines on campus to
meet and exchange shared experiences and new ideas.
With funds available to it through graduate student activity fees the GSA sponsors events open to all students, faculty, and staff.
The GSA (and its umbrella organizations) sponsor and/or participate in various activities throughout t h e academic year.
These include Graduate Student Orientation, Graduate Student Day, Commencement celebrations, Books & Bagels:
Conversations on Interdisciplinary Research, Teaching Workshops, the Engineering Research Symposium, Creativity & Innovation
Colloquia, volunteer work, intramural sports leagues, hiking trips, skiing trips and happy hours which bring together students
from across the entire campus in community building efforts. The GSA also runs a newsletter and a website to highlight its
achievements as well as event announcements.
Graduate student organizations recognized under the GSA 2013-2014:
Drexel Preconception Peer Educators (PPE)
Wilbur W. Oaks Physician Assistant Society
Drexel Graduate Women in Science & Engineering (DGWISE)
Biomedical Graduate Student Association (BGSA)
DEAGA (Entrepreneurship)
Health Management and Policy Club (HMPC)
PRAGATHI
Drexel IEEE Graduate Forum (DIG)
Chinese Graduate Christian Fellowship
Drexel Black Graduate Student Union (DBGSU)
Communication, Culture, and Media Association for Doctoral Students (CCMADS)
Drexel Special Libraries Association (DUSLA)
Arts Administration Graduate Association (AAGA)
Biology Graduate Student Association
Mechanical Engineering Graduate Student Association (MEGA)
Latino Interdisciplinary Graduate Association (LIGA)
International Graduate Student Association (IGSA)
Department of Civil, Architectural, & Environmental Engineering Graduate Society (CAEE-GS)
MathBytes
Chemical and Biological Engineering GSA (CBEGSA)
Chemistry GSA
Physical Therapy Club
Physics Graduate Student Association (PGSA)
MAGNET
Materials Research Society (MRS)
Student Government Organization for the School of Public Health (SGO SPH)
Environmental & Occupational Health Club (EOHC)
Drexel Student Chapter of the American Library Association (Drexel SCALA)
Drexel University Society of American Archivists (DUSAA)
Engineering Graduate Association (EGA)
Persian Students Association (PSA)
38
AWARDS AND COMPETITIONS
The Office of Graduate Studies runs a number of award competitions to recognize the achievements of graduate students. These
include:
Commencement Awards
In time for Commencement, awards for outstanding master’s and doctoral graduates are made each year.
Outstanding Master’s Awards
Four annual awards are available to be presented to master’s degree students at Drexel graduating at every Commencement who
demonstrate the highest standards of scholarship, leadership ability and strong commitment to civic responsibility among their
peers.
The awards are designed for those who are receiving their master’s degrees and leaving Drexel. Students who are PhD and
doctoral students collecting a master’s along the way are not eligible.
A prize of $500 and a certificate of recognition will be awarded by the Office of Graduate Studies to one master’s student in each
of the following categories:
•
•
•
•
Arts and Humanities (for students in Media Arts and Design, Humanities).
Social Sciences (for students in Business, Education, Information Science, Psychology).
Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (for students in Mathematics, all Engineering programs).
Physical and Life Sciences (for students in Bioscience, Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science, Biomedical
Engineering, Nursing and Health Professions, Public Health)
The department groupings given are not exhaustive (for reasons of brevity) and should not be considered to be cast in stone. For
example, a Biomedical Engineering student or one in Information Science who has written a praiseworthy thesis as part of the
requirements of the degree may be nominated in the Mathematical Sciences and Engineering category if the student’s thesis topic
is thought to fall in this area. If you have questions regarding the appropriate group placement, please contact the Graduate
Studies Office.
Nomination Procedures
Only one nomination per award offered is allowed per department (or college with no departments) – unless the
program is graduating an unusually high number of students in which case two nominations will be allowed- and must
be submitted by the department head/chair (or dean, for colleges with no departments) to the Office of Graduate
Studies. Nomination materials in a single pdf file should be e-mailed to [email protected] by a date near the end of May
and should include:
•
Two letters of recommendation (with one from the applicant’s department head or graduate advisor);
•
An expanded abstract of the applicant’s thesis or portfolio (between 5 and 10 pages), if applicable;
•
A curriculum vita that lists educational and research training, publications *(if any), awards received (if any)
and other pertinent information;
•
A 2-3 page statement in the nominee’s own words indicating how he or she meets the award criteria
•
Evidence of extracurricular activities and service to the University and the community, if any;
•
A filed application for degree.
Application packages that are not complete or are late will not be considered.
Award Selection Procedures
I. The Office of Graduate Studies has appointed an awards committee that will review nominations and submit
names of prize winners to the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies.
II. If the award committee judges that no nomination is outstanding in any category, no award will be given in
that category.
39
III. Winners will be informed by early June. They will be recognized at Commencement but will receive their
awards at a special ceremony in the Graduate Studies Office during the week of Commencement.
*In the graduate student’s CV, in the section highlighting papers published, presentations made and
conferences attended, the details of the papers/posters should conform to the following, wherever
appropriate:
For meeting/conference contributions:
Meeting Type
(National/International/Regional)
Format of
presentation
(Poster, Oral);
allowed time
if oral
Published in
Proceedings?
Refereed
proceedings?
Invited or
accepted
Published
elsewhere?
Author
order
(first, last,
.. ) and
workload
(100%,
50%, .. )
For published work:
Peer-reviewed
paper/book chapter (by
invitation or
submission)
Acceptance rate
Impact factor of journal
or audience of
circulation
(International, National,
Regional)
Number of citations
Author order (first,
last, .. ) and workload
(100%, 50%, .. )
Outstanding Dissertation Awards
Three annual awards are presented to doctoral students graduating at each Commencement who have written outstanding
dissertations that reflect great research. The awards, with a cash prize of $1000 and a certificate of recognition each, are in the
following categories:
•
•
•
Social Sciences (for students in Business, Education, Information Science, Psychology);
Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (for students in Mathematics, all Engineering programs);
Physical and Life Sciences (for students in Bioscience, Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science and
Policy, Biomedical Engineering, Nursing and Health Professions, Public Health).
The department groupings given are not exhaustive (for reasons of brevity) and should not be considered to be cast in stone. For
example, a Biomedical Engineering student or one in Information Science who has written a praiseworthy thesis as part of the
requirements of the degree may be nominated in the Mathematical Sciences and Engineering category if the student’s thesis topic
is thought to fall in this area. If you have questions regarding the appropriate group placement, please contact the Graduate
Studies Office.
Nomination Procedures
Only one nomination per award offered is allowed per department (or college with no departments) – unless the
program is graduating an unusually high number of students in which case two nominations will be allowed- and must
be submitted by the department head/chair (or dean, for colleges with no departments) to the Office of Graduate
Studies. Nomination materials in a single pdf file should be e-mailed to [email protected] by a date near the end of May
and should include:
•
•
Two letters of recommendation (with one from the dissertation advisor and the other from a member of the
dissertation committee or someone notable in the nominee’s field of research);
a supporting letter from the department head/chair explaining why the nominee was chosen;
40
•
•
•
•
•
a short summary (no more than 5-10 pages) of the student’s dissertation or a copy of the external abstract as
originally submitted with the dissertation to the Office of Graduate Studies;
A curriculum vita that lists educational and research training, publications *(if any), awards received (if any)
and other pertinent information;
A 2-3 page statement in the nominee’s own words and in lay language indicating how he or she meets the
award criteria;
Evidence of extracurricular activities and service to the University and community, if any;
A copy of the student’s D5 form or notice of dissertation defense.
Application packages that are not complete or are late will not be considered.
Award Selection Procedures
I. The Office of Graduate Studies has appointed an award committee that will review nominations and submit
names of prize winners to the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies.
II. If the award committee judges that no nomination is outstanding in any category, no award will be given in
that category.
III.
Winners will be informed by early June. They will be recognized at Commencement but will receive their
awards at a special doctoral ceremony, the Doctoral Celebration.
Evaluation Criteria
I. Originality of the work and creativity demonstrated;
II. Output achieved or likely to be achieved (papers, presentations, posters, etc.);
III.
Impact on the field (through citations, H-index, etc.);
IV. Recognition by others (through awards, invitations to make presentations, placement after graduation, etc.);
V. Standing of the student among peers, past and present.
*In the graduate student’s CV, in the section highlighting papers published, presentations made and
conferences attended, the details of the papers/posters should conform to the following, wherever
appropriate:
For meeting/conference contributions:
Meeting Type
(National/International/Regional)
Format
of
presentation
(Poster,
Oral);
allowed time
if oral
Published in
Proceedings?
Refereed
proceedings?
Invited
or
accepted
Published
elsewhere?
Author
order
(first, last,
.. ) and
workload
(100%,
50%, .. )
For published work:
41
Peer-reviewed
paper/book chapter (by
invitation
or
submission)
Acceptance rate
Impact factor of journal
or
audience
of
circulation
(International,
National, Regional)
Number of citations
Author order
(first,
last, .. ) and workload
(100%, 50%, .. )
Great Promise Doctoral Awards
Three annual awards are presented to doctoral students graduating at every Commencement who are deemed to exhibit great
promise in enhancing Drexel’s reputation in the future. The awards, with a cash prize of $1000 and a certificate of recognition
each, are in the following categories:
•
•
•
Social Sciences (for students in Business, Education, Information Science, Psychology);
Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (for students in Mathematics, all Engineering programs);
Physical and Life Sciences (for students in Bioscience, Chemistry, Physics, Environmental Science and Policy,
Biomedical Engineering, Nursing and Health Professions, Public Health)
The department groupings given are not exhaustive (for reasons of brevity) and should not be considered to be cast in stone. For
example, a Biomedical Engineering student or one in Information Science who has written a praiseworthy thesis as part of the
requirements of the degree may be nominated in the Mathematical Sciences and Engineering category if the student’s thesis topic
is thought to fall in this area. If you have questions regarding the appropriate group placement, please contact the Graduate
Studies Office.
Nomination Procedures
Only one nomination per award offered is allowed per department (or college with no departments) – unless the
program is graduating an unusually high number of students in which case two nominations will be allowed- and must
be submitted by the department head/chair (or dean, for colleges with no departments) to the Office of Graduate
Studies. Nomination materials in a single pdf file should be e-mailed to [email protected] by a date near the end of May
and should include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Two letters of recommendation from individuals familiar with Drexel’s mission and traditions, and should
stress the all-around qualities of the nominee and the likelihood of future success;
a supporting letter from the department head/chair explaining why the nominee was chosen;
a short summary (no more than 5-10 pages) of the student’s dissertation or a copy of the external abstract as
originally submitted with the dissertation to the Office of Graduate Studies;
A curriculum vita that lists educational and research training, publications *(if any), awards received (if any)
and other pertinent information;
A 2-3 page statement in the nominee’s own words and in lay language indicating how he or she meets the
award criteria;
Evidence of extracurricular activities and service to the University and community, if any;
A copy of the student’s D5 form or notice of dissertation defense.
Application packages that are not complete or are late will not be considered.
Award Selection Procedures
I. The Office of Graduate Studies has appointed an awards committee that will review nominations and submit
names of prize winners to the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies.
II. If the award committee judges that no nomination is outstanding in any category, no award will be given in
that category.
III.
Winners will be informed by early June. They will be recognized at Commencement but will receive their
awards at a special doctoral ceremony, the Doctoral Celebration.
42
Evaluation Criteria
I. Originality of the work and creativity demonstrated;
II. Output achieved or likely to be achieved (papers, presentations, posters, etc.);
III. Recognition by others (through awards, invitations to make presentations, placement after graduation, etc.);
IV. Standing of the student among peers, past and present;
V. Leadership ability and strong commitment to civic responsibility;
VI. Impact of the student’s extracurricular activities on society and the university.
*In the graduate student’s CV, in the section highlighting papers published, presentations made and
conferences attended, the details of the papers/posters should conform to the following, wherever
appropriate:
For meeting/conference contributions:
Meeting
Type
(National/International/Regional)
Format
of
presentation
(Poster, Oral);
allowed time if
oral
Published
in
Proceedings?
Refereed
proceedings?
Invited or
accepted
Published
elsewhere?
Author
order
(first, last,
.. ) and
workload
(100%,
50%, .. )
For published work:
Peer-reviewed
paper/book chapter (by
invitation
or
submission)
Acceptance rate
Impact
factor
of
journal or audience of
circulation
(International,
National, Regional)
Number of citations
Author order (first,
last, .. ) and workload
(100%, 50%, .. )
Graduate Student Day Awards
Graduate Student Day usually occurs at the end of May each year. The occasion is to recognize the contributions of graduate
students towards the mission of the university especially in the classroom, in the teaching lab and the research lab. Excellence
awards (in Research, in Teaching, and in Service) are handed out to deserving nominees during a ceremony at an appropriate
venue. A reception then follows.
Research Awards
The Office of Graduate Studies through its Graduate Student Excellence Committee selects graduate students, who have
exhibited outstanding research/scholarship/creativity in the past year, for certificates of recognition and monetary awards that
are handed out at a ceremony on Graduate Student Day (usually in May).
The dossier for each nomination must include the following information:
•
Graduate student’s name and the department/program in which the student is enrolled
43
•
Graduate student’s CV highlighting papers published, presentations made and conferences attended since April of the
previous year, if any - the details of the papers/posters should conform to the following, wherever appropriate:
For meeting contributions:
Meeting
Type
(National/International/Regional)
Format
of
presentation
(Poster, Oral);
allowed time if
oral
Published
in
Proceedings?
Refereed
proceedings?
Invited or
accepted
Published
elsewhere?
Author
order
(first, last,
.. ) and
workload
(100%,
50%, .. )
For published work:
Peer-reviewed
paper/book chapter (by
invitation
or
submission)
Acceptance rate
Impact
factor
of
journal or audience of
circulation
(International,
National, Regional)
Number of citations
Author order (first,
last, .. ) and workload
(100%, 50%, .. )
• A 2-page statement by the student explaining the significance of their research
• A letter from a referee/faculty advisor stating the reasons for nominating this particular student
• An endorsement note from the department/program’s graduate advisor or director/head.
Nominations (each to be placed in a single pdf file) should be sent to Teck-Kah Lim, Associate Vice Provost, Graduate Studies at
[email protected] or submitted in hardcopy to the Graduate Studies Office (Randell 240). Deadline for submissions is usually
near the end of April.
Teaching Assistant Excellence Awards
Nominations for excellent Teaching Assistants (TAs) are solicited online from all undergraduates who have been taught by TAs in
labs, recitations, workshops, clinics and lectures and from faculty who have worked with the TAs. A Committee on Teaching
Assistant Excellence appointed by the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies reviews these before deciding on a list of
finalists. The finalists are asked to submit a 2-3 page statement each detailing their teaching efforts and why they deserve to be
recognized. In the category of TAs who have demonstrated continued excellence the finalists are required to submit teaching
portfolios. The winners are then selected from the list of finalists.
Nominations usually close at the end of April. (The TA Excellence Committee may accept a nomination after this time, but it
is possible that it won’t be given the same weight as nominations submitted on time.)
Nominees must meet the following requirements:
1. Have been appointed as teaching assistants and taught at least one full quarter as TAs during the current academic
year.
2. Be teaching or have taught courses/labs/recitations for which they had major responsibility and/or played a major role in the
teaching of the class.
44
To nominate a TA: Complete the TA nomination form on the Graduate Studies website:
http://drexel.edu/provost/graduatestudies/news/ta_awards_nominations.html
Cite specific examples and details to support your answer.
Self-nominations will not be considered.
To qualify, at least one nomination must come from a student. Award winners who are not graduating will be expected to
participate in TA Prep Course activities during the week before classes begin.
For more information, contact Alexis Finger at 215-895-6818 or [email protected]
45
TRAVEL SUBSIDY AWARDS
Domestic Travel Subsidy
Important Notice: With effect from January 1, 2015, only applications from students making presentations in oral form (i.e. in the
form of a paper in front of an audience) will be considered for travel funding, unless posters are the only mechanism allowed by the
conference/meeting organizers for students to show their work.
The Office of Graduate Studies offers a limited number of travel subsidies annually to encourage student participation in
academic meetings and conferences within the United States and territories (includes Puerto Rico). Subsidies are awarded to
masters or PhD/doctoral students presenting at a gathering of a professional society where they have the opportunity not only
to discuss their research with colleagues from around the nation (or world), but also to hone their presentation skills for a
wide (maybe international) audience. The award will have a maximum value of $400 (including a maximum of $200 towards
registration fees and a maximum of $200 towards other meeting/conference-related expenses such as transportation, lodging, and
food). Students can only receive one grant per fiscal year (July to June). There is a cap of five awards to any one meeting.
To be eligible, students must be enrolled in a full-time doctoral or master’s program at Drexel and must be presenting an invited
talk or a paper at the meeting or conference. To apply, students should complete the online Application for Domestic Travel
Subsidy and submit it along with all supporting application materials. The application MUST be submitted at least one month
before the start date of the conference/meeting. A complete list of qualifications, conditions, and materials required can be found
online at the Office of Graduate Studies website.
The amount of support awarded will be based, among other factors, on the type of participation and anticipated visibility of the
student in the conference, the subsidy funds available and any other funding the student is receiving to help cover expenses;
students intending to attend international meetings are not eligible for this program (but please see below). All award
determinations will be at the discretion of the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Studies. The student will be reimbursed only
upon submission of appropriate receipts, which must conform to University policy on allowable travel reimbursements.
International Travel Awards (ITA) for Faculty and Graduate Students
The Office of International Programs also offers travel awards to graduate students who wish to attend meetings outside the
United States. The competitive International Travel Award Program provides assistance to full-time faculty and graduate
students up to $750 per academic year toward participation in an international conference outside the United States within
the participant’s professional field.
If you have any questions about the International Travel Award (ITA) program, contact the Office of International programs at
[email protected] or by phone 215-895-6372.
Higher Education Advocate Travel Award
Drexel University’s Office of Graduate Studies and Graduate Student Association offer a limited number of Higher Education
Travel Awards to support any graduate student advocating for higher education. The objective of this award is to challenge and
fund Drexel’s graduate students to return to their alma maters (high school & universities) to share the opportunities higher
education has afforded them. Graduate students are especially desirable for this advocacy because they are relatable; sharing a
generation and educational background with even high school audiences. Ideally, a graduate student would give talk (1)
introducing themselves as an alumnus of the host institution, (2) sharing their story and why they chose graduate school, (3)
introducing their discipline and research (4) revealing their future plans to apply their degree and (5) challenging the audience to
consider graduate education and research.
It is desirable, but not necessary, for the host institution to be an academic institution: high school, college, or university and the
host institution is the applicant’s alma mater. The talk delivered to the host institution does not have to be the primary reason for
travel.
Award: Up to $300 in travel support and the purchase of business cards for the student. Award recipients will be recognized as
Higher Education Advocates during Drexel’s annual Graduate Student Day in May. Students may receive this award once
annually.
Requirements of the Award: All Drexel graduate students are eligible for the award. Recipients are required to submit (1)
original travel receipts to Office of Graduate Studies for reimbursement, (2) one photograph and a recording of their presentation
46
(audio or video) to be archived with Drexel and available for public view. Video cameras are available for Award Recipients to
rent from Office of Graduate Studies at no cost. Presentations may be in any language.
Application Instructions: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. A decision will be returned within 4 weeks. To apply, send
the following four components (combined in a single pdf file) to the [email protected] with the subject “Higher Education
Advocate Travel Award.”
1. Application Form
2. Letter of Support from Host School/Institution/Academy
3. C.V.
4. Support Documentation for Cost Estimates
47
ORIENTATION, WORKSHOPS AND TRAINING
Drexel Fellowships Office Workshops
The Drexel Fellowships Office supports students across the University in their applications for competitive national and international
fellowships. They raise campus-wide awareness of opportunities and directly help students create strong applications through
intensive individual advising and support. To set up an appointment, please email us at [email protected] or register for one of
their workshops at http://drexel.edu/fellowships/
Graduate Student Orientation
Orientation in the fall each year is our official way of welcoming students to the Drexel Community. It ensures that the incoming
class begins the term with an informed and consistent level of knowledge about the culture and community that is Drexel. Students
will also be introduced to many enriching and rewarding curricular and co-curricular activities. These activities include a Career
Management orientation, workshops on “How to Get the Most Out of Your Advising Relationships” and various other workshops
that will acquaint the student with Drexel’s academic standards and prepare them for the rigors of its graduate programs. Orientation
also includes various social activities that will allow students to meet their classmates and to get to know Philadelphia. In addition,
we provide information on all the administrative matters that students will need to address as well as local information to help them
get settled in the area.
Teaching Assistant (TA) Preparation Course: EDUC 775
This is a special, free, one-credit course that is mandatory for all incoming teaching assistants. It consists of a week-long pre-term
series of preparatory workshops and practice teaching sessions typically the week before classes begin in the fall and one additional
two-hour workshops during fall term.
Objectives: This course is designed to provide teaching assistants with the following
1.
2.
3.
4.
Understanding of the role and value of the TA in the Drexel undergraduate academic experience
Awareness of the expectations and needs of a diverse student population
Awareness of support services, instructional resources and technology: audio visual and online,
Understanding of teaching tasks and opportunities to practice doing them:
•
prepare for a class
•
create a lesson plan
•
introduce yourself to a class
•
create an interactive learning environment
•
present material in different ways to accommodate different backgrounds and styles of learning
•
field student questions
•
give feedback
•
grade
•
evaluate good teaching practices
•
manage challenging classroom and office hour situations
The TA Handbook and Course Materials can be found on the EDUC 775 page on the Graduate Studies website:
http://drexel.edu/provost/graduatestudies/services/educ775.html
Students who believe that their previous work experience has prepared them appropriately for their TA duties can request
exemption from the Fall Quarter workshops and from registration in EDUC 775. ITAs who don’t receive a 55 on the SPEAK
test should take Humanities 006, Section Two in the fall.
The Teaching Assistant Certificate (TAC)
Although a large number of our graduate doctoral students who accept fellowships as teaching assistants anticipate pursuing an
eventual career in college teaching, all our PhD programs provide little in the way of formal training for that. As a result the Office
of Graduate Studies has organized TA Orientation and the special TA course EDUC 775. In EDUC 775, now mandatory for new
TAs, the students begin with TA Orientation then meet four times during the Fall where the focus is on getting them to be ready for
their responsibilities, to handle various issues of classroom management beginning with the first day of class, how to establish and
maintain credibility as the instructor from day one, how to communicate effectively, how to handle absenteeism, tardiness, cheating,
difficult students, how to set classroom expectations, how to get students to be engaged in the class, how to use technology
effectively in the classroom, how to grade fairly, etc. For those who are definitely headed into teaching, the Office of Graduate
Studies has begun to offer the Teaching Assistant Certificate.
The Teaching Assistant Certificate (TAC) is a joint effort of the Office of Graduate Studies and the student's academic department. 48
To earn a certificate, the teaching assistant must do the following:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Find a faculty member as a teaching mentor
Work closely under that person’s guidance (as an associate) including shadowing the professor and sharing their mentor’s
experiences as they run their courses
Have their teaching observed and formally critiqued by the teaching mentor
Participate in departmental or university teaching workshops
Develop a teaching portfolio
Request a comprehensive teaching assessment by faculty mentor
Procedures for Completion of TAC
1. Anytime after completing at least two quarters of a teaching associateship, a teaching assistant can complete the portfolio and
submit it to the Office of Graduate Studies for approval.
2. The primary faculty liaison submits a checklist of skills attained by the TA and a letter informing the Office of Graduate Studies
that the teaching assistant has successfully completed the requirements.
3. The checklist and letter have to be submitted prior to the deadline in order to be eligible to receive the Teaching Assistant
Certificate for a given year. The expected deadline is the 5th week of the Spring Quarter.
4. The Office of Graduate Studies sends the teaching assistant a letter notifying him/her of the successful completion of the
certificate requirements.
5. The Certificate is presented at the Graduate Student Day Ceremony in May/June.
The Teaching Portfolio
Advanced doctoral students competing for faculty positions are increasingly asked to provide documentation of their teaching
experience, ability and effectiveness. Evidence indicates that a teaching portfolio is the preferred method of gathering and presenting
this information. Therefore the Office of Graduate Studies will use the teaching portfolio as part of the application process for the
Outstanding TA Award and as the most important qualification for the Teaching Assistant Certificate.
The contents of a portfolio vary according to the preferences of the candidate, the conventions of the discipline and the desired
audience/award. The following items are typical:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
reflective statement on the candidate’s teaching theories, goals, and practices
copies of syllabi, paper topics, examinations, or other course handouts.
one or more sets of student evaluations, with the candidates commentary on them
videotape of the candidate in one or more kinds of teaching situations (for example, lecturing, leading a discussion)
report of any faculty mentors’ class visitation
teaching-related projects designed by the candidate
documentation of teaching awards
prospectus for course(s) the candidate would like to teach in the future
scholarly activities and their relation to the candidates’ teaching
letters of recommendation from mentors or advisors (the Teaching Assistant Certificate also requires a final summary
assessment by the faculty teaching mentor)
An annual teaching portfolio workshop is scheduled every summer. For more information please contact Dr. Lim at
[email protected]
49
ACADEMIC AND FINANCIAL SUPPORT
Health Insurance Subsidy
Beginning in the year 2008, representatives of the Drexel University’s Graduate Student Association and the Office of the Provost
worked collaboratively to design a health insurance subsidy program specifically for some Drexel University doctoral candidates.
In keeping with best practices, the university will defray in part or whole the premiums for the university-offered Aetna Health
insurance program to all Teaching Assistants, Research Assistants, and Graduate Assistants enrolled in a doctoral program and
working on a full-time assistantship basis.
Students whose appointments already provide health coverage in their compensation packages are not eligible as are those who
choose to use any plan other than that offered by the university.
Qualifications for the subsidy include:
1. Full time academic enrollment in a doctoral program
2. A qualified Assistantship Appointment. These include:
 TA-Teaching Assistant
 RA- Research Assistant
 GA- Graduate Assistant
Full-time assistantship appointment terms (20 hours per week for at least 3 quarters of the academic year) will qualify for a full
health insurance subsidy of the Student Dragon Plan. Subsidies up to the cost of the Dragon Plan will be provided to those who
meet the above requirements and elect the Student Dragon Preferred Plan coverage. For students who desire it, because they
choose the Preferred Plan, the university provides a special payroll deduction plan that spreads the premium payments over 9
months.
Any full time graduate student who works less than the 3 quarters in the academic year or works less than the required full
workload will receive a prorated subsidy. The prorated subsidy is equal to the percentage of work hours and/or length of
appointment. Example, a 12 month appointment, with 10 hours per week workload is equal to 50% subsidy.
PROCESS: Assistantship responsibilities that span classifications (i.e. TA, RA or GA) should be assigned at minimum
50% of the workload in each classification. Exceptions to this formula may be granted on a case by case basis.
Dissertation Fellowship
The Office of Graduate Studies offers a small number of fellowships to current Teaching Assistants (TAs) who have had at least
two years of service as a TA and are about to enter the final term of their PhD degree program, i.e. in the quarter/semester in which
they are writing up and defending their dissertation or who are about to finish their degree requirements prior to going out on
clinical internship as in the case of students in Clinical Psychology. For those who are applying for the summer quarter, there must
be evidence that they have been TAs during that part of the year in the previous two years. A stipend of up to $4,000 can be
awarded that must be used to relieve the student of teaching responsibilities. Though the award may not match dollar-for-dollar
the regular stipend that the fellow is expecting to receive, it is expected that the student’s department will be able to find an
adjunct or otherwise qualified instructor to stand in for the awardee.
Application Instructions: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, but MUST be submitted by the 6th week of the
quarter/semester prior to the tenure of the fellowship. To apply, the student must send the following components (combined in a
single pdf file) to the [email protected] with the subject “Dissertation Fellowship”:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Application form, fully completed (found on the Office of Graduate Studies website)
A 2-page statement from the student highlighting why the fellowship is particularly timely
A letter stating the former TA status of the student
An appointment letter covering the period in which the student hopes to use the fellowship
Resume/CV (Curriculum Vitae)
Two letters of recommendation from mentors or advisors, with statements (and evidence such as draft chapters) validating
the nearness to graduation of the student and the academic merit contained in the dissertation
50
Emergency Loan Fund
The Office of Graduate Studies will lend up to $500 to any graduate student who faces an emergency. The loan
will be interest- free and must be made good within a month. Some form of collateral will be required.
Retention Support
The Office of Graduate Studies will pay for a tutor for any first-year graduate student who is encountering
difficulties in coursework. Once ascertained that a need exists, arrangements will be made to
secure the services of a tutor.
Writing Assistance
Writing assistance is available at all times at the University’s Writing Center to graduate students wishing to
improve their writing skills or to write a paper or proposal or their dissertation. Trained coaches and consultants
are on call. If interested in these workshops, sign up at the Writing Center or on their website registration page.
These workshops are free and open to all students. Students can register by following the workshop link on the
Writing Center website. For more information, c o n t a c t t h e W r i t i n g C e n t e r a t 2 1 5 - 895 - 6633.
Statistics Assistance
Graduate students seeking help with the statistical analyses of their data can consult with a team of statisticians who
have offered their services to students. Arrangements can be made through the Office of Graduate Studies to
use the Biostatistics Service Center in the School of Public Health on an as-needed basis. We also have an oncall faculty member (Neil Desnoyers, LeBow College of Business, [email protected], 215-571-4672)
who is willing to be a resource for students in need of assistance with statistics issues.
Placement Assistance
Graduate students seeking help with placement can consult with a team (Ken Bohrer and Mary Ellen TaggartFord) in the Steinbright Career Development Center. In addition to face-to-face assistance, the team offers
workshops throughout the year. These include:
•
Writing a CV for PhD students
•
Resume Repair & Cover Letter Writing for Graduate Students
•
CPT Workshop
•
Job Search Skills
•
Strategies for Finding Jobs
•
Graduate Co-op
•
Interviewing Skills
•
OPT Workshop
•
Navigating the Career Fair
•
Expectations in the Workplace
Parental Accommodation Fellowships
Parental Accommodation Fellowships are available to current students receiving full-time Research
Assistantships (RA) or Teaching Assistantships (TA) who satisfy the following criteria:
• The student is pregnant, or is the primary caregiver of her/his infant child or adopted infant child.
• The student has completed at least one year in her/his program as an RA or TA and is in
good academic standing.
•
The student has an appointment letter that indicates that she/he has been promised fulltime support through any combination of TA and/or RA for the period (no more than a
quarter) in which the fellowship is tenable.
Award: A maximum of $4,000 can be awarded that must be used to relieve the student of teaching
responsibilities or as a replacement for her/his stipend if the student is an RA. The award may not
match dollar- for-dollar the regular stipend that the fellow is expecting to receive. In the case of a
TA, it is expected that the student’s department will be able to find an adjunct or otherwise
qualified instructor to stand in for the awardee.
Guidelines:
• The Parental Accommodation Fellowship may be taken during the quarter in which the
child is born or adopted, or during the quarter immediately following.
• Students should consult with their academic advisors to determine how they will
maintain full-time enrollment.
• Students with loans should consult with Drexel Central on matters related to Financial
Aid before beginning their parental accommodation fellowship.
• International students should discuss the parental accommodation fellowship and
attendant leave with International Students and Scholars Services to be sure there are no
unforeseen issues related to their visa status.
Application Instructions: Applications should be submitted by the 6th week of the quarter/semester
prior to the tenure of the fellowship. To apply, the student must send the following components
(combined in a single pdf file) to the Office of Graduate Studies at [email protected] with the
subject “Parental Accommodation Fellowship”:
1. Application form, fully completed (Form found on the Office of Graduate Studies website)
2. The student’s letter requesting the parental accommodation
3. A copy of the student’s assistantship appointment letter
4. A letter from the student’s supervisor detailing the arrangements that will account for
the student’s teaching and research responsibilities during the accommodation period
5. One of the following:
o Confirmation of pregnancy signed by a US doctor;
o A birth certificate for the infant child; or
o A statement of adoption from an adoption agency
EXTERNAL GRADUATE STUDENT FORUMS
There are four graduate student forums that offer useful information to all graduate students. They can be accessed at:
http://www.graduatejunction.net/forums
http://www.gradshare.com/ind
ex.html http://onlinephd.org/
http://www.vitae.ac.uk/
Use these websites to ask questions and get answers about anything affecting graduate students, in particular
about various aspects of graduate student life. Post questions that you can't ask your advisor or your peers and
receive answers with tips and other useful information. Or share your experiences to assist others.
SURVIVAL GUIDE FOR INTERNATIONAL GRADUATE STUDENTS
Drexel’s Office of Faculty Development and Equity offers a guidebook for international faculty and their families to
assist in their transition to the Drexel community and Philadelphia area. The information contained therein is also
relevant to our graduate students so we suggest that they visit this site: http://www.drexelgsa.org/drexel-graduate-student-faqs/
http://drexel.edu/fde/InternationalFacultyGuidebook.pdf
In addition, the Graduate Student Association offers Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on their website:
http://www.drexelgsa.org/drexel-graduate-student-faqs/
3141 Chestnut Street, Randell 240
Philadelphia, PA 19104
TEL 215.895.0366
FAX 215.895.0495
E-MAIL [email protected]
www.drexel.edu/graduatestudies
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