Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager Front cover

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Front cover
Going Green with IBM
Systems Director
Active Energy Manager
Understand power and energy
efficiency on IBM Systems
Learn about IBM Green technology
and offerings
Manage IBM Systems with
Active Energy
Phil Ainsworth
Miguel Echenique
Bob Padzieski
Claudio Villalobos
Paul Walters
Debbie Landon
ibm.com/redbooks
Redpaper
International Technical Support Organization
Going Green with IBM Systems Director
Active Energy Manager
September 2008
REDP-4361-00
Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in “Notices” on
page vii.
First Edition (September 2008)
This edition applies to IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager version 3.1.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2008. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADP Schedule
Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The team that wrote this paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Become a published author . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Comments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 1. IBM energy management overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
1.1 The value of being energy efficient in the IT industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.2 Energy management levels and offerings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
1.2.1 The IBM Cool Blue portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
1.2.2 IBM STG Lab Services Data Center Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
1.2.3 Incentive programs for improving data center energy efficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.2.4 Asset disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
1.3 Energy efficiency terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Chapter 2. IBM energy management concepts and technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1 Energy management concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.1 Energy, power, and efficiency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.2 Label power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.3 Input power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.4 Output power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.5 Ambient and exhaust temperatures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.6 Power related events . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.7 Power saving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.8 Power capping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2 EnergyScale for POWER6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.1 Power and temperature data collection and reporting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.2 Power capping and power limitations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.3 Power saver mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.4 Measurement-based implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.5 Guaranteed safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.6 Policy-driven power management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.7 Calibration considerations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.8 Idle power reduction/ Processor Core NAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.9 EnergyScale for I/O. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3 BladeCenter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.1 POWER6 processor-based blades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4 Intelligent power distribution unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1 Active Energy Manager product overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.1 What is new in Active Energy Manager version 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.2 Positioning Active Energy Manager functions by platform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.3 Active Energy Manager basic components. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.4 IBM Systems Director product overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.1.5 Planning Web sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
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3.2 Upgrading to Active Energy Manager from PowerExecutive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Hardware requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.1 Active Energy Manager server hardware requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.2 Active Energy Manager provider hardware requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Software requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.1 Active Energy Manager components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.2 Active Energy Manager server software installation considerations . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4.3 Active Energy Manager server supported operating systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5 Downloading the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.1 Active Energy Manager server checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.2 Active Energy Manager console checklist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.3 Accessing the Active Energy Manager download Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.4 Downloading the IBM Systems Director server and console files. . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.5 Downloading the IBM Systems Director HMC extension files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.6 Downloading the Active Energy Manager extension version files. . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.7 Downloading the Active Energy Manager standalone version files . . . . . . . . . . .
3.5.8 Downloading the Active Energy Manager provider firmware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6 Active Energy Manager licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.1 IBM Systems Director licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.2 Active Energy Manager licensing overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.6.3 Active Energy Manager licensing roadmap. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
4.1 Overview of the installation process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.2 IBM Systems Director server on Windows for installation of
Active Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.2.1 Installing IBM Systems Director server for Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
4.2.2 Installing the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Windows . . . . 69
4.2.3 Installing Active Energy Manager on Windows with IBM Systems
Director server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
4.2.4 Installing Active Energy Manager license on Windows IBM Systems
Director server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
4.3 IBM Systems Director console on Windows installation for Active Energy Manager . . 77
4.3.1 Installing IBM Systems Director console install for Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
4.3.2 Installing HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console on Windows . . . . . . 80
4.3.3 Installing Active Energy Manager on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
4.4 IBM Systems Director server on Linux installation for Active Energy Manager . . . . . . 86
4.4.1 Installing IBM Systems Director server for Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
4.4.2 Installing the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Linux . . . . . . . 89
4.4.3 Installing Active Energy Manager for IBM Systems Director server on Linux . . . . 90
4.4.4 Active Energy Manager for IBM Systems Director on Linux license installation . . 90
4.5 IBM Systems Director console install on Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
4.5.1 IBM Systems Director install on Linux. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
4.5.2 HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console on Linux. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
4.5.3 Active Energy Manager install on Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
4.6 Installing the stand-alone version of Active Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
4.6.1 Installing the Active Energy Manager standalone on Windows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
4.6.2 Installing the Active Energy Manager standalone on Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
4.7 Migration from PowerExecutive to Active Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
4.7.1 Migration for a Windows server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
4.7.2 Migration for a Linux server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
4.7.3 Migrating the Windows standalone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
4.7.4 Migrating to the Linux standalone version. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
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Chapter 5. Using Active Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1 Overview of Active Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.1 Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.2 Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.1.3 Active Energy Manager supported environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2 Navigating around IBM Systems Director console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.1 IBM Systems Director Managed Objects pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.2 IBM Systems Director Groups pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.3 Tasks pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.2.4 The Active Energy Manager task . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3 Connecting to Active Energy Manager providers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.1 Automatic discovery using Service Location Protocol. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3.2 Manual discovery using a specific IP address . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4 Authenticating to Active Energy Manager providers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.1 Active Energy Manager credential requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.2 Objects that require authentication on discovery by IP address . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4.3 Objects that require authentication after discovery by IP address . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5 Introducing the Active Energy Manager console. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.1 Starting the Active Energy Manager console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.2 Active Energy Manager navigation pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.5.3 Active Energy Manager current data pane . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6 Understanding the Active Energy Manager task menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.1 Active Energy Manager console tool bar icons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.2 Active Energy Manager console managed object context menu . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.3 Active Energy Manager console drop-down menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.4 IBM Systems Director console Active Energy Manager tasks tree . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.5 IBM Systems Director console managed object context menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.6 IBM Systems Director console managed group context menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.7 IBM Systems Director console drop-down menus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6.8 Active Energy Manager tasks matrix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7 Introducing the Active Energy Manager tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8 Enabling and disabling data collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.9 Managing trend data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.10 Viewing trend data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.10.1 Viewing trend data as a chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.10.2 Viewing trend data as a table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11 Viewing current data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.1 Terminology for current data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.2 Current data for non-PDU+ power managed objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.3 Current data for PDU+ power managed objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.12 Exporting data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.12.1 Exporting trend data as a chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.12.2 Exporting trend data as a table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.12.3 Exporting current data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13 Setting the power saver function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.1 Querying power saver mode capability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.2 Setting power saver using the Active Energy Manager console menus . . . . . .
5.13.3 Setting power saver using the HMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.13.4 Setting power saver through the FSP using ASMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14 Setting the power cap function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.1 Setting power cap for a specific power managed object. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.2 Setting power cap generically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.3 Setting power cap in watts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5.14.4 Setting power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max . . . . . . . . . . .
5.14.5 Setting power cap based on trend data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.15 Derating power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.16 Using the watt-hour meter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.17 Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.17.1 Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks using the task interface. . . . . . . . . .
5.17.2 Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks using the scheduler interface . . . . .
5.17.3 Scheduling power saver using the HMC scheduler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.18 Understanding and configuring the PDU+. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.18.1 Supported PDU+ models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.18.2 PDU+ load groups. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.18.3 Connecting the PDU+ to a LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.18.4 Connecting an environmental monitoring probe to the PDU+. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.18.5 Configure a PDU+. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.19 Refreshing the data view. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.20 Getting help for Active Energy Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.21 Using the Active Energy Manager command line interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.21.1 CLI commands versus supported hardware matrix. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.22 Automating the power saver function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.23 Running other power-related tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.23.1 Using the Power load calculator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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242
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Appendix A. Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Active Energy Manager not appearing in IBM Systems Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Active Energy Manager properties not saved across sessions on Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Active Energy Manager tasks do not launch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error 1603: Error installing Windows Installer engine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Error: Device not supported by Active Energy Manager: <system name>. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting data to a network share fails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Full Scale Power exceeded on LS21 and LS41 blade servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
License fails on Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power capping fails on HS20 server blades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Systems not appearing in Active Energy Manager console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
243
244
244
244
244
245
245
245
246
246
246
Appendix B. Effect on POWER6 performance metrics of processor throttling. . . . . 247
vi
Appendix C. What’s new in Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Metering Devices folder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Support for SynapSense sensor nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exporting data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Managing collection of trend data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Active Energy Manager console refresh rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Event viewer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Support for additional PDU+s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional hardware support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
249
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Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to get Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
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viii
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Preface
Energy efficiency of data centers is a critical priority for IT managers. As energy and power
costs become a significant portion of IT costs, understanding and investing in energy
management has never been more important. IBM® Systems Director Active Energy
Manager™, an extension of IBM Systems Director, helps you to monitor and manage the
power usage of systems. Originally designed to support IBM BladeCenter® and System x™,
Active Energy Manager now supports the power management of additional IBM systems,
including POWER6™ processor-based systems, as well as storage devices through the
intelligent Power Distribution Unit (PDU+).
Active Energy Manager can effectively monitor and control power in the data center at the
system, chassis, or rack level. By enabling these power management technologies, data
center managers can more effectively power manage their systems while lowering the cost of
computing.
Active Energy Manager helps determine the proper power allocation for each system in the
data center. It can assist in determining how to allocate power to existing systems more
efficiently so that additional systems can be accommodated without the need for additional
power and cooling. When power is constrained, chargeable optional features of Active Energy
Manager allow power to be rationed on a system-by-system basis, enabling available
processing power to match current workload closely.
This IBM Redpaper publication is intended for system administrators to help them effectively
monitor and manage the power usage of systems in a data center. This paper introduces
energy management concepts and technologies and then provides a step-by-step guide to
planning for, installing, configuring, and using Active Energy Manager.
The team that wrote this paper
This paper was produced by a team of specialists from around the world working at the
International Technical Support Organization (ITSO), Rochester Center.
Phil Ainsworth is a Senior Technical Specialist with IBM Australia
and has supported the System i™, iSeries®, AS/400®, and their
predecessors since 1980. He provides presales technical support
for the System i marketing team, and specializes in Windows®
integration on System i. Other areas of interest include high
availability, the implementation of storage area networks, and logical
partitioning on System i. Since 1988 Phil has co-authored a number
of IBM Redbooks® including seven IBM Redbooks on running
Windows and Linux® on the integrated xSeries® server (IXS),
integrated xSeries adapter (IXA) and iSCSI. He is also a regular
presenter at IBM conferences and other technical events.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
ix
Miguel Echenique is an IBM Certified iSeries Technical Solution
Implementation/Designer in the IBM Argentina. He has 20 years of
experience in AS/400, iSeries and System i. His areas of expertise
include logical partitioning on System i, system management,
performance tuning, hardware configuration, backup and recovery,
and System i installation. He also provides internal technical
presentations for IBM Argentina. Currently he is working in the
Outsourcing Argentina Area as a System i specialist.
Bob Padzieski is a Consulting IT Specialist as part of Advanced
Technical Support for the Americas, working in Rochester,
Minnesota. He has 9 years of experience in systems management
software field. He has worked at IBM for 30 years, working on
System/38™, AS/400 and System i. His areas of expertise include
System i installation, systems management, and virtualization.
Claudio Villalobos is a IT Specialist in System i. He has 17 years of
experience in systems management, performance tuning, hardware
configuration, LPAR, backup and recovery, and System i installation.
He has been working at IBM Argentina since 2004. He has
experience in the System 36, AS/400, and System i environment
and provides technical support, systems implementation, and
configuration for different customers around the world.
Paul Walters is a Software Engineer with IBM United States and
has been with IBM since 1999 supporting the System i, iSeries,
AS/400, and their predecessors since 2006. He holds a B.S in
Computer Information Sciences from Mankato State University,
Minnesota. He provides technical support for System i customers
and specializes in PM iSeries products and IBM Director Server on
System i. Other areas of interest include IT server support and
implementation.
Debbie Landon is an IBM Certified Senior IT Specialist in the IBM
ITSO, Rochester Center. Her current area of expertise is the System
i collaboration products, including Domino® and related Lotus®
products such as Sametime® and QuickPlace®. Debbie has been
with IBM for 24 years working first with the S/36 and then the
AS/400, which has since evolved to the IBM System i platform.
Before joining ITSO in November of 2000, Debbie was a member of
the PartnerWorld® for Developers iSeries team, supporting IBM
Business Partners in the area of Domino for iSeries.
x
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:
Brad Behle
Gordie Grout
Kristi Hansen
Terry L Jensen
Chris Parker
Cale Rath
Jeff Van Heuklon
Mark Vanderwiel
Active Energy Manager development team
Andrew Ferragine
zSeries® Engineering System Test team
Thomas Gray
Jim Hansen
Joanna Pohl-Misczyk
Jenifer Servais
ITSO, Rochester Center
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Preface
xi
xii
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
1
Chapter 1.
IBM energy management
overview
This chapter discusses the value of energy management for the IT industry and introduces
the tools, technologies, and processes provided by IBM and others that can help improve IT
energy efficiency. This chapter briefly discusses the many terms of energy management and
provides references to additional information.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
1
1.1 The value of being energy efficient in the IT industry
Energy efficiency in data centers is a critical priority for IT managers. As energy and power
costs become a significant portion of IT cost, understanding and investing in energy
management has never been more important. For example, looking at today’s power and
cooling costs, the cost for power and cooling a server for three years is 1.5 times the cost of
purchasing the server hardware. Projections for the year 2012 raise the factor from three
times to 22 times, depending on the assumptions used1.
Some companies have outgrown their current data centers because of exceeding available
power, cooling resources, or space and have been forced to relocate or to build a new data
center. If the new data center is properly planned, however, this expense may actually result
in a financial return.
Thinking globally, estimated data center power demands are growing at unsustainable rates:
򐂰 1.2% of global electrical output is used by servers and cooling.2
򐂰 USD$7.2 billion was spent on data centers worldwide in 2005.2
򐂰 Only about half the power entering the data center is used by the IT equipment.3
IBM recognizes the importance of going green in the data center for both environmental and
financial reasons and has initiated Project Big Green. This is the broadest initiative ever at
IBM with the intention to reallocate $1 billion a year to gain the following achievements:
򐂰 Guarantee the research and development funding for IT energy efficiency technology
򐂰 Create a worldwide IBM “Green Team” of energy efficiency specialists
򐂰 Plan, build, or prepare its facilities to be green data centers based on IBM best practices
and innovative technologies in power and cooling
򐂰 Use virtualization as the technology accelerator for our green data centers to drive
utilization up and annual power cost per square foot down
IBM also intends to make its technologies, practices, and experience available to assist
clients in making their data centers more efficient.
What can a “greener” solution mean to you? For the typical 25,000 square foot data center
that spends $2.6 million in power annually, energy costs potentially can be cut in half. Based
on the energy mix in the US, this savings is roughly equal to a reduction in carbon emissions
of 7,439 tons per year, which is approximately equal to taking 1,300 automobiles off the road
or reducing the amount of coal burned for energy generation by 3.5 million pounds.
1
2
3
2
Brill, Kenneth G., Data Center Energy Efficiency and Productivity, The Uptime Institute, Inc., 2007,
http://www.uptimeinstitute.org/whitepapers
Koomey, Jonathan, Estimating Total Power Consumption by Servers in the U.S and the World, 2007,
http://enterprise.amd.com/Downloads/svrpwrusecompletefinal.pdf
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=prod_development.server_efficiency#epa
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
1.2 Energy management levels and offerings
Being energy efficient begins by understanding the areas to manage and the relevant
technologies and offerings that are available. Figure 1-1 shows three general IT levels where
energy is consumed and can be managed as well as the IBM tools and offerings that can be
used. It also shows the relative significance of the segments in each area and how the levels
relate to each other. The technologies and offerings are part of the IBM Cool Blue™ Portfolio,
Data Center Services from IBM STG Lab Services, or solutions from IBM site and facilities
services.
IBM also has Data Center Infrastructure Ecosystem partners who are global providers of data
center infrastructure equipment and can bring leadership technologies to clients to address
power, cooling, and management challenges.
Figure 1-1 shows the following three general areas for energy management:
򐂰 Server utilization: Getting more work out of each system
򐂰 Server hardware: Optimizing hardware energy use
򐂰 Data center operations: Reducing fundamental power and energy costs
Useful work out
Server utilization
•System virtualization
20% CPU
resource
used
80% CPU Idle
•IBM Blade Center
•POWER6 technology
•IBM Active Energy Manager
Server hardware
70% power supply, memory, fans,
planar, drives, …
30% processor
Data center operations
35% IT equipment load
•IBM Heat eXchanger
•Data Center Stored Cooling
•IBM Mobile Measurement Technology
65% power & cooling
Total power into the data center
Figure 1-1 Areas of energy management
Two of the bars in Figure 1-1 are expansions of one of the segments in the level below it. This
shows that if you focus only on server utilization you are only looking at 30% of the hardware
energy costs, which is only 35% of the overall data center energy costs. Therefore, focusing
on virtualization alone addresses 30% of 35%, or only 10.5%, of the area for potential energy
savings. If improving server utilization allows you to eliminate some servers, however, that
might propagate further savings at lower levels. For instance, reducing the amount of server
hardware can prevent a major investment in data center operations if a power or cooling limit
was being reached.
Chapter 1. IBM energy management overview
3
Another point of Figure 1-1 on page 3 is that overall efficiency of the data center is the ratio of
how much useful work you get out versus how much power you input. There are losses at
every level, mostly as heat. The focus for making a data center energy efficient begins with
understanding what results need to be delivered to the business. Then you can look at the
expenses or capital costs that can be managed to get the best return.
The relative values for each segment represent an average data center and your values will
differ to some extent. You may already understand what these values are for your data center.
If you do not, a good place to start is with a one day evaluation from IBM STG Lab Services.
For a brief description of this offering, see “Server and Storage Power/Cooling Trends and
Data Center Best Practices Evaluation” on page 7.
Another good first step to understanding your current energy usage and areas for
improvement is to use the data center energy efficiency self-assessment tool available on the
Services page of the IBM Energy Efficiency Services Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/optimizeit/cost_efficiency/energy_efficiency/services.h
tml
Figure 1-1 on page 3 also notes where some of the IBM technologies might be used to
improve energy efficiency in a specific area. This collection of technologies is called The IBM
Cool Blue Portfolio and consists of the following products, technologies, and offerings which
are described in 1.2.1, “The IBM Cool Blue portfolio” on page 5:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Virtualization of servers and storage
Active Energy Manager
Rear Door Heat eXchanger
BladeCenter architecture and Power Configurator tool
IBM POWER6 processors
IBM System z™ mainframe technology
IBM STG Lab Services currently offers the following data center services, which are
described in 1.2.2, “IBM STG Lab Services Data Center Services” on page 7:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Server and Storage Power/Cooling Trends and Data Center Best Practices Evaluation
IT Systems Energy Efficiency Assessment
Installation of the IBM Cool Blue Rear Door Heat eXchanger
Data Center Thermal Analysis and Optimization
Data Center Energy Efficiency Optimization
Data Center Health Audit
IT Systems Performance and Power Evaluation
IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager Implementation Jumpstart
In addition to technology and services, examine the following basic measures:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
4
Organizing IT equipment into a hot aisle and cold aisle configuration
Blocking cable openings in the raised floor to reduce wasting cold air in hot aisles
Looking for and removing under-floor cable and other blockages that impede airflow
Turning off servers that are not doing any work
Turning off computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units in areas where the hardware is
not generating enough heat to require that level of cooling
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
1.2.1 The IBM Cool Blue portfolio
No single solution for improving energy efficiency is right for every customer. IBM has a broad
collection of products, technologies, and offerings to address many different aspects. This
collection is referred to as the IBM Cool Blue portfolio and its elements are briefly described in
this section. For more details on any of these elements, go to the IBM Cool Blue Portfolio Web
site:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/optimizeit/cost_efficiency/energy_efficiency/technology
.html
Virtualization of servers and storage
Improving server and storage utilization is the fastest path to return on investment (ROI) of a
green data center. Distributed servers typically run at utilization levels in the range of 5% to
20%. Virtualization and workload management enable consolidation on larger servers or
mainframes and can achieve utilization levels of 85% or more. Reducing the number of
servers and storage units can also reduce the requirements for facilities, power, and cooling
expense. For example, as part of Project Big Green, IBM will consolidate 3,900 servers on to
30 z/Linux systems with an estimated reduction of 80% in energy consumption and 85% in
floor space, leading to a savings of $250 million over five years.
Active Energy Manager
Active Energy Manager is the cornerstone of the IBM Green initiative. It is a software tool that
can provide you with a single view of the actual power usage across multiple platforms as well
as help you increase energy efficiency by controlling power use across the data center. This
can result in substantial savings and cost reductions.
Active Energy Manager provides out-of-the-box management for IBM Systems and
BladeCenters while being able to provide a cross-environment view of power and thermal
usage within a data center. It supports both new and existing systems, although some
functions are only available with the newer technologies.
Most of this document is devoted to helping you understand the value of Active Energy
Manager and how to implement it in your data center.
Rear Door Heat eXchanger
The Rear Door Heat eXchanger, shown in Figure 1-2 on page 6, can remove over 50% of a
rack’s heat output. It requires no new fans or electrical load. It attaches to the back of the rack.
The depth measurement is about the same as a standard rack acoustical door, adding about
4 inches to the depth of a rack. The lightweight door fits a 26 inch wide, 42U High Enterprise
rack and swings wide to help provide unrestricted access to electrical components stored in
the rack. It can remove up to 50,000 BTUs of heat coming out of the back of the rack.
Chapter 1. IBM energy management overview
5
Figure 1-2 Rear Door Heat eXchanger
The door has no moving parts to service and is designed to be priced less than a five ton AC
unit capable of removing a similar amount of heat. The Rear Door Heat eXchanger is cost
effective, performing 1 KW cooling for about $286, which is about one quarter of the cost of
traditional methods.
Note: A pump must be purchased and connected to a water chiller in the data center.
Conditioned water is what flows through the piping in the Rear Door Heat eXchanger.
BladeCenter architecture and Power Configurator tool
BladeCenters run cooler to deliver greater reliability and use as much as 37% less energy
than competitive blades. The following key IBM innovations are what sets the IBM
BladeCenter architecture apart:
򐂰 A shared power infrastructure able to reach peak efficiency even under small load
򐂰 IBM Calibrated Vector Cooling technology to allow dual paths of air to each component
򐂰 A shared cooling approach that utilizes high-efficiency blowers
The IBM System x and BladeCenter Power Configurator is a tool that can be downloaded and
run to provide a detailed understanding of the energy savings a BladeCenter can provide. A
link to the tool can be found on the IBM Cool Blue portfolio Web site.
IBM POWER6 processors
IBM POWER6 processor-based servers were designed to deliver outstanding performance
per watt and innovative virtualization technologies. The design starts at the chip level with the
following features:
򐂰 Power reduction to monitor and reduce power to idle logic within cores
򐂰 Nap mode to power off inactive cores and restore power when needed
򐂰 Thermal tuning which uses sensors to monitor and reduce power to overactive circuits
Variable fan speed reduces power to fans (1/3 of total server power) by up to 45% based on
ambient temperature.
A feature called Live Partition Mobility provides the ability to move running partitions from
one POWER6 server to another, providing the capability to conserve power by moving
workloads off under-utilized servers to achieve optimal system utilization and energy
efficiency.
6
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
POWER6 architecture with EnergyScale™ technology also provides the following power
management features:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Power trending
Power saving
Maximum power caps
Thermal measurement
For more information about EnergyScale technology, see 2.2, “EnergyScale for POWER6” on
page 16.
IBM System z mainframe technology
There are many documented examples of how consolidating multiple servers into an IBM
System z environment results in outstanding energy and operational efficiency. System z
servers can run at utilization rates as high as 100% for long periods of time. This means that
power that is consumed is used for transaction processing, rather than just keeping the
servers' lights on.
By taking advantage of System z virtualization capabilities hundreds or even thousands of
smaller servers can be replaced by a single System z mainframe. That single System z
mainframe no longer requires external networking to communicate between virtual servers.
All of the servers are in a single box with huge, internal I/O pathways. This often helps the
performance of complex, interconnected applications, in addition to saving power by reducing
the data center network infrastructure.
1.2.2 IBM STG Lab Services Data Center Services
The IBM Systems and Technology Group (STG) Lab Services team is composed of experts
who develop and deploy solutions across IBM's family of system offerings. This team has
skills and experiences gleaned from the delivery of core business solutions through
thousands of client and business partner engagements worldwide. Their consultants can
handle the tasks or can work side-by-side with a customer's technical team to help transfer
knowledge and skills.
This section briefly describes some of the key services and products available for data
centers. For more information, visit the STG Lab Services Data Center Services Web page:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/services/labservices/labservices_datacenter.html
Server and Storage Power/Cooling Trends and Data Center Best
Practices Evaluation
IBM STG Lab Services can evaluate the power and cooling trends of current and
next-generation IBM products and then deliver insights into the requirements they place on a
facility. This is completed in a single day seminar and covers the following topics:
򐂰 Reviews the power and cooling trends of the IBM product line and shows how they impact
the data center
򐂰 Presents state-of-the-art data center designs
򐂰 Presents potential ventilation schemes used in cooling high density racks
򐂰 Presents comparisons of the various data center liquid cooled enhancements
򐂰 Reviews data center power, thermal, and I/O best practices
Chapter 1. IBM energy management overview
7
IT Systems Energy Efficiency Assessment
The IT Systems Energy Efficiency Assessment investigates and analyzes your IT power,
cooling and space utilization. IBM STG Lab Services can develop a solution that can help
reduce power, cooling resources, and data center space by considering the capacities,
constraints, and your data center goals. This assessment outlines a strategy to help achieve a
client’s goals and typically completes in two to three weeks.
Installation of the IBM Cool Blue Rear Door Heat eXchanger
IBM can facilitate the installation of the IBM Cool Blue Rear Door Heat eXchanger on a
client’s server products. IBM STG Lab Services will examine the data center server layout,
develop a 3D layout of the complete system, create a project plan to eliminate data center hot
spots with energy efficient cooling, install the Rear Door Heat eXchanger, and verify its
operation.
Data Center Thermal Analysis and Optimization
A Data Center Thermal Analysis and Optimization is an evaluation completed by expert IBM
thermal engineers to optimize an existing or future IT equipment layout. This evaluation
analyzes existing or future data center thermal capacity, installed IT equipment load, and data
center features. The analysis is performed using state-of- the-art tools including
Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling software. This evaluation is typically
scheduled to complete in an elapsed time frame of four weeks. Figure 1-3 shows a modeling
of airflows in a data center.
Figure 1-3 Modeling airflows in the data center
Data Center Energy Efficiency Optimization
IBM STG Lab Services can make recommendations to reduce wasted energy to lower
operating expenses through an evaluation of current data center IT equipment and facility
infrastructure power demand, efficiency, and capacity. Suggestions are made on how to
expand IT system capacity within existing facilities and available power budget. Normally this
service is scheduled to complete in a time frame of one to two weeks.
Data Center Health Audit
A health evaluation of the physical infrastructure of your data center and facility can assist in
planning for future requirements. IBM STG Lab Services identifies and makes
recommendations to reduce risks associated with the existing infrastructure and to improve
site availability. This audit is typically completed in two to three weeks.
8
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
IT Systems Performance and Power Evaluation
This IBM study includes the IBM IT Systems Rationalization Study but with the added power
component. It determines the steps that need to be taken to maintain or reduce power levels
of current data centers and still increase IT performance up to 30% annually. Typically this
study is completed in six to ten weeks.
IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager Implementation
Jumpstart
STG Lab Services has integrated its Server and Storage Power/Cooling Trends and Data
Center Best Practices Evaluation offering with IBM Systems Director and Active Energy
Manager to deliver a turnkey solution for supported IBM IT equipment. This engagement can
help to show you how to manage actual power consumption that affects the thermal load IBM
servers place on a data center.
1.2.3 Incentive programs for improving data center energy efficiency
Many energy providers offer financial incentives to their customers who improve the energy
efficiency of their data centers. For example, the following incentives may be available:
򐂰 Receive $200 per kW of demand savings. A project that removes 4 racks of servers, 7
DASD units, and 10 tape units and replaces them with 2 server racks and 2 DASD units
can reduce the data center demand profile by 98.9 kW. This project may be eligible for an
incentive or rebate for as much as $19,780.
򐂰 Incentives or rebates for studies or assessments that result in operational energy savings.
A data center thermal assessment that results in reduced cooling costs through air flow
and delivery optimization may be eligible for an incentive or rebate of some or all of the
study cost.
򐂰 Financial incentives to customers who undertake IT virtualization projects that result in the
removal of computing equipment.
The Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Energy (DSIRE) project at North
Carolina State University has created a Web site that provides a fast and convenient method
for accessing information about renewable energy and energy efficiency incentives. It also
provides information about regulatory policies administered by federal and state agencies,
utilities, and local organizations. Access this information at the following Web site:
http://www.dsireusa.org/
1.2.4 Asset disposal
Another area where IBM has services to keep the planet a bit greener is the environmentally
responsible asset recovery and disposal solutions. This service handles both IBM and
non-IBM equipment and focuses on several desirable aspects:
򐂰 Environmentally responsible
Alleviates your compliance concerns. IBM handles your disposed systems in an
environmentally friendly manner, using premier processes built on more than 20 years of
experience and complying with all government laws and regulations.
򐂰 Security
Your data is important and IBM can help ensure it does not end up in the wrong hands
when you dispose of your old systems.
Chapter 1. IBM energy management overview
9
򐂰 Value
IBM Asset Recovery Solutions pays for marketable equipment from IBM and other
vendors, giving you money to invest in other core IT investments or to donate to your
favorite environmental cause.
1.3 Energy efficiency terminology
This section discusses some energy efficiency terminology.
IBM Green Initiative or Project Big Green
“Project Big Green” is one of an overall set of solutions from IBM to help customers optimize
their IT solutions. The focus of this area is applying energy efficient technology, products,
skills and services to reduce data center energy consumption.
IBM is using its expertise and energy-smart technology innovations to outline a five-step
approach for clients that is designed to dramatically improve energy efficiency:
1. Diagnose
Evaluate existing facilities including energy assessment, virtual 3-D power management,
and thermal analytics
2. Build
Plan, build, or update to an energy efficient data center
3. Virtualize
Virtualize IT infrastructures and special purpose processors
4. Measure, Manage, and Optimize
Seize control with power management software
5. Cool
Exploit liquid cooling solutions, inside and outside of the data center
These five steps comprise the IBM Cool Blue portion of Project Big Green.
More information can be found about the IBM Green Initiative and Project Big Green on the
following Web pages:
򐂰 Become more energy efficient:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/optimizeit/cost_efficiency/energy_efficiency/
򐂰 IBM Project Big Green:
http://www.ibm.com/press/greendatacenter
IBM Energy Efficiency Initiative
This term is often used to refer to the same solutions that are part of the IBM Project Big
Green.
IBM Cool Blue Portfolio
IBM has a broad collection of products, technologies, and offerings to address many different
aspects of improving energy efficiency. See 1.2.1, “The IBM Cool Blue portfolio” on page 5 or
the following Web address for more information about the Cool Blue portfolio:
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
http://www.ibm.com/systems/optimizeit/cost_efficiency/energy_efficiency/technology
.html
IBM EnergyScale architecture
IBM EnergyScale is a technology that was developed for the IBM POWER6 processor-based
systems. EnergyScale provides functions that help the user to understand and control IBM
system power and cooling usage. This enables better facility planning, provides energy and
cost savings, enables peak energy usage control, and increases system availability. For more
information, see 2.2, “EnergyScale for POWER6” on page 16.
IBM Active Energy Manager
IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager measures, monitors, and manages the energy
management components built into IBM systems while enabling a cross-platform
management solution. This document describes the Active Energy Manger functions as well
as how to deploy it.
IBM PowerExecutive
PowerExecutive™ is the precursor product to IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
V3.1. PowerExecutive was available for x86 systems only.
Green Grid
The Green Grid is an association of IT professionals seeking to dramatically raise the energy
efficiency of data centers through a series of short-term and long-term proposals. The
organization is chartered to develop meaningful, platform-neutral standards, measurement
methods, processes, and new technologies to improve energy efficient performance of global
data centers. For more information, see the Green Grid Web site:
http://www.thegreengrid.org/
Power, energy, and efficiency
A discussion of these terms is found in 2.1, “Energy management concepts” on page 14.
Chapter 1. IBM energy management overview
11
12
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
2
Chapter 2.
IBM energy management
concepts and technologies
This chapter provides a description of the concepts and technologies used to manage energy
for IBM BladeCenter and IBM POWER6 processor-based systems.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
13
2.1 Energy management concepts
This section describes some general energy management concepts.
2.1.1 Energy, power, and efficiency
Many people use the terms power and energy interchangeably. Although they both pertain to
getting work done, they have different technical meanings and business implications.
򐂰 Power
Power is a measure of the rate at which work can be done. It also used to describe the
rate at which energy will be transformed from one state to another while accomplishing
work at a particular instant in time. In most countries, power is measured in watts,
kilowatts or megawatts. It is also measured in horsepower.
A 100 watt power rating for a light bulb represents the rate at which that bulb transforms
electricity into light and heat. A two-horsepower rating of a motor can represents the rate
at which that motor can do an amount of work, namely move a half-ton one foot in one
second. It can also represents a rating of how the motor consumes electricity and is
equivalent to nearly 1,500 watts. If the motor is not fully loaded at a particular point in time,
it doing less work than its rated power and likely consuming less electricity.
򐂰 Energy
Energy is a measure of a resource that is consumed over time to achieve some work. In its
stored form, energy represents the potential for getting work done. One of the most
familiar measurements of energy is the kilowatt-hour. It is a widely-used measurement by
which electricity is metered and billed. If a 100 watt light bulb is left on for 15 hours, it
consumes 1,500 watt-hours or 1.5 kilowatt-hours of electrical energy. This is roughly the
same amount of energy a fully-loaded two-horsepower motor consumes in one hour.
Energy is also measured in joules, ergs, BTUs, (British Thermal Units) and calories.
򐂰 Efficiency
Efficiency is a measure of the useful work that is output versus the total energy consumed.
For example, a high-efficiency light bulb puts out more lumens over time while using fewer
kilowatt-hours of electricity. A less efficient light bulb might emit more heat, and if that heat
is not used for anything, it is a waste of the electrical energy consumed to operate the
bulb. Since electric motors are generally inefficient, their horsepower rating represents the
electricity they might consume versus the work they might do.
If two items have the same efficiency rating but one has double the power rating, the
higher-rated item should be able to perform twice as much useful work in the same
amount of time. It would also use twice the energy in that time.
Power times efficiency is a measure of how much useful work a system can get done in an
instant in time. If you have more time, you can use more energy to get more work done. From
a financial perspective, using more energy is an operating expense. If you do not have the
time, however, you might be able to invest in a more efficient system. This is a capital
expense. If you cannot find a more efficient system, then you might need to expand the
system (another form of capital expense). If this expansion results in system power
requirements beyond what your current infrastructure can deliver, you might have to make a
major capital investment need to make a major capital investment to improve or replace the
power and cooling infrastructure of your data center.
14
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
2.1.2 Label power
Most items that use electricity have Underwriters' Laboratories (UL) power rating. For servers,
this rating is printed on a label on the back of the server and represents the absolute worst
case power that system can ever draw. This label power or nameplate power is based on the
capacity of the system’s power supplies. It takes into account a fully-configured system with
the highest power usage components running the highest possible workload.
2.1.3 Input power
Input power defines the power that a system or device is actually using at an instant in time.
This is almost always less than the calculated maximum defined by the label power. Knowing
the input power of all the equipment in the data center is important when planning for new
equipment. Some servers and power distribution units can monitor and report on their input
power usage. If that is not available, an electrician can usually provide a device that can
measure and record the current flowing into the system. Then, using the formula of
11watt = 1volt × 1amp , input power can be calculated.
2.1.4 Output power
Output power is a value that is determined from several system sensors. It represents the
amount of power system components are consuming from the internal power supplies. It is
less than the input power due to losses when the power is converted from AC input to DC
output or from other circuitry that filters out input power fluctuations. It can vary based on
changes in demand for power by individual components.
2.1.5 Ambient and exhaust temperatures
Some devices have temperature sensors that measure the temperature of the air used for
cooling as it flows into and out of the system. The input air temperature is referred to as the
ambient temperature, because it represents the temperature of the system’s environment at
the point air is drawn into the system. Monitoring the input temperature is important because
it can indicate if something unexpected has happened with the cooling systems in a data
center.
The exhaust temperature is measured where the air flows from the system and back into the
data center. It provides an indication of the amount of heat generated by the system. If the
exhaust temperature rises while the ambient temperature is relatively constant, then it is likely
that there are problems with either the airflow intended to cool the system or with some
component of the system overheating. In either case, a quick analysis is required and
appropriate action taken to prevent an unplanned outage.
Note: In most cases, exhaust temperature is calculated instead of measured due to the
number of sensors that would be required to accurately measure average exhaust
temperature.
Chapter 2. IBM energy management concepts and technologies
15
2.1.6 Power related events
There are many classes of events that are of interest when managing the use of power and
energy. These include the more critical events that indicate the system, or some part of it, is
not functioning because the power was switched off or a failure occurred in the main supply or
in individual modules. Events may also be generated when power is restored, or if some
power throttle has been modified.
2.1.7 Power saving
Power (energy) saver mode is a way to reduce the energy a system will consume by dropping
the internal voltages and frequencies by a fixed percentage. From a systems management
perspective, this might be done on a scheduled basis when the system workloads are known
to be well below the system’s full capacity. It might also be used to reduce energy
consumption in peak periods because of either peak energy costs or power available in the
data center. When power (energy) saver mode is enabled, however, the reduction in
processor frequency may affect workload performance.
2.1.8 Power capping
Some systems or components have the ability to keep their peak power usage below a
defined limit. This can be done with internal or external processing of monitors and actuators.
The actuators might scale processor voltages or scale processor or memory frequencies.
They might also “throttle” the processor, which delays instruction processing by injecting dead
cycles. When power cap limits are reached and the capping techniques are enabled,
performance of the workloads may be impacted.
2.2 EnergyScale for POWER6
The IBM Power Architecture® technology-based family, the IBM POWER6 processor, has
significantly higher clock frequencies and uses improved lithography with smaller device sizes
than its predecessors. As processor power and heat increase and components are packed
ever more tightly, the result cannot only increase performance but also increase energy
consumption and heat generation. This may compound what was already a thermal
challenge. As a result, traditional high-margin designs can no longer take full advantage of the
technology advances without addressing the heat and energy issues.
Active measurement and management of power and thermal system attributes is required to
provide power efficiency and maximum performance for critical workloads. The
implementation of performance-aware power and thermal management for POWER6
processor-based systems is called the EnergyScale architecture.1 Energy consumption is
becoming a large issue in computer-based businesses. The energy required to power and
cool computers can be a significant cost to a business, reducing profit margins and
consuming resources. In addition, the cost of creating power and cooling infrastructure can
be prohibitive to business growth.
In response to these challenges, the IBM EnergyScale technology has been developed for the
POWER6 processor-based systems. EnergyScale provides functions that help the user to
understand and control server power and cooling issues. This enables better facility planning,
1
16
Section 2.2, “EnergyScale for POWER6” on page 16 is extracted from the IBM Systems Journal article
'EnergyScale for IBM POWER6 microprocessor-based systems” found at the following Web site:
http://researchweb.watson.ibm.com/journal/rd/516/mccreary.pdf
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
provides energy and cost savings, enables control of peak energy usage, and increases
system availability. The EnergyScale architecture meets a number of basic customer
requirements for system-level power management. This is described in the following sections.
2.2.1 Power and temperature data collection and reporting
Facility managers and data center operators need to know how much power a system draws
and how much heat it generates. Traditionally, such data is collected only during crises by
using external measurement devices. The EnergyScale architecture addresses this
requirement by providing continuous data collection using built-in sensors and firmware.
2.2.2 Power capping and power limitations
System designers deal with power limitations imposed by constraints on packaging and
power supply designs, as well as cooling subsystem limitations. Most of these constraints are
due to cost or size considerations, but they can significantly limit the amount of power and
cooling available in the system. Often the individual components, especially the processors,
are capable of additional performance, but the power and thermal costs require the system to
enforce limits to ensure safe, continued operation.
The EnergyScale architecture provides the support necessary to do this dynamically rather
than using static safety margins in the design. In addition, because of data center design
considerations, customers may need to impose even lower limits on power and heat than
those of an individual system. Such a need may arise when a customer uses the system in a
data center with power delivery or cooling limitations or when the organization needs or wants
to limit power and heat for cost or environmental reasons.
2.2.3 Power saver mode
At times customers might want the system to operate efficiently, saving as much power as
possible while limiting the amount of performance reduction. The EnergyScale architecture
provides a power-saving mode to achieve balance between performance and power
consumption.
2.2.4 Measurement-based implementation
The EnergyScale implementation is measurement-based, continuously taking measurements
of voltage and current to calculate the power drawn. It uses temperature sensors to measure
heat as well as performance counters to determine the characteristics of workloads. Unlike
many other power management implementations in the industry, it does not attempt to project
power and temperature, for instance, from system utilization but rather from real-time
measurements, providing a higher level of accuracy and performance.
2.2.5 Guaranteed safety
The EnergyScale architecture contains a number of features that are designed to ensure
safe, continued operation of the system during adverse power or thermal conditions as well
as in certain cases in which the EnergyScale implementation itself fails.
Chapter 2. IBM energy management concepts and technologies
17
2.2.6 Policy-driven power management
The EnergyScale architecture implements policies for power management that represent
user-defined objectives and constraints imposed by the system design. The EnergyScale
implementation includes user interfaces that display power and temperature data and allow
the user to set and monitor policies. These user interfaces are extensions to preexisting ones,
providing consistency with the other functions in the product line and other IBM server
systems.
2.2.7 Calibration considerations
To determine which actions it should take, the power and thermal management logic in the
EnergyScale implementation must have some basic information about the POWER6
processors. Each POWER6 chip has a unique set of power, thermal, and performance
characteristics. To make this information available to the system, each chip contains
module-level vital product data (VPD) such as the frequencies that it supports, their
associated voltages, and the amount of power that the chip consumes at the specified
operating point. This information is collected during manufacturing tests and is used to
calibrate the behavior of the EnergyScale control system. In addition, each system design has
well-defined power supply and thermal cooling capacities. In some cases there is redundant
power and the system has a lower power capacity when one of the redundant components is
not operational.
2.2.8 Idle power reduction/ Processor Core NAP
A major problem with earlier Power Architecture technology-based machines is that their
power consumption is high when they are idle, because they run a tight, predictable
processor-bound idle loop. The POWER6 processor supports a new low-power mode called
Nap that stops processor execution. When both hardware threads of a processor core enter
Nap mode, the whole core enters Nap, the hardware turns off many of the circuits inside the
core, which reduces power consumption. The temperature then decreases, further reducing
power.
Exiting nap mode is sufficiently rapid for its use in many circumstances as an idle state. When
an operating system yields control of a hardware thread to the hypervisor, the hypervisor
determines whether the processor core is in a shared processor pool. If so, and if there is no
other partition to dispatch, the hypervisor puts the thread into Nap mode. If the core is in the
dedicated processor pool, then it always puts the thread into Nap mode.
2.2.9 EnergyScale for I/O
IBM POWER6 processor-based System i and System p™ models automatically power off
pluggable, PCI adapter slots that are not being used to save approximately 14 watts per slot.
A PCI adapter slot is considered not being used when the slot is empty, when the slot is not
assigned to a partition, or when the partition to which the slot is assigned is not powered on.
A PCI slot is powered off immediately by system firmware when it is dynamically removed
from the partition to which it was assigned, or when the partition to which it is assigned is
powered off. It is also powered off immediately by system firmware or hardware if the adapter
is physically removed from the slot. Such removal of PCI adapters is not supported and the
user should explicitly power off the slot using the I/O adapter concurrent maintenance utilities
prior to removing the adapter.
18
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Furthermore, system firmware automatically scans all pluggable PCI slots at regular intervals
looking for ones that meet the criteria for being not in use and powers them off. This ensures
slots left on after platform power on are subsequently powered off if they are not in use. This
support is available for all POWER6 processor-based System i and System p machines and
the expansion units they support.
2.3 BladeCenter
A BladeCenter system consists of a chassis and a number of modules. The chassis is the
physical enclosure that houses the modules. The modules are the individual components,
such as blade servers, storage, switches, and blowers that are inserted into bays in the
chassis.
IBM BladeCenter platforms are designed for energy efficiency. The design includes the
following highlights:
򐂰 Power supplies that are up to 91% efficient
򐂰 Low-power processor options:
– HS21 models with 35, 40 or 50-watt Intel® Xeon processors
– LS21 and LS41 blades with 68-watt AMD™ Opteron™ processors
– JS20 with a 72W IBM PowerPC® 970FX dual-core processors (36W per core), which
consume almost 37% less power than 95W Xeon or Opteron processors
򐂰 Solid state hard drives that use up to 87% less power and heat than mechanical hard
drives
򐂰 An integrated 10 Gb Ethernet switch which can be more than 95% energy efficient
compared with external switch offerings
򐂰 Consolidation of communications switch modules, power supply modules, blower
modules, management modules, a CD-ROM drive, and a floppy drive into one
BladeCenter chassis removes more than a hundred components from the individual
servers and racks and replace them with a few centralized components per chassis
򐂰 Calibrated Vectored Cooling™ optimizes air intake, fan placement, and zone cooling
technologies to maximize the air flow for optimal cooling efficiency, where dual paths of air
to each component improve uptime and longevity and reduce wasteful air movement and
heat generation
򐂰 Overall energy efficiency of 20–40% better than 1U rack servers for similar configurations
2.3.1 POWER6 processor-based blades
The IBM BladeCenter JS12 Express and JS22 Express blade servers leverage the same
capabilities in the BladeCenter chassis with high performance and high energy efficiency of
the EnergyScale architecture. POWER6 technology makes it easy to allocate and control the
power you need for UNIX®, IBM i (formerly i5/OS®), and Linux workloads in the BladeCenter
environment.
Chapter 2. IBM energy management concepts and technologies
19
2.4 Intelligent power distribution unit
To collect the power data on 9117-MMA or 9406-MMA systems, an intelligent power
distribution unit (PDU+) must be used to provide the power to the system components. On
systems that support power trending, the power data is collected internally from the system
itself and does not require any additional hardware to obtain the power usage data. A PDU+
can also be used to collect power usage data from non-server equipment, like storage units,
I/O drawers, and non-IBM hardware.
A PDU+ mounts in a rack and provides power outlets for the server’s components. The PDU+
device contains power meters on the power outlets. Active Energy Manager can collect and
consolidate this data. With the power cords of a system plugged into a PDU+, the PDU+ can
provide information it monitors on the power consumption of the system to monitor trends.
This requires the user to input mappings and descriptions of the outlets that system and other
hardware are using.
For details about how to use the PDU+ with Active Energy Manager, refer to 5.18,
“Understanding and configuring the PDU+” on page 228.
20
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
3
Chapter 3.
Planning for Active Energy
Manager
This chapter discusses the IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager product and
describes the requirements to consider when setting up an IBM Systems Director Active
Energy Manager version 3.1 environment.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
21
3.1 Active Energy Manager product overview
IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager version 3.1 is the next generation product of
IBM PowerExecutive which was previously available for IBM x86 architecture systems only.
Active Energy Manager now supports additional IBM platforms and provides new capabilities
that build upon the functions previously available with IBM PowerExecutive version 2.1.
Active Energy Manager is an extension of IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 and is
available for installation on Linux on POWER™, Linux on x86 architecture, Linux on System
z, and Microsoft® Windows. Active Energy Manager helps you monitor and manage the
power usage of systems across IBM systems and non-IBM systems. Originally designed to
support IBM BladeCenter and System x, Active Energy Manager now supports the power
management of additional IBM servers, including POWER6 processor-based systems and
System z, as well as storage devices through the PDU+.
Active Energy Manger is an energy management software tool that can provide a single view
of the actual power usage across multiple platforms as opposed to the benchmarked or rated
power consumption. It can effectively monitor and control power in the data center at the
system, chassis, or rack level. By enabling these power management technologies, data
center managers can more effectively power manage their systems while lowering the cost of
computing.
The following power management functions are available with Active Energy Manager:
򐂰 Power trending
With power trending you can monitor the consumption of power by a supported power
managed object in real time. You can use this data not only to track the actual power
consumption of monitored devices, but also to determine the maximum value over time.
The data can be presented either graphically or in tabular form.
򐂰 Thermal trending
With thermal trending, you can monitor the heat output and ambient temperature of a
supported power managed object in real time. You can use this data to help avoid
situations where overheating may cause damage to computing assets, and to study how
the thermal signature of various monitored devices varies with power consumption. The
data can be presented either graphically or in tabular form.
򐂰 CPU trending
With CPU trending, you can determine the actual CPU speed of processors for which
either the power saver or power cap function is active. The data can be presented either
graphically or in tabular form.
򐂰 Power saver
With power saver you can save energy by throttling back the processor voltage and
clocking rate. You can use the power saver function to match computing power to
workload while at the same time reducing your energy costs. Power saver can be
scheduled using the IBM Systems Director scheduler. You can also write a script to turn
power saver on or off based on the CPU utilization. See the IBM EnergyScale for
POWER6 Processor-Based Systems white paper for an example:
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_wh/n/PSW03033USEN/PSW03033USEN.PDF
22
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
򐂰 Power cap
With power cap you can allocate less energy for a system by setting a cap on the number
of watts that the power managed system can consume. If the power consumption of the
server approaches the cap, Active Energy Manager throttles back the processor voltage
and clocking rate in the same way as for the power saver function. In this way you can
guarantee that the power cap value is not exceeded. The advantage of power cap is that
you can limit the energy consumption of supported systems to a known value and thereby
allow data center managers to better match power requirements to power availability.
Power cap can be scheduled using the IBM Systems Director scheduler.
For a more detailed description of the different Active Energy Manager functions, refer to 5.7,
“Introducing the Active Energy Manager tasks” on page 153.
Active Energy Manager measures, monitors, and manages energy consumption using
hardware and software built into IBM systems, enabling a cross platform power management
solution. It also provides a source of energy management data that can be exploited by IBM
Tivoli® enterprise solutions such as IBM Tivoli Monitoring and IBM Tivoli Usage and
Accounting Manager.
Active Energy Manager offers a solution that helps determine the proper power allocation for
each server in the data center. It can assist customers in determining how to allocate power
more efficiently to existing servers so that additional servers can be accommodated without
the need for additional power and cooling. When power is constrained, chargeable optional
features of Active Energy Manager allow power to be rationed on a server-by-server basis,
enabling available processing power to match current workload more closely.
IBM Active Energy Manager enables clients to do the following tasks:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Increase energy efficiency by monitoring power use across the data center
Negotiate the best utility rates based on accurate trend assessments
Limit server power requirements by capping maximum power consumption
Potentially reduce power costs
More effectively plan new data center construction or modifications
Plan power capacity requirements based on actual usage
Justify incremental hardware purchases based on available power capacity
Better utilize existing resources
Active Energy Manager enables you to optimize the usage of your computing resources by
measuring, monitoring, and controlling energy consumption, thereby helping you to reduce IT
costs and provide more efficient planning for your data center. Active Energy Manager's open
design and support for industry standards enable heterogeneous physical management with
support for multiple platforms and operating systems, helping to protect your IT investment.
For a detailed description of the Active Energy Manager architecture, refer to 5.1.1,
“Architecture” on page 102.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
23
3.1.1 What is new in Active Energy Manager version 3.1
Active Energy Manager version 3.1 contains the following enhancements compared with its
predecessor PowerExecutive version 2.1:
򐂰 Support for POWER6 blade servers
The JS12 and JS22 POWER6 blade servers provide support for Active Energy Manager
functions as shown in Table 3-1 on page 26. For more information about the JS12 and
JS22 blade servers, refer to the following Web sites:
– IBM BladeCenter JS12 Express server
•
http://www.ibm.com/systems/bladecenter/hardware/servers/js12/index.html
•
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/cgi-bin/ssialias?infotype=AN&subtype=CA&htmlf
id=897/ENUS108-233&appname=USN
– IBM BladeCenter JS22 server
•
http://www.ibm.com/systems/bladecenter/hardware/servers/js22e/index.html
•
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/cgi-bin/ssialias?infotype=AN&subtype=CA&htmlf
id=897/ENUS107-679&appname=USN
򐂰 Support for IBM POWER6-based systems and servers
Active Energy Manager supports the System i and System p POWER6 models. The
functions available vary according to the model as shown in Table 3-1 on page 26.
򐂰 Support for the discovery and monitoring of PDU+
PDUs (power distribution units) are available with a variety of IBM racks, including those
that are available with System i, System p, Power 5xx, BladeCenter, System x rack servers
and some storage controllers. Servers and other equipment that exist in a rack get their
power by plugging into these PDUs.
An intelligent PDU (PDU+) is a PDU that not only controls power distribution and provides
circuit protection, but also monitors the power and temperature of connected devices.
These connected devices can be existing IBM systems that do not support power and
thermal monitoring natively, or other devices or non-IBM systems that do not have power
metering capability.
The IBM DPI® C13+ and IBM DPI C19 PDU+ units are intelligent PDUs that are
supported for use with Active Energy Manager. They report power and thermal trending
data to the Active Energy Manager server for any equipment that is plugged into their
individual load groups.
In addition, with Active Energy Manager, a user can associate an IBM Systems Director
managed object with a PDU+ outlet, allowing the power consumption for the server to be
displayed in the Active Energy Manager console. In cases where there are multiple power
supplies for a server and each is plugged into a different PDU+ in the rack, Active Energy
Manager adds the different values together to display a graph of the total power being
consumed by the server.
Through PDU+ support, Active Energy Manager can monitor power usage on existing
servers that do not have power metering built in. Additionally, Active Energy Manager
monitors how many amps are being consumed by a PDU+ overall (or a load group), and
how this compares to the maximum current that the PDU+ can support. Users are alerted
when a PDU+ approaches its capacity.
24
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Important: IBM DPI C13+ and IBM DPI C19 PDU+ PDUs were available before the
announcement of Active Energy Manager. Any existing versions of an aforementioned
PDU+ in the field need to be upgraded to the November 7th, 2007 version of the PDU+
firmware in order for Active Energy Manager to support them.
For additional information about how Active Energy Manager works with a PDU+, see
5.18, “Understanding and configuring the PDU+” on page 228.
򐂰 Support for new models of System x servers
Refer to the following Web address for a list of the currently supported managed systems:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_r
eqs_managed_systems.html
򐂰 Support for System z servers
Active Energy Manager version 3.1 can now run on Linux for System z as well as it can
monitor and manage System z servers.
򐂰 Support for monitoring of storage
The DS3000, DS4000™, DS6000™, and N series storage controllers ship with racks
supported by the IBM DPI C13+ PDU+ unit. Through the use of the PDU+, Active Energy
Manager can support power monitoring of these controllers.
򐂰 Other enhancements
– PowerExecutive required that all supported power managed systems be polled at the
same frequency (defaulted to once per minute). With Active Energy Manager version
3.1 users can set a different polling rate for different power managed systems. Systems
that need to be closely monitored can be polled more frequently, whereas lower priority
systems can be polled less often. This targeted approach improves monitoring for the
most important systems.
– The PowerExecutive server was supported on Windows and Linux running on x86
architecture systems only. Active Energy Manager version 3.1 server also supports
running on Linux on POWER6 processor-based systems and Linux on System z.
– Active Energy Manager now includes the ability to report events to IBM Systems
Director. Events like system offline or online, and power and thermal critical warnings
are reported in the IBM Systems Director console event log.
Note: This publication was written based on Active Energy Manager version 3.1. For
details of the new features and enhancements that are available in IBM Systems Director
Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1, see Appendix C, “What’s new in Active Energy
Manager version 3.1.1” on page 249.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
25
3.1.2 Positioning Active Energy Manager functions by platform
Active Energy Manager functions can be divided into two basic groups:
򐂰 Monitoring functions:
– Power trending
– Thermal trending
– CPU trending
You do not need a license for the monitoring functions.
򐂰 Management functions:
– Power saver
– Power cap
You must have a license for the management functions after the 60 day try-and-buy period
has expired. To obtain the appropriate Active Energy Manager licenses, refer to 3.6, “Active
Energy Manager licensing” on page 53.
Table 3-1 shows the power managed systems supported for each Active Energy Manager
function.
Note: Table 3-1 on page 26 is accurate at the time this publication was written. It will
change over time as additional systems are supported.
Table 3-1 Power managed systems supported for each Active Energy Manager function
26
Active Energy Manager function
Power managed systems supported
Power trending and thermal
trending
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 550
9117 MMA-Power 5701
9125 F2A-Power 575
9119 FHA-Power 595
9406 MMA-System i 5701
9117 MMA-System p 5701
System z10™ EC E12 (2097 E12)
System z10 EC™ E26 (2097 E26)
System z10 EC E40 (2097 E40)
System z10 EC E56 (2097 E56)
System z10 EC E64 (2097 E64)
7998 60X—IBM BladeCenter JS12 Express server
7998 61X—IBM BladeCenter JS22 server
IBM x86 architecture blade servers
IBM System x rack and tower servers
Existing IBM systems1
IBM Storage systems1
I/O drawers1
Other IBM devices1
Non-IBM devices1
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Active Energy Manager function
Power managed systems supported
CPU trending
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 550
9125 F2A-Power 575
9119 FHA-Power 595
7998 60X-IBM BladeCenter JS12 Express server
7998 61X-IBM BladeCenter JS22 server
IBM x86 architecture blade servers
IBM System x rack and tower servers
Power saver
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 5502
9117 MMA-Power 5702
9125 F2A-Power 575
9119 FHA-Power 595
9406 MMA-System i 570
9117 MMA-System p 5702
7998 61X-IBM BladeCenter JS22 server
IBM x86 architecture blade servers3
IBM System x rack and tower servers3
Power cap
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9407 M15—Power 520
9408 M25—Power 520
9409 M50—Power 550
8203 E4A—Power 520
8204 E8A—Power 550
7998 60X—IBM BladeCenter JS12 Express server
7998 61X—IBM BladeCenter JS22 server
IBM x86 architecture blade servers4
IBM System x rack and tower servers4
1Power
and thermal trending functions are only available for these systems and devices when they
are connected to a PDU+. It is the PDU+ that provides the Active Energy Manager functionality, not
the attached system or device.
2Power
saver mode is only available on those models whose POWER6 processors are rated at more
than or equal to 4.0 GHz, and only if feature code 1800 (GX dual port RIO-2 attach) is not present.
3
The dynamic power saving function is supported on selected Intel and AMD processors. This function
is similar, but not identical to the POWER6 EnergyScale Power Saver function. Dynamic power saving
is system controlled and enabled in the BIOS. For dynamic power saving to become operational, the
operating system must also support it. For a list of IBM systems that support this function, refer to the
following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_manag
ed_systems.html
4The power cap function is supported on selected Intel and AMD processors. This function is similar,
but not identical to the POWER6 EnergyScale function of the same name. For a list of IBM systems
that support this function, refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_manag
ed_systems.html
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
27
3.1.3 Active Energy Manager basic components
When we talk about Active Energy Manager, we are really talking about the Active Energy
Manager server which is an extension to IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2. You must
install IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 before attempting to install Active Energy
Manager. Refer to 3.4, “Software requirements” on page 35 for more detail regarding Active
Energy Manager software prerequisites.
Note: A standalone version of Active Energy Manager is available to install on the x86
platform only. It contains the Active Energy Manager server plus just enough IBM Systems
Director code to support the Active Energy Manager functionality in one installable file.
For more information about the extension and standalone versions of Active Energy Manager,
refer to 3.4.2, “Active Energy Manager server software installation considerations” on
page 36. Figure 3-1 shows the basic components of the Active Energy Manager environment.
Active Energy Manager
console
Active Energy Manager
server
Active Energy
Manager providers
Power managed
systems
Figure 3-1 Basic components of the Active Energy Manager environment
Like IBM Systems Director, Active Energy Manager has a server component and a console
component. The Active Energy Manager server communicates with the Active Energy
Manager providers, each of which manages one or more power managed systems. An Active
Energy Manager provider collects power-related data on behalf of the power managed
systems that it controls and forwards that data to the Active Energy Manager server.
The Active Energy Manager console communicates with, and downloads data from, the
Active Energy Manager server. The Active Energy Manager console is your interface to the
power monitoring and management functions. Through the console, you can view
power-related data as well as manage those systems that are capable of power
management.
It is the power managed systems whose power consumption we are trying to measure, not
the Active Energy Manager providers. An Active Energy Manager provider can be thought of
as a client to an Active Energy Manager server. The Active Energy Manager provider’s
function is to collect data on behalf of, and power manage the systems that it controls. You do
not need to install any Active Energy Manager software on the Active Energy Manager
providers because the Active Energy Manager client functionality is built into the provider’s
firmware. However, each provider must have a prerequisite firmware level installed to support
Active Energy Manager functions.
For more information about the architecture of Active Energy Manager, refer to 5.1, “Overview
of Active Energy Manager” on page 102.
28
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
3.1.4 IBM Systems Director product overview
IBM Systems Director is an integrated suite of tools that provide you with comprehensive
systems management capabilities to maximize system availability and lower IT costs. Its
open, industry standard design supports the management of a variety of hardware and
operating systems, including Intel and AMD processor-based systems, as well as IBM
System i, System p, Power 5xx, POWER6 blade servers, and System z servers. IBM Systems
Director can also manage other SNMP devices such as the IBM DPI C13+ and IBM DPI C19
PDU+s.
IBM Systems Director automates many of the processes that are required to manage
systems proactively, including capacity planning, asset tracking, preventive maintenance,
diagnostic monitoring, troubleshooting, and more. It has a graphical user interface that
provides easy access to both local and remote systems.
IBM Systems Director is designed to manage a complex environment that contains
thousands of servers, desktop computers, workstations, laptop computers, and other
assorted devices. It can be used in environments with multiple operating systems, and
integrated with robust workgroup and enterprise management software such as Tivoli from
IBM.
An IBM Systems Director environment contains the following groups of hardware:
򐂰 One or more servers on which the IBM Systems Director server is installed. Such servers
are called management servers.
򐂰 Servers, workstations, desktop computers, mobile computers and other devices that are
managed by IBM Systems Director. Such systems are called managed systems.
򐂰 Network devices, printers, or computers that have Simple Network Management Protocol
(SNMP) agents installed or embedded. Such devices are called SNMP devices.
򐂰 Additional managed objects such as platforms and chassis.
Collectively, all managed systems, devices, and objects are referred to as managed objects.
For more information about IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2, refer to Implementing IBM
Director 5.20, SG24-6188.
IBM Systems Director server
IBM Systems Director server is the main component of IBM Systems Director and is installed
on the management server. It provides all the management function of IBM Systems Director
and contains the management data, the server engine, and the application logic.
IBM Systems Director server provides basic functions such as the discovery of managed
objects, persistent storage of configuration and management data, an inventory database,
event listening, security and authentication, management console support, and administrative
tasks. Inventory data is stored in a Structured Query Language (SQL) database. You can
access information that is stored in this relational database even when the managed objects
are not available.
IBM Systems Director Server communicates with managed objects to receive information and
issue commands, and provides the communications and database infrastructure used by
Active Energy Manager server. IBM Systems Director server communicates with the IBM
Systems Director console to display network status information and receive instructions from
the system administrator.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
29
IBM Systems Director console
IBM Systems Director console provides a graphical interface that enables the system
administrator to perform tasks on the IBM Systems Director Server. Data is transferred
between the IBM Systems Director console and IBM Systems Director server over a TCP/IP
network. Using IBM Systems Director console, you can conduct comprehensive systems
management using either drag and drop or mouse clicks.
You can install IBM Systems Director console on as many systems as needed because IBM
Systems Director includes an unlimited use license for IBM Systems Director console. The
system on which IBM Systems Director console is installed is referred to as a management
console.
Note: When you install IBM Systems Director server on Microsoft Windows or Linux, IBM
Systems Director console is installed automatically.
3.1.5 Planning Web sites
You may find the following Web addresses useful when planning your Active Energy Manger
environment:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager home page:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/extensions/actengmrg.html
򐂰 Active Energy Manager Installation and User’s Guide (Information Center format):
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/index.jsp?topic=/aem_310/
frb0_main.html
򐂰 Active Energy Manager Installation and User’s Guide (PDF format):
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_aem3.1
_docs_user.pdf
򐂰 IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager version 3.1 release notes:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/aem3.1_docs
_relnotes.pdf
򐂰 IBM EnergyScale for POWER6 processor-based systems Whitepaper:
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_wh/n/PSW03033USEN/PSW03033USEN.PDF
򐂰 IBM Systems Director home page:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/
򐂰 IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager for POWER V3.1 announcement letter:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/9/897/ENUS207-289/ENUS207289.PDF
򐂰 IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager for x86 version 3.1:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/7/897/ENUS207-287/ENUS207287.PDF
򐂰 IBM Systems Director for x86 V5.20 announcement letter:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/0/897/ENUS206-290/ENUS206290.PDF
30
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
3.2 Upgrading to Active Energy Manager from PowerExecutive
IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager was previously known as IBM PowerExecutive.
It is possible to upgrade to Active Energy Manager 3.1 from PowerExecutive version 2.0 or
later. Attempts to upgrade from versions prior to PowerExecutive version 2.0 will fail.
To upgrade from PowerExecutive version 2.0 or later to Active Energy Manager version 3.1,
download the appropriate version of the Active Energy Manager server installation file. If you
installed PowerExecutive version 2.0 or later using the standalone version and would like to
upgrade to Active Energy Manager version 3.1, you must upgrade using the Active Energy
Manager version 3.1 standalone version. If you installed PowerExecutive version 2.0 or later
using the extension version, you must upgrade using the Active Energy Manager version 3.1
extension. You do not need to uninstall PowerExecutive version 2.0 or later before you
upgrade to Active Energy Manager 3.1.
The first time you start the IBM Systems Director server after upgrading from PowerExecutive
version 2.0 or later to Active Energy Manager version 3.1, the existing PowerExecutive trend
and event data is migrated to Active Energy Manager format. Depending on how much data
you have to migrate, this may take several hours or more. During this time you can use IBM
Systems Director, but not Active Energy Manager. If you do not want to keep your old
PowerExecutive trend and event data, you can uninstall PowerExecutive and choose the
option to delete the database during the uninstall. Then, when you install Active Energy
Manager version 3.1, there will be no data to migrate.
Attention: If you intend to migrate to Active Energy Manager from PowerExecutive version
2.0 or later, back up the PowerExecutive database. Otherwise, if you revert back to
PowerExecutive, without doing this backup, you cannot recover your data.
For more information about upgrading to Active Energy Manager from PowerExecutive, refer
to 4.7, “Migration from PowerExecutive to Active Energy Manager” on page 96.
3.3 Hardware requirements
This section covers the hardware requirements for the Active Energy Manager server and the
Active Energy Manager providers.
3.3.1 Active Energy Manager server hardware requirements
There are minimum hardware requirements that the system on which you want to run Active
Energy Manager must meet.
Note: The following guidelines were developed from the results of laboratory testing of
Active Energy Manager version 3.1 under simulated stress conditions. Because it is not
possible to test all configurations under all conditions, these values must be accepted as
guidelines, rather than absolute fact. The following guidelines apply to both 32-bit Windows
environments and 32-bit Linux environments. In 64-bit environments, it can be anticipated
that more memory is required to support the application, but that other requirements are
similar to the 32-bit environment.
The requirements listed in this section are in addition to any requirements for other functions
of IBM Systems Director.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
31
Processor requirements for Active Energy Manager
Processors are exercised during the normal polling function, while refreshing the console to
show trend information, and when making power management decisions. Of these, polling
and refreshing the console are the most significant, which means that initiating simultaneous
queries of the database from multiple consoles can affect the amount of processing capacity
that is needed to maintain adequate performance.
Active Energy Manager installs on x86 architecture (Windows and Linux) and POWER
processor-based blade servers (Linux only) that support the installation of IBM Systems
Director version 5.20.2.
x86
The processing power required depends on the number of IBM Systems Director managed
objects:
򐂰 A single x86 processor of 2 GHz or higher is sufficient to run Active Energy Manager for
moderate numbers (500 or less) of managed objects.
򐂰 An x86 processor of more than 3 GHz, preferably with hyperthreading or other
multi-threading function enabled, is recommended to manage an environment of 1,000
managed objects.
򐂰 A dual-core or two-core system, preferably with hyperthreading or other multi-threading
function enabled, is recommended to manage an environment of 2,000 managed objects.
POWER processor-based blade (Linux only)
As it is for x86, the processing power required for POWER processor-based blades depend
on the number of IBM Systems Director managed objects:
򐂰 An rPerf rating of 2 or higher should be reserved to run Active Energy Manager for
moderate numbers (500 or less) of managed objects.
򐂰 An rPerf rating of at least 3.5 is recommended for environments up to 1,000 objects.
򐂰 When scaling to larger numbers of managed objects, add 1.5 to the rPerf requirement for
every 1,000 managed objects.
Memory requirements for Active Energy Manager
As with processor and disk, the amount of memory needed for Active Energy Manager
depends on the number of objects managed, and the frequency with which objects are polled
and power histories are queried. If other IBM Systems Director functions are not stressed, a
moderate configuration of 500 objects can be monitored and managed within the 1 GB of
base memory that is recommended for IBM Systems Director.
If both IBM Systems Director functions and Active Energy Manager functions are exercised
on the same system, it is likely that more memory is needed to allow an optimal amount of
Active Energy Manager data to remain memory resident. For most configurations, an
additional 1 GB of memory is more than adequate. In configurations supporting over 1,000
managed objects with multiple query functions exercised simultaneously, additional memory
upgrades may be needed.
Disk storage requirements for Active Energy Manager
By default, Active Energy Manager archives 31 days of power-related information in its
database. The space needed depends on the number of objects being monitored. If you are
planning to manage more than 1,000 objects, we recommend that the database, and
therefore the location of both IBM Systems Director and Active Energy Manager, be on a
logical disk that is striped over multiple drives to allow I/O spreading.
32
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Each Active Energy Manager provider can expose multiple power managed objects. The
following examples illustrate this point:
򐂰 A BladeCenter can have over 20 power managed objects, including blade servers, power
supplies and network switches
򐂰 A single HMC can have multiple power managed systems under its control
򐂰 A single PDU+ can have multiple devices plugged into its load groups
The disk storage needed also depends on the rate at which power managed objects are
being polled. Active Energy Manager is shipped with a default polling rate of one minute.
Changing this to 5 minutes reduces the total storage requirement by 80%. Assuming a default
polling rate of 1 minute, the additional disk storage required per month is approximately 3.5
GB for every 100 managed objects. Therefore, 35 GB is required for 1,000 System x rack
mounted servers. For 1,000 PDU+s fully populated with systems or storage units, the total
number of managed objects is 6,000. In this case, one might expect a disk storage
requirement of 200 GB. Experimental data shows this to be closer to 140 GB.
As with processing requirements, disk drives are exercised most heavily by the regular polling
of power managed systems and by the processing of queries to refresh console panels.
Therefore, using multiple consoles simultaneously may increase the need to have multiple
disks in a striped array to provide adequate performance. In general, using one or two
consoles provides adequate performance assuming that there are no more than 1,000
managed objects per disk drive.
3.3.2 Active Energy Manager provider hardware requirements
We have already discussed the hardware requirements for the Active Energy Manager
server. The Active Energy Manager client function is supplied by an Active Energy Manager
provider. The Active Energy Manager providers include the following modules:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
System z Hardware Management Console (zHMC)
Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM)
BladeCenter management module (BC MM)
Remote Support Adapter (RSA)
Baseboard Management Controller (BMC)
Flexible Service Processor (FSP)
Intelligent Power Distribution Unit (PDU+)
For a more detailed description of what an Active Energy Manager provider is, refer to 5.1.2,
“Terminology” on page 106.
Table 3-2 on page 34 shows a list of the Active Energy Manager providers and the power
managed systems they support.
Note: Table 3-2 is accurate at the time of writing this document but will change over time
as additional systems are supported.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
33
Table 3-2 Active Energy Manager providers and supported power managed systems
Active Energy Manager provider
Power managed systems
FSP direct
FSP through HMC
FSP through IVM4
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9406 MMA-System i 570
9117 MMA-System p 5703
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 550
9117 MMA-Power 5703
9125 F2A-Power 575
9119 FHA-Power 595
PDU+
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9406 MMA-System i 5703
9117 MMA-System p 5703
Existing IBM systems
IBM Storage systems
I/O drawers
Other IBM devices
Non-IBM devices
zHMC
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
System z10 EC E12 (2097 E12)
System z10 EC E26 (2097 E26)
System z10 EC E40 (2097 E40)
System z10 EC E56 (2097 E56)
System z10 EC E64 (2097 E64)
BladeCenter management module
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
7998 60X-IBM BladeCenter JS12 Express server
7998 61X-IBM BladeCenter JS22 server
IBM x86 architecture blade servers1
Remote Support Adapter (RSA) and
Baseboard Management Controller (BMC)
򐂰
IBM System x rack and tower servers2
1For
a list of x86 architecture blade servers that support Active Energy Manager power monitoring
and power management functions refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_manag
ed_systems.html
2For
a list of System x rack and tower servers that support Active Energy Manager power monitoring
and power management functions refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_manag
ed_systems.html
3
A PDU+ provides additional power management function for a 9406 MMA-System i 570, a 9117
MMA-System p 570, or a 9117 MMA-Power 570 because power trending, thermal trending, and CPU
trending are not available for these systems through the FSP or HMC. You can have a separate
connection to the FSP or HMC for these systems to access the power saver function concurrently with
other functions provided by the PDU+.
4
In an Active Energy Manager environment, IVM only supports the 8203 E4A-Power 520 and the 8204
E8A-Power 550.
For a list of Active Energy Manager functions supported by each power managed system,
refer to Table 3-1 on page 26.
34
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
3.4 Software requirements
This section examines the components of the Active Energy Manager environment and the
prerequisite software levels required.
3.4.1 Active Energy Manager components
Active Energy Manager is built on IBM Systems Director. The components of the Active
Energy Manager server and console are shown in Table 3-2 on page 34.
Active Energy Manager
console
HMC extension
BladeCenter
Management extension
Active Energy Manager
console
IBM Systems Director console
Active Energy Manager
server
HMC extension
BladeCenter
Management extension
Active Energy Manager
server
IBM Systems Director server
Active Energy
Manager providers
Power managed
systems
Figure 3-2 Components of the Active Energy Manager server and console
As shown in Figure 3-2, the Active Energy Manager environment is comprised of the following
components:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager server
The Active Energy Manager server is the heart of the Active Energy Manager
environment. It regularly polls the Active Energy Manager providers which collect
power-related information about behalf of the power managed systems they control. The
Active Energy Manager server is comprised of the following components:
–
–
–
–
IBM Systems Director server version 5.20.2
BladeCenter management extension (included with IBM Systems Director server)
Hardware Management Console (HMC) extension
Active Energy Manager server extension
The HMC extension for IBM System Director is only required to manage System p,
System i, and Power 5xx systems.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
35
򐂰 Active Energy Manager console
The Active Energy Manager console enables you to monitor and manage power
consumption data from IBM systems. It opens in a separate window to IBM Systems
Director console.
The Active Energy Manager console is installed automatically on the Active Energy
Manager server. We recommend that you set up an Active Energy Manager console on a
separate computer, however.
The Active Energy Manager console is comprised of the following components:
– IBM Systems Director console version 5.20.2 (included with IBM Systems Director
server)
– BladeCenter management extension (included with IBM Systems Director server)
– HMC extension
– Active Energy Manager console extension
The HMC extension for IBM Systems Director is only required to manage System p,
System i, and Power 5xx systems.
򐂰 Active Energy Manager providers
As discussed in 3.3.2, “Active Energy Manager provider hardware requirements” on
page 33, Active Energy Manager providers can be thought of as the devices that host the
Active Energy Manager client code. This code is imbedded in the firmware running on the
device which is acting as the Active Energy Manager provider. You do not need to install
any additional code on the providers. You will need to make sure that the providers have
the prerequisite level of firmware, however, to support Active Energy Manager
functionality, as described in 3.5.8, “Downloading the Active Energy Manager provider
firmware” on page 53.
򐂰 Power managed systems
A power managed system is a device whose power consumption you want to monitor and
manage. Each power managed system is controlled by an Active Energy Manager
provider. Power managed systems do not require any additional software and there are no
prerequisite code levels. However, only certain IBM systems are supported as power
managed systems as shown in Table 3-2 on page 34.
For more information about the architecture of Active Energy Manager, refer to 5.1, “Overview
of Active Energy Manager” on page 102.
3.4.2 Active Energy Manager server software installation considerations
Active Energy Manager version 3.1 requires IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2. There is
also an IBM Systems Director Express version. It provides a simplified installation that installs
IBM Systems Director server using default values for a number of installation options. The
resulting IBM Systems Director console displays a filtered task list allowing the user to start
with a core set of essential tasks. Additional tasks can be added to the console after
installation.
Restriction: IBM Systems Director Express does not support Active Energy Manager
version 3.1.
36
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
There are two versions of Active Energy Manager:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager extension version
In this version the Active Energy Manager extension is installed on top of IBM Systems
Director version 5.20.2. It contains the full complement of IBM Systems Director functions
and is the recommended way to install Active Energy Manager.
With the extension version of Active Energy Manager you must install each of the
components shown in Figure 3-2 on page 35 separately and in the correct order. The
Active Energy Manager version 3.1 extension to IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 has
separate installers for Windows and Linux. InstallShield is used for Windows installation
and RPM is used for Linux installation. Windows installation is a traditional, dialog-based
installation. Linux installation is a test-mode, unattended installation.
Installing the Active Energy Manager extension version is described in 4.2, “IBM Systems
Director server on Windows for installation of Active Energy Manager” on page 61.
򐂰 Active Energy Manager standalone version
With the Active Energy Manager standalone version, IBM Systems Director is integrated
with Active Energy Manager. There is a single installation file that contains Active Energy
Manager, the HMC and BladeCenter management extensions, and a cut down version of
IBM Systems Director. The standalone version has the same Active Energy Manager
functionality as the extension version, but contains just enough IBM Systems Director to
support Active Energy Manager. Once installed, the Active Energy Manager server
standalone version functions the same as the extension version except for some minor
differences in the user interface.
The standalone version of Active Energy Manager version 3.1 has separate installers for
Windows and Linux. InstallShield 11 Premier Edition is used for Windows installation and
RPM is used for Linux installation. The standalone installer wrappers an installation of (or
upgrade to) Embedded Systems Director version 5.20.2, followed by an installation of (or
upgrade to) the Active Energy Manager version 3.1 extension. The prerequisite HMC and
BladeCenter management extensions are installed as part of the wrappered installation.
Installing the Active Energy Manager standalone version is described in 4.6, “Installing the
stand-alone version of Active Energy Manager” on page 92.
Restriction: The Active Energy Manager standalone version is only supported on x86
Linux and Windows platforms.
3.4.3 Active Energy Manager server supported operating systems
Active Energy Manager server supports a subset of the operating systems supported by IBM
Systems Director server. For an up-to-date list of operating systems that support the
installation of Active Energy Manager server, refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_support
ed_operating_systems.html
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
37
At the time of writing this document, the following operating systems are supported for the
installation of Active Energy Manager server:
򐂰 Windows
– Windows Server® 2003 Enterprise Edition
– Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition x64
Note: The Windows server should be up-to-date with the latest Windows operating
system and installer fixes.
򐂰 Linux
– x86 architecture
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS, version 4.0, for Intel x86-64
Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS, version 4.0, for Intel x86
Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES, version 4.0, for Intel x86-64
Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES, version 4.0, for Intel x86
Red Hat Enterprise Linux ES, version 5.0 and 5.1, for Intel x86
SUSE® LINUX Enterprise Server 9 for x86-64
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 for x86
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 10 for x86-64
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 10 for x86
– Power architecture
•
•
•
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS, version 4.0, for POWER
Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS, version 5.0 and 5.1, for POWER
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 for POWER
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 10 for POWER
– System z
•
•
•
•
•
Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS, version 4.0, for IBM System z
Red Hat Enterprise Linux AS, version 5.0, for IBM System z
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 for IBM S/390®
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 9 for IBM System z
SUSE LINUX Enterprise Server 10 for IBM System z
Important: The Active Energy Manager stand-alone version is not supported on Linux
on POWER platforms.
38
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
3.5 Downloading the software
This section describes what software you need to download and how to download it.
You need the following components available to implement an Active Energy Manager
environment:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager server
The Active Energy Manager server is used to poll the Active Energy Manager providers for
power-related data and store the data in a database so that it can be retrieved by the
Active Energy Manager console. The following versions are available:
– Windows
•
•
Extension version
Standalone version
– Linux
•
•
Extension version
Standalone version
You need to download either the extension or standalone version of Active Energy
Manager server for Windows or Linux. Refer to 3.5.1, “Active Energy Manager server
checklist” on page 40 for the names of the required files.
򐂰 Active Energy Manager console
The Active Energy Manager console is used to access the Active Energy Manager server
and provide a graphical interface to the monitoring and management of power managed
objects. The following versions are available:
– Windows: Extension version (only)
– Linux: Extension version (only)
You need to download the extension version of Active Energy Manager console for
Windows or Linux. Refer to 3.5.2, “Active Energy Manager console checklist” on page 41
for the names of the required files.
򐂰 Active Energy Manager provider firmware
Providers supply the Active Energy Manager client function and control power managed
objects. You do not need to install any Active Energy Manager software as such on the
Active Energy Manager providers because the Active Energy Manager client functionality
is built into the provider’s firmware. However, each provider must have a prerequisite
firmware level installed to support Active Energy Manager functions. See 3.5.8,
“Downloading the Active Energy Manager provider firmware” on page 53 for details.
Important: The Active Energy Manager server and console functions can be combined
onto a single physical platform. This is because when you install the Active Energy
Manager server, the Active Energy Manager console is also installed automatically on the
server. Therefore, from a software perspective, at a minimum you only need to install an
Active Energy Manager server. However, we recommend that you also install a separate
Active Energy Manager console for reasons of convenience and performance.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
39
3.5.1 Active Energy Manager server checklist
This section provides checklists of the software you need to download for the Active Energy
Manager server.
To set up an Active Energy Manager server, you need to download the following files,
depending on whether you want to install the extension or stand-alone version of Active
Energy Manager server and whether you want to run the Active Energy Manager server on
Windows or Linux. Refer to 3.4.2, “Active Energy Manager server software installation
considerations” on page 36.
Note: We do not cover the installation of Active Energy Manager server on POWER or
System z Linux in this document, although they are supported.
Active Energy Manager extension version
Download the following files if you want to install the extension version of Active Energy
Manager server on Windows or Linux on x86 architecture:
򐂰 Windows on x86 architecture
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 for Windows and Linux on x86 (full install
package). The file name is dir5.20.2_System_x.iso.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 Release Notes (optional). The file name is
dir5.20.2_docs_relnotes.pdf.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 Service Update 1 for Windows (Update Package).
The file name is ibm_sw_dir_5.20.02su1_windows_i386.zip.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 HMC Server for Windows. The file name is
dir5.20.2_hmcserver_windows.exe.
– Active Energy Manager for Windows Server and Console Extension. The file name is
ActiveEnergyManager3.1.exe.
򐂰 Linux on x86 architecture
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 for Windows and Linux on x86 (full install
package). The file name is dir5.20.2_System_x.iso.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 Release Notes (optional). The file name is
dir5.20.2_docs_relnotes.pdf.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 Service Update 1 for Linux (Update Package).
The file name is ibm_sw_dir_5.20.02su1_linux_i386.tar.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 HMC Common for Linux. The file name is
HMCCommonExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 HMC Server Extension for Linux. The file name is
HMCServerExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm.
– Active Energy Manager for Linux: Server Extension. The file name is
ActiveEnergyManager-server-3.1-5.noarch.rpm.
Active Energy Manager standalone version
Download the following files if you want to install the standalone version of Active Energy
Manager server on Windows or Linux on x86 architecture:
򐂰 Windows on x86 architecture: The file name is ActiveEnergyManagerSA3.1.exe.
򐂰 Linux on x86 architecture: The file name is ActiveEnergyManagerSA-3.1-x.i386.rpm.
40
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
3.5.2 Active Energy Manager console checklist
This section provides checklists of the software you download for the Active Energy Manager
console. To set up a separate Active Energy Manager console, download the following files,
depending if you run the Active Energy Manager console on Windows or Linux on x86
architecture:
򐂰 Windows on x86 architecture
– You can use the option to install the IBM Systems Director console from the menu on
the IBM Systems Director server installation CD. Alternatively, you can download the
file entitled IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 Console for Windows (full install
package). The file name is dir5.20.2_console_windows.zip.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 HMC Console for Windows. The file name is
dir5.20.2_hmcconsole_windows.exe.
– Active Energy Manager for Windows: Server and Console Extension. The file name is
ActiveEnergyManager3.1.exe.
򐂰 Linux on x86 architecture
– You can use the option to install the IBM Systems Director console from the menu on
the IBM Systems Director server installation CD. Alternatively, you can download the
file entitled IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 Console for Linux on x86 (full rpm
install packages). The file name is dir5.20.2_console_linux.tar
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 HMC Common for Linux. The file name is
HMCCommonExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm.
– IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 HMC Console Extension for Linux. The file name
is HMCConsoleExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm.
– Active Energy Manager for Linux: Console Extension. The file name is
ActiveEnergyManager-console-3.1-5.noarch.rpm.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
41
3.5.3 Accessing the Active Energy Manager download Web site
To access the Active Energy Manager download Web site, perform the following steps:
1. Start a Web browser session and navigate to the following Web site:
https://www14.software.ibm.com/webapp/iwm/web/preLogin.do?lang=en_US&source=dmp
2. On the IBM Director page (Figure 3-3), if you previously registered with IBM to download
software, click Sign in. If you are not registered, click the register now link.
Figure 3-3 Accessing the IBM Systems Director download Web site
If you need to register, perform the following steps:
a. On the My IBM registration page (Figure 3-4), fill in the IBM ID and password fields.
You can use the same user ID and password to download other IBM software. Click
Continue at the bottom of the page.
Figure 3-4 Registering with IBM to download IBM Systems Director software, 1 of 3
42
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
b. On the next page (Figure 3-5), provide the necessary information and click Submit.
Figure 3-5 Registering with IBM to download IBM Systems Director software, 2 of 3
c. On the next page (Figure 3-6), click Continue.
Figure 3-6 Registering with IBM to download IBM Systems Director software, 3 of 3
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
43
d. In the Sign-in window (Figure 3-7), sign in with your registered ID and password.
Figure 3-7 Signing in to access the IBM Systems Director download Web site
You see the IBM Systems Director download Web page as shown in Figure 3-8 on page 45.
This is the Web page you start from when downloading each of the following Active Energy
Manager components:
򐂰 IBM Systems Director Server and Console
Refer to 3.5.4, “Downloading the IBM Systems Director server and console files” on
page 45.
򐂰 IBM Systems Director HMC Extension
Refer to 3.5.5, “Downloading the IBM Systems Director HMC extension files” on page 48.
򐂰 Active Energy Manager extension version
Refer to 3.5.6, “Downloading the Active Energy Manager extension version files” on
page 50.
򐂰 Active Energy Manager standalone version
Refer to 3.5.7, “Downloading the Active Energy Manager standalone version files” on
page 52.
44
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Figure 3-8 IBM Systems Director download Web page
3.5.4 Downloading the IBM Systems Director server and console files
When downloading the IBM Systems Director server installation files you first need to decide
the platform on which you want to run IBM Systems Director (and therefore Active Energy
Manager):
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Windows running on x86 architecture
Linux running on x86 architecture
Linux running on POWER architecture (not covered in this document)
Linux running on System z (not covered in this document)
Note: If you intend to install the standalone version of Active Energy Manager, you still
need to download the IBM Systems Director server file because it contains the IBM
Systems Director console. The Active Energy Manager standalone version does not
contain the IBM Systems Director console.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
45
To download the IBM Systems Director server installation files, perform the following steps:
1. Access the IBM Systems Director download Web site as described in 3.5.3, “Accessing
the Active Energy Manager download Web site” on page 42.
2. On the IBM Director page (Figure 3-8 on page 45), select IBM Director for Windows and
Linux on x86 and click Continue.
3. On the page that shows you business contact information, scroll down to the License
section (Figure 3-9). Select the I agree check box and click I confirm.
Figure 3-9 Downloading the IBM Systems Director server and console files, license agreement
4. On the IBM Director page (Figure 3-10 on page 47) complete the following steps:
a. Select the following check boxes:
•
Director 5.20.2 for Windows and Linux on x86 (full install package)
The file name is dir5.20.2_System_x.iso. This CD image file contains both the
Windows and Linux IBM Systems Director server code.
Note: The ISO image also contains the Windows and Linux IBM Systems
Director console code. You do not need to download it separately.
•
IBM Director 5.20.2 Release Notes (optional)
The file name is dir5.20.2_docs_relnotes.pdf.
•
For Windows, select IBM Director 5.20.2 Service Update 2 for Windows (Update
Package)
The file name is ibm_sw_dir_5.20.02su2_windows_i386.zip.
•
For Linux, select IBM Director 5.20.2 Service Update 2 for Linux (Update
Package)
The file name is ibm_sw_dir_5.20.02su2_linux_i386.tar.
b. In the License section, select the I agree check box.
c. Click I confirm at the bottom of the page.
46
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Figure 3-10 Selecting the IBM Systems Director server and console files to download
5. On the Initial Setup window (Figure 3-11), specify a download location and click OK.
Figure 3-11 Specifying a download location for the IBM Systems Director server and console files
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
47
6. You see the Download Director window shown in Figure 3-12. When the download has
completed, close the window.
Figure 3-12 Progress window for downloading the IBM Systems Director server and console files
7. Burn the following files to a CD:
– dir5.20.2_System_x.iso file
An ISO file is a CD image. The best way to initiate the burn process is to double click
the ISO file after it has been downloaded. This should start up your burner software
and initiate the burn process. Most CD burner software recognizes ISO files and
automatically unpacks them during the burn process. Do not be concerned that the CD
appears to be blank after the burn process has completed. This is normal.
– ibm_sw_dir_5.20.02su2_windows_i386.zip file for Windows
Extract the compressed file and burn the unpacked files to CD or copy to a memory
key.
– ibm_sw_dir_5.20.02su2_linux_i386.tar file for Linux
Extract the TAR file and burn the unpacked files to CD or copy to a memory key.
Note: After you have installed the IBM Systems Director server as described in 4.2.1,
“Installing IBM Systems Director server for Windows” on page 61, apply the update.
3.5.5 Downloading the IBM Systems Director HMC extension files
To download the IBM Systems Director HMC extension files, perform the following steps:
1. Access and sign in to the IBM Systems Director download Web site, as described in 3.5.3,
“Accessing the Active Energy Manager download Web site” on page 42.
2. After signing in, On the IBM Director download page (Figure 3-8 on page 44), select IBM
Director Plug-ins & Extensions for Windows and Linux on x86 and click Continue.
48
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
3. On the IBM Director page (Figure 3-13) complete the following steps.
a. (Windows only) Select the following check boxes:
•
IBM Director 5.20.2 HMC Server for Windows
The file name is dir5.20.2_hmcserver_windows.exe. This file is used for the IBM
Systems Director server running on Windows.
•
IBM Director 5.20.2 HMC Console for Windows
The file name is dir5.20.2_hmcconsole_windows.exe. This file is used for IBM
Systems Director console running on Windows.
b. (Linux only) Select the following check boxes:
•
IBM Director 5.20.2 HMC Common for Linux
The file name is HMCCommonExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm. This file is used for both
the IBM Systems Director server and the IBM Systems Director console running on
Linux.
•
IBM Director 5.20.2 HMC Server Extension for Linux
The file name is HMCServerExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm. This file is used for the IBM
Systems Director server running on Linux.
•
IBM Director 5.20.2 HMC Console Extension for Linux
The file name is HMCConsoleExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm. This file is used for the IBM
Systems Director console running on Linux.
c. In the License section, select the I agree check box.
d. Click I confirm at the bottom of the page.
Figure 3-13 Selecting the files to download for the IBM Systems Director HMC extension files
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
49
4. Specify a download location in the Initial Setup window shown in Figure 3-14. If you have
already downloaded other files in this Web browser session, the download might start
automatically. Click OK.
Figure 3-14 Specifying a download location for the IBM Systems Director HMC Extension files
5. Close the Download Director window shown in Figure 3-15 after the download has
completed. After the files have been downloaded, you can burn them to CD or copy to a
memory key.
Figure 3-15 Downloading the IBM Systems Director HMC Extension files.
3.5.6 Downloading the Active Energy Manager extension version files
To download the Active Energy Manager extension version files, perform the following steps:
1. Access the IBM Systems Director download Web site, as described in 3.5.3, “Accessing
the Active Energy Manager download Web site” on page 42.
2. Select the radio button for IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager in the window
shown in Figure 3-8 on page 45 and click Continue.
3. On the IBM Director page (Figure 3-16 on page 51) complete the following steps. Scroll
down to the bottom of the page and select the following check boxes:
a. (Windows only) Select the following check box:
•
Active Energy Manager for Windows: Server and Console Extension
The file name is ActiveEnergyManager3.1.1.exe. This file is used to install the
Active Energy Manager extension version on both the IBM Systems Director server
and console.
50
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
b. (Linux only) Select the following check boxes:
•
Active Energy Manager for Linux: Server Extension
The file name is ActiveEnergyManager-server-3.1.1-2.noarch.rpm. This file is used
to install the Active Energy Manager extension version on the IBM Systems Director
server.
•
Active Energy Manager for Linux: Console Extension
The file name is ActiveEnergyManager-console-3.1.1-2.noarch.rpm. This file is
used to install the Active Energy Manager extension version on the IBM Systems
Director console.
c. In the License section, select the I agree check box.
d. Click I confirm at the bottom of the page.
Figure 3-16 Selecting the files to download for the Active Energy Manager extension version files
4. Specify a download location in the Initial Setup window shown in Figure 3-14 on page 50.
If you have already downloaded other files in this Web browser session, the download
might start automatically. Click OK.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
51
5. Close the Download Director window (Figure 3-17) when the download has completed.
After the files have been downloaded, you can burn them to CD or copy to a memory key.
Figure 3-17 Downloading the Active Energy Manager extension version files
3.5.7 Downloading the Active Energy Manager standalone version files
To download the Active Energy Manager standalone version files, perform the following steps:
1. Access and sign in to the IBM Systems Director download Web site, as described in 3.5.3,
“Accessing the Active Energy Manager download Web site” on page 42.
2. Select the radio button for IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager in the window
shown in Figure 3-8 on page 45. Click Continue.
3. On the IBM Director page (Figure 3-16 on page 51) complete the following steps. Scroll
down to the bottom of the page and
a. (Windows only) Select the following check box:
•
Active Energy Manager Standalone for Windows
The file name is ActiveEnergyManagerSA3.1.1.exe. This file is used to install the
Active Energy Manager server standalone version.
b. (Linux only) Select the following check box:
•
Active Energy Manager Standalone for Linux on x86
The file name is ActiveEnergyManagerSA-3.1.1-2.i386.rpm. This file is used to
install Active Energy Manager server standalone version.
c. In the License section, select the I agree check box.
d. Click I confirm at the bottom of the page.
4. Specify a download location in the Initial Setup window shown in Figure 3-14 on page 50.
If you have already downloaded other files in this Web browser session, the download
might start automatically. Click OK.
52
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
5. You see the Download Director window as shown in Figure 3-18. After the download has
completed, close the window. After the files have been downloaded, you can burn them to
CD or copy to a memory key
Figure 3-18 Downloading the Active Energy Manager standalone version files
3.5.8 Downloading the Active Energy Manager provider firmware
In order for your IBM power managed systems to be visible to the Active Energy Manager
server, the Active Energy Manager providers managing these systems must have the
prerequisite level of firmware installed. Table 3-3 shows the prerequisite firmware levels that
are required on each Active Energy Manager provider.
Table 3-3 Active Energy Manager provider prerequisite firmware levels
Active Energy Manager provider
Prerequisite firmware level
FSP
EM320_021
HMC
Version 7 Release 3.2.0 Service Pack 0
BladeCenter Management Module
Refer to the following Web site:
RSA
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2
/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_managed_systems.html
BMC
zHMC and SE
Driver 73 or higher
PDU+
November 7th, 2007 level
3.6 Active Energy Manager licensing
Licensing for Active Energy Manager is complicated because you need to consider licensing
for both IBM Systems Director as well as Active Energy Manager. This section covers the
following aspects of Active Energy Manager licensing:
򐂰 IBM Systems Director licensing
– IBM Systems Director server licensing
– IBM Systems Director client licensing
– IBM Systems Director software subscription
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
53
򐂰 Active Energy Manager licensing overview
򐂰 Active Energy Manager licensing roadmap
–
–
–
–
Establish which systems require an Active Energy Manager license
Categorize each IBM system as to its size
Order Active Energy Manager licenses
Order software subscription for Active Energy Manager licenses
3.6.1 IBM Systems Director licensing
This discussion of IBM Systems Director licensing is framed in terms of the licensing required
to support Active Energy Manager. Because we limit our discussion of Active Energy
Manager to installation on x86 architecture IBM servers, our discussion of IBM Systems
Director licensing is also confined to the same systems, even though IBM Systems Director is
supported across all IBM platforms.
Refer to the announcement letter on the following Web site for details of IBM Systems
Director licensing on x86 architecture servers:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/0/897/ENUS206-290/ENUS206290.PDF
In terms of x86 architecture IBM systems, IBM Systems Director licensing occurs at two
levels:
򐂰 IBM Systems Director server
򐂰 IBM Systems Director client
IBM Systems Director server licensing
Every new IBM System x server and IBM BladeCenter includes an IBM Systems Director
server license. This license includes authorizations for the following installations:
򐂰 One installation of IBM Systems Director server
򐂰 Twenty installations of IBM Systems Director agent on non-IBM systems
򐂰 Unlimited installations of IBM Systems Director console
Therefore, assuming that you are intending to install IBM Systems Director server on an IBM
x86 architecture platform, you should not need to purchase a license. For installation of IBM
Systems Director server on non-IBM x86 architecture servers, you need to purchase
additional IBM Systems Director server licenses as detailed in the previously mentioned IBM
Systems Director announcement letter. To order, contact your IBM representative.
The IBM Systems Director agent does not confer Active Energy Manager capability onto
non-IBM servers. Refer to “IBM Systems Director client licensing” for more details.
In summary, for the purposes of setting up an Active Energy Manager environment, you do
not need to purchase any IBM Systems Director server licenses unless you want to set up
IBM Systems Director Server on a non-IBM machine.
Note: IBM Systems Director console is included with IBM Systems Director server and
does not require a license.
IBM Systems Director client licensing
When we use the term IBM Systems Director client licensing, we are really talking about
licenses for IBM Systems Director managed objects. IBM Systems Director managed objects
are devices that IBM Systems Director Server can find in the network. In terms of power
management, there is a special class of IBM Systems Director managed objects we call
54
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Active Energy Manager providers. The Active Energy Manager provider function is built into
the service processors of most IBM systems. Therefore, Active Energy Manager providers do
not require any kind of IBM Systems Director client license. The providers include the
following items:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
System z Hardware Management Console (zHMC)
Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM)
BladeCenter management module (BCMM)
Remote Support Adapter (RSA)
Baseboard Management Controller (BMC)
Flexible Service Processor (FSP)
Intelligent Power Distribution Unit (PDU+)
Table 3-2 on page 34 provides a cross reference showing the IBM power managed systems
that are managed by these Active Energy Manager providers.
Most IBM systems have an IBM Systems Director client function built into their service
processors. This IBM Systems Director client function is called an agent in IBM Systems
Director terminology. Different IBM systems support different levels of IBM Systems Director
agent. In order for IBM Systems Director to manage non-IBM systems, you can buy additional
IBM Systems Director agent licenses. However, as previously mentioned, these agents do not
confer the capability for non-IBM systems to be managed by an Active Energy Manager
server. The only way that you can provide a degree of Active Energy Manager functionality to
non-IBM systems (or IBM systems that do not have power metering capability built in) is to
connect them to a supported PDU+ (refer to 5.18, “Understanding and configuring the PDU+”
on page 228 for more information).
In summary, for the purposes of setting up an Active Energy Manager environment, you do
not need to purchase any IBM Systems Director agent (client) licenses.
IBM Systems Director software subscription
Software subscription provides support and program upgrades for IBM Systems Director.
One year of software subscription for IBM Systems Director and associated programs is
included with the license for the product. You must place a separate order for subscription
registration at time of initial order or supply of the product. After one year, software
subscription must be renewed, regardless of whether the initial license was supplied free with
a new IBM server, or was purchased for a non-IBM server. One or two year software
subscription options are available. Acquiring program upgrades for eligible offerings under
software subscription is only available under a current and active software subscription
contract.
3.6.2 Active Energy Manager licensing overview
There are several important points that you need to understand about Active Energy Manager
licensing:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager licenses are in addition to any IBM Systems Director licenses
required.
򐂰 Some components of Active Energy Manager are no-charge, while there are other
optional components that are chargeable and therefore require a license.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
55
򐂰 When we talk about Active Energy Manager licensing we are really talking about licenses
for the Active Energy Manager clients (called power managed systems). The Active
Energy Manager server itself does not require a license. However, you need to install a
license key on the Active Energy Manager server, depending on how many systems you
wish to power manage (as opposed to power monitor which is free). If all you want to do is
power monitor your systems, you do not need any Active Energy Manager licenses.
򐂰 As with IBM Systems Director, there is no Active Energy Manager client as such. The
client code that Active Energy Manager server communicates with is built into the service
processor of the IBM power managed systems.
The no-charge components of Active Energy Manager provide the following power monitoring
functions:
򐂰 Power trending
򐂰 Thermal trending
򐂰 CPU trending
The licensed components of Active Energy Manager provide the following power
management functions:
򐂰 Power saver
򐂰 Power cap
Note: Because the power saver and power cap functions are only applicable to x86 and
Power Systems, you do not need an Active Energy Manager license for any other IBM
platforms (such as System z) because they only support the no-charge monitoring
functions.
There are two ways you can obtain Active Energy Manager:
򐂰 Order it on CD-ROM
If you order Active Energy Manager on CD-ROM, you must pay for the appropriate number
of licenses. There is a license keyfile on the CD-ROM. Also, ordering it on CD-ROM still
requires you to download the actual code from the Web as all that is on the CD-ROM is the
license key.
򐂰 Download it from the Internet as previously discussed in 3.5, “Downloading the software”
on page 39.
If you download Active Energy Manager from the Internet, you can use it for evaluation
purposes for up to 60 days under the terms of the IBM International License Agreement
for Evaluation of programs (ILAE). The 60-day evaluation period begins the first time you
start Active Energy Manager, and the number of days left on the evaluation license
appears in the status bar at the bottom of the Active Energy Manager console window.
The day the evaluation license expires is also displayed.
The evaluation license enables use of the optional (chargeable) power management
functions. During the evaluation period, you are offered an option to purchase a
permanent license. If you purchase a permanent license, a keyfile is shipped on a
CD-ROM. Once you install the license, the optional power management functions are
enabled, and function just as they did during the evaluation period with your configurations
and settings remaining intact. However, if the 60-day evaluation period expires without the
purchase of a license, the Active Energy Manager power management functions are
disabled. The monitoring functions, on the other hand, do not require the keyfile and
remain enabled.
Note: The Active Energy Manager console does not require a license.
56
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Refer to the announcement letters on the following Web sites for details of Active Energy
Manager licensing:
򐂰 On Power Systems:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/9/897/ENUS207-289/ENUS207289.PDF
򐂰 On x86 systems:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/7/897/ENUS207-287/ENUS207287.PDF
3.6.3 Active Energy Manager licensing roadmap
To obtain the correct type and number of Active Energy Manager licenses that you need,
perform the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Establish which IBM systems require an Active Energy Manager license.
Categorize each identified IBM system as to its size.
Order Active Energy Manager licenses.
Order software subscription for Active Energy Manager licenses.
This section covers each of these steps in more detail.
Establish which IBM systems require an Active Energy Manager license
As previously mentioned, the only Active Energy Manager functions that you need a license
for are the power management functions of power saver and power cap. Not every power
managed system supports the power saver or power cap functions. Power managed systems
that support power saver and power cap are listed in Table 3-1 on page 26.
Once you have established which of your IBM systems support either the power saver or
power cap functions, you then need to categorize each server in terms of its size.
Categorize each identified IBM system as to its size
The chargeable power management functions have a system size-specific price structure
based upon the type of server being managed. After you have determined which of your
systems actually require an Active Energy Manager license, you need to categorize each of
these systems by size. The following list is a definition of the server categories:
򐂰 Small server
–
–
–
–
System x machines
BladeCenter x86 and POWER6 blade servers
System p and Power 5xx machines in Processor Groups C5, D5, and E5
System i and Power 5xx machines in Processor Groups P05, P10, and P20
򐂰 Medium server
– System p and Power 5xx machines in Processor Group F5
– System i and Power 5xx machines in Processor Groups P30 and P40
򐂰 Large server
– System p and Power 5xx machines in Processor Groups G5 and H5
– System i and Power 5xx machines in Processor Groups P50 and P60
– System z machines
Note: These models are currently available in the associated processor groups as at the
time of writing this document, but will change over time. Check the Active Energy Manager
announcement letters for updates to this list.
Chapter 3. Planning for Active Energy Manager
57
Order Active Energy Manager licenses
After you have determined the number and size of the IBM systems for which to order Active
Energy Manager licenses, follow the instructions under the appropriate following bullet:
򐂰 Ordering Active Energy Manager licenses for x86 architecture systems
For details on how to order and price Active Energy Manager licenses for x86 architecture
systems, consult the Ordering information and Prices section in the announcement letter
at the following Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/7/897/ENUS207-287/ENUS207287.PDF
To buy Active Energy Manager licenses for x86 architecture systems, go to the following
Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/buy.html
򐂰 Ordering Active Energy Manager licenses for Power Systems
For details on how to order and price Active Energy Manager licenses for Power Systems,
consult the Ordering information and Prices section in the announcement letter at the
following Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/9/897/ENUS207-289/ENUS207289.PDF
The announcement letter only contains ordering and pricing features. To order Active
Energy Manager licenses and obtain prices, contact your IBM representative.
Order software subscription for Active Energy Manager licenses
Software subscription provides support and program upgrades for Active Energy Manager.
One year of software subscription for Active Energy Manager and associated programs is
included with the license for the product. You must place a separate order for subscription
registration at the time of initial order or supply of the product. After one year, software
subscription must be renewed. A one year software subscription option is available. Acquiring
program upgrades for eligible offerings under software subscription is available only through a
current and active software subscription contract.
To order software subscription for Active Energy Manager licenses, follow the instructions
under the appropriate following bullet:
򐂰 Ordering software subscription for x86 systems
For details on how to order and price software subscription for Active Energy Manager
licenses on x86 architecture systems consult the Software subscription and Prices section
in the announcement letter at the following Web page:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/7/897/ENUS207-287/ENUS207287.PDF
To actually buy Active Energy Manager software subscription for x86 architecture systems,
go to the following Web page:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/buy.html
򐂰 Ordering software subscription for Power Systems
For details on how to order and price software subscription for Active Energy Manager
licenses on Power Systems, consult the Ordering information and Prices section in the
announcement letter at the following Web page:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/9/897/ENUS207-289/ENUS207289.PDF
The announcement letter only contains ordering and pricing features. To order software
subscription and obtain prices, contact your IBM representative.
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4
Chapter 4.
Installing Active Energy Manager
This chapter provides step by step instructions for installing IBM Systems Director Active
Energy Manager on Windows and Linux platforms.
Important: IBM does not support Active Energy Manager if an express install of IBM
Systems Director server was used. Even if you have IBM Systems Director server
installed, you must follow most of the steps covered in this chapter.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
59
4.1 Overview of the installation process
Active Energy Manager must be installed on both the IBM Systems Director server and an
IBM Systems Director console. The IBM Systems Director server and console can be
installed on either Windows or Linux or both. For a list of supported Windows and Linux
versions, see Chapter 3, “Planning for Active Energy Manager” on page 21. There is also a
standalone version of Active Energy Manager that runs on Windows and Linux using x86
hardware.
This chapter discusses how to install IBM Systems Director server, console, and Active
Energy Manager standalone on your Windows and Linux platforms. The following
components are required to ensure that Active Energy Manager will operate correctly:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
IBM Systems Director
HMC extension
BladeCenter extension
Active Energy Manager
All of these components need to be installed on at least one server and one workstation. The
server requires the IBM Systems Director server code and the workstation requires the IBM
Systems Director console code. You can use the server as your console if you wish as the
IBM Systems Director console is installed by default. Depending on your environment, refer to
the following sections to install Active Energy Manager:
򐂰 If you are installing on a Windows platform, see the following sections:
– Section 4.2, “IBM Systems Director server on Windows for installation of Active Energy
Manager” on page 61
– Section 4.3, “IBM Systems Director console on Windows installation for Active Energy
Manager” on page 77
򐂰 If you are installing on a Linux platform, see the following sections:
– Section 4.4, “IBM Systems Director server on Linux installation for Active Energy
Manager” on page 86
– Section 4.5, “IBM Systems Director console install on Linux” on page 90
򐂰 If you are interested in installing a standalone version of Active Energy Manger, see 4.6,
“Installing the stand-alone version of Active Energy Manager” on page 92.
Note: For the installation examples shown in this chapter, we used version 5.20.2 of IBM
Systems Director server and console and version 3.1 of Active Energy Manager and Active
Energy Manager standalone.
The IBM Systems Director and Active Energy Manager code can be downloaded from the
Web. See 3.5, “Downloading the software” on page 39 for details.
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
4.2 IBM Systems Director server on Windows for installation of
Active Energy Manager
This section provides instructions for installing IBM Systems Director server on a Windows
server for the purposes of using Active Energy Manager and covers the following topics:
򐂰 Section 4.2.1, “Installing IBM Systems Director server for Windows” on page 61
򐂰 Section 4.2.2, “Installing the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Windows”
on page 69
򐂰 Section 4.2.3, “Installing Active Energy Manager on Windows with IBM Systems Director
server” on page 71
򐂰 Section 4.2.4, “Installing Active Energy Manager license on Windows IBM Systems
Director server” on page 74
For more details on IBM Systems Director server, see Implementing IBM Director 5.20,
SG24-6188.
Important: If you have IBM Systems Director server installed already you must ensure that
you have the BladeCenter Management Extension feature installed.
4.2.1 Installing IBM Systems Director server for Windows
This section shows you how to install the IBM Systems Director server which includes the
IBM Systems Director console on a Windows platform. Perform the following steps:
1. Insert the IBM Systems Director CD into the CD tray of the Windows server.
2. In the IBM Director Setup window (Figure 4-1), click Install IBM Director Server.
Note: If you are installing IBM Systems Director server on a system, you do not need to
install IBM Systems Director console on that system. The IBM Systems Director
console is automatically installed during the server install process.
Figure 4-1 IBM Systems Director Setup window
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
61
3. In the IBM Director Server - InstallShield Wizard window (Figure 4-2), click Next.
Figure 4-2 IBM Director Server InstallShield wizard
4. In the License Agreement window (Figure 4-3), read the terms of the license agreement,
select I accept the terms in the license agreement, and click Next.
Figure 4-3 License agreement
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
5. In the Installation Type window (Figure 4-4), click Next.
Important: Do not check the Perform an Express installation of IBM Systems Director
server, this does not install everything that is required for Active Energy Manager.
Figure 4-4 Installation type
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
63
6. In the Feature and installation directory selection window (Figure 4-5), which shows the
default features of the IBM Systems Director server to be installed, expand BladeCenter
Management Extension and select This feature will be Installed on local hard drive.
Click Next.
Important: The BladeCenter Management Extension feature must be installed for
Active Energy Manager.
Figure 4-5 Selecting the BladeCenter Management Extension feature
7. In the IBM Director service account information window, you must enter a User name and
Password as shown in Figure 4-6. Click Next.
Figure 4-6 IBM Systems Director account service information
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
8. In the Encryptions settings window (Figure 4-7), the default is to have encryption turned
on. Click Next.
Important: If you choose to have your server encrypted then your IBM Systems
Director agents will also need to be encrypted as well.
Figure 4-7 Encryption settings
9. In the Software Distribution settings window (Figure 4-8), click Next.
Figure 4-8 Software distribution settings
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
65
10.In the Ready to Install the Program window (Figure 4-9), click Install.
Figure 4-9 Ready to install IBM Systems Director server
11.In the Network driver configuration window (Figure 4-10), click OK.
Figure 4-10 Network driver configuration
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
12.In the IBM Director database configuration window (Figure 4-11), select the default
database application of Apache Derby and click Next.
Figure 4-11 IBM Systems Director database configuration
13.In the IBM Director Apache Derby Database configuration pop-up window (Figure 4-12),
enter a database name and click Next.
Figure 4-12 Specifying a database name
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
67
14.In the InstallShield Wizard Completed window (Figure 4-13), click Finish.
Figure 4-13 InstallShield wizard completed
15.After you are finished with the installation of IBM Systems Director server for Windows,
you are prompted to restart your machine (Figure 4-14).
Caution: Make sure if you are working in a production environment that you are able to
restart the Windows server before you click Yes. Otherwise click No.
Figure 4-14 Restarting the Windows server after installing IBM Systems Director server
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
4.2.2 Installing the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on
Windows
After installing the IBM Systems Director server code on your Window server, you must install
the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Windows. Perform the following steps:
1. Download and run the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server from the IBM
Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.5, “Downloading the IBM Systems Director HMC
extension files” on page 48 for details.
2. In the HMC extension for IBM Director Server - InstallShield Wizard window (Figure 4-15),
click Next.
Figure 4-15 HMC extension for IBM Director Server InstallShield wizard
3. In the License Agreement window (Figure 4-16), read the terms of the license agreement
and select I accept the terms in the license agreement. Click Next.
Figure 4-16 License agreement
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
69
4. In the Destination Folder window (Figure 4-17), click Next.
Figure 4-17 Destination folder
5. In the Ready to Install the Program window (Figure 4-18), click Install.
Figure 4-18 Ready to install the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Windows
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
6. In the InstallShield Wizard Completed window (Figure 4-19), click Finish.
Figure 4-19 InstallShield wizard completed
4.2.3 Installing Active Energy Manager on Windows with IBM Systems
Director server
After you have installed the IBM Systems Director server code on your Windows server and
the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Windows, you are ready to install
Active Energy Manager on the IBM Systems Director server. Perform the following steps:
1. Download and run the installation program for Active Energy Manager from the IBM
Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.6, “Downloading the Active Energy Manager
extension version files” on page 50 for details.
2. In the Active Energy Manager 3.1 - InstallShield Wizard window (Figure 4-20), click Next.
Figure 4-20 Active Energy Manager InstallShield wizard
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
71
3. In the License Agreement window (Figure 4-21), read the terms of the license agreement
and select I accept the terms in the license agreement. Click Next.
Figure 4-21 License agreement
4. If your IBM Systems Director server is running at this point you will get the Director Server
Control Notification window (Figure 4-22). Click Next. If your IBM Systems Director server
is not running, you will not see this window and can continue with step 5 on page 73.
Figure 4-22 Warning message that IBM Systems Director server must be stopped
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
5. In the Ready to Install the Program window (Figure 4-23), click Install.
Figure 4-23 Ready to install Active Energy Manager on the IBM Systems Director server
If your IBM Systems Director server was running as discussed in step 4 on page 72, you
will see the stopping IBM Systems Director window (Figure 4-22 on page 72). Otherwise
you see the Installing Active Energy Manager 3.1 window shown in Figure 4-24.
Figure 4-24 Installing Active Energy Manager
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
73
6. In the InstallShield Wizard Completed window (Figure 4-25), click Finish.
Figure 4-25 Active Energy Manager successfully installed
4.2.4 Installing Active Energy Manager license on Windows IBM Systems
Director server
Perform the following steps to install the Active Energy Manager license on the Windows IBM
Systems Director server:
Note: The Active Energy Manager license is only available on CD.
1. Insert the Active Energy Manager license CD into the CDROM drive tray of the Windows
server.
If you see the message shown in Figure 4-26, you do not have Active Energy Manager
installed on this machine.
Figure 4-26 Active Energy Manager not installed message
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
2. The CD autostarts and you see the Active Energy Manager License InstallShield Wizard
(Figure 4-27). Click Next.
Figure 4-27 Active Energy Manager License InstallShield wizard
3. In the License Agreement window (Figure 4-28), read the terms of the license agreement
and select I accept the terms in the license agreement. Click Next.
Figure 4-28 License agreement
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
75
4. In the Ready to Install the Program window (Figure 4-29), click Install.
Figure 4-29 Ready to install the Active Energy Manager license
5. In the InstallShield Wizard Completed window (Figure 4-30), click Finish.
Figure 4-30 Active Energy Manager license successfully installed
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
4.3 IBM Systems Director console on Windows installation for
Active Energy Manager
This section describes the steps for installing IBM Systems Director console on Windows and
covers the following topics:
򐂰 Section 4.3.1, “Installing IBM Systems Director console install for Windows” on page 77
򐂰 Section 4.3.2, “Installing HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console on Windows”
on page 80
򐂰 Section 4.3.3, “Installing Active Energy Manager on Windows” on page 83
Note: If you have IBM Systems Director server installed on this system you do not need to
install the IBM Systems Director console.
4.3.1 Installing IBM Systems Director console install for Windows
Perform the following steps to install the IBM Systems Director console on a Windows
workstation:
1. Insert the IBM Systems Director CD into the CD tray of the Windows workstation.
2. In the autorun window from the IBM Systems Director CD (Figure 4-31), click Install IBM
Director Console.
Figure 4-31 Autorun menu from IBM Systems Director CD
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
77
3. In the IBM Director Console - InstallShield Wizard window (Figure 4-32), click Next.
Figure 4-32 IBM Systems Director console InstallShield wizard
4. In the License Agreement window (Figure 4-33), read the terms of the license agreement
and select I accept the terms in the license agreement. Click Next.
Figure 4-33 License agreement
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
5. In the Feature and installation directory selection window (Figure 4-34), expand
BladeCenter Management Extension and select This feature will be installed on local
hard drive. Click Next.
Important: The BladeCenter Management Extension must be installed in order for
Active Energy Manager to be installed successfully.
Figure 4-34 Selecting the BladeCenter Management Extension feature
6. In the Ready to Install the Program window (Figure 4-35), click Install.
Figure 4-35 Ready to install the IBM Systems Director console
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
79
7. In the InstallShield Wizard Completed window (Figure 4-36), click Finish.
Figure 4-36 IBM Systems Director console successfully installed
4.3.2 Installing HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console on Windows
After installing the IBM Systems Director console on your Windows workstation, you must
install the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console. Perform the following steps:
1. Download and run the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server from the IBM
Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.5, “Downloading the IBM Systems Director HMC
extension files” on page 48 for details.
2. In the HMC extension for IBM Director Console - InstallShield Wizard window
(Figure 4-37), click Next.
Figure 4-37 HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console InstallShield wizard
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
3. In the License Agreement window (Figure 4-38), read the terms of the license agreement
and select I accept the terms in the license agreement and click Next.
Figure 4-38 License agreement
4. In the Destination Folder window (Figure 4-39), click Next.
Figure 4-39 Destination folder
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
81
5. In the Ready to Install the Program window (Figure 4-40), click Install.
Figure 4-40 Ready to install the HMC extension for the IBM Systems Director console
6. In the InstallShield Wizard Completed window (Figure 4-41), click Finish.
Figure 4-41 HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console successfully installed
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
4.3.3 Installing Active Energy Manager on Windows
After you have installed the IBM Systems Director console and the HMC extension for IBM
Systems Director console on your Windows workstation, you are ready to install the Active
Energy Manager. Perform the following steps:
1. Download and run the installation program for Active Energy Manager from the IBM
Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.6, “Downloading the Active Energy Manager
extension version files” on page 50 for details.
2. In the Active Energy Manager 3.1 - InstallShield Wizard window (Figure 4-42). click Next.
Figure 4-42 Active Energy Manager 3.1 installation wizard
If you get the error message shown in Figure 4-43, then you missed step 5 on page 79.
Figure 4-43 Active Energy Manger installer information
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
83
3. In the License Agreement window (Figure 4-44), read the terms of the license agreement
and select I accept the terms in the license agreement. Click Next.
Figure 4-44 Active Energy Manager license agreement
If you get the error message shown Figure 4-45, then you missed installing the HMC
extension for IBM Systems Director console on Windows as covered in 4.3.2, “Installing
HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console on Windows” on page 80.
Important: The HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console does not need to be
installed unless you are managing System i and System p machines.
Figure 4-45 Hardware Management Console not found error message
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
4. In the Ready to Install the Program window (Figure 4-46), click Install.
Figure 4-46 Ready to install Active Energy Manager
5. In the InstallShield Wizard Completed window (Figure 4-47), the Active Energy Manager
installation has completed successfully. Click Finish.
Figure 4-47 Active Energy Manager successfully installed
You are now ready to begin using Active Energy Manager. For details on using Active Energy
Manager, see Chapter 5, “Using Active Energy Manager” on page 101.
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
85
4.4 IBM Systems Director server on Linux installation for Active
Energy Manager
This section provides instructions for installing IBM Systems Director server on a Linux server
for the purposes of using Active Energy Manager and covers the following topics:
򐂰 Section 4.4.1, “Installing IBM Systems Director server for Linux” on page 86
򐂰 Section 4.4.2, “Installing the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Linux” on
page 89
򐂰 Section 4.4.3, “Installing Active Energy Manager for IBM Systems Director server on
Linux” on page 90
򐂰 Section 4.4.4, “Active Energy Manager for IBM Systems Director on Linux license
installation” on page 90
For more details on IBM Systems Director server, see Implementing IBM Director 5.20,
SG24-6188.
Note: In the examples shown in this section, we use SLES 10 enterprise with xwindows for
our installation.
4.4.1 Installing IBM Systems Director server for Linux
Perform the following steps to install IBM Systems Director server on a Linux server:
1. Insert the IBM Systems Director CD into the CD-ROM drive. Find and mount the CD-ROM
drive. Type the following command and look for the attached CD-ROM:
dmesg | more
Note: For this example, we use sr0 as the device for the CD-ROM drive.
2. Run the following commands:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/sr0 -t iso9660 -r /cdrom
cd /cdrom/director/server/linux/i386
3. Copy the dirserv.rsp file to your system.
4. Find and edit the line in dirserv.rsp file that is currently set to BladeCenter=0 as shown in
Figure 4-48 on page 87. Change this value to a 1. Save and close the file.
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Figure 4-48 Gedit of the dirserv.rsp file
5. To install the IBM Systems Director server for Linux, type the following command:
dirinstall /directory/dirserv.rsp
Press Enter.
Tip: You might need to use a ./ in front of this command. This depends on how your
Linux server is configured.
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
87
6. When you are at the end of the installation, you will get an IBM Systems Director database
configuration window (Figure 4-49). For our example, we selected the default of Apache
Derby. Click Next.
Note: You may choose a database program you have or you can use the Apache Derby
which is packaged with IBM Systems Director server.
Figure 4-49 IBM Systems Director database configuration
7. In the IBM Director Apache Derby Database configuration window (Figure 4-50), specify
the Apache Derby database name and click Next.
Figure 4-50 Specifying a database name
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
As shown in Figure 4-51, you see that the database configuration has finished.
Figure 4-51 IBM Systems Director Apache Derby database configuration completed successfully
8. Run the following command to authorize users to the console:
dircli authusergp name=root type=domain
In this example, we show how to authorize user root to the console
4.4.2 Installing the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Linux
After you have installed the IBM Systems Director server code on your Linux server, you must
install the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Linux. Perform the following
steps:
1. Download and run the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server from the IBM
Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.5, “Downloading the IBM Systems Director HMC
extension files” on page 48 for details.
The files that you need to download for IBM Systems Director version 5.20.2 on Linux
include:
– HMCCommonExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm
– HMCServerExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm
2. Once these files have been downloaded, change to their location using the cd command.
Tip: The following two commands must be done in order.
3. Type the following command:
rpm -ivh HMCCommonExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm
Press Enter to install the common files that are required for the HMC extension for IBM
Systems Director server on Linux.
4. Type the following command:
rpm -ivh HMCServerExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm
Press Enter. This installs the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Linux.
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
89
4.4.3 Installing Active Energy Manager for IBM Systems Director server on
Linux
After you have installed the IBM Systems Director server and the HMC extension for IBM
Systems Director server on your Linux server, you are ready to install Active Energy Manager
on the IBM Systems Director server. Perform the following steps:
1. Download and run the installation program for Active Energy Manager from the IBM
Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.6, “Downloading the Active Energy Manager
extension version files” on page 50 for details.
2. After this file has been downloaded, change to its location using the cd command.
3. Type the following command:
rpm -ivh ActiveEnergyManager-server-3.1-x.noarch.rpm
Press Enter. This installs Active Energy Manager.
Note: If the IBM Systems Director server is running, it will be restarted at this time.
4.4.4 Active Energy Manager for IBM Systems Director on Linux license
installation
Perform the following steps to install the Active Energy Manager license:
1. Insert the Active Energy Manager License CD into the CDROM tray.
2. Locate ActiveEnergyManagerLicense-3.1-x.noarch.rpm.
3. Run rpm -ivh ActiveEnergyManagerLicense-3.1-x.noarch.rpm. In our example, x is
replaced with a number 2.
4.5 IBM Systems Director console install on Linux
This section describes the steps for installing the IBM Systems Director console on Linux and
covers the following topics:
򐂰 Section 4.5.1, “IBM Systems Director install on Linux” on page 91
򐂰 Section 4.5.2, “HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console on Linux” on page 91
򐂰 Section 4.5.3, “Active Energy Manager install on Linux” on page 92
Note: If you have IBM Systems Director server installed on this system you do not need
to install the IBM Systems Director console on that system as well.
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4.5.1 IBM Systems Director install on Linux
Perform the following steps to install IBM Systems Director console on a Linux workstation:
1. Insert the IBM Systems Director CD into the CD-ROM drive. Find and mount the CD-ROM
drive. Type dmesg | more and look for the Attached CD-ROM.
Note: For this example, we use sr0 as the device for the CD-ROM drive.
2. Run the following commands:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/sr0 -t iso9660 -r /cdrom
cd /cdrom/director/console/linux/i386
3. Copy the dircon.rsp file to your system
4. Locate and edit the dircon.rsp file.
5. Look for the BladeCenter=0 line in this file and change this value to a 1. Save the file.
6. Type the following command:
dir5.20.2_console_linux.sh -r /directory/dircon.rsp
Press Enter. This installs the IBM Systems Director console on your Linux workstation.
4.5.2 HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console on Linux
After you have installed the IBM Systems Director console on your Linux workstation, you
must install the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console. Perform the following
steps:
1. Download the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director console from the IBM Systems
Director Web site:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/downloads.html
Download the following files for IBM Systems Director 5.20.2:
– HMCCommonExt-5.20.2-x.noarch.rpm
– HMCConsoleExt-5.20.2-x.noarch.rpm
2. After these files have been downloaded, change to their location using the cd command.
Note: The following two commands must be done in order.
3. Type the following command:
rpm -ivh HMCCommonExt-5.20.2-x.noarch.rpm
Press Enter. This installs the common files needed for the HMC extension.
4. Type the following command:
rpm -ivh HMCConsoleExt-5.20.2-x.noarch.rpm
Press Enter. This installs the HMC Console extension on your IBM Systems Director
console.
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91
4.5.3 Active Energy Manager install on Linux
After you have installed the IBM Systems Director console and the HMC extension for IBM
Systems Director console on your Linux workstation, you are ready to install the Active
Energy Manager. Perform the following steps:
1. Download and run the installation program for Active Energy Manager from the IBM
Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.6, “Downloading the Active Energy Manager
extension version files” on page 50 for details.
2. After this file has been downloaded, change to its location using the cd command.
3. Type the following command:
rpm -ivh ActiveEnergyManager-console-3.1-x.noarch.rpm
Press Enter. This installs Active Energy Manager. You are now ready to begin using Active
Energy Manager. For details on using Active Energy Manager, see Chapter 5, “Using
Active Energy Manager” on page 101.
4.6 Installing the stand-alone version of Active Energy Manager
This section show you how to install the standalone versions of Active Energy Manager on
both the Windows and Linux platforms.
4.6.1 Installing the Active Energy Manager standalone on Windows
To install the stand-alone version of Active Energy Manager on an x86 Windows platform:
1. Download and run the installation program for Active Energy Manager standalone version
from the IBM Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.7, “Downloading the Active Energy
Manager standalone version files” on page 52 for details.
2. In the Active Energy Manager 3.1 Standalone - InstallShield Wizard window (Figure 4-52),
click Next.
Figure 4-52 Active Energy Manager 3.1 Standalone InstallShield Wizard
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3. In the License Agreement window (Figure 4-53), read the terms of the license agreement
and select I accept the terms in the license agreement. Click Next.
Figure 4-53 License agreement
4. In the Destination Folder window (Figure 4-54), click Next.
Figure 4-54 Destination folder
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
93
5. Fill out the information in the service account information window (Figure 4-55). The Local
computer name or domain field is filled in automatically. Click Next.
Figure 4-55 Specifying the service account information
6. In the Ready to Install the Program window (Figure 4-56), click Install.
Figure 4-56 Ready to install the Active Energy Manager standalone version
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7. In the InstallShield Wizard Completed window (Figure 4-57), click Finish.
Figure 4-57 Active Energy Manager 3.1 Standalone successfully installed
8. Restart your machine when prompted, as shown in Figure 4-58.
Caution: Make sure if you are working in a production environment that you are able to
restart the Windows server before you click Yes. Otherwise click No.
Figure 4-58 Active Energy Manager Standalone reboot
4.6.2 Installing the Active Energy Manager standalone on Linux
This section shows you how to install the standalone version of Active Energy Manager on a
x86 Linux platform. Perform the following steps:
1. Download and run the installation program for Active Energy Manager standalone version
from the IBM Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.7, “Downloading the Active Energy
Manager standalone version files” on page 52 for details.
2. After this file has been downloaded, change to its location using the cd command.
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3. Type the following command:
rpm -ivh ActiveEnergyManagerSA-3.1-x.i386.rpm
Press Enter. This installs Active Energy Manager standalone application.
4.7 Migration from PowerExecutive to Active Energy Manager
This section discusses how to migrate from PowerExecutive to the Active Energy Manager
and covers the following topics:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Section 4.7.1, “Migration for a Windows server” on page 96
Section 4.7.2, “Migration for a Linux server” on page 97
Section 4.7.3, “Migrating the Windows standalone” on page 99
Section 4.7.4, “Migrating to the Linux standalone version” on page 100
4.7.1 Migration for a Windows server
This section shows you how to migrate a Windows server running PowerExecutive to Active
Energy Manager. This process is much like a full installation. Perform the following steps:
1. Uninstall the HMC extension for Windows if it installed.
2. Update or install IBM Systems Director server version 5.20.2. See 4.2.1, “Installing IBM
Systems Director server for Windows” on page 61 for details.
3. Install the HMC Console if required. See 4.2.2, “Installing the HMC extension for IBM
Systems Director server on Windows” on page 69 for details.
4. Install Active Energy Manager. See 4.2.3, “Installing Active Energy Manager on Windows
with IBM Systems Director server” on page 71 for details. You will see a warning about
upgrading the Power Executive database as shown in Figure 4-59 on page 97.
Attention: This upgrade to the database cannot be reversed. We recommend that you
backup the PowerExecutive database before upgrading to Active Energy Manager. If
you need to revert back to using PowerExecutive and you did not backup the database,
you cannot recover your data.
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Figure 4-59 Database upgrade warning window
4.7.2 Migration for a Linux server
This section shows you how to migrate a Linux server running PowerExecutive to Active
Energy Manager. This process is much like a full installation. Perform the following steps:
1. Insert the IBM Systems Director CD into the CD-ROM drive. Find and mount the CD-ROM
drive. Type dmesg | more and look for the attached CD-ROM.
Note: For this example, we use sr0 as the device for the CD-ROM drive.
2. Run the following commands:
mkdir /cdrom
mount /dev/sr0 -t iso9660 -r /cdrom
cd /cdrom/director/server/linux/i386
3. Copy the dirserv.rsp file to your system.
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
97
4. Find and edit the line in dirserv.rsp file that is currently set to BladeCenter=0 as shown in
Figure 4-60. Change this value to a 1. Save and close the file.
Figure 4-60 Gedit of the dirserv.rsp file
You are now ready to install the IBM Systems Director server for Linux.
5. Type the following command:
dirinstall /directory/dirserv.rsp
Press Enter.
Tip: You might need to use a ./ in front of this command. This depends on how your
Linux server is configured.
6. Type the following command:
rpm -U HMCCommonExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm
Press Enter. This upgrades the common files required for the HMC extension for IBM
Systems Director server on Linux.
7. Type the following command:
rpm -U HMCServerExt-5.20.2-1.noarch.rpm
Press Enter. This upgrades the HMC extension for IBM Systems Director server on Linux.
8. Type the following command:
rpm -U ActiveEnergyManager-console-3.1-x.noarch.rpm
Press Enter. This upgrades you to Active Energy Manager. You will see a notice about
updating the PowerExecutive database.
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Attention: This upgrade to the database cannot be reversed. We recommend that you
backup the PowerExecutive database before upgrading to Active Energy Manager. If
you need to revert back to using PowerExecutive and you did not backup the database,
you cannot recover your data.
4.7.3 Migrating the Windows standalone
This section shows you how to migrate from PowerExecutive to the Active Energy Manager
standalone version on Windows. Perform the following steps:
1. Refer to 4.6.1, “Installing the Active Energy Manager standalone on Windows” on page 92,
for details on installing the Active Energy Manger standalone version.
2. You will see one additional window (Figure 4-61) warning you about the PowerExecutive
database upgrade.
Attention: This upgrade to the database cannot be reversed. We recommend that you
backup the PowerExecutive database before upgrading to Active Energy Manager. If
you need to revert back to using PowerExecutive and you did not backup the database,
you cannot recover your data.
Figure 4-61 Database upgrade warning
Chapter 4. Installing Active Energy Manager
99
4.7.4 Migrating to the Linux standalone version
This section shows you how to migrate from PowerExecutive to the Active Energy Manager
standalone version on Linux. Perform the following steps:
1. Download and run the installation program for Active Energy Manager standalone version
from the IBM Systems Director Web site. See 3.5.7, “Downloading the Active Energy
Manager standalone version files” on page 52 for details.
2. When this file has been downloaded, you must change to its location using the cd
command.
3. Type the following command:
rpm -ivh ActiveEnergyManagerSA-3.1-x.i386.rpm
Press Enter. This installs Active Energy Manager standalone application. You will see a
notice about updating the PowerExecutive database.
Attention: This upgrade to the database cannot be reversed. We recommend that you
backup the PowerExecutive database before upgrading to Active Energy Manager. If
you need to revert back to using PowerExecutive and you did not backup the database,
you cannot recover your data.
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5
Chapter 5.
Using Active Energy Manager
This chapter shows you how to use Active Energy Manager.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
101
5.1 Overview of Active Energy Manager
As described in Chapter 3, “Planning for Active Energy Manager” on page 21, Active Energy
Manager is a product that provides power management function on top of the base IBM
Systems Director product. In this section we show you how the different parts of the IBM
Systems Director and Active Energy Manager environments relate to each other and describe
the various terms used throughout this chapter.
5.1.1 Architecture
Figure 5-1 shows a high level view of the IBM Systems Director and Active Energy Manager
environments and their object management domains. For a description of the terms used in
Figure 5-1, refer to 5.1.2, “Terminology” on page 106.
IBM Systems Director server
Active Energy
Manager server
Active Energy
Manager
providers
Other
IBM
Systems
Director
managed
objects
IBM Systems Director
managed objects
Other
Active Energy
Manager power
managed objects
Active Energy Manager
power managed objects
Figure 5-1 IBM Systems Director and Active Energy Manager object management domains
Note the following points in Figure 5-1:
򐂰 Power managed objects are objects that can be managed by an Active Energy Manager
server. They comprise the Active Energy Manager providers and objects being power
managed by Active Energy Manager providers.
For definitions of an Active Energy Manager provider and power managed object, refer to
5.1.2, “Terminology” on page 106.
򐂰 Active Energy Manager providers are also IBM Systems Director managed objects.
Therefore, you see Active Energy Manager providers in the IBM Systems Director console
Managed Objects pane, along with other IBM Systems Director managed objects.
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Figure 5-2 shows the management domains of the IBM Systems Director console and the
Active Energy Manager console.
IBM Systems Director server
Active Energy
Manager server
IBM Systems Director console
Active Energy Manager providers
zHMC HMC
IVM
BC
MM
RSA
BMC
Other Active Energy Manager
power managed objects
FSP
iPDU
Other
IBM
Systems
Director
managed
objects
Non-Active
Energy Manager
capable devices
Active Energy Manager console
Figure 5-2 IBM Systems Director console and Active Energy Manager console domains
Note the following points in Figure 5-2:
򐂰 The IBM Systems Director console can manage all IBM Systems Director managed
objects as well as all Active Energy Manager providers.
򐂰 The Active Energy Manager console can manage all power managed objects except the
following Active Energy Manager providers:
– System z Hardware Management Console (zHMC)
– Hardware Management Console (HMC)
– Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM)
The reason for this is that the zHMC, HMC, and IVM are acting as power management
proxies. Unlike the BC MM, RSA, BMC, FSP, and PDU+, they do not control power
managed systems directly.
򐂰 The IBM Systems Director console and the Active Energy Manager console open in
different windows.
򐂰 The PDU+ normally manages devices that are not Active Energy Manager-capable, but
some power managed objects can also be connected to a PDU+ and gain additional
Active Energy Manager functionality. PDU+ connected devices that are not Active Energy
Manager capable do not appear in the Active Energy Manager console.
Chapter 5. Using Active Energy Manager
103
Figure 5-3 shows the types of IBM systems that can be managed by Active Energy Manager,
and the Active Energy Manager providers that control these systems from a power
management perspective.
Active Energy Manager server
TCP/IP network
HMC
FSP
POWER6
System i
or
System p
IVM
FSP
POWER6
System i
or
System p
BC
MM
RSA
BMC
SE
x86
blade
server
System x
rack
server
System x
rack
server
System
z10
POWER
blade
server
zHMC
FSP
POWER6
System i
or
System p
Cell
blade
server
iPDU
Nonpower
managed
objects:
Legacy
Storage
I/O
Non-IBM
Figure 5-3 Active Energy Manager providers and managed systems
Note the following points in Figure 5-3:
򐂰 The Active Energy Manager server can power manage a POWER6 system in four ways:
– Directly, by communicating with the system’s integrated FSP
A POWER6 System i, System p, or Power 5xx system always has an integrated FSP
(service processor) which provides management capabilities. You would normally
communicate directly with the FSP to power manage a POWER6 system only when it
is not being managed by an HMC or IVM.
– Indirectly, by communicating with the system’s managing HMC or IVM
A POWER6 System i, System p, or Power 5xx system is usually managed by an
external HMC which provides additional management capabilities compared with an
FSP, and can manage multiple POWER6 systems concurrently. In this case, Active
Energy Manager communicates with the FSP on the power managed system through
its controlling HMC.
The following Power 5xx systems are also supported by Active Energy Manager when
managed by IVM as an alternative to an HMC:
•
•
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 550 (4.0 GHz and above models only)
As for the HMC, Active Energy Manager communicates with the FSP on the power
managed system through its controlling IVM.
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
– Indirectly, by communicating with the server’s managing IVM
As previously mentioned, the 8203 E4A-Power 520 and 8204 E8A-Power 550 systems
can also be managed by IVM as an alternative to an HMC.
IVM is a tool that has the following capabilities:
•
It is a component of the PowerVM™ Express, Standard, and Enterprise editions.
PowerVM is virtualization software for Power systems from IBM.
•
It runs in an AIX® partition under Virtual I/O Server (VIOS).
•
Its main function is the creation and management of partitions.
•
It provides similar partition creation and management capabilities to the HMC. It can
only manage one 8203 E4A-Power 520 or 8204 E8A-Power 550, whereas an HMC
can manage multiple systems.
– Indirectly, by communicating with a PDU+ that has POWER6 System i, System p, or
Power 5xx systems attached. Note, however, that the PDU+ provides a lower level of
power management function than if the Active Energy Manager server were to be
connected directly to the FSP, HMC, or IVM of the POWER6 System i, System p, or
Power 5xx system, except for the 9117 MMA-Power 570, 9406-MMA System i 570, and
the 9117-MMA System p 570. This is because these systems only support the power
saver function natively. Connection to a PDU+ can provide additional Active Energy
Manager functionality.
򐂰 The PDU+ is intended to provide limited Active Energy Manager functionality to attached
existing devices, storage, I/O drawers, and other devices that cannot otherwise be
managed by Active Energy Manager.
򐂰 In the case of x86 architecture blade servers and System x rack servers, the following is
true:
– The Active Energy Manager interface to a BladeCenter is the management module
(BC MM in Figure 5-3 on page 104).
– The Active Energy Manager interface to an IBM System x rack or tower server is either
an RSA or BMC.
– The BC MM, RSA, and BMC provide an energy management interface to an Active
Energy Manager server in a similar way to an FSP. The BC MM, RSA, BMC, and FSP
are all systems management devices that are integrated into their respective server
hardware in the following manner:
•
•
•
•
BC MM: BladeCenter
RSA: System x rack or tower server
BMC: System x rack or tower server
FSP: System i, System p or Power 5xx server
򐂰 The Active Energy Manager server can monitor a System z10 by communicating with its
managing zHMC. System z10 is always managed by an external zHMC which provides
additional management capabilities to the Support Element (SE). The zHMC can manage
multiple System z10 systems as well as other System z models.
The SE of a System z10 provides similar management functions to an FSP, BC MM, RSA,
or BMC. There are some differences:
– The SE cannot connect directly to an Active Energy Manager server. It must connect
through a zHMC.
– The SE is a separate machine (for example an IBM ThinkPad) that is tightly coupled
with the System z10 Central Processor Complex (CPC) from a management
perspective, but is not physically integrated into the frame of the System z10 like the
FSP, BC MM, RSA, and BMC.
Chapter 5. Using Active Energy Manager
105
5.1.2 Terminology
To help you understand the terminology used in Figure 5-1 on page 102, Figure 5-2 on
page 103, and Figure 5-3 on page 104, we provide the following definitions:
Device
A device, in the context of this chapter, is a generic term we use to represent a computer
or other piece of equipment in an IBM Systems Director or Active Energy Manager
environment. Devices can be IBM Systems Director managed objects or Active Energy
Manager power managed objects.
We also refer to machines connected to a PDU+ as devices if they have no inherent Active
Energy Manager power management capabilities.
IBM Systems Director managed object
IBM Systems Director managed objects are devices that can be managed by IBM
Systems Director server, and appear in the Managed Objects pane of the IBM Systems
Director console. Based on their type, IBM Systems Director managed objects are
gathered together into groups that appear in the Groups pane of the IBM Systems Director
console.
Active Energy Manager provider
An Active Energy Manager provider is an IBM Systems Director managed object that the
Active Energy Manager server can communicate with to retrieve power-related data on
behalf of power managed objects that the provider is controlling.
Active Energy Manager providers can be thought of as guardians of, or gateways to,
systems whose power consumption can be monitored and managed. These systems are
termed power managed objects. You must authenticate to the Active Energy Manager
provider before you can gain access to the power managed objects that the provider is
controlling.
Active Energy Manager providers have the capability to monitor and manage the power
usage of the power managed objects they are controlling using a level of functionality that
depends on the type of object and the type of provider.
The following list details the Active Energy Manager providers:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
System z Hardware Management Console (zHMC)
Hardware Management Console (HMC)
Integrated Virtualization Manager (IVM)
BladeCenter management module (BC MM)
Remote Support Adapter (RSA)
Baseboard Management Controller (BMC)
Flexible Service Processor (FSP)
Intelligent Power Distribution Unit (PDU+)
Power managed object
Power managed objects are devices that can be managed by an Active Energy Manager
server. They comprise Active Energy Manager providers and devices being power
managed by Active Energy Manager providers.
Power managed objects include power managed systems and other devices that are not
actual systems, such as BladeCenter media trays, power domains, and blower modules.
We exclude devices connected to a PDU+ and other devices that have no inherent power
management capabilities from our definition of power managed objects.
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Power managed systems
Power managed systems are IBM systems that support Active Energy Manager functions.
This includes the following examples:
–
–
–
–
–
–
System z10
System i
System p
Power 5xx
System x rack or tower servers
x86 and POWER6 architecture blade servers
Power managed systems are a subset of power managed objects.
Managed server
Managed server is a generic term we use to refer to IBM systems that are either IBM
Systems Director managed objects or Active Energy Manager power managed systems.
Managed object
Depending on the context, we use the term managed object generically to refer to either
an IBM Systems Director managed object or an Active Energy Manager power managed
object.
5.1.3 Active Energy Manager supported environments
The Active Energy Manager functions that are available on each supported IBM platform vary.
Table 5-1 on page 108 shows you which Active Energy Manager functions are available for
the different supported IBM power managed systems and the Active Energy Manager
interface that you can use to power manage these systems. In the context of this document a
supported IBM power managed system is the same as an IBM Systems Director-managed
object that supports Active Energy Manager functionality.
Note: Table 5-1 is accurate at the time this publication was written but will change over
time as additional systems are supported.
Note the following points:
򐂰 The EnergyScale power cap function is implicit on all POWER6 processor-based systems.
For more information about the EnergyScale power cap function refer to Chapter 2, “IBM
energy management concepts and technologies” on page 13.
򐂰 The EnergyScale for I/O function is implicit on all POWER6 processor-based systems
except POWER6 blade. The power savings achieved by this function get factored into the
calculation of Pcap min and Pcap max. For more information about the EnergyScale for
I/O function refer to Chapter 2, “IBM energy management concepts and technologies” on
page 13.
򐂰 Power trending implies thermal trending and CPU trending, except in the case of a PDU+
and zHMC which do not support CPU trending.
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107
Table 5-1 Power managed systems and Active Energy Manager functions for each interface
Active Energy Manager
provider
Power managed systems
FSP direct4
FSP through HMC
򐂰
򐂰
9406 MMA-System i 570
9117 MMA-System p 5705
FSP direct4
FSP through HMC
FSP through IVM10,11
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 5505
9125 F2A-Power 575
9119 FHA-Power 595
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Power trending
Thermal trending
CPU trending
Power saver6,7
Power cap
PDU+
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9406 MMA-System i 5703
9117 MMA-System p 5703
Existing IBM systems
IBM Storage systems
I/O drawers
Other IBM devices
Non-IBM devices
򐂰
򐂰
Power trending
Thermal trending
zHMC
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
System z10 EC E12 (2097 E12)
System z10 EC E26 (2097 E26)
System z10 EC E40 (2097 E40)
System z10 EC E56 (2097 E56)
System z10 EC E64 (2097 E64)
򐂰
򐂰
Power trending
Thermal trending
IVM11
򐂰
7998 60X-IBM BladeCenter JS12
Express server5
7998 61X-IBM BladeCenter JS22
server
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Power trending
Thermal trending
CPU trending
Power saver
Power cap
򐂰
108
Active Energy Manager
functions supported
Power saver6,7
BladeCenter
management module
򐂰
IBM x86 architecture blade servers1
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Power trending
Thermal trending
CPU trending
Power saver8
Power cap9
Remote Support Adapter
(RSA)
Baseboard Management
Controller (BMC)
򐂰
IBM System x rack and tower servers2
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Power trending
Thermal trending
CPU trending
Power saver8
Power cap9
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Active Energy Manager
provider
Power managed systems
Active Energy Manager
functions supported
1
For a list of x86 architecture blade servers that support Active Energy Manager power monitoring
and power management functions refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_manag
ed_systems.html
2
For a list of IBM System x rack and tower servers that support Active Energy Manager power
monitoring and power management functions refer to the Web site listed above.
3
A PDU+ provides additional power management function for a 9117-MMA Power 570, 9406
MMA-System i 570 or a 9117 MMA-System p 570 because power trending and thermal trending are
not available for these systems through the FSP or HMC. You may have a separate connection to the
FSP or HMC of these systems to access the power saver function concurrently with other functions
provided by the PDU+.
4 If
the system whose FSP you are trying to connect to is managed by an HMC or IVM, IBM Systems
Director cannot discover the system’s FSP directly. Instead, discover the system using the managing
HMC or IVM.
5 Power saver mode is only available on those models whose POWER6 processors are rated at
greater than or equal to 4.0 GHz, and only if feature code 1800 (GX dual port RIO-2 attach) is not
present.
6 In
addition to the Active Energy Manager provider interface, power saver mode can also be set
directly through the HMC graphical user interface for these systems. Refer to 5.13.3, “Setting power
saver using the HMC” on page 192.
7 In
addition to the Active Energy Manager provider interface, power saver mode can also be set
directly through ASMI for these systems. You can access ASMI either through the HMC, or by
connecting directly to the FSP. Refer to 5.13.4, “Setting power saver through the FSP using ASMI” on
page 196.
8 The
dynamic power saving function is supported on selected Intel and AMD processors. This
function is similar, but not identical to the POWER6 EnergyScale Power Saver function. Dynamic
power saving is system controlled and enabled in the BIOS. For dynamic power saving to become
operational, the operating system must also support it. For a list of IBM systems that support this
function, refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_manag
ed_systems.html
9
The power cap function is supported on selected Intel and AMD processors. This function is similar,
but not identical to the POWER6 EnergyScale function of the same name. For a list of IBM systems
that support this function, refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_manag
ed_systems.html
10
In an Active Energy Manager environment, IVM only supports the 8203 E4A-Power 520 and the
8204 E8A-Power 550.
11
Accessing Active Energy Manager functions through IVM is only supported with IBM Systems
Director server running on Linux.
Chapter 5. Using Active Energy Manager
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5.2 Navigating around IBM Systems Director console
As described in Chapter 3, “Planning for Active Energy Manager” on page 21 and Chapter 4,
“Installing Active Energy Manager” on page 59 there are two versions of Active Energy
Manager:
򐂰 IBM Systems Director version full version
With this version, you first install IBM Systems Director and then you install Active Energy
Manager on top of it. This gives you access to full IBM Systems Director and Active
Energy Manager functionality and is the version we describe in this chapter.
򐂰 IBM Systems Director standalone version
The standalone version is a single product that contains just enough IBM Systems
Director to support the Active Energy Manager functions. You do not get access to the full
function of IBM Systems Director.
If you have installed the standalone version of Active Energy Manager, you might see
minor differences compared with what is described in this chapter.
To use the functions that are provided by Active Energy Manager, you need to know how to
navigate your way around the IBM Systems Director console. After you have installed IBM
Systems Director and IBM Systems Director console, you see the Systems Director
console icon () on both the Windows server and your Windows workstation.
Figure 5-4 Systems Director icon
To log in to IBM Systems Director console and set up the display, perform the following steps:
1. Double-click the Systems Director console icon and you see the login window
(Figure 5-5). If you have installed the standalone version of Active Energy Manager, you
will see a slightly different login window.
Figure 5-5 IBM Systems Director login window, full IBM Systems Director version
2. Enter the IP address or host name of the IBM Systems Director server, a user id with
administrator rights on the server, and the password. Click OK.
You see a display similar to the one shown in Figure 5-6 on page 111.
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Figure 5-6 IBM Systems Director console initial display
It may take several minutes for data to be downloaded from the IBM Systems Director
server to the console. The download status is shown in the bottom left corner of the
display. An enlargement is shown in Figure 5-7.
Figure 5-7 IBM Systems Director console download status
When the download has finished, you see a display similar to the one shown in Figure 5-8
on page 112. See 5.3, “Connecting to Active Energy Manager providers” on page 119 for
details about how to discover managed objects.
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111
Figure 5-8 IBM Systems Director console initial display, waiting to discover objects
3. To view the different panes on the IBM Systems Director console, click and hold the arrow
on the left side of the display and drag the vertical bar across to expose the Groups pane
as shown in Figure 5-9. Repeat this procedure for the Tasks pane on the right side.
Figure 5-9 IBM Systems Director console initial display, exposing the Groups pane
Depending on whether or not there are pre-existing managed objects on your IBM
Systems Director server, you see a display similar to the one shown in Figure 5-10 on
page 113.
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Figure 5-10 IBM Systems Director console full display
5.2.1 IBM Systems Director Managed Objects pane
The middle pane on the IBM Systems Director console is called the Managed Objects pane.
This pane lists all the objects that IBM Systems Director has discovered. Figure 5-11 on
page 114 is an example of a Managed Objects pane showing some Active Energy Manager
providers that IBM Systems Director has discovered. If the icon for a managed object is
greyed out, it means that the managed object has previously been connected to IBM Systems
Director, but is not currently communicating.
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113
Figure 5-11 IBM Systems Director console, Managed Objects pane
You can order the managed objects by name, TCP/IP address, TCP/IP host name, operating
system, or MAC address by simply clicking the header of the column by which you to order.
5.2.2 IBM Systems Director Groups pane
The left pane on the IBM Systems Director console is called the Groups pane. The managed
objects shown in Figure 5-11 are divided into groups. These groups are shown in the Groups
pane of the IBM Systems Director console, an example of which is shown in Figure 5-12 on
page 115.
The All Managed Objects group shows all the managed objects that IBM Systems Director
has discovered, and is the default view when you start IBM Systems Director console. The
number and type of groups shown in Figure 5-12 on page 115 may be different than the
Groups pane on your IBM Systems Director console, depending on your environment.
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Figure 5-12 IBM Systems Director console, Groups pane
The following IBM Systems Director groups can contain Active Energy Manager providers:
򐂰 All Managed Objects group
This group contains all managed objects that IBM Systems Director has discovered,
including Active Energy Manager providers. An example of this group is shown in
Figure 5-10 on page 113.
򐂰 BladeCenter Chassis group
This group contains all the BladeCenter chassis that IBM Systems Director has
discovered. The Active Energy Manager provider in this case is the BladeCenter’s
management module. An example of this group is shown in Figure 5-13.
Figure 5-13 IBM Systems Director console, BladeCenter Chassis group
򐂰 Chassis group
In terms of Active Energy Manager providers, this group contains the same managed
objects as the BladeCenter Chassis group.
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115
򐂰 Chassis and Chassis Members group
This group contains all the BladeCenter chassis and their associated blade servers and
switch modules that IBM Systems Director has discovered. The Active Energy Manager
provider in this case is the same as for the BladeCenter Chassis and Chassis groups, that
is, the BladeCenter’s management module. An example of this group is shown in
Figure 5-14.
Figure 5-14 IBM Systems Director console, Chassis, and Chassis Members group
򐂰 HMC group
This group contains all the HMCs and IVMs that IBM Systems Director has discovered. An
example of this group is shown in Figure 5-15.
Figure 5-15 IBM Systems Director console, HMC group
򐂰 HMC and HMC Members group
This group contains all the HMCs, IVMs, and their respective managed systems that IBM
Systems Director has discovered. The HMCs’ and IVMs’ managed systems may or may
not support Active Energy Manager functionality, and therefore may or may not appear in
the Active Energy Manager console. An example of this group is shown in Figure 5-16.
Figure 5-16 shows two POWER6 FSPs which support Active Energy Manager
functionality, and therefore they both appear in the Active Energy Manager console. The
logical partition rchas645 is not an Active Energy Manager provider and therefore does not
appear in the Active Energy Manager console.
Figure 5-16 IBM Systems Director console, HMC, and HMC Members group
򐂰 Physical Platforms group
This group contains all the FSPs, RSAs, and BMCs that IBM Systems Director has
discovered. This includes the following equivalent IBM systems:
– POWER6 System i, System p, and Power 5xx systems
– System x rack or tower servers that have supported RSAs or BMCs installed
– Blade servers that have supported BMCs installed
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An example of this group is shown in Figure 5-17.
Figure 5-17 IBM Systems Director console, Physical Platforms group
򐂰 Platform Managers and Members group
In terms of Active Energy Manager providers, this group contains the same managed
objects as the HMC and HMC Members group.
򐂰 Platforms group
In terms of Active Energy Manager providers, this group contains the same managed
objects as the Physical Platforms group. In addition, it also contains POWER6 System i,
System p, and Power 5xx logical partitions.
򐂰 Platforms and Platform Members group
This group contains the same managed objects as the Platforms group.
򐂰 RMON Devices group
This group contains all the zHMCs that IBM Systems Director has discovered. An example
of this group is shown in Figure 5-18.
Figure 5-18 IBM Systems Director console, RMON Devices group
򐂰 SNMP Devices group
In terms of Active Energy Manager providers, this group contains all the PDU+s and
zHMCs that IBM Systems Director has discovered. It also contains other SNMP devices
such as BladeCenter switch modules. An example of this group is shown in Figure 5-19.
Figure 5-19 IBM Systems Director console, SNMP Devices group
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117
5.2.3 Tasks pane
The right pane on the IBM Systems Director console is called the Tasks pane as shown in
Figure 5-10 on page 113. The tasks pane lists all IBM Systems Director tasks that can be used
on the managed objects that IBM Systems Director has discovered. A task can be run on a
managed object or objects, or group by simply dragging the task onto the managed object or
group. Figure 5-20 is an example of a Tasks pane showing the IBM Systems Director tasks
available. The task at the top of the list is the Active Energy Manager task. We discuss how
you can use this task in 5.2.4, “The Active Energy Manager task” on page 118.
Figure 5-20 IBM Systems Director console, Tasks pane
5.2.4 The Active Energy Manager task
The Active Energy Manager task icon is shown in Figure 5-21. As previously mentioned, it is
located in the IBM Systems Director console at the top of the Tasks pane.
Figure 5-21 Active Energy Manager task icon
If you click the small shaded box to the left of the Active Energy Manager icon, you see the
expanded task tree shown in Figure 5-22 on page 119. The tasks you see in Figure 5-22 on
page 119 (Disable Power Collection, Enable Power Collection, Max Performance Cap, Min
Power Cap, and so forth) are the standard ones that come with the Active Energy Manager
product.
You can create your own power management tasks (sometimes called policies) which are
also shown in the task tree under Power Management™. These user-created policies can
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
perform tasks such as turning on power saver mode at a certain (scheduled) time, or setting
the power cap to a specific number of watts. To learn how to create your own power
management policies refer to 5.13, “Setting the power saver function” on page 183 and 5.14,
“Setting the power cap function” on page 201.
Figure 5-22 Active Energy Manager tasks tree
Active Energy Manager tasks can be run on a managed object or objects, or group by simply
dragging the task onto the managed object or group. For example, the Power Saver On task
can be dragged from the Tasks pane and dropped onto one of the icons in the Managed
Objects or Groups pane to initiate the power saver function on that managed object or group.
You can also use the Active Energy Manager task to start the Active Energy Manager console
by double clicking it.
5.3 Connecting to Active Energy Manager providers
For a definition of an Active Energy Manager provider refer to 5.1, “Overview of Active Energy
Manager” on page 102. To connect to, or discover Active Energy Manager providers, there
are two methods you can use:
򐂰 Automatic discovery using Service Location Protocol (SLP)
We describe this method in 5.3.1, “Automatic discovery using Service Location Protocol”
on page 121.
򐂰 Manual discovery using a specific IP address
We describe this method in 5.3.2, “Manual discovery using a specific IP address” on
page 122.
In terms of the number of IBM Systems Director server connections you can have to the
different Active Energy Manager providers, be aware of the following situations:
򐂰 The default number of IBM Systems Director server connections you can have to a
BladeCenter management module, RSA, or BMC defaults to one. By using the
management interface to the BladeCenter management module, RSA, or BMC, you can
increase the limit for the discovery and management functions of IBM Systems Director.
򐂰 By default you can have multiple IBM Systems Director server connections to an FSP,
HMC, IVM, or zHMC.
򐂰 By default you can have multiple IBM Systems Director server connections to a PDU+, but
we recommend only one. This is because every time an Active Energy Manager server
connects to a PDU+ it resets the start time for collecting power trending information. This
can lead to misleading results. For example, if Active Energy Manager server A polls a
Chapter 5. Using Active Energy Manager
119
PDU+ every 4 minutes, and Active Energy Manager server B polls the same PDU+ every
minute, then every time server A reads the power trending information, it only sees a
maximum of the previous minute’s worth of data because server B has reset the PDU+
within the previous minute.
Before connecting to an Active Energy Manager provider, you need to understand what the
supported Active Energy Manager providers are and the IBM systems that can be managed
by each provider. Table 5-2 shows a list of the different types of Active Energy Manager
providers, the option on the IBM Systems Director discovery menu that you use to discover
the provider, the IBM Systems Director group where the Active Energy Manager provider can
be viewed, and the backend Active Energy Manager-capable systems and other power
managed objects.
Note: Table 5-2 is accurate at the time of writing this publication but will change over time
as additional systems are supported.
Table 5-2 IBM Systems Director discovery options for Active Energy Manager providers
Type of Active
Energy Manager
provider
IBM Systems
Director
discovery
menu option
IBM Systems Director group
where the Active Energy
Manager provider can be
viewed
BladeCenter
management
module
BladeCenter
Chassis
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
FSP4
FSP4
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Backend Active Energy Manager power
managed objects
All Managed Objects
BladeCenter chassis
Chassis
Chassis and Chassis
Members
Shows blade servers and
switches as well
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
BladeCenter chassis1
Blade servers2
Other BladeCenter internal modules,
for example media trays and fan
packs
All Managed Objects
HMC and HMC members
Physical Platforms
Platform Managers and
Members
Platforms
Platforms and Platform
Members
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9406 MMA-System i 570
9117 MMA-System p 570
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 550
9117 MMA-Power 570
HMC
HMC
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
All Managed Objects
HMC
HMC and HMC members
Platform Managers and
Members
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9406 MMA-System i 570
9117 MMA-System p 570
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 550
9117 MMA-Power 570
9125 F2A-Power 575
9119 FHA-Power 595
IVM5
IVM
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
All Managed Objects
HMC
HMC and HMC members
Platform Managers and
Members
򐂰
7998 60X-IBM BladeCenter JS12
Express server
7998 61X-IBM BladeCenter JS22
server
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 550
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Type of Active
Energy Manager
provider
IBM Systems
Director
discovery
menu option
IBM Systems Director group
where the Active Energy
Manager provider can be
viewed
Backend Active Energy Manager power
managed objects
RSA or BMC
Physical
Platforms
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
All Managed Objects
Physical platforms
Platforms
Platforms and Platform
Members
PDU+
SNMP Devices
򐂰
򐂰
All Managed Objects
SNMP devices
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Existing systems
Storage
I/O drawers
Other IBM devices
Non-IBM devices
zHMC
SNMP Devices
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
All Managed Objects
RMON Devices
SNMP devices
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
System z10 EC E12 (2097 E12)
System z10 EC E26 (2097 E26)
System z10 EC E40 (2097 E40)
System z10 EC E56 (2097 E56)
System z10 EC E64 (2097 E64)
System x rack and tower servers with
supported RSAs and BMCs3
1 For
a list of supported BladeCenter chassis refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_managed_systems.html
2 For
a list of supported BladeCenter blade servers refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_managed_systems.html
3 For
a list of supported System x rack and tower servers refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_managed_systems.html
4 Once an FSP has been managed by an HMC or IVM, it remains that way. IBM Systems Director can no longer connect
to the FSP as an Active Energy Manager provider. Therefore, you must connect to the FSP’s managing HMC or IVM.
5 Accessing
Active Energy Manager functions through IVM is only supported with IBM Director Server running on Linux.
5.3.1 Automatic discovery using Service Location Protocol
If you do not know the IP addresses of the Active Energy Manager providers to which you
want to connect, or if there are simply too many to connect to each one individually by IP
address, you can choose automatic discovery which uses Service Location Protocol (SLP).
SLP is a protocol that sends a broadcast out onto the network and listens for responses from
targeted systems. If a targeted system responds to the SLP broadcast, IBM Systems Director
server establishes a connection to it and registers it as a managed object. You can only
discover endpoints located on the same IP subnet as the IBM Systems Director server using
this method, unless the routers on your subnet are set up to pass SLP broadcasts. Because
SLP is a “noisy” protocol it is likely that your network routers are set up to block such
broadcasts.
To discover Active Energy Manager providers automatically using SLP, click the pull-down
arrow next to the Discover icon (flashlight) in the tool bar of the IBM Systems Director
console, as shown in Figure 5-23 on page 122. On the drop-down menu displayed, select the
type of Active Energy Manager provider you want to discover.
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121
IBM Systems Director broadcasts onto the network and waits for responses. You may need to
wait for several minutes before you see the discovered objects appear in the Managed
Objects pane. Depending on the size of the network and the option you select, IBM Systems
Director may discover a large number of objects.
Note: The discovery process is network intensive and may add considerably to the traffic
on your network.
Figure 5-23 IBM Systems Director console, automatic discovery using SLP
5.3.2 Manual discovery using a specific IP address
In cases where you know the IP address of the Active Energy Manager provider, IBM
Systems Director can connect to the provider directly providing there is a TCP/IP route to it.
To connect to an Active Energy Manager provider using manual discovery, click pull-down
menu options of Console → New → Managed Objects on the IBM Systems Director
console as shown in Figure 5-24 on page 123. Then select the type of Active Energy
Manager provider to which you want to connect. You may need to refer to Table 5-2 on
page 120 to determine the correct provider for the device whose power you want to manage.
You are prompted to enter the IP address of the Active Energy Manager provider. You also
might need to enter additional information depending on the type of Active Energy Manager
provider to which you are trying to connect. For each type of Active Energy Manager provider
we show you an example of the discovery window and the information you need to enter to
connect to the endpoint in the following sections.
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Figure 5-24 IBM Systems Director console, manual discovery by IP Address
Discovering a BladeCenter management module
To discover a BladeCenter management module, click Console → New → Managed
Objects → BladeCenter Chassis. You see the Add BladeCenter Chassis window shown in
Figure 5-25.
Figure 5-25 Discovering a BladeCenter management module
As shown in Figure 5-25, you need to enter the following information to discover this Active
Energy Manager provider:
򐂰 Chassis name
The chassis name is the host name of the management module. A quick way of
determining this host name is to telnet to the IP address of the management module.
When you log on, the host name is displayed. Alternatively, if the host name is registered
on a DNS server that IBM Systems Director can see in the network, the following DOS
command returns the host name
command ping -a <IP address>
򐂰 IP address of the management module
The management module’s IP address must be changed from its default (as shipped)
value in order for IBM Systems Director to find it.
򐂰 A user id which has supervisor level access to the management module
򐂰 A password for the user id
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123
Discovering an FSP
To discover an FSP, click Console → New → Managed Objects → FSP. You see the Add
FSP window shown in Figure 5-26.
Figure 5-26 Discovering an FSP
IBM Systems Director server can connect to the FSP of POWER5™ and POWER6
processor-based systems that are not blade servers using one of the following two methods:
򐂰 Directly (no managing HMC or IVM)
In this case, IBM Systems Director discovers the FSP directly when you click Console →
New → Managed Objects → FSP and enter the FSP’s IP address.
򐂰 Through an HMC or IVM
In this case, IBM Systems Director discovers the FSP by first connecting to its managing
HMC or IVM. To discover an FSP through its managing HMC or IVM, refer to “Discovering
an HMC or IVM” on page 125.
Note: If the POWER5 or POWER6 processor-based system whose FSP to which you are
trying to connect is managed by an HMC or IVM, you cannot connect to the system’s FSP
directly. Instead, discover the system using the managing HMC or IVM.
IBM Systems Director also supports POWER5 processor-based systems for IBM Systems
Director functions such as distributing code fixes or software to endpoints. It is necessary,
therefore, for IBM Systems Director to be able to connect to these systems through their
FSPs. However, POWER5 processor-based systems have very limited Active Energy
Manager functionality. The only way to bring such a system into the Active Energy
Manager environment is to connect the POWER5 processor-based system to a PDU+
power outlet. You can then monitor the power and thermal trending information for the
system through the PDU+.
As shown in Figure 5-26, you need to enter the following information to discover this Active
Energy Manager provider:
򐂰 IP address of the port on the FSP to which you want to connect
򐂰 The name is optional, but you may wish to specify a nickname here. Otherwise, IBM
Systems Director console displays the host name of the managed object.
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Discovering an HMC or IVM
To discover an HMC or IVM, click Console → New → Managed Objects → HMC or IVM. You
will see the Add HMC (Figure 5-27) or Add IVM window (Figure 5-28).
Figure 5-27 Discovering an HMC
Figure 5-28 Discovering an IVM
IBM Systems Director can connect to EnergyScale-enabled POWER6 processor-based
systems through the system’s managing HMC or IVM.
Note: Accessing Active Energy Manager functions through IVM is only supported with IBM
Systems Director server running on Linux.
As shown in Figure 5-27 and Figure 5-28, you need to enter the following information to
discover these Active Energy Manager providers:
򐂰 IP address of the port on the HMC or IVM to which you want to connect
򐂰 The name is optional, but you may wish to specify a nickname here. Otherwise, IBM
Systems Director console displays the host name of the managed object.
Important: You need to authenticate to the HMC or IVM in IBM Systems Director console
(as described in 5.4, “Authenticating to Active Energy Manager providers” on page 127)
before any EnergyScale-enabled POWER6 processor-based systems being managed by
the HMC or IVM appear on the IBM Systems Director console and Active Energy Manager
console.
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125
Discovering an RSA or BMC
To discover an RSA or BMC, click Console → New → Managed Objects → Physical
Platforms. You see the Add Physical Platforms window shown in Figure 5-29.
Figure 5-29 Discovering an RSA or BMC
As shown in Figure 5-29, you need to enter the following information to discover these Active
Energy Manager providers:
򐂰 IP address of the port on the RSA or BMC to which you want to connect
򐂰 The name is optional, but you may wish to specify a nickname here. Otherwise, IBM
Systems Director console displays the host name of the managed object.
Tip: For systems that have both an RSA and a BMC installed, we recommend that you
discover the system using the RSA because it is the more intelligent device and provides a
higher level of power management functionality. You cannot connect to the RSA and BMC
on the same machine concurrently. You must connect to one or the other.
Discovering a PDU+ or zHMC
To discover a PDU+ or zHMC, click Console → New → Managed Objects → SNMP
Devices. You see the Add SNMP Devices window shown in Figure 5-30.
Figure 5-30 Discovering a PDU+ or zHMC
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
IBM Systems Director server recognizes PDU+s and zHMCs as Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) devices because they provide data to IBM Systems Director
server using SNMP support. SNMP is an industry standard protocol for the monitoring and
management of network attached devices. As shown in Figure 5-30 on page 126, you need to
enter the following information to discover these Active Energy Manager providers:
򐂰 IP address of the port on the PDU+ or zHMC to which you want to connect
򐂰 SNMP version is the version of Simple Network Management Protocol that you use to
discover the PDU+ or zHMC. IBM supports the following different versions of SNMP:
– PDU+s
SNMPv1 and v3 are supported for PDU+s. SNMPv1 is the more common method and
requires you to specify the PDU+ community name. If SNMPv3 is used for discovering
a PDU+, the Community Name field is replaced by the Profile Name field.
– zHMCs
SNMPv1 and v2c are supported for zHMCs. SNMPv1 is the more common method,
but both require you to specify the zHMC’s community name.
򐂰 Community Name (SNMPv1 or SNMPv2c specified) is effectively a password that you
need to authenticate to the SNMP device.
Note: For a PDU+, the community name must be configured with write access. If the
community name only has read access, Active Energy Manager cannot retrieve
trending data from the PDU+.
򐂰 Profile Name (SNMPv3 specified) specifies a profile that has been defined using the
SNMP tab of the Systems Director console's Options → Server Preferences drop-down
menu. Enter the profile name in the Profile Name field of the Add SNMP Devices window.
Check the Use as a discovery seed check box if you want to use the device at the specified
IP address as a seed for discovering additional SNMP devices on other IP subnets. The
discovery seed is usually a gateway on your local IP subnet which is running an SNMP agent.
The SNMP agent searches for other SNMP devices on subnets accessible through the
gateway. Omitting the discovery seed option does not stop SNMP from performing discovery,
but limits it to the devices in the network to which the IBM Systems Director server is directly
connected.
5.4 Authenticating to Active Energy Manager providers
Important: You can only gain access to a power managed object through the Active
Energy Manager console if you have first authenticated to the object’s Active Energy
Manager provider.
You can tell whether or not you have already authenticated to a power managed object’s
Active Energy Manager provider by the presence of a little lock symbol next to the provider’s
icon in the Managed Objects pane of the IBM Systems Director console. The lock symbol
indicates that you have not yet authenticated to the Active Energy Manager provider, and
therefore cannot access any power managed objects that it controls. For example,
Figure 5-31 on page 128 shows three managed objects with the lock symbol.
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127
Figure 5-31 IBM Systems Director console showing objects requiring authentication
Once you have successfully authenticated to an Active Energy Manager provider, the lock
symbol disappears and the power managed objects that are being controlled by the provider
appear in the IBM Systems Director console and in the Active Energy Manager console
(assuming that the objects are enabled for Active Energy Manager functions). You can then
perform Active Energy Manager tasks on these objects.
All Active Energy Manager providers except SNMP devices (the PDU+ and zHMC), can be
discovered automatically using SLP (refer to 5.3.1, “Automatic discovery using Service
Location Protocol” on page 121). In this case, you do not need to authenticate to the Active
Energy Manager provider during the discovery process. As a result, Active Energy Manager
providers discovered using SLP appear with the lock symbol in the IBM Systems Director
console Managed Objects pane. Therefore, if you use SLP you only need to authenticate to
an Active Energy Manager provider (other than a PDU+ or zHMC) when you want to access
the provider’s power managed objects through the Active Energy Manager console.
5.4.1 Active Energy Manager credential requirements
Table 5-3 shows the credentials you need to authenticate to each Active Energy Manager
provider.
Table 5-3 Active Energy Manager provider credential requirements
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Active Energy Manager providers
Credential requirements
FSP
User id: admin1
Password:
HMC or IVM
Supervisor-level user id:
Password:
BladeCenter H Management Module
BladeCenter Management Module
Chassis name:
Supervisor-level user id:
Password:
RSA
Supervisor-level user id:
Password:
BMC
Supervisor-level user id:
Password:
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Active Energy Manager providers
Credential requirements
zHMC
Community name:
PDU+
Community name:
1 admin
is the only FSP user id supported for use with Active Energy Manager.
We now describe the Active Energy Manager providers to which you need to authenticate on
discovery using a specific IP address and those to which you can authenticate after they have
been discovered.
5.4.2 Objects that require authentication on discovery by IP address
As discussed in 5.3.2, “Manual discovery using a specific IP address” on page 122, the
following Active Energy Manager providers require you to specify authentication credentials to
discover them individually by IP address:
򐂰 BladeCenter management module
򐂰 PDU+
򐂰 zHMC
For example, to discover a BladeCenter chassis by IP address, see “Discovering a
BladeCenter management module” on page 123.
In the Add BladeCenter Chassis window shown in Figure 5-25 on page 123, you must enter a
management module user id and password with supervisor level authority to discover a
BladeCenter Chassis.
5.4.3 Objects that require authentication after discovery by IP address
The following Active Energy Manager providers do not require you to authenticate to them
when attempting to discover them individually by IP address:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
FSP
HMC
IVM
RSA
BMC
In order for a power managed system that is being controlled by one of these providers to
appear in the Active Energy Manager console, however, you must first authenticate to the
provider through IBM Systems Director console.
Restriction: When logging on to an FSP, admin is the only supported user id that you can
use for authentication through IBM Systems Director console.
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In the case of authenticating to an HMC or IVM, note the following points:
򐂰 You need a user id with supervisor level authority.
򐂰 Once you have successfully authenticated to the HMC or IVM, the power managed
objects that the HMC or IVM is managing become visible in the Managed Objects pane of
the IBM Systems Director console and in the navigation pane of the Active Energy
Manager console. However, the HMC or IVM itself is not shown in the Active Energy
Manager console.
򐂰 It is the service processor of the system the HMC or IVM is managing that provides the
Active Energy Manager functionality, not the HMC or IVM itself.
򐂰 Once an FSP has been managed by an HMC or IVM, you cannot discover the FSP directly
as an Active Energy Manager provider. You must connect to and authenticate with the
FSP’s managing HMC or IVM first.
To authenticate to an Active Energy Manager provider, perform the following steps:
1. Right-click the object in the IBM Systems Director console Managed Objects pane and
select the Request Access option. Figure 5-32 shows an example of authenticating to an
HMC.
Figure 5-32 IBM Systems Director console: Authenticating to a managed object after discovery
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2. In the Request Access to Systems window (Figure 5-33), enter a valid user id and
password. Click OK.
Figure 5-33 Request Access to Systems dialog box
3. On the Access Request Succeeded window (Figure 5-34) click OK.
Figure 5-34 Access Request Succeeded dialog box
The little lock icon next to the Active Energy Manager provider is no longer displayed as
shown in Figure 5-35, and the systems that the HMC is managing are displayed.
Figure 5-35 IBM Systems Director console, successful authentication to a managed object
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If the object to which you have requested access is one of the following Active Energy
Manager providers, it appears in the Active Energy Manager console window as a power
managed object:
– FSP
– RSA
– BMC
If the object to which you have requested access is an HMC or IVM, it does not appear in
the Active Energy Manager console window. Instead, the service processors being
managed by the HMC or IVM appear in the Active Energy Manager console under
Power-Managed Objects (ac).
Figure 5-36 shows the Active Energy Manager console with the power managed objects
being managed by the HMC shown in Figure 5-35 on page 131. If the HMC were to be
managing systems that do not support Active Energy Manager functionality (for example
the rchas645 logical partition shown in Figure 5-35 on page 131), those systems do not
show up in the Active Energy Manager console.
Figure 5-36 Active Energy Manager console showing objects that appear after authentication
5.5 Introducing the Active Energy Manager console
The Active Energy Manager console runs in a separate window from the IBM Systems
Director console. It is designed to allow you to manage systems and other devices that
support Active Energy Manager functionality. Although you can access some Active Energy
Manager tasks from the IBM Systems Director console, we recommend that you always open
the Active Energy Manager console to work with devices that can be power managed. The
Active Energy Manager console gives you access to more power management functions than
IBM Systems Director console and provides more flexibility when working with power
managed objects.
Attention: The Active Energy Manager console only shows you power managed objects
that you have authenticated to, as described in 5.4, “Authenticating to Active Energy
Manager providers” on page 127.
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5.5.1 Starting the Active Energy Manager console
There are two methods you can use to start the Active Energy Manager console:
򐂰 Using the Active Energy Manager icon (
).
The Active Energy Manager icon is located in the tool bar of the IBM Systems Director
console (Figure 5-37).
Figure 5-37 IBM Systems Director console tool bar
To start Active Energy Manager using this icon, first select a managed object or objects in
the IBM Systems Director Managed Objects pane, or a group in the Groups pane. Then
click the Active Energy Manager icon. The Active Energy Manager console opens for the
selected objects or group only. An example is shown in Figure 5-40 on page 134.
The default is to view all power managed objects known to Active Energy Manager. For
performance reasons, we recommend that when you open the Active Energy Manager
console you only include those objects with which you are immediately concerned.
Tip: You can open multiple Active Energy Manager console windows, each displaying a
different set of power managed objects.
򐂰 Using the Active Energy Manager task shown in Figure 5-38
Figure 5-38 Active Energy Manager task icon
The Active Energy Manager task is located at the top of the Tasks pane of the IBM
Systems Director console as shown in Figure 5-39.
Figure 5-39 IBM Systems Director console, Tasks pane
If you click the Active Energy Manager task, you expand the task tree (or contract it if it is
already expanded) and start the Active Energy Manager console. The Active Energy
Manager console opens and shows all the power managed objects known to the Active
Energy Manager server. An example is shown in Figure 5-40 on page 134.
Note: Unlike the Active Energy Manager icon, you cannot start the Active Energy
Manager console for specific power managed objects or groups when using the Active
Energy Manager task.
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Figure 5-40 Active Energy Manager console example
In the bottom left corner of the Active Energy Manager console you can see how many days
you have left in the evaluation period before you need to enter a license key to continue using
Active Energy Manager-licensed functions. See Figure 5-41.
Figure 5-41 Active Energy Manager evaluation license expiration date
The licensed functions of Active Energy Manager include power saver mode and power cap.
You do not need a license to use the monitoring functions of Active Energy Manager. For
more information about Active Energy Manager licensing, see 3.6, “Active Energy Manager
licensing” on page 53.
As shown in Figure 5-40, the Active Energy Manager console has two panes:
򐂰 Navigation pane on the left side
򐂰 Current data pane on the right side
These are discussed in the following sections.
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5.5.2 Active Energy Manager navigation pane
The Active Energy Manager console navigation pane (Figure 5-42) shows Active Energy
Manager providers and other power managed objects in a hierarchical tree structure.
Figure 5-42 Active Energy Manager console Navigation pane
As shown in Figure 5-42, you notice that some of the power managed objects in the
navigation pane of the Active Energy Manager console have the following colored tips:
򐂰 Green: The object is communicating with the Active Energy Manager server.
򐂰 Orange: The object is not currently communicating with the Active Energy Manager server,
although it has been previously.
򐂰 Grey: The BladeCenter bay is empty.
Note: Hovering your mouse pointer over a power managed object displays additional
information related to that object.
Figure 5-42 shows the hierarchical structure of the Active Energy Manager console
navigation pane. The root node (folder) is at the top of the hierarchy. If you open the Active
Energy Manager console with the All Managed Objects group selected in IBM Systems
Director console (the default), the root node of the navigation pane is called the All Objects
folder. If you open the Active Energy Manager console with one or more IBM Systems
Director managed objects selected, the root node of the navigation pane is called the
Selected Objects folder.
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Either way, the root node is the parent for the following child folders:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Power Managed Objects (ac)
Power managed objects (dc)
Intelligent PDUs (ac)
Other objects
Note that ac stands for alternating current and dc stands for direct current. Alternating current
comes from the mains and is input into the power managed object. Direct current is what is
provided by a PDU+, or power supply in a managed system, to power the device.
We discuss each of these folders in the following sections.
Power Managed Objects (ac)
The Power Managed Objects (ac) folder contains the following types of Active Energy
Manager providers and other power managed objects:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
FSPs which are power managing POWER6 System i, System p, and Power 5xx systems
BladeCenter management modules which are power managing BladeCenter chassis
RSAs and BMCs which are power managing System x rack or tower servers
System z10 servers which are being managed by a zHMC
An example of a Power Managed Objects (ac) folder is shown in Figure 5-43.
Figure 5-43 Active Energy Manager console, Power Managed Objects (ac) folder
In Figure 5-43, note the following examples of power managed objects contained in the Power
Managed Objects (ac) folder:
򐂰 RSA
5e154087.kirkland.ibm.com is an RSA which is power managing a System x server.
򐂰 FSP
645FSP-9409-E8A-SN104C93 and BearsFSP-9406-675-SN10BAD8C are FSPs which
are power managing POWER6 System i, System p, and Power 5xx systems. If the IBM
Systems Director managed object to which you have requested access is an HMC or IVM,
it does not appear in the Active Energy Manager console. Instead, the FSPs being
managed by the HMC or IVM appear in the Active Energy Manager console.
򐂰 System z10
H52, H73, and H74 are System z10 machines being power managed by a zHMC. The
zHMC itself is not shown in the Active Energy Manager console.
򐂰 BladeCenter management module
M00145EDF8878 ia a management module power managing a BladeCenter.
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When you are viewing a BladeCenter under the Power-Managed Objects (ac) folder, you
see two child folders called Power Domain 1 and Power Domain 2. Each power domain
represents a group of BladeCenter modules that are controlled by a power supply unit.
The following modules show up in the Active Energy Manager console and can be
managed using Active Energy Manager functions:
–
–
–
–
–
–
Blade servers
Power modules
Blower modules
I/O modules
Midplanes
Media trays
When viewing the blade servers for a BladeCenter in the navigation pane, you might see
what appears to be the same blade server occupying two adjacent bays, as seen in
Figure 5-44. What you are seeing is a single double-wide blade server.
Figure 5-44 Active Energy Manager console showing a double-wide blade server
Power Managed Objects (dc)
The Power Managed Objects (dc) folder contains the following types of power managed
objects:
򐂰 BladeCenter E: machine type 8677
򐂰 BladeCenter T: machine type 8720
򐂰 BladeCenter HT: machine type 8740
Intelligent PDUs (ac)
The Intelligent PDUs (ac) folder contains supported PDU+ Active Energy Manager providers.
For a list of supported PDU+s, refer to 5.18, “Understanding and configuring the PDU+” on
page 228. An example of an Intelligent PDUs (ac) folder is shown in Figure 5-45 on page 138.
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Figure 5-45 Active Energy Manager console, Intelligent PDUs (ac) folder
In Figure 5-45, note the following points:
򐂰 Each PDU+ is shown as a separate child folder of the Intelligent PDUs (ac) folder.
򐂰 Six load groups are shown for each PDU+. For a discussion of PDU+ load groups refer to
5.18, “Understanding and configuring the PDU+” on page 228.
Other Objects
The Other Objects folder contains objects that are visible to Active Energy Manager but for
which there are no Active Energy Manager-supported monitoring or management functions
available. Objects usually appear in this folder because they do not have the prerequisite level
of firmware required by Active Energy Manager. In other words, Active Energy Manager can
“see” the device but cannot manage it. An example of an Other Objects folder is shown in
Figure 5-46 on page 139.
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Figure 5-46 Active Energy Manager console, Other Objects folder
5.5.3 Active Energy Manager current data pane
The Active Energy Manager console current data pane is shown on the right side of the
console display. It shows the current information for the selected power managed object or
group of power managed objects. The current data pane refreshes automatically
approximately every 20 seconds. You cannot change this, but you can force a refresh using
the Refresh option.
We discuss the information contained in the current data for a single object or group of
objects in 5.11, “Viewing current data” on page 171.
5.6 Understanding the Active Energy Manager task menus
When you are running Active Energy Manager tasks, there are several ways to access these
tasks. Access is provided through both the Active Energy Manager console and the IBM
Systems Director console in the following manner:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager console
– Tool bar icons
– Managed object context menu
– Drop-down menus
򐂰 IBM Systems Director console
–
–
–
–
Active Energy Manager tasks tree
Managed object context menu
Managed group context menu
Drop-down menus
We show examples of each of these menus in the following sections.
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Note the following points:
򐂰 Not all Active Energy Manager tasks are available from all menus. We provide a cross
reference of the various Active Energy Manager tasks against the different menus from
which you can access these tasks in Table 5-5 on page 151.
򐂰 The Active Energy Manager tasks that are available on the IBM Systems Director console
menus use different terminology than the Active Energy Manager console menus. This
results from the fact that the Active Energy Manager console is new with Active Energy
Manager 3.1. Prior to that, the existing PowerExecutive 2.1 product functions were only
available from the IBM Systems Director console menu. The terminology used on the IBM
Systems Director console menus comes from PowerExecutive 2.1. Table 5-4 shows a
cross reference of PowerExecutive 2.1 terms versus Active Energy Manager 3.1 terms.
Table 5-4 Comparing PowerExecutive 2.1 versus Active Energy Manager 3.1 terminology
PowerExecutive 2.1 terminology
Active Energy Manager 3.1 terminology
Data Collection → Disable Power Collection
Data Collection → Disable Data Collection
Data Collection → Enable Power Collection
Data Collection → Enable Data Collection
Power Management → Power Saver On
Manage Power → Power saver on
Power Management → Power Saver Off
Manage Power → Power saver off
Power Management → Min Power Cap1
Manage Power:
→ Set a power cap in watts
→ Set a power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max
→ Set a power cap based on trend data
Power Management → Max Performance Cap1
Manage Power
→ Set a power cap in watts
→ Set a power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max
→ Set a power cap based on trend data
Power Management → Capping Off
Manage Power → Power cap off
1 There
is no exact equivalent for these functions in the Active Energy Manager menus, but you can achieve the same
result using the corresponding Active Energy Manager functions shown here.
For a detailed description of each of the Active Energy Manager tasks that you can use, refer
to 5.7, “Introducing the Active Energy Manager tasks” on page 153.
5.6.1 Active Energy Manager console tool bar icons
At the top of the Active Energy Manager console window there is a tool bar as shown in
Figure 5-47. The icons on this tool bar allow you to access the various Active Energy
Manager tasks for a power managed object. The tool bar is the recommended method for
using Active Energy Manager functions.
Figure 5-47 Active Energy Manager console tool bar icons
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The following list details the tool bar icons and their meanings:
򐂰 Enable/Disable Data Collection (
򐂰 Manage Trend Data (
򐂰 Manage Power (
)
)
)
– Power saver
– Power cap
򐂰 Derate Power (
)
򐂰 Watt-Hour Meter (
򐂰 Configure PDU (
)
)
򐂰 Show Current Data (
)
򐂰 Show Trend Data as Chart (
)
򐂰 Show Trend Data as Table (
)
򐂰 Refresh (
)
To compare the tasks available through the tool bar in the Active Energy Manager console
with the tasks that are accessible through other menus, refer to Table 5-5 on page 151.
5.6.2 Active Energy Manager console managed object context menu
In addition to accessing tasks for a power managed object by using the icons, you can also
run Active Energy Manager tasks by right-clicking a power managed object or group in the
Active Energy Manager console navigation pane and selecting a task from the context menu.
All possible tasks that are available for a power managed object are listed on the context
menu. Tasks not available for a particular object are greyed out. Figure 5-48 shows an
example of the context menu for a power managed object. Tasks not available for a particular
power managed object or group are greyed out. The managed object context menu always
shows the Manage Power option being available, however, even though you may not be able
to set the power saver mode or power cap for the selected object or group.
Figure 5-48 Active Energy Manager console showing a managed object context menu
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The following Active Energy Manager functions are available on the managed object context
menu:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Export (data)
Enable/Disable Data Collection
Manage Trend Data
Manage Power
– Power Saver
– Power Cap
Derate Power
Watt-Hour Meter
Configure PDU
Delete
To compare the tasks available through the managed object context menu in the Active
Energy Manager console with the tasks that are accessible through other menus, refer to
Table 5-5 on page 151.
5.6.3 Active Energy Manager console drop-down menus
There are four drop-down menus on the Active Energy Manager console:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Edit drop-down menu
View drop-down menu
File drop-down menu
Help drop-down menu
These menus allow you access to Active Energy Manager tasks for the selected power
managed object or group of objects.
To compare the tasks available through the drop-down menus in the Active Energy Manager
console with the tasks that are accessible through other menus, refer to Table 5-5 on
page 151.
In the following sections we describe the Active Energy Manager console drop-down menus
in more detail.
Edit drop-down menu
To use the Edit drop-down menu, select one or more power managed objects, or a group of
objects, and click Edit on the menu bar. The following Active Energy Manager functions are
available on the Edit menu:
򐂰 Enable Data Collection
򐂰 Manage Trend Data
򐂰 Manage Power
– Power Saver
– Power Cap
򐂰 Derate Power
򐂰 Watt-Hour Meter
򐂰 Configure PDU
򐂰 Delete
Figure 5-49 on page 143 is an example of the Edit drop-down menu. Tasks not available for a
particular power managed object or group are greyed out. The Edit drop-down menu always
shows the Manage Power option being available, however, even though you may not in fact
be able to set power saver mode or power cap for the selected object or group.
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Figure 5-49 Active Energy Manager console Edit drop-down menu
View drop-down menu
To use the View drop-down menu, select one or more power managed objects, or a group of
objects, and click View on the menu bar. The following Active Energy Manager functions are
available on the View menu:
򐂰 Show Current Data
򐂰 Show Trend Data as Chart
򐂰 Show Trend Data as Table
These three choices enable you to choose how you want to display trend data in the right
pane of the Active Energy Manager console.
򐂰 Refresh
The display in the right pane of the Active Energy Manager display automatically refreshes
approximately every 20 seconds. You cannot change this, but you can force a refresh
using the Refresh option.
An example of the View drop-down menu is shown in Figure 5-50.
Figure 5-50 Active Energy Manager console View drop-down menu
File drop-down menu
To use the File drop-down menu, select one or more power managed objects, or a group of
objects, and click File on the menu bar. The only Active Energy Manager function available on
the File menu is the Export option. There are three choices for the Export option:
򐂰 Current Data
򐂰 Trend Data as Chart
򐂰 Trend Data as Table
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An example of the File drop-down menu is shown in Figure 5-51. Only one of the File →
Export options is active; the other two are greyed out. To change the active option, either
click the appropriate icon in the tool bar, or click View on the menu bar then select the radio
button for the option you require.
Figure 5-51 Active Energy Manager console File drop-down menu
Help drop-down menu
To use the Help drop-down menu, click Help → Using Active Energy Manager on the menu
bar. An example of the Help drop-down menu is shown in Figure 5-52.
Figure 5-52 Active Energy Manager console Help drop-down menu
5.6.4 IBM Systems Director console Active Energy Manager tasks tree
In addition to accessing power-related tasks for a managed object from the Active Energy
Manager console, you can also run Active Energy Manager tasks from the IBM Systems
Director console Active Energy Manager tasks tree. To open up the Active Energy Manager
tasks tree, click the little square next to the Active Energy Manager icon in the Tasks pane of
IBM Systems Director console as shown in Figure 5-53.
Figure 5-53 Active Energy Manager task icon
You see the Active Energy Manager tasks tree as shown in Figure 5-54. User-created policies
are also listed here as tasks. For example, the task labelled Powercap5000Watts is a
user-created policy.
Figure 5-54 Active Energy Manager tasks tree
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The following Active Energy Manager functions are available on the tasks tree:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager: Starts the Active Energy Manager console
򐂰 Data collection:
– Disable Power Collection
– Enable Power Collection
򐂰 Power Management:
–
–
–
–
–
Max Performance Cap
Min Power Cap
Power Capping Off
Power Saver Off
Power Saver On
These menu options use PowerExecutive 2.1 terminology. Table 5-4 on page 140 gives you
the equivalent Active Energy Manager terminology.
You can run the Active Energy Manager tasks shown in Figure 5-54 on page 144 by dragging
and dropping one of the icons onto a managed system or group in the IBM Systems Director
console. The task dialog box that appears provides access to the IBM Systems Director
scheduler which enables you to schedule the Active Energy Manager task. If the selected
task is not valid for the managed object or group, you see the error message shown in
Figure 5-55.
Figure 5-55 Active Energy Manager task drag and drop error message
You also see an error message if the target system is secured. That is, if it has the lock icon
next to it. You must authenticate to the managing Active Energy Manager provider before you
can run Active Energy Manager functions on the managed object the provider is controlling.
For details about how to authenticate to an Active Energy Manager provider, refer to 5.4,
“Authenticating to Active Energy Manager providers” on page 127.
To compare the tasks available through the Active Energy Manager tasks tree in IBM Systems
Director console with the tasks that are accessible through other menus, refer to Table 5-5 on
page 151.
5.6.5 IBM Systems Director console managed object context menu
In addition to accessing power-related tasks for a managed object by using the Active Energy
Manager tasks tree, you can also run Active Energy Manager tasks by right-clicking a
managed object in the IBM Systems Director console Managed Objects pane and selecting a
task from the context menu. An example of the context menu for a managed object is shown
in Figure 5-56 on page 146.
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Figure 5-56 IBM Systems Director console managed object context menu
In Figure 5-56 tasks not available for a particular managed object are either greyed out or not
shown. The following Active Energy Manager tasks are available from this menu:
򐂰 Data collection:
– Disable Power Collection
– Enable Power Collection
򐂰 Power Management:
–
–
–
–
–
Max Performance Cap
Min Power Cap
Power Capping Off
Power Saver Off
Power Saver On
򐂰 Active Energy Manager: This option starts the Active Energy Manager console for the
selected managed object(s).
These menu options use PowerExecutive 2.1 terminology. Table 5-4 on page 140 gives you
the equivalent Active Energy Manager terminology.
Tip: With the exception of the Active Energy Manager option itself, all Active Energy
Manager tasks listed on the managed object context menu can be scheduled through the
task dialog box. If you need to schedule an Active Energy Manager task we recommend
this method. Refer to 5.17, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks” on page 211 for
more information about scheduling an Active Energy Manager task.
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To compare the tasks available through the managed object context menu in the IBM
Systems Director console with the tasks that are accessible through other menus, refer to
Table 5-5 on page 151.
There are other options on the managed object context menu that, although they are not
specific to Active Energy Manager, are useful when you are managing Active Energy
Manager providers:
򐂰 Request access
Authenticate to an Active Energy Manager provider which is showing the lock symbol with
the Request access option. Once you have authenticated, the power managed object or
objects controlled by the provider appear in the Active Energy Manager console and you
can run Active Energy Manager tasks on them. For more information about authenticating
to Active Energy Manager providers refer to 5.4, “Authenticating to Active Energy Manager
providers” on page 127.
򐂰 Change password
This option changes the authentication password on the Active Energy Manager provider.
򐂰 Open
This option opens the managed object and displays its system attributes.
򐂰 Delete
This option deletes the managed object.
򐂰 Rename
This option renames the managed object. By default, IBM Systems Director displays the
host name of the managed object.
򐂰 Power management
This option controls power to the managed object in the following manner:
– Power on
– Restart now
– Power off now
Each of these options can be scheduled through the task dialog box. None of these tasks
are specific to Active Energy Manager.
򐂰 Presence check
Managed objects appear greyed out if they are not currently communicating with the IBM
Systems Director server. To check if a greyed out object has now become available, you
can perform a presence check on the object. If the managed object has become available
again, the presence check causes the object to change from greyed out to normal
intensity.
5.6.6 IBM Systems Director console managed group context menu
In addition to accessing power-related tasks for a managed object by using the managed
object context menu, you can also run Active Energy Manager tasks by right-clicking a
managed group in the IBM Systems Director console Groups pane and selecting a task from
the context menu. An example of the context menu for a managed group is shown in
Figure 5-57 on page 148.
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Figure 5-57 IBM Systems Director console managed group context menu
In Figure 5-57 tasks not available for a particular managed group are either greyed out or not
shown. The following Active Energy Manager tasks available from this menu:
򐂰 Data collection:
– Disable Power Collection
– Enable Power Collection
򐂰 Power Management:
–
–
–
–
–
Max Performance Cap
Min Power Cap
Power Capping Off
Power Saver Off
Power Saver On
򐂰 Active Energy Manager: This option starts the Active Energy Manager console for the
selected managed group or groups.
These menu options use PowerExecutive 2.1 terminology. Table 5-4 on page 140 gives you
the equivalent Active Energy Manager terminology.
Tip: With the exception of the Active Energy Manager option itself, all Active Energy
Manager tasks listed on the managed group context menu can be scheduled through the
task dialog box. If you need to schedule an Active Energy Manager task we recommend
this method. Refer to 5.17, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks” on page 211 for
more information about scheduling an Active Energy Manager task.
To compare the tasks available through the managed group context menu in the IBM Systems
Director console with the tasks that are accessible through other menus, refer to Table 5-5 on
page 151.
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5.6.7 IBM Systems Director console drop-down menus
There are two drop-down menus on the IBM Systems Director console that allow access to
Active Energy Manager tasks for the selected managed object or group:
򐂰 Tasks drop-down menu
򐂰 Active Energy Manager icon drop-down menu
These menus only provide a subset of the complete set of Active Energy Manager tasks. The
Active Energy Manager tasks available from the IBM Systems Director console are existing
functions that were provided by the PowerExecutive 2.1 product. The Active Energy Manager
console provides a more specialized environment for monitoring and managing objects from a
power use perspective.
To compare the tasks available through the drop-down menus in the IBM Systems Director
console with the tasks that are accessible through other menus, refer to Table 5-5 on
page 151.
In the following sections we describe the IBM Systems Director console drop-down menus in
more detail.
Tasks drop-down menu
To use the Tasks drop-down menu, select one or more managed objects, or a group of
managed objects, and click Tasks → Active Energy Manager. Then select from the following
four options on the Active Energy Manager menu:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager: <selected managed object, objects, or group>
This option starts the Active Energy Manager console for the selected managed object,
objects, or group.
򐂰 Data collection:
– Disable Power Collection
– Enable Power Collection
򐂰 Power Management:
–
–
–
–
–
Max Performance Cap
Min Power Cap
Power Capping Off
Power Saver Off
Power Saver On
򐂰 Help for Active Energy Manager
These menu options use PowerExecutive 2.1 terminology. Table 5-4 on page 140 gives you
the equivalent Active Energy Manager terminology.
An example of the Tasks drop-down menu is shown in Figure 5-58 on page 150. Active
Energy Manager tasks that are not supported for the selected managed object(s) or group
have a black circle with a bar next to them.
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Figure 5-58 IBM Systems Director console Tasks drop-down menu
To compare the tasks available through the Tasks drop-down menu in the IBM Systems
Director console with the tasks that are accessible through other menus, refer to Table 5-5 on
page 151.
Active Energy Manager icon drop-down menu
To use the Active Energy Manager icon drop-down menu, select one or more managed
objects, or a group of managed objects, and then click the down arrow next to the Active
Energy Manager icon on the tool bar as shown in Figure 5-59.
Figure 5-59 IBM Systems Director console Active Energy Manager icon drop-down menu
The options available from this menu are the same ones that are described in the Tasks
drop-down menu.
To compare the tasks available through the Active Energy Manager icon drop-down menu in
the IBM Systems Director console with the tasks that are accessible through other menus,
refer to Table 5-5 on page 151.
5.6.8 Active Energy Manager tasks matrix
In Table 5-5 on page 151 we provide a cross reference of the various Active Energy Manager
tasks against the different menus where you can access these tasks.
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Table 5-5 Active Energy Manager tasks matrix
Active Energy
Manager task
Active
Energy
Manager
console:
Active
Energy
Manager
console:
Active
Energy
Manager
console:
IBM
Systems
Director
console:
IBM
Systems
Director
console:
IBM
Systems
Director
console:
IBM
Systems
Director
console:
Tool bar
icons
Managed
object
context
menu
Drop-down
menus
Active
Energy
Manager
tasks tree
Managed
object
context
menu
Managed
group
context
menu
Drop-down
menus
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
Open the Active
Energy Manager
console:
See page 133.
Enable and disable
data collection:
See page 158.
X
X
X4
Manage trend data:
See page 160.
X
X
X4
View trend data as
a chart:
See page 162.
X
X2
View trend data as
a table:
See page 162.
X
X2
View current data:
See page 171.
X
X2
X
X3
X1
X1
X1,4
X
X
X
X
Set Power Cap:
See page 201.
X1
X1
X1,4
X
X
X
X
Derate power:
See page 208.
X
X
X4
Use the Watt-hour
meter:
See page 209.
X
X
X4
Export data:
See page 179.
Set Power Saver
using Active Energy
Manager:
See page 190.
Set Power Saver
using the FSP:
See page 196.
Set Power Saver
using IVM:
See page 192.
Set Power Saver
using the HMC:
See page 192.
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Active Energy
Manager task
Active
Energy
Manager
console:
Active
Energy
Manager
console:
Active
Energy
Manager
console:
IBM
Systems
Director
console:
IBM
Systems
Director
console:
IBM
Systems
Director
console:
IBM
Systems
Director
console:
Tool bar
icons
Managed
object
context
menu
Drop-down
menus
Active
Energy
Manager
tasks tree
Managed
object
context
menu
Managed
group
context
menu
Drop-down
menus
X6
X6
Schedule Active
Energy Manager
tasks:
See page 211.
Configure the
PDU+:
See page 228.
X
Refresh data:
See page 237.
X
Get help with Active
Energy Manager:
See page 238.
X
X4
X2
X5
1 These
tasks are available using the Manage Power icon or menu option.
2 These
tasks are available from the Active Energy Manager console View drop-down menu.
3 This
task is available from the Active Energy Manager console File drop-down menu.
4 These
5 This
X
tasks are available from the Active Energy Manager console Edit drop-down menu.
task is available from the Active Energy Manager console Help drop-down menu.
6 When
you run an Active Energy Manager task from these menus, the task dialog box that appears provides access to
the IBM Systems Director scheduler which enables you to schedule the task. Access to the scheduler is not an option.
From Table 5-5 on page 151 note the following points:
򐂰 The Active Energy Manager console tool bar and managed object context menu provides
more flexible options for configuring Power Cap than the IBM Systems Director console
menus. Some Active Energy Manager tasks are available from the IBM Systems Director
console menus but the best way to run Active Energy Manager tasks is from the Active
Energy Manager console. The options on the IBM Systems Director console that provide
access to Active Energy Manager tasks are a legacy of the previous PowerExecutive 2.1
implementation. We recommend that you use the Active Energy Manager console.
򐂰 The tool bar on the Active Energy Manager console provides access to most of the Active
Energy Manager tasks. To export data either select the Export option on the Active
Energy Manager managed object context menu, or click File → Export.
򐂰 Schedule an Active Energy Manager task with the IBM Systems Director managed object
context menu. When you select an Active Energy Manager task from the menu, there is a
Schedule button that provides you with direct access to the scheduler for the selected
operation. Alternatively, you can drag one of the tasks in the Active Energy Manager tasks
tree in the IBM Systems Director console Tasks pane onto a managed object.
In both cases, you see the window shown in Figure 5-60 on page 153. Clicking the
Schedule button starts the IBM Systems Director scheduler.
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Figure 5-60 Scheduling an Active Energy Manager task
For more information about scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks, refer to 5.17,
“Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks” on page 211.
5.7 Introducing the Active Energy Manager tasks
In this section we show you how to use each of the Active Energy Manager tasks.
There are several ways that you can access the Active Energy Manager tasks. All of the
Active Energy Manager tasks and the menus from which you can access them are listed in
Table 5-5 on page 151. Refer to this table to find out which menu to use to access the Active
Energy Manager task you want to run.
We use Active Energy Manager 3.1 terminology in this section and not PowerExecutive 2.1
terminology. See Table 5-4 on page 140 for a comparison of the different terms.
The Active Energy Manager tasks that are available, together with the interfaces that you can
access these tasks through, are listed in Table 5-6 on page 154.
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Table 5-6 Active Energy Manager task interfaces
Active Energy Manager task
Active Energy
Manager console
interface
IBM Systems
Director console
interface
Open the Active Energy Manager
console
X
X
Enable and disable data collection
X
X
Manage trend data
X
View trend data as a chart
X
View trend data as a table
X
View current data
X
Export data
X
Set Power Saver
X
X
Set Power Cap
X
X
Derate power
X
Use the Watt-hour meter
X
Schedule Active Energy Manager
tasks
X
Configure the PDU+
X
Refresh the data view
X
Get help with Active Energy Manage
X
X
HMC or IVM
interface
ASMI interface
on the FSP
X
X
Power Saver
only
X
Use the Active Energy Manager
command line interface1
Automate Power Saver2
1 You can use the Active Energy Manager command line interface commands from either a Windows or Linux command
line prompt.
2 To
automate the Power Saver function you need to run a Java™ program on the IBM Systems Director server.
We now provide a brief description of each Active Energy Manager task, and point you to a
detailed description of these tasks.
򐂰 Open the Active Energy Manager console
This task starts the Active Energy Manager console to interact with devices that are
supported for power management by Active Energy Manager. For a detailed description of
this task refer to 5.5.1, “Starting the Active Energy Manager console” on page 133.
򐂰 Enable and disable data collection
This task starts and stops trend data collection for an Active Energy Manager managed
object. In the IBM Systems Director console, the equivalent tasks are called Enable and
Disable Power Collection. Although they have different names, these tasks perform the
same function of enabling and disabling data collection in Active Energy Manager: to
collect data from the power managed object or objects.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.8, “Enabling and disabling data collection”
on page 158.
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򐂰 Manage trend data
Specify how often the Active Energy Manager server should poll the power managed
object for data and how long that data is to be kept. The polling interval can be set from
one minute to one day. You can also specify how long to keep the data in days. The polling
interval is applied only to the selected object, while the number of days to keep the data is
applied to all Active Energy Manager managed objects.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.9, “Managing trend data” on page 160.
򐂰 View trend data
View the following trend data over time as either a chart (graph) or a table:
–
–
–
–
Power consumption
CPU clock rate
Thermal signature
Power cap
You can set the time interval for viewing trend data from one hour up to one year, or you
can define a custom interval of your choice where start and end times may both be in the
past.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.10, “Viewing trend data” on page 162.
򐂰 View current data
View the current power-related information for a single managed object or a group of
objects. The current data views show you additional detailed information that is not
available on the trend data displays.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.11, “Viewing current data” on page 171.
򐂰 Refresh the data view
Refresh the data in the right pane of the Active Energy Manager console display. The data
automatically refreshes approximately every 20 seconds, but the Refresh option will
display an immediate update of the data between regular refresh intervals.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.19, “Refreshing the data view” on
page 237.
򐂰 Export data
Export the following types of data from the Active Energy Manager database to a file which
you can use in an external application:
– Current data
Can be exported in CSV, XML, and HTTP formats.
– Trend data as chart
Can be exported as a JPEG.
– Trend data as table
Can be exported in CSV, XML, and HTTP formats.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.12, “Exporting data” on page 179.
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򐂰 Set Power Saver
Set power saver mode for the selected power managed object interactively or as a policy.
Power saver mode throttles back the POWER6 processor by reducing the frequency
(GHz) at which the processor is driven and the voltage supplied to the processor. This has
the effect of reducing the processor’s power consumption, as well as its processing
capacity. You can set power saver on Active Energy Manager managed objects using the
following methods:
– Using the Active Energy Manager menus
– Through the power managed object’s FSP using ASMI
– Using the HMC which is acting as the Active Energy Manager provider for the
managed system
Note: Although the various menus and icons for Active Energy Manager-capable
objects show the Manage Power option being available, you may not be able to set
power saver mode for the particular selected object. Active Energy Manager cannot
always determine whether the selected object supports the power saver function.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.13, “Setting the power saver function” on
page 183.
򐂰 Set Power Cap
Set power cap for the managed object interactively or as a policy. Power cap sets a fixed
limit on the amount of power which a managed object can consume.
Normally, the data center manager calculates the power requirements of the center by
adding up the individual requirements of each device based on the label power. Label
power, which is a rating set by an independent organization, is the maximum possible
power that the device can consume. In most cases, this value is far in excess of the actual
power normally consumed. Set a power cap to calculate the actual power requirements of
the data center by setting a guaranteed upper limit on the power consumption of the
managed systems.
Note: Although the various menus and icons for Active Energy Manager-capable
objects show the Manage Power option being available, you may not be able to set
power cap for the particular selected object. Active Energy Manager cannot always
determine whether or not the selected object supports the power cap function.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.14, “Setting the power cap function” on
page 201.
򐂰 Derate power
Obtain a more realistic value for the power use of a managed object that does not
accurately report its power consumption to Active Energy Manager because it does not
support the hardware necessary to do this. You derate power by specifying a factor (the
derating percentage) that adjusts the rated power consumption (label power) of the device
to a value that more accurately reflects its actual consumption. The device then reports its
derated power rather than its label power to Active Energy Manager.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.15, “Derating power” on page 208.
򐂰 Use the Watt-hour meter
Estimate the total power cost for a power managed object by specifying a cost per
kilowatt-hour as well as a factor that takes into consideration the cooling cost associated
with the managed system.
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For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.16, “Using the watt-hour meter” on
page 209.
򐂰 Schedule Active Energy Manager tasks
You can schedule the following Active Energy Manager tasks using the IBM Systems
Director scheduler:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
Enable power collection
Disable power collection
Power Saver on
Power Saver off
Max performance cap
Min power cap
Power Capping off
We use PowerExecutive 2.1 terminology here because that is what is shown on the Active
Energy Manager tasks tree in the IBM Systems Director console. IBM Systems Director
console provides the best interface for scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks.
You can schedule the following Active Energy Manager tasks using the HMC scheduler:
– Power Saver on
– Power Saver off
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.17, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager
tasks” on page 211.
򐂰 Configure the PDU+
Configure a PDU+ by associating power consuming devices with physical power outlets
on the PDU+. The outlets are organized by circuit breaker into units called load groups.
The PDU+ reports power and thermal trending data to Active Energy Manager per load
group.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.18, “Understanding and configuring the
PDU+” on page 228.
򐂰 Get help with Active Energy Manager
There is extensive help available for Active Energy Manager through both the Active
Energy Manager console and the IBM Systems Director console.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.20, “Getting help for Active Energy
Manager” on page 238.
򐂰 Use the Active Energy Manager command line interface
There is a command line interface available for selected Active Energy Manager functions
from both Windows and Linux client workstations.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.21, “Using the Active Energy Manager
command line interface” on page 239.
򐂰 Automate Power Saver
There is a Java program available that enables you to turn power saver mode on and off
dynamically, depending on the current utilization of the POWER6 processor.
For a detailed description of this task refer to 5.22, “Automating the power saver function”
on page 242.
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In most cases, we recommend that you run an Active Energy Manager task using the icons in
the Active Energy Manager console tool bar, as discussed in 5.6.1, “Active Energy Manager
console tool bar icons” on page 140. There is usually more than one way you can run an
Active Energy Manager task, however, as shown in 5.6.8, “Active Energy Manager tasks
matrix” on page 150.
5.8 Enabling and disabling data collection
By default, data collection is enabled for power managed objects displayed in the Active
Energy Manager console that are capable of reporting their power consumption. You might
decide to suspend data collection to limit the amount of disk space required by the Active
Energy Manager database or to reduce the network traffic caused by polling of the power
managed objects.
You can only enable or disable data collection at the Active Energy Manager provider or
power managed system level. You cannot disable data collection for a particular blade server
or PDU+ load group, for example.
The following different methods are available to enable or disable data collection:
򐂰 Active Energy Manager provider level
There are two methods for enabling or disabling data collection at the Active Energy
Manager provider level:
– Using the Active Energy Manager console
You can enable or disable data collection at the Active Energy Manager provider level
by right-clicking the provider in the Active Energy Manager console, as shown in
Figure 5-61.
In Figure 5-61 you can see the Active Energy Manager provider called
M00145EDF8878, which is a BladeCenter management module. If you right-click this
provider, you see the Enable Data Collection option on the context menu. If selected,
then data is being collected; if not, then collection has been stopped. Simply click the
Enable Data Collection option to either enable or disable data collection.
Figure 5-61 Enabling and disabling data collection at the Active Energy Manager provider level 1
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Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
– Using the IBM Systems Director console
You can also enable or disable data collection at the Active Energy Manager provider
level by right-clicking the provider in the IBM Systems Director console, as shown in
Figure 5-62.
In the IBM Systems Director console, the equivalent tasks are called Enable Power
Collection and Disable Power Collection. Although they have different names, these
tasks perform the same function as Enable and Disable Data Collection in the Active
Energy Manager console. That is, to collect power-related data from the managed
objects.
Figure 5-62 Enabling and disabling data collection at the Active Energy Manager provider level 2
򐂰 Power managed system level
An Active Energy Manager power managed system is a power managed object for which
you can enable or disable power-related data collection.
Using an Active Energy Manager power managed system, you can enable or disable data
collection in exactly the same way as for Active Energy Manager providers. You can tell if
an object is a power managed system (or server) by hovering your mouse pointer over the
object. You see a small label titled Server is power-managed. An example is shown in
Figure 5-63.
Figure 5-63 Enabling and disabling data collection at the power managed system level
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You can also enable or disable data collection using the Enable/Disable Data Collection
icon on the tool bar of the Active Energy Manager console by performing the following steps:
1. Click the Active Energy Manager provider or power managed object for which you want to
enable or disable data collection.
2. Click the Enable/Disable Data Collection icon (
console tool bar.
) on the Active Energy Manager
If the icon is not greyed out, then clicking it disables data collection. If it is greyed out, then
clicking it enables data collection (assuming that the object can be power managed).
5.9 Managing trend data
Specify how often you want to collect trend data for an Active Energy Manager provider or
other power managed object, and how long you want to keep the trend data. Although you
can manage trend data for most objects in the Active Energy Manager console, you cannot
manage trend data for a PDU+ load group or devices in the Other Objects folder. To manage
trend data, perform the following steps:
1. Click the object that you want to manage trend data for.
2. Click the Manage Trend Data icon (
) on the Active Energy Manager console tool bar,
or right-click the power managed object and select Manage Trend Data as shown in
Figure 5-64.
Figure 5-64 Managing trend data for a power managed object
3. On the Manage Trend Data window (Figure 5-65), specify the polling interval in minutes,
which is how often the Active Energy Manager server polls the device you selected for
trend data. The default and minimum polling interval is one minute, but you might want to
poll devices less frequently depending on your requirements.
Figure 5-65 Specifying trend data parameters
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Note: For a BladeCenter management module, Active Energy Manger uses a minimum
polling interval of ten minutes, regardless of the value specified.
For a BladeCenter and PDU+, you may need to wait an additional period of time (up to
several minutes) for the data to be collected from the downstream blade servers or
devices connected to a PDU+.
Note: The polling interval is applied only to the selected object, while the number of
days to keep the data is applied to all Active Energy Manager managed objects.
Take the following factors into consideration when setting the polling interval:
– How often does data need to be gathered to meet your requirements? Are there
devices for which you need to closely monitor their trending data, or others that you can
monitor less often if you know that the trending data changes little over time? If only
basic power consumption data is required, polling every five or ten minutes may be
sufficient.
– The Active Energy Manager server polls the power managed objects every minute by
default. Because the server only sends changed data to the console, increasing the
polling interval reduces the number of changes to the Active Energy Manager
database. In this case, the amount of data that needs to be refreshed on the Active
Energy Manager console, and hence the time taken to perform the refresh, are
reduced. Therefore, to keep the refresh time to a minimum, we recommend that you
set the polling interval to the largest value that still enables you to collect meaningful
data.
– Depending on the environment in which the Active Energy Manager server is running,
(server CPU speed, disk speed, network bandwidth, number of systems being polled,
polling interval) the server might not be able to maintain the polling rate at the set
value. In this case, the Active Energy Manager server polls the devices as fast as it is
able. Increasing the polling interval can decrease the CPU, disk, and network load on
the Active Energy Manager server.
– The more frequently systems are polled, the more data is collected and the more disk
space is needed to hold this data.
Click OK.
4. From the Manage Trend Data window (Figure 5-65 on page 160), decide how much
historical data you want to keep for a device by specifying the number of days to keep the
data. The default setting in Active Energy Manager is to keep the trend data for 31 days
then delete it. When managing a large number of systems, a large amount of data is
gathered and saved, often in the range of gigabytes. Decreasing the number of days
therefore decreases the amount of disk space needed.
Note: The number of days you specify applies to all trend data, not just the data
collected for the selected object.
The Manage Trend Data window also tells you how much data you currently have stored in
the Active Energy Manager database. If the Active Energy Manager database cannot
expand any further due to disk storage constraints, the oldest data is automatically deleted
to make room for new data.
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5.10 Viewing trend data
The ability to view trending data for a device is a powerful tool in the management of power in
the data center. Active Energy Manager collects the following types of trend information:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Power consumption
CPU clock rate
Thermal signature
Power cap
You can view trend data as a chart (graph) or as a table. We discuss both methods in detail in
this section.
Note the following points regarding trend data:
򐂰 You can set the time interval for viewing trend data from one hour up to one year, or you
can define a custom interval of your choice where start and end times can both be in the
past. This enables you to review historical data.
򐂰 Not all Active Energy Manager providers and power managed objects support all types of
trending information. To determine which trending functions are supported in each
hardware environment, refer to Table 5-1 on page 108.
򐂰 When viewing trend data as either a chart or as a table, stopping and starting IBM
Systems Director server causes gaps in the data.
򐂰 Although Active Energy Manager displays the current power cap value as trend data, this
value is normally fixed and therefore does not vary over time unless you specifically
change it.
򐂰 The minimum and maximum power readings shown in the trend data are representative of
measurements made within the power managed object. Some external AC power meters
might not be able to capture or display the same peaks as are displayed using the Active
Energy Manager power meter. This is due to differences such as the averaging periods of
the Active Energy Manager power meter, the averaging periods of the external power
meter, and the filtering behavior of the power managed object’s power supply.
5.10.1 Viewing trend data as a chart
Being able to monitor trend data as a chart or graph is a powerful tool for data center
administrators because they can easily see how the different metrics are changing over time:
򐂰 Power consumption
Data center administrators can easily see how power consumption is changing over time,
and use the information to predict the power consumption of the data center at various
times of the day, week, or month. They can also identify anomalies, manage power
consumption when electrical demands or costs are high, and determine appropriate
power caps if applicable.
򐂰 CPU clock rate
Active Energy Manager charts the effective CPU speed of the energy-managed system’s
processors. For example, when a user enables power saver mode, the nominal CPU
speed shown on the chart reflects the decrease in the actual CPU clock speed from its
rated value.
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򐂰 Thermal signature
The inlet (ambient) temperature, and outlet (exhaust) temperature of the managed system
over time can be measured and displayed on the chart. This gives data center
administrators early warning of potentially dangerous rises in processor temperature and
allows them to take corrective action.
򐂰 Power cap
The trending chart also shows the minimum, current, and maximum power cap for the
power managed system. Normally, a data center has to provide enough power to cover the
rated power consumption (also called label power) of all systems connected to the data
center's power supply. However, the rated power is usually considerably greater than the
actual power consumed by the system. Setting a power cap for each system in the data
center to a value which provides adequate power for the system, but is less than the rated
power, enables the administrator to calculate the actual power requirements of the data
center, instead of using a value based on rated power. Setting a power cap can delay or
obviate the need to build additional power supply infrastructure.
Viewing trend data as a chart can be further broken down in terms of whether the devices
being monitored are connected to a PDU+ or not. The respective charts are different because
a PDU+ only supports a subset of the power management functions of most other Active
Energy Manager providers. Perform the following steps to view trend data as a chart:
1. Click the Active Energy Manager power managed object that you want to view trend data
for as a chart. You can click a group of power managed objects, but the data is usually
more meaningful if you select a single device only.
2. Click the Show Trend Data as Chart icon (
tool bar.
) on the Active Energy Manager console
You see a chart such as the one shown in Figure 5-66 on page 164 or Figure 5-67 on
page 165. Thermal trending and CPU trending appear in a separate chart below the
power trending chart.
Be aware of the following features of the trending charts:
򐂰 You can set the time interval for viewing trend data from one hour up to one year or you
can define a custom interval of your choice where start and end times can both be in the
past. To find out how to set the time period, refer to “Setting a time interval for the trend
data” on page 166.
򐂰 By hovering the mouse pointer over an event icon on the graph, you can view a description
of the event.
Important: IBM Systems Director and Active Energy Manager events are displayed on the
trend data chart as one of the following types of icon:
򐂰 Red circle with a white cross: Critical events
򐂰 Yellow triangle: Warning events
򐂰 Green square: Harmless events
You can place your mouse over each event in the trend data chart to see a description of
the event that occurred as shown in Figure 5-66. In the trend data table, these events are
shown in the Event column.
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Viewing trend data as a chart for a non-PDU+ device
For an Active Energy Manager power managed object that is not a PDU+, you see a chart
similar to the one shown in Figure 5-66.
Figure 5-66 Showing trend data as a chart for a non-PDU+ device
For a description of the different colored lines and shading shown in Figure 5-66, refer to
Table 5-7 on page 167. For an explanation of terms such as average watts (input) and current
Pcap, refer to Table on page 171.
Viewing trend data as a chart for a PDU+ device
For an Active Energy Manager power managed object that is a PDU+, you see a chart similar
to the one shown in Figure 5-67 on page 165. A PDU+ reports power and ambient
temperature, it does not report exhaust temperature or CPU speed.
The PDU+ trend data shown in Figure 5-67 on page 165 displays power and temperature
trending information when one of the following power managed objects is selected in the left
pane of the Active Energy Manager console window:
򐂰 Intelligent PDUs (ac) folder
򐂰 PDU+
򐂰 PDU+ load group
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Figure 5-67 Showing trend data as a chart for a PDU+ device
For a description of the different colored lines and shading shown in Figure 5-67, refer to
Table 5-7 on page 167. For an explanation of terms such as average watts (input) refer to
Table on page 171.
Thermal trending and CPU trending chart
For an Active Energy Manager managed object, you see a chart similar to the one shown in
Figure 5-68. This chart appears at the bottom of the power trending chart, but we show it
separately here for clarity. This chart shows the following information:
򐂰 Thermal and CPU trending for a non-PDU+ power managed object. The equivalent chart
for a PDU+ is similar, but the PDU+ chart does not show the effective CPU speed.
򐂰 The inlet (ambient) temperature and outlet (exhaust) temperature of the device over time.
򐂰 The effective CPU speed in percentage of the system processors over time. For example,
when an administrator enables power saver mode, the effective CPU speed decreases to
reflect the decrease in CPU clock rate. The CPU trend line shows less than 100% when
power saver is switched on and can also show less than 100% if a power cap is active.
Figure 5-68 Chart showing thermal trending and CPU trending
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For a description of the different colored lines and shading shown in Figure 5-68 on page 165,
refer to Table 5-7 on page 167. For an explanation of terms such as exhaust temperature and
effective CPU speed, refer to 5.11.1, “Terminology for current data” on page 171.
Setting a time interval for the trend data
You can select the time range for the data you want to view by clicking the pull-down list for
the Trend Data for field and selecting either a predefined time interval or creating a custom
time interval as shown in Figure 5-69.
Figure 5-69 Setting a time interval for the trend data
The time intervals specified in the Trend Data for drop-down menu shown in Figure 5-69 are
dynamic in that for whatever time you specify (except custom interval), the data is constantly
being updated. For example, if you select Last hour, the chart is constantly being updated to
show you the data for the previous hour. However, if you specify a date and time in the
Custom Trend Data Interval window (as shown in Figure 5-70), you see the static data for that
particular (historical) time interval only.
Figure 5-70 Specifying a custom trend data Interval
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Reading the trend data chart
There is a legend at the top of the charts shown in Figure 5-66 on page 164 and Figure 5-67
on page 165 that indicates the meaning of each of the lines and colored regions on the chart.
Each of these chart metrics can be turned on and off by checking and unchecking the
associated box. Depending on the power managed object for which you are viewing the trend
data, some of the chart metrics may not be available. If a particular power managed object
does not support a certain metric then it is not shown. If there is no data available for a metric
that is supported for a particular power managed object then the metric is greyed out.
Table 5-7 lists the complete set of chart metrics that are available, how they appear on a trend
data chart, and what they mean.
Table 5-7 Trend data chart metrics
Chart metric
How metric
appears in the
chart
What the metric means
Green line
BladeCenter power domain: The power in watts (ac) currently being
consumed by the whole domain.
Power (upper chart)
Average (Input)
Power meter-enabled managed objects: The power in watts (ac) currently
being consumed, as reported by the power meter.
Non-power meter-enabled power managed objects: The nameplate watts
(ac), also called label power. The nameplate watts might be derated to more
accurately reflect the actual amount of power being consumed.
Average (Output)
Blue line
BladeCenter power domain: The power in watts (dc) currently being
consumed by the whole domain.
Power meter-enabled managed objects: The power in watts (dc) currently
being consumed, as reported by the power meter.
Non-power meter-enabled managed objects: The nameplate watts (dc),
also called label power. The nameplate watts might be derated to more
accurately reflect the actual amount of power being consumed.
Pcap
(Min/Max/Current)
Solid/Solid/Broken
black line
Pcap min: For a managed object that supports power capping, this is the
minimum power cap setting in watts.
Pcap max: For a managed object that supports power capping, this is the
maximum power cap setting in watts.
Current Pcap: For a managed object that supports power capping, this is
the current power cap setting in watts.
Upper Percentile
(Output)
Shaded light blue
region
This specifies a value for the upper range of variation from the average
power output that you wish to view. For example, a value of 80% defines a
region within which 80% of all collected power output data that are above
the average lie. The default value is 100% which shows the maximum
power consumed.
Lower Percentile
(Output)
Shaded light blue
region
This specifies a value for the lower range of variation from the average
power output that you wish to view. For example, a value of 80% defines a
region within which 80% of all collected power output data that are below
the average lie. The default value is 0% which shows the minimum power
consumed.
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Chart metric
How metric
appears in the
chart
What the metric means
Average Watts
from PDU+ (Input)
Black line
This is the average power (ac) that is being supplied to the device by the
attached PDU+.
Nameplate Power
(Input)
Static value
The maximum rated power in watts (ac) that the power managed object
can draw. This value is also called label power.
Temp/CPU (lower chart)
Exhaust
Temperature
Red line
An estimate of the current temperature of air exiting the power managed
object measured in degrees Celsius and based on the current ambient
temperature. The current ambient temperature depends on the fan speed,
because the fan speed increases as the temperature increases. The effect
is to keep the ambient temperature within safe operating limits.
Ambient
Temperature
Blue line
The current temperature of air entering the power managed object
measured in degrees Celsius.
Effective CPU
Speed (%)
Dark green line
with light green
shaded area
For a power-metered managed object this is the current CPU speed as a
percentage of the rated speed. Values of less than 100% mean that the
CPU or CPUs have been throttled back.
Nominal CPU
speed
Static value
Rated speed of the CPU or CPUs.
Critical
Red circle with
white cross
This is a severe error indicating that a device has failed or may fail.
Warning
Yellow triangle
This is a warning that a device has suffered an error that may progress to a
critical event.
Harmless
Green square
This is a notification of a change in the environment but does not indicate
an error.
Events (either chart)
5.10.2 Viewing trend data as a table
Viewing power trending data as a table can be further broken down in terms of whether the
devices being monitored are connected to a PDU+ or not. The respective tables are different
because a PDU+ measures power consumption differently compared with other power
managed objects. Perform the following steps to view trend data as a table:
1. Click the power managed object that you want to view trend data for as a table. You can
click a group of power managed objects, but the data is usually more meaningful if you
select a single object only.
2. Click the Show Trend Data as Table icon (
tool bar.
) on the Active Energy Manager console
You see a table such as the one shown in Figure 5-71 on page 169 or Figure 5-72 on
page 170.
3. Select the time range for the data you want to view by clicking the down arrow of the Trend
Data for drop-down menu and selecting either a predefined time interval or creating a
custom time interval as described in “Setting a time interval for the trend data” on
page 166.
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Figure 5-71 Showing trend data as a table for a non-PDU+ device
For a description of the different metrics refer to 5.11.1, “Terminology for current data” on
page 171.
Viewing trend data as table for a non-PDU+ device
For a power managed object that is not a PDU+, you see a table similar to the one shown in
Figure 5-71. This table displays the raw measurements, as opposed to trending lines. The
data can also be exported to a spreadsheet.
Be aware of the following are features of this chart:
򐂰 You can set the time interval for viewing trend data from one hour up to one year or you
can define a custom interval of your choice where start and end times can both be in the
past.
򐂰 You notice in Figure 5-71 that at there are some blank cells in the table. These are
associated with the managed system being offline.
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Viewing trend data as a table for a PDU+ device
For a power managed object that is a PDU+, you see a table similar to the one shown in
Figure 5-72.
For a description of the terms used in Figure 5-72, refer to 5.11.1, “Terminology for current
data” on page 171.
In the chart you can set the time interval for viewing trend data from one hour up to one year
or you can define a custom interval of your choice where start and end times can both be in
the past.
Figure 5-72 Showing trend data as a table for a PDU+ device
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5.11 Viewing current data
View point-in-time data for a power managed object or group of power managed objects. An
important point to understand when viewing current data is that you see additional information
that is not available from the trending data charts and tables.
The following list illustrates how current data is presented:
򐂰 Current data for non-PDU+ power managed object
– Single non-PDU+ power managed object
– Group of non-PDU+ power managed objects
򐂰 Current data for PDU+ power managed object
– Single PDU+ power managed object
– Group of PDU+ power managed objects
To view the current data, perform the following steps:
1. Click the power managed object or group of power managed objects for which you want to
view the current data.
2. Click the Show Current Data icon (
) on the Active Energy Manager console tool bar.
Before we show you some examples of viewing current data, we provide a list of terms used
in the current data displays. Refer to this table if you are unsure of any terms shown in the
current data displays.
5.11.1 Terminology for current data
This section explains the terms you might see in the current data pane. The terminology you
see depends on the type of power managed object you are viewing. Use this information as a
reference if you need help understanding the current data terminology.
Acoustic mode
For BladeCenter chassis and other servers that support noise reduction (acoustic) mode,
the possible values are enabled or disabled. For servers that do not support acoustic
mode, this parameter is blank.
Amps (used/capacity)
The current amps being drawn and the total capacity in amps that can be drawn by a
PDU+ load group. Graphical views of the amps used as a percentage of capacity may
show yellow (warning) or red (critical) markers on the graph, depending on how close the
amps used is to capacity.
Average watts from PDU+ (input)
The current average input power in watts (ac) that is currently being consumed by the
devices connected to the PDU+ and the PDU+ itself. This data is available only after the
devices on the PDU+ have been configured (refer to 5.18, “Understanding and configuring
the PDU+” on page 228). The Average watts from PDU+ (input) is reported by load group,
not by device.
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Average watts (input)
For a BladeCenter power domain this is the power in watts (ac) currently being consumed
by the whole domain.
For power meter-enabled managed objects this is the power in watts (ac) currently being
consumed as reported by the power meter.
For non-power meter-enabled managed objects this is the nameplate watts (ac). The
nameplate watts might be derated by the operator to more accurately reflect the actual
amount of power being consumed.
Average watts (output)
For a BladeCenter power domain this is the power in watts (dc) currently being consumed
by the whole domain.
For power meter-enabled managed objects this is the power in watts (dc) currently being
consumed as reported by the power meter.
For non-power meter-enabled managed objects this is the nameplate watts (dc). The
nameplate watts might be derated by the operator to more accurately reflect the actual
amount of power being consumed.
Bay
For a BladeCenter this is the bay number of the power managed object.
BTUs/hour
The estimated heat output generated by the power managed object in British Thermal
Units (BTUs) where 1 watt = 3.412 BTUs per hour.
Current ambient °C
The current temperature of air entering the power managed object measured in degrees
Celsius.
Current CPU throttle values (%)
For a non-POWER6 blade server this is the current CPU speed as a percentage of the
rated speed. Values of less than 100% mean that the CPU or CPUs have been throttled
back.
Current exhaust °C
An estimate of the current temperature of air exiting the power managed object measured
in degrees Celsius, based on the current ambient temperature and fan speed.
Current Pcap
For a power managed object that supports power capping, this is the current power cap
setting in watts.
Data collection
The current status of Active Energy Manager data collection. This can be enabled,
disabled or offline. An offline status indicates that data collection is enabled, but Active
Energy Manager cannot currently contact the endpoint.
Derate nameplate watts to (%)
Reduce the nameplate watts to the specified percentage to provide a more accurate
measure of power consumption for blade servers that do not support power metering.
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Description
A description of the device that is connected to an outlet of a PDU+ load group. If the
device is an IBM Systems Director managed object, then the description can be retrieved
by clicking the Browse button on the Configure PDU panel and selecting the IBM Systems
Director managed object from the list.
Effective CPU speed (%)
For a power-metered managed object this is the current CPU speed as a percentage of
the rated speed. Values of less than 100% mean that the CPU or CPUs have been
throttled back.
Firmware level
The firmware level of the PDU+.
HMC name
The name of the managing HMC or zHMC as it is known to IBM Systems Director.
PDU+ name
The name of the PDU+ as it is known to IBM Systems Director.
Last policy
The last policy for the power managed object and the time it was applied.
Location
A user supplied label for the location of a PDU+ load group.
Machine type/model
The machine type and model of the power managed object.
Max ambient °C
The maximum temperature of air entering the PDU+ measured in degrees Celsius during
the last polling period.
Max Pcap
For a managed object that supports power capping, this is the maximum power cap
setting in watts.
Max watts (input)
The maximum power in watts (ac) being drawn by the power managed object during the
last polling period.
Max watts (output)
The maximum power in watts (dc) being drawn by the devices attached to the PDU+
during the last polling period.
Metering level
The current level of metering if power metering is supported and enabled for a managed
object. There are three possible values:
– Disabled
– Monitoring only
– Capping
Min ambient °C
The minimum temperature of air entering the PDU+ measured in degrees Celsius during
the last polling period.
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Min Pcap
For a managed object that supports power capping, this is the minimum power cap setting
in watts.
Min watts output
The minimum power in watts (dc) being drawn by the devices attached to the PDU+ during
the last polling period.
Model
The System z model number.
Name
The name of the power managed object or group of power managed objects as they are
known to Active Energy Manager.
Nameplate watts (input)
The maximum rated power in watts (ac) that the power managed object can draw. This
value is also called label power.
Nameplate watts (output)
The maximum rated power in watts (dc) that the power managed object can draw. This
value is also called label power.
Outlet name
The power outlet name (J1–J12) on the PDU+.
Oversubscription policy
There are three oversubscription policies:
– No oversubscription
Only enough blade servers are allowed to power on so that, if one power module fails,
the remaining blade servers continue to run without having to be throttled back.
– Recoverable oversubscription
If a power module fails, all blade servers continue to run. Some blade servers may
need to be throttled back to stay within the power envelope. More blade servers can be
powered with this policy than with the first policy.
– Non-recoverable oversubscription
All blade servers can power on regardless. If a power module fails, blade servers are
throttled back in the hope that the remaining power module can handle them all, but
there's no guarantee. The remaining power module may be overwhelmed and fail, in
which case all the blade servers lose power.
Power domain 1
The set of managed objects that are supplied with power by the first power supply module
in a BladeCenter. There are two power domains in a BladeCenter. A power domain shows
up as a child of the BladeCenter management module in the navigation pane of the Active
Energy Manager console.
Power domain 2
The set of managed objects that are supplied with power by the second power supply
module in a BladeCenter. There are two power domains in a BladeCenter. A power
domain shows up as a child of the BladeCenter management module in the navigation
pane of the Active Energy Manager console.
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Power-managed device
The name of the device that is connected to an outlet of a PDU+ load group. If the device
is an IBM Systems Director managed object, then the name can be retrieved when you
click the Browse button on the Configure PDU panel.
Power meter
The version of the power meter for a managed object, if supported.
Power saver
For a non-POWER6 blade server the possible values are supported or not supported.
Dynamic power saving is system controlled and enabled in the BIOS. For power saving to
become operational, the operating system must also support it. For a POWER6 blade
server the possible values are on, off, or not supported.
Preset blade throttle value (W)
For a non-POWER6 blade server, this is the preset value in watts to which the blade
server can be throttled back.
Rated watts (output)
The maximum rated power in watts (dc) that the power managed object can draw. This
value is also called label power.
Redundancy status
Whether or not a redundant power supply is available for the managed object.
Serial
The serial number of the System z server.
Time
The date and time when the current data was collected.
Type
For a BladeCenter this is the type of object being managed within the BladeCenter. For
other power managed objects this is the machine type.
Upgradeable
Used to establish whether the software or firmware on an object in the Other Objects
folder is upgradeable to a level allowing Active Energy Manager functions to work with the
object.
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5.11.2 Current data for non-PDU+ power managed objects
You see different information when you view the current data for a non-PDU+ power managed
object compared with a PDU+. We deal with the two cases separately. In this section we show
examples of the current data that is available for non-PDU+ power managed objects.
Single non-PDU+ power managed object
For a non-PDU+ power managed object, you see current data that is similar to the table
shown in Figure 5-73.
Figure 5-73 Current data for a non-PDU+ power managed object
For a description of the terms used in Figure 5-73, refer to 5.11.1, “Terminology for current
data” on page 171.
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Group of non-PDU+ power managed objects
For a group of power managed objects, you see current data that is similar to the table shown
in Figure 5-74.
Figure 5-74 Current data for a group of non-PDU+ power managed objects
For a description of the terms used in Figure 5-74, refer to 5.11.1, “Terminology for current
data” on page 171.
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5.11.3 Current data for PDU+ power managed objects
In this section we show examples of the current data that is available for PDU+ power
managed objects.
Single PDU+ power managed object
For a power managed object that is a PDU+, you see current data that is similar to the table
shown in Figure 5-75.
Figure 5-75 Current data for a PDU+ power managed object
For a description of the terms used in Figure 5-75, refer to 5.11.1, “Terminology for current
data” on page 171.
In addition to the current data for the PDU+ as a whole, current data display shows current
information for each load group. Of special interest are the colored bars that represent the
current power consumption (small vertical bar) for each load group in relation to the total
capacity of the load group:
򐂰 Green: Normal power consumption range.
򐂰 Yellow: High power consumption but not yet critical.
򐂰 Red: Critical condition where the power consumption is near or at its maximum rated
value. If the power consumption of the load group exceeds its rated value the circuit
breaker trips and power is cut to the load group.
By monitoring the current data for a PDU+, an operator can take action to reduce power
consumption before the circuit breaker trips.
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Group of PDU+ power managed objects
For a group of power managed objects that are PDU+s, you may see current data that is
similar to the table shown in Figure 5-76.
Figure 5-76 Current data for a group of PDU+ power managed objects
For a description of the terms used in Figure 5-76, refer to 5.11.1, “Terminology for current
data” on page 171.
5.12 Exporting data
Export the following types of data from the Active Energy Manager database as files for use in
external applications:
򐂰 Trend data as a chart
Can be exported as a JPEG.
򐂰 Trend data as a table
Can be exported in CSV, XML, and HTTP formats.
򐂰 Current data
Can be exported in CSV, XML, and HTTP formats.
The data exported is the data currently in view in the right pane of the Active Energy Manager
console.
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Note: On Windows, saving exported data to a network share that is not mapped to a drive
letter is not supported. When using the File → Export function, you must specify a local
disk or a network share that is mapped to a drive when saving the exported data.
5.12.1 Exporting trend data as a chart
You can export trend data in chart format as a JPEG file by following these steps:
1. Set the time period over which you want to view data as described in “Setting a time
interval for the trend data” on page 166.
2. In the Active Energy Manager console, click File → Export → Trend Data as Chart or
right-click the power managed object and select Export → Trend Data as Chart as
shown in Figure 5-77.
Figure 5-77 Selecting to export trend data as a chart
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3. On the Export Trend Data as Chart window (Figure 5-78), select the directory to which you
want to export the data and type a name for the file in the File Name field. Click OK.
Figure 5-78 Exporting trend data as a chart
5.12.2 Exporting trend data as a table
You can export trend data in table format as a CSV, XML, or HTML file by performing the
following steps:
1. Set the time period over which you want to view data as described in “Setting a time
interval for the trend data” on page 166.
2. In the Active Energy Manager console, click File → Export → Trend Data as Table or
right-click the power managed object and select Export → Trend Data as Table as shown
in Figure 5-79.
Figure 5-79 Selecting to export trend data as a table
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3. On the Export Trend Data as Table window (Figure 5-80), select the directory to which you
want to export the data and type a name for the file in the File Name field. In the Files of
Type field, select the type of file format you want. Click OK.
Figure 5-80 Exporting trend data as a table
5.12.3 Exporting current data
You can export current data as a CSV, XML, or HTML file by performing the following steps:
1. Set the time period over which you want to view data as described in “Setting a time
interval for the trend data” on page 166.
2. In the Active Energy Manager console, click File → Export → Current Data or right-click
the power managed object and select Export → Current Data as shown in Figure 5-81.
Figure 5-81 Selecting to export current data
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3. On the Export Current Data window (Figure 5-82), select the directory to which you want
to export the data and type a name for the file in the File Name field. In the Files of Type
field select the type of file format you want. Click OK.
Figure 5-82 Exporting current data
5.13 Setting the power saver function
The power saver function is available on selected IBM systems as shown in Table 5-1 on
page 108.
For POWER6 processor-based systems, Power Saver mode throttles back the POWER6
processor by reducing the frequency (GHz) at which the processor is driven and the voltage
supplied to the processor. This has the effect of reducing the processor’s power consumption
by up to 30%. Power saver should be set or scheduled for periods of low processor utilization
which can be determined by monitoring the CPU trend data as described in 5.10, “Viewing
trend data” on page 162. For a detailed discussion of the implementation of power saver on
the POWER6 processor refer to 2.2.3, “Power saver mode” on page 17.
This section covers the following tasks:
򐂰 Querying power saver mode capability
Note: This task is only available for POWER6 processor-based systems.
Before attempting to set the power saver function on a managed system, you should
confirm that the POWER6 processor-based managed system actually supports power
saver mode. Refer to 5.13.1, “Querying power saver mode capability” on page 185 to
determine if your managed system supports power saver mode.
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򐂰 Setting power saver mode
Assuming that your managed system supports power saver mode, you can set it using any
of the following methods:
– Using the Active Energy Manager console menus
Use this method for any type of power managed object if your organization has a
systems management strategy in place based on IBM Systems Director and Active
Energy Manager.
You can also set power saver using the IBM Systems Director console menus, but we
recommend that you use the Active Energy Manager console menus because they
provide more flexibility by way of allowing you to set up and change policies. Also,
Active Energy Manager provides access to a greater range of power managed objects
than the IBM Systems Director console. Therefore, we only describe how to set power
saver using the Active Energy Manager console menus.
Refer to 5.13.2, “Setting power saver using the Active Energy Manager console
menus” on page 190 for a description of how to do this.
– Using the managed system’s HMC graphical user interface
Use this method for POWER6 processor-based systems if you have not implemented
Active Energy Manager and the system is being managed by an HMC.
Refer to 5.13.3, “Setting power saver using the HMC” on page 192 for a description of
how to do this.
– Through the managed system’s FSP using ASMI
Use this method for POWER6 processor-based systems if you have not implemented
Active Energy Manager and the system is not being managed by an HMC or IVM.
Refer to 5.13.4, “Setting power saver through the FSP using ASMI” on page 196 for a
description of how to do this.
You can schedule a change to the power saver function in the following ways:
򐂰 Using the IBM Systems Director scheduler
Refer to 5.17.1, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks using the task interface” on
page 212 and 5.17.1, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks using the task interface”
on page 212.
򐂰 Using the HMC scheduler
Refer to 5.17.3, “Scheduling power saver using the HMC scheduler” on page 222.
Power saver can also be automated to turn on and off according to the workload on the
POWER6 processor by using a supplied Java program. Refer to 5.22, “Automating the power
saver function” on page 242 for more information.
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5.13.1 Querying power saver mode capability
Attention: This task is only available for POWER6 processor-based systems.
You can query power saver mode capability in two ways:
򐂰 Using the HMC
If your system is being managed by an HMC, use this method. We cover this method in
this section.
򐂰 Using the FSP
If your system is not being managed by an HMC, you can query power saver mode
capability using the same method you use to change it. This is described in 5.13.4,
“Setting power saver through the FSP using ASMI” on page 196.
The HMC reports the following two levels of power saver mode capability:
򐂰 Firmware power saver mode capability
This indicates whether or not the firmware loaded on the FSP of the POWER6
processor-based system is capable of performing power saver mode functions. This does
not imply that the POWER6 hardware itself also supports power saver mode.
򐂰 Hardware Power Saver mode capability
This indicates whether the POWER6 hardware itself supports the power saver mode
function. For example, POWER6 processor-based systems with a nominal operating
frequency of less than 4.0 GHz do not support power saver mode at the hardware level,
even if the installed FSP firmware does.
There are two methods you can use to query Power Saver capability using the HMC:
򐂰 Using the HMC graphical user interface
Refer to “Querying power saver capability using the HMC graphical user interface” (next
section) for a description of how to do this.
򐂰 Using the HMC’s command line interface
Refer to “Querying power saver capability using HMC command line interface” on
page 189 for a description of how to do this.
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Querying power saver capability using the HMC graphical user interface
To query a POWER6 processor-based managed system’s power saver mode capabilities
using the HMC graphical user interface, perform the following steps:
1. If you do not have access to the HMC’s physical console, start a Web browser session to
the HMC by entering the following URL:
https://<IP address of the HMC port> \
One of the HMC’s two Ethernet ports must be connected to the network and be accessible
using TCP/IP.
2. Click the Log on and launch the Hardware Management Console web application link
shown in Figure 5-83.
Figure 5-83 Launching the HMC graphical user interface from a Web browser
3. Enter a user id and password with supervisor level authority and click Logon as shown in
Figure 5-84.
Figure 5-84 Logging on to the HMC graphical user interface from a Web browser
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4. On the Hardware Management Console window (Figure 5-85), expand Systems
Management → Servers.
Figure 5-85 HMC console
5. Select the check box in the Select column of the managed system whose power saver
capabilities you want to query, as shown in Figure 5-86.
Figure 5-86 Selecting the managed system to query power saver capability
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6. Click the small icon in the shape of a square to the right of the system name in the Name
column. From the drop-down menu shown in Figure 5-87, select Properties.
Figure 5-87 Displaying the properties of the selected managed system
7. From the window shown in Figure 5-88 click the Capabilities tab.
Figure 5-88 Managed system’s properties window
8. Near the bottom of the list displayed in the Capabilities tab (Figure 5-89 on page 189), you
see two settings for Firmware Power Saver Capable and Hardware Power Saver Capable.
Both settings must be True for the power saver function to be available on this POWER6
processor-based managed system.
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Figure 5-89 Displaying the capabilities of the managed system
9. Click Cancel to close the managed system’s Properties window.
10.Either click the Logoff button on the Hardware Management Console window or proceed
to 5.13.2, “Setting power saver using the Active Energy Manager console menus” on
page 190 to change the power Saver mode setting.
Querying power saver capability using HMC command line interface
The HMC’s command line interface is recommended for advanced users only. To query a
POWER6 processor-based managed system’s power saver mode capabilities using the
HMC’s command line interface, perform the following steps:
1. Start a command line interface to the HMC using a command line utility such as PuTTY.
2. Log on to the HMC using a user id with Supervisor-level authority.
3. List the Power Saver capabilities of the managed system using the following lssyscfg
command:
lssyscfg -r sys -F
"name,state,type_model,serial_num,firmware_power_saver_capable,hardware_power_s
aver_capable"
There is only a single space between the -F and “name,.
The following example illustrates the output of this command:
name=e52fsp8,state=Power
Off,type_model=9117-MMA,serial_num=10FFE5B,firmware_power_saver_capable=1,hardw
are_power_saver_capable=1
You see two settings for firmware_power_saver_capable and
hardware_power_saver_capable. Both settings must be True (equal to 1) for the power
saver function to be available on this POWER6 processor-based managed system.
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5.13.2 Setting power saver using the Active Energy Manager console menus
To set power saver for an Active Energy Manager managed object, perform the following
steps:
1. Click the power managed object for which you want to set power saver. Alternatively, if you
want to create a generic power saver policy, click the Power-Managed Objects (ac)
folder.
2. Either click the Manage Power icon (
) on the Active Energy Manager console tool bar
or right-click the previously selected object and select Manage Power.
3. Depending on your power managed object, you see one of three possible views of the
Manage Power window:
– If the power managed object you selected does not support the Power Saver function,
as shown in Figure 5-90, the Power Saver section is greyed out.
Figure 5-90 Power saver function not supported for the power managed object
– If the power managed object you selected supports the Power Saver function, as
shown in Figure 5-91 on page 191, select either the Power saver on or Power saver
off radio button.
Note: To apply the Power Saver setting, you must also set Power Cap to one of its
values, even if the Power Cap is off.
After you have set Power Cap to one of its values, click Apply Now.
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Figure 5-91 Setting power saver on a power managed object
– If you elected to create a new Power Saver policy or update an existing one, you need
to perform the following steps:
i. Enter the name of a new Power Saver policy in the Name field or select an existing
policy from the drop-down list.
ii. Select either the Power saver on or Power saver off radio button as required.
iii. Select one of the Power Cap radio buttons.
Note: To save the Power Saver policy you must also set Power Cap to one of its
values, even if this it is Power Cap off.
iv. After you have set the Power cap value, click Save. The policy is saved. New
policies appear in the Active Energy Manager tasks tree in the Tasks pane of the
IBM Systems Director console.
You can then schedule the new or updated policy to run at a certain time as
described in 5.17, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks” on page 211.
An example is shown in Figure 5-92 on page 192.
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Figure 5-92 Creating or updating a power policy
5.13.3 Setting power saver using the HMC
The HMC is a machine that controls and manages the hardware configuration of POWER5
and POWER6 processor-based systems. For example, you can configure logical partitions on
the managed system and start or stop them. The HMC provides both a graphical user
interface and a command line interface that you can use to configure and manage the various
features offered by the managed systems. You can access the HMC graphical and command
line interfaces either locally on the HMC’s console or from a client machine across a TCP/IP
network.
The HMC only supports setting the power saver mode feature of EnergyScale and not power
cap.
When enabling or disabling power saver mode through the HMC, the new setting might not
take effect immediately. Normally, if the operation is performed before the managed system is
powered on, the desired mode does not change to the new setting until the system is up and
running. If the power saver mode is in transition between the on and off states, any further
changes are blocked.
There are two methods you can use to set power saver mode using the HMC:
򐂰 Using the HMC graphical user interface
Refer to “Setting power saver using the HMC graphical user interface” (next section) for a
description of how to do this.
򐂰 Using the HMC command line interface
Refer to “Setting power saver mode using HMC command line interface” on page 195 for a
description of how to do this.
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Setting power saver using the HMC graphical user interface
To set Power Saver mode using the HMC graphical user interface, perform the following
steps:
1. If you do not have access to the HMC’s physical console, start a Web browser session to
the HMC by entering the following URL:
https://<IP address of the HMC port>
One of the HMC’s two Ethernet ports must be connected to the network and be accessible
using TCP/IP.
2. Click the Log on and launch the Hardware Management Console web application link
as shown in Figure 5-93.
Figure 5-93 Launching the HMC graphical user interface from a Web browser
3. Enter a user id and password with supervisor level authority and click Logon as shown in
Figure 5-94.
Figure 5-94 Logging on to the HMC graphical user interface from a Web browser
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4. On the Hardware Management Console window (Figure 5-95), expand Systems
Management → Servers. Click the managed system whose Power Saver setting you
want to change.
Figure 5-95 Selecting the managed system to set power saver capability
5. Expand Operations → Power Management as shown in Figure 5-96.
Figure 5-96 Displaying the power management settings of the power managed system
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6. Click the down arrow for the Desired power saver mode drop-down menu as shown in
Figure 5-97. Select Enabled or Disabled as required and click OK.
Figure 5-97 Setting power saver mode using the HMC graphical user interface
7. Click OK on the confirmation window shown in Figure 5-98.
Figure 5-98 Confirmation for setting the power saver mode
8. Click the Logoff button in the top right corner of the HMC display and click OK to confirm
the log off.
Setting power saver mode using HMC command line interface
The HMC’s command line interface is recommended for advanced users only. To set a
managed system’s power saver mode using the HMC’s command line interface, perform the
following steps:
1. Start a command line interface to the HMC using a command line utility such as PuTTY.
2. Log on to the HMC using a user id with Supervisor-level authority.
3. Set the power saver mode of the managed system using the following chpwrmgmt
command:
chpwrmgmt -m <managed system name> -r sys -o enabled | disabled
For example:
chpwrmgmt -m e52fsp8 -r sys -o enabled
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4. To confirm the current power Saver mode setting, use the following lspwrmgmt command:
lspwrmgmt -m <managed system name> -r sys
For example:
lspwrmgmt -m e52fsp8 -r sys
Following is an example of the output of this command:
name=e52fsp8,type_model=9117-MMA,serial_num=10FFE5B,curr_power_saver_mode=Disab
led,desired_power_saver_mode=Disabled
5.13.4 Setting power saver through the FSP using ASMI
POWER6 processor-based systems can be managed with or without an HMC. In cases
where there is no managing HMC or IVM, IBM Systems Director can establish a direct
connection to the POWER6 processor-based system's FSP. From this connection, you can
access the Active Energy Manager functions of the FSP. The Advanced System Management
Interface (ASMI) of the FSP only supports the power saver mode feature of EnergyScale and
not power cap. You can access the ASMI interface of the FSP from a Web browser session
either locally or across a network using TCP/IP.
With ASMI, a user can query the current power saver mode setting and enable or disable it. If
a given POWER6 processor-based system does not support EnergyScale functions, the
ASMI menus omit the Power Management Mode Setup option.
Note: You must use the admin user id to alter the power saver mode setting when using
ASMI.
There are two ways you can change the power saver setting on a power managed system
through its FSP using ASMI:
򐂰 By connecting directly to the power managed system’s FSP
Use this method if the system is not being managed by an HMC or IVM.
To establish a TCP/IP connection to the FSP, one of the FSP’s two external Ethernet ports
must be connected to the network and be accessible using TCP/IP. In this case, you start
a Web browser session to the FSP by entering the following URL:
https://<IP address of the FSP port>
򐂰 By connecting to the power managed system’s FSP through its managing HMC
Use this method if the system is being managed by an HMC. In this case, the HMC
provides access to the ASMI interface on the FSP in the managed system.
There are two ways to access the managed system’s FSP through its managing HMC:
– Through the HMC’s physical console
– By starting a Web browser session to the HMC from a client in the network
To establish a TCP/IP connection to the HMC, one of the HMC’s two external Ethernet
ports must be connected to the network and be accessible using TCP/IP.
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In the following example, we first log on to the system’s managing HMC and then use ASMI to
access the FSP of the system on which we want to change the power saver mode. If you are
connecting directly to the FSP, start at step 7 on page 199.
To set power saver using ASMI, perform the following steps:
1. Start a Web browser session to the FSP’s managing HMC by entering the following URL:
https://<IP address of the HMC port>
2. Click the Log on and launch the Hardware Management Console web application link
in the Hardware Management Console window shown in Figure 5-99.
Figure 5-99 Launching the HMC graphical user interface from a Web browser
3. Enter a user id and password with supervisor level authority and click Logon as shown in
Figure 5-100.
Figure 5-100 Logging on to the HMC graphical user interface from a Web browser
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4. Expand Systems Management → Servers in the window shown in Figure 5-101 and
select the managed system whose power saver setting you want to change.
Figure 5-101 Selecting the managed system to set power saver capability
5. Expand Operations → Launch Advanced System Management (ASM) as shown in
Figure 5-102.
Figure 5-102 Launching the ASMI, 1 of 2
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6. On the Launch ASM Interface window (Figure 5-103), click OK.
Figure 5-103 Launching the ASMI, 2 of 2
7. If you are connecting directly to the managed system’s FSP rather than accessing the FSP
though the HMC, start a Web browser session to the FSP by entering the following URL:
https://<IP address of the FSP port>
If you are connecting to the FSP either directly or through the managing HMC, you see the
display shown in Figure 5-104. Enter the admin user id and password. You must use the
admin user id to change the power saver setting. Click Log in.
Figure 5-104 Logging on to the Advanced System Management interface (ASMI)
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8. Expand System Configuration → Power Management Mode Setup as shown in
Figure 5-105.
Figure 5-105 Selecting the Power Management Mode Setup option
9. On the Power Management Mode Setup window (Figure 5-106), select Enabled or
Disabled from the Power Saver drop-down menu and click Save settings.
Figure 5-106 Setting power saver through the FSP using ASMI
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10.Click the Log out button in the top left corner of the confirmation shown in Figure 5-107.
Figure 5-107 Power saver mode successfully enabled
11.Close the Web browser session and return to the HMC Web browser session (if you
connected through the FSP’s managing HMC).
12.Click the Logoff button in the top right corner of the HMC display and click OK to confirm
the log off.
5.14 Setting the power cap function
Power cap sets a fixed limit on the amount of power which a managed object can consume. If
the cap is reached, the speed of the processor is throttled back and the voltage reduced to
keep the power used by the managed system under the cap.
Normally, the data center manager calculates the power requirements of the center by adding
up the individual requirements of each device based on the device’s label power. Label power,
which is a rating set by an independent organization, is the maximum possible power that the
device can consume. In most cases, this value is far in excess of the actual power consumed.
The idea of limiting the power consumption of a managed system by setting a power cap
enables you to calculate the actual power requirements of the data center by setting a cap on
the maximum power consumption of the devices within the data center.
Power cap is similar to power saver in that both functions restrict the capacity of the processor
to reduce power consumption. However, power saver is either on or off whereas power cap
can be set between a minimum value (called minimum power cap, or Pcap min) and a
maximum value (called maximum performance cap, or Pcap max). These values are
determined by an algorithm that takes into consideration all of the power using devices within
the managed system. Pcap min and Pcap max are calculated to ensure that the managed
system always operates within safe power limits. If power capping needs to be enforced by
the Active Energy Manager provider, it is the processor that has its power reduced, not other
devices within the system such as disk drives or memory slots. When power is constrained to
a POWER6 processor, the voltage and clocking rate are reduced to reduce the power to the
required Pcap level.
If hot-swappable components are added to or removed from a power managed system while
it is powered on, the minimum and maximum power cap values displayed by Active Energy
Manager are not updated until the next system restart. In this case, the system may consume
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more power than previously expected, and may not be able to throttle power consumption all
the way down to the displayed minimum power cap value. If the currently set maximum power
cap value is lower than the system can enforce, this value may be exceeded under some
circumstances.
The BladeCenter management module displays information about allocated power and the
power capping range for individual blade servers. The allocated maximum power cap for a
blade server is not the worst case maximum amount of power that the blade server can
consume (the nameplate power), but is a typical maximum across various hardware
configurations. This allocated maximum power cap is used by the management module to
budget a typical maximum amount of power for a given blade server to determine if the blade
server will fit within the BladeCenter domain’s power budget and be allowed to power on. The
maximum power in the power capping range for a blade server will be different than the
allocated maximum power. The maximum power in the power capping range reflects the
nameplate power for the blade server.
By default, from the IBM Systems Director console you can set a value for the power cap
equal to Pcap min or Pcap max. If you set the power cap using the Active Energy Manager
console, you have much greater flexibility in setting the power cap. There are options to set
the power cap somewhere in between Pcap min and Pcap max, based on different criteria.
Setting the power cap to Pcap min or Pcap max means that throttling starts to occur if power
consumption reaches this value. For Pcap min, the amount of throttling depends on the
propensity of the managed system to use power in excess of Pcap min. The degree of
throttling will be somewhere between zero and the architected maximum. For Pcap max, the
amount of throttling similarly depends on the propensity of the managed system to use power
in excess of Pcap max, but throttling is less likely to occur than if the Power Cap is set to Pcap
min.
In many cases the power consumption of the managed system will never exceed the power
cap. If, for example, the data center suffers a failure of a cooling unit, the fans in the managed
systems will need to work harder to cool the systems, thus increasing the power consumption
of the system as a whole. In this case, power capping reduces the power consumption of the
processor, thereby reducing the heat produced.
The power cap setting is persistent across restarts of a managed system, but in the case of a
blade server, the setting is lost if the blade server is removed from the chassis.
The Power Cap function is available on selected IBM systems as shown in Table 5-3 on
page 128.
For a detailed discussion of the implementation of power cap on the POWER6 processor,
refer to 2.1.8, “Power capping” on page 16.
Power Cap can be scheduled using the IBM Systems Director scheduler as discussed in
5.17, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks” on page 211.
You can create or change a power cap policy in two ways:
򐂰 For a specific power managed object
򐂰 Generically by not specifying a power managed object
We cover both cases in this section.
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5.14.1 Setting power cap for a specific power managed object
To set power cap for a specific power managed object, perform the following steps:
1. Click the managed object that you want to set a power cap for.
2. Click the Manage Power icon ( ) on the Active Energy Manager console tool bar or
right-click the managed object and select Manage Power.
3. The managed object you selected appears in the Target field shown in Figure 5-108.
Figure 5-108 Setting the power cap function for a managed system
The policy that you create or change can be directly applied to the selected managed
object using the Apply now button, or saved for later use using the Save option. If you
save the policy, it appears in the Tasks pane of the IBM Systems Director console, and you
can run it by dragging and dropping it on an object in the Managed Objects pane. In this
case, the policy can be applied to any IBM Systems Director managed object that
supports power cap, not just the power managed object that you selected when creating or
changing the policy.
4. Click the appropriate radio button to either set power cap off, or set it on using one of the
following three methods:
– As a value in watts
Refer to 5.14.3, “Setting power cap in watts” on page 205.
– As a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max
Refer to 5.14.4, “Setting power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max” on
page 206.
– As a value in watts based on trend data
Refer to 5.14.5, “Setting power cap based on trend data” on page 207.
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5.14.2 Setting power cap generically
To set power cap generically, perform the following steps:
1. Click the Power-Managed Objects (ac) folder.
2. Click the Manage Power icon ( ) on the Active Energy Manager console tool bar or
right-click the folder and select Manage Power.
There is no target system specified. Therefore you can create or change a power cap
policy that can be used on any power managed object that supports the power cap
function. The policy appears in the Tasks pane of the IBM Systems Director console, and
you can run it by dragging and dropping it on an object in the Managed Objects pane. The
policy that you create or change can be saved for later use using the Save option. The
Apply Now option is not available when you are creating or changing a Power Cap policy
generically.
3. From the Manage Power window shown in Figure 5-109, click the appropriate radio button
to either set power cap off or set it on using one of the following three methods:
– As a value in watts
Refer to 5.14.3, “Setting power cap in watts” on page 205.
– As a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max
Refer to 5.14.4, “Setting power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max” on
page 206.
– As a value in watts based on trend data
Refer to 5.14.5, “Setting power cap based on trend data” on page 207.
Figure 5-109 Setting the power cap function generically
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5.14.3 Setting power cap in watts
The simplest way to set a power cap is to choose a value in watts somewhere between Pcap
min and Pcap max. By observing historical power trend data as described in 5.10, “Viewing
trend data” on page 162, you can determine an appropriate value for the power cap in watts
so that you can be confident that the power cap value you set is appropriate for your
requirements.
To set the power cap in watts, perform the following steps:
1. As shown in Figure 5-110, on the Manage Power window, select the Set a power cap in
Watts radio button. Enter a value in the Cap value (Watts) box or move the slider to the
desired value.
Figure 5-110 Setting a power cap in watts
2. Apply the settings you specified using one of the following methods:
– Apply Now
Clicking Apply Now runs the current setting for power cap interactively.
– Save as a new policy
Entering a new policy name in the Name field activates the Save button and enables
you to save the setting for power cap as a new policy for the power managed object.
This new policy appears in the Active Energy Manager tasks tree in the Tasks pane of
the IBM Systems Director console.
– Save as an updated policy
Selecting an existing policy name from the drop-down menu in the Name field activates
the Save button and enables you to save the setting for power cap as an update to the
existing policy for the power managed object.
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5.14.4 Setting power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max
The advantage of setting a power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max is that
should the hardware configuration of the managed system change, so will the values for Pcap
min and Pcap max as determined by the power cap algorithm. In this case, because you have
set the power cap as a percentage, the power cap self adjusts to the new hardware
configuration. You can also use this method to set a power cap for a group of power managed
systems, rather than individual caps for each one. To set the power cap as a percentage from
Pcap min to Pcap max, perform the following steps:
1. Select the Set a power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max radio button
shown in Figure 5-111. Enter a percentage in the Cap value (%) box or move the slider to
the desired value. A value of 0% on the slider corresponds to the minimum power cap
(Pcap min); a value of 100% corresponds to the maximum power cap (Pcap max).
Figure 5-111 Setting a power cap as a percentage from Pcap min to Pcap max
2. Apply the settings you specified using one of the following methods:
– Apply Now
Clicking Apply Now runs the current setting for power cap interactively.
– Save as a new policy
Entering a new policy name in the Name field activates the Save button and enables
you to save the setting for power cap as a new policy for the power managed object.
This new policy appears in the Active Energy Manager tasks tree in the Tasks pane of
the IBM Systems Director console.
– Save as an updated policy
Selecting an existing policy name from the drop-down menu in the Name field activates
the Save button and enables you to save the setting for power cap as an update to the
existing policy for the power managed object.
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5.14.5 Setting power cap based on trend data
Setting the power cap based on trend data enables you to formulate a power cap policy
based on historical data. The important thing to decide is your capping goal. If you never want
power cap to engage (based on historical data), you would set your capping goal to 0%. A
capping goal of 0% corresponds to a Pcap value equal to the maximum observed power
consumption over the observation period. A negative percentage corresponds to a Pcap
value lower than the observed maximum and a positive percentage corresponds to a Pcap
value greater than the observed maximum. A positive percentage gives room for the power
consumption to grow without incurring throttling.
In addition to the capping goal, you also need to specify a time interval on which your capping
policy is to be based. This is done on the drop-down menu on the Manage Power window.
Generally speaking, the longer the time interval you specify the more confident you can be
that your policy will hold, unless there has been a recent change to the environment that has
skewed the trend data away from the historical norm.
To set a power cap based on trend data, perform the following steps:
1. Select the Set a power cap based on trend data radio button shown in Figure 5-112.
Enter a value in the Capping goal box or move the slider to the desired value.
The center of the slider corresponds to the maximum power consumption over the
specified time interval. Moving the slider to the left of center sets the power cap to a
smaller fraction of the historical maximum power consumption. Moving the slider to the
right of center sets the power cap higher to add additional margin.
From the drop-down list box, select a time interval (one to four weeks) over which the
historical maximum power consumption is to be calculated.
Figure 5-112 Setting a power cap based on trend data
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2. Apply the settings you specified using one of the following methods:
– Apply Now
Clicking Apply Now runs the current setting for power cap interactively.
– Save as a new policy
Entering a new policy name in the Name field activates the Save button and enables
you to save the setting for power cap as a new policy for the power managed object.
This new policy appears in the Active Energy Manager tasks tree in the Tasks pane of
the IBM Systems Director console.
– Save as an updated policy
Selecting an existing policy name from the drop-down menu in the Name field activates
the Save button and enables you to save the setting for power cap as an update to the
existing policy for the power managed object.
5.15 Derating power
Power meter-enabled systems are able to accurately report their power consumption to Active
Energy Manager. However, not all managed systems have the power meter installed. In this
case, such systems simply report their power consumption as the rated power (also called the
label power). The label power is the maximum possible power that the managed system can
consume, which is usually far in excess of the actual power consumed. In this case, to obtain
a more accurate measure of actual power consumed, a derating factor can be specified as a
percentage for the system, where the default is 100%. The managed system then reports its
power consumption as the label power multiplied by the derating factor. Although the resulting
power consumption value is fixed, and does not necessarily reflect the actual value, it
provides a more accurate picture of the power used by non-power metered devices.
To set the derating factor, perform the following steps:
1. Click the power managed object for which you want to set the derating factor.
2. Click the Derate Power icon ( ) on the Active Energy Manager console tool bar or
right-click the power managed object and select Derate Power as shown in Figure 5-113.
Figure 5-113 Derating the label power of an object
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3. On the Derate Power window (Figure 5-114), set the derating factor. Click OK.
Figure 5-114 Specifying the derating power factor
5.16 Using the watt-hour meter
The watt-hour meter provides a simple way to calculate the total cost of power to run a
managed system. To use the watt-hour meter you simply enter the cost per kilowatt-hour and
a cooling rate factor. The cooling rate factor is the amount of power required to cool the
managed system divided by the amount of power the managed system consumes. The cost
of cooling is therefore equal to the cost of power required to run the managed system
multiplied by the cooling factor. It defaults to 1.5.
The total cost of power to run a managed system is the sum of the cost of power to run the
managed system plus the cost of power to cool it.
The Watt-hour meter also retrieves the value for the nameplate power (also called the label
power) from the managed system and compares it to the actual power being consumed and
presents the result as a bar chart.
To use the watt-hour meter, perform the following steps:
1. Click the power managed object or group of power managed objects for which you want to
use the watt-hour meter to calculate the cost of power.
2. Click the Watt-hour Meter icon ( ) on the Active Energy Manager console tool bar or
select the Watt-Hour Meter option on the power managed object context menu as shown
in Figure 5-115 on page 210.
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Figure 5-115 Using the watt-hour meter for an object
3. On the Watt-Hour Meter window shown in Figure 5-116, the time period shown can be set
as described in “Setting a time interval for the trend data” on page 166.
Enter values for the price per kilowatt-hour ($), and the cooling rate factor. Click the
Calculate button to view the results. When finished, click Close.
Figure 5-116 Watt-hour meter window
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5.17 Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks
There are two basic methods you can use to schedule Active Energy Manager tasks:
򐂰 Using the IBM Systems Director scheduler
This is the primary method you would use to schedule an Active Energy Manager task to
run on a power managed object or objects.
The IBM Systems Director scheduler can only be accessed through the IBM Systems
Director console, not the Active Energy Manager console. The Active Energy Manager
tasks available through the IBM Systems Director console interface use slightly different
terminology compared with their equivalents available through the Active Energy Manager
console. Refer to Table 5-4 on page 140 for a comparison of the different terms.
If you need more detailed information about the IBM Systems Director scheduler, refer to
Implementing IBM Director 5.20, SG24-6188.
There are two ways you can access the IBM Systems Director scheduler:
– Task interface
This method uses an Active Energy Manager task as the starting point. You access the
scheduler when you apply an Active Energy Manager task to a selected IBM Systems
Director managed object.
Using the task interface is usually simpler than using the scheduler interface, but it is
also less flexible.
We describe how to schedule an Active Energy Manager task using the task interface
in 5.17.1, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks using the task interface” on
page 212.
– Scheduler interface
This method uses the IBM Systems Director scheduler itself as the starting point. After
starting the scheduler you select the IBM Systems Director managed objects and the
Active Energy Manager tasks you want to schedule for those objects.
Using the scheduler interface provides the most flexibility, but may not be as easy to
use as the task interface.
We describe how to schedule an Active Energy Manager task using the scheduler
interface in 5.17.2, “Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks using the scheduler
interface” on page 214.
򐂰 Using the HMC scheduler
You can schedule the following Active Energy Manager tasks using the HMC scheduler:
– Power saver on
– Power saver off
We describe how to schedule an Active Energy Manager task using the HMC scheduler in
5.17.3, “Scheduling power saver using the HMC scheduler” on page 222.
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5.17.1 Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks using the task interface
To schedule an Active Energy Manager task using the task interface, perform the following
steps:
1. Access the IBM Systems Director scheduler using one of the following methods:
– Using the IBM Systems Director console managed object context menu.
Note: When using the managed object context menu, you do not have access to
user-defined policies. Only the IBM-supplied policies are shown.
To use the managed object context menu, right-click the IBM Systems Director
managed object you wish to schedule a task for and select the Active Energy Manager
task that you want to schedule. An example is shown in Figure 5-117.
Figure 5-117 Accessing the scheduler using the IBM Systems Director managed object context menu
– Dragging and dropping a task from the Active Energy Manager tasks tree on to an IBM
Systems Director console managed object.
Note: When using this method you can schedule user-defined policies. For
example, the policy entitled Powercap5000Watts shown in Figure 5-118.
User-defined policies are not shown on the managed object context menu.
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To drag and drop a task, perform the following steps:
i. Select a task from the Active Energy Manager tasks tree in the Tasks pane of the
IBM Systems Director console as shown in Figure 5-118.
Figure 5-118 Accessing the Active Energy Manager task tree in IBM Systems Director
ii. Drag and drop the task on to an IBM Systems Director managed object, as shown
in Figure 5-119.
Figure 5-119 Dragging and dropping an Active Energy Manager task on to a managed object
2. Click Schedule on the task dialog box (Figure 5-120).
Figure 5-120 Task dialog box for a managed object
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3. On the New Scheduled Job window (Figure 5-121), enter a name for the scheduled job
and date and time. Optionally, click the Advanced button to see additional options or click
OK to schedule the job.
Figure 5-121 Scheduling a new job
5.17.2 Scheduling Active Energy Manager tasks using the scheduler interface
To schedule an Active Energy Manager task using the IBM Systems Director scheduler
interface, perform the following steps:
1. Click the Scheduler icon in the Tasks pane of the IBM Systems Director console display,
as shown in Figure 5-122.
Figure 5-122 Accessing the scheduler interface using the Scheduler task
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2. On the Scheduler window (Figure 5-123), click File → New Job.
Figure 5-123 Creating a new scheduled job in IBM Systems Director scheduler
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3. On the New Scheduled Job window (Figure 5-124), on the Date/Time tab, enter the date
and time that you want the task to run.
Figure 5-124 Creating a new IBM Systems Director scheduled job, Date/Time tab
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4. From the Task tab as shown in Figure 5-125 perform the following steps:
a. Expand the Active Energy Manager icon.
b. Select the Active Energy Manager task (policy) that you want to schedule. This can be
a standard task that is supplied with Active Energy Manager or a custom policy that
you have created yourself as described in 5.13, “Setting the power saver function” on
page 183 or 5.14, “Setting the power cap function” on page 201.
c. Click the Select button and the task or policy is added to the Selected Task pane as
shown in Figure 5-125.
You can select multiple tasks or policies to run at the scheduled time.
Figure 5-125 Creating a new IBM Systems Director scheduled job, Task tab
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5. As shown in Figure 5-126, click the Targets tab and select a managed object in the
Available pane that you want to apply the task (policy) to. Click the Add button and the
managed object is added to the Selected pane as shown in Figure 5-126.
You can select multiple managed objects to which you apply the task (policy).
Figure 5-126 Creating a new IBM Systems Director scheduled job, Targets tab
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6. As shown in Figure 5-127, click the Options tab and select the available options as
appropriate.
Figure 5-127 Creating a new IBM Systems Director scheduled job, Options tab
7. Click File → Save As. You might see the message shown in Figure 5-128. This means
that the managed object or objects that you selected do not support the Active Energy
Manager function you are trying to schedule. In this case, you can still save the scheduled
job by clicking the Yes button or return to the New Scheduled Job window to change your
choices.
Figure 5-128 Creating a new IBM Systems Director scheduled job: Warning dialog box
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8. You are prompted to enter a name for the scheduled job as shown in Figure 5-129. Click
OK.
Figure 5-129 Creating a new IBM Systems Director scheduled job, naming the job
9. Click OK in the confirmation window shown in Figure 5-130.
Figure 5-130 Creating a new IBM Systems Director scheduled job, confirmation message
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The scheduled job appears on the calendar in the Scheduler window as shown in
Figure 5-131.
Figure 5-131 IBM Systems Director Scheduler window, calendar tab showing newly scheduled job
The scheduled job also appears on the Jobs tab of the Scheduler window as shown in
Figure 5-132.
Figure 5-132 IBM Systems Director Scheduler window, Jobs tab showing newly scheduled job
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10.Right-click the scheduled job to see a number of options that are available to you
(Figure 5-133).
Figure 5-133 IBM Systems Director Scheduler window, Jobs tab showing scheduled job options
11.Click File → Close to close the Scheduler window.
5.17.3 Scheduling power saver using the HMC scheduler
To schedule power saver on or off using the HMC scheduler, perform the following steps:
1. Start a Web browser session to the HMC by entering the following URL:
https://<IP address of the HMC port>
2. Click the Log on and launch the Hardware Management Console web application link
as shown in Figure 5-134.
Figure 5-134 Launching the HMC graphical user interface from a Web browser
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3. Enter a user id and password with supervisor level authority and click Logon as shown in
Figure 5-135.
Figure 5-135 Logging on to the HMC graphical user interface from a Web browser
4. On the Hardware Management Console window (Figure 5-136), expand Systems
Management → Servers. Select the system whose power saver setting you want to
change.
Figure 5-136 Selecting the managed system to set power saver capability
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5. Expand Operations → Schedule Operations as shown in Figure 5-137.
Figure 5-137 Selecting the Scheduling Operations option
6. Click Options → New as shown in Figure 5-138.
Figure 5-138 Scheduling power saver using the HMC scheduler, 1 of 2
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7. Click Change power saver mode on a managed system as shown in Figure 5-139.
Figure 5-139 Scheduling power saver using the HMC scheduler, 2 of 2
8. Enter values for the Date, Time, and Time Window fields (Figure 5-140) for the scheduled
operation. Click the Repeat tab.
Figure 5-140 Setting up a scheduled operation from the HMC console, Date and Time tab
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9. If you want to repeat the scheduled operation, click the Set up a repeated scheduled
operation radio button (Figure 5-141) and select the appropriate options. Click the
Options tab.
Figure 5-141 Setting up a scheduled operation from the HMC console, Repeat tab
10.Select Enabled or Disabled from the Power Saver mode drop-down menu shown in
Figure 5-142. Click Save to activate the scheduled operation.
Figure 5-142 Setting up a scheduled operation from the HMC console, Options tab
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11.Click OK in the confirmation window shown in Figure 5-143. .
Figure 5-143 Scheduling Power Saver using the HMC scheduler
Figure 5-144 shows the Customize Scheduled Operations window shown from which you
may delete the following tasks:.
Figure 5-144 Power Saver job schedule in the HMC scheduler
12.To delete the scheduled operation, check the box in the Select column and select the
Delete option on the Options drop-down menu.
13.To view details of the scheduled operation, check the box in the Select column and select
the Schedule Details option on the View drop-down menu.
14.(Optional) You might want to explore the other options available on the drop-down menus
that allow you to perform various tasks on the scheduled operations.
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5.18 Understanding and configuring the PDU+
Before describing how to configure a PDU+, this section provides you with some background
information.
A PDU+ performs the same function as a standard PDU in that it controls power distribution
and provides circuit protection to rack mounted devices. In addition, a PDU+ has extra
intelligence that enables it to act as an Active Energy Manager provider. A PDU+ can report
power and thermal trending data to Active Energy Manager for existing systems that do not
have these capabilities built in. In other words, a PDU+ provides some Active Energy
Manager functionality for devices that otherwise cannot be managed by Active Energy
Manager. There are two Active Energy Manager functions that are provided by the PDU+:
򐂰 Power trending
򐂰 Thermal trending
Devices that you can connect to an PDU+ and then use the PDU+ to report trending
information to Active Energy Manager include the following examples:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
Existing systems
Storage
I/O drawers
Non-IBM machines
You can also connect managed objects that support Active Energy Manager functions to a
PDU+. In this case, you can manage the objects directly using Active Energy Manager, as
well as using the PDU+ to report power and thermal trending information. This might be
useful for systems such as the POWER6 processor-based 9406-MMA System i 570 and
9117-MMA System p 570 which only support the power saver function natively. In this case,
the PDU+ adds power and thermal trending functionality.
For a list of supported devices and the Active Energy Manager functions that the PDU+
provides when managing these devices, refer to Table 5-1 on page 108.
PDU+s provide data to the IBM Systems Director server using built-in Simple Network
Management Protocol (SNMP) support. SNMP is an open industry standard for monitoring
and management of network attached devices. IBM Systems Director server connects to a
PDU+ as a generic SNMP device.
Once the PDU+ has been added as a managed object in IBM Systems Director, it is present
in the Intelligent PDUs (ac) branch of the tree in the Active Energy Manager console. See
Figure 5-145 on page 229 for an example.
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Figure 5-145 Active Energy Manager console managed objects tree, Intelligent PDUs (ac) folder
The PDU+ current data pane displays PDU+ information when either the Intelligent PDUs
(ac) node, a PDU+ node, a load group node, or an outlet node is selected in the All Objects
pane. Figure 5-146 shows an example of the current data for a PDU+. Note the Amps Used
versus Capacity bar graphs which show how close each load group is to maximum capacity.
For more information about this view, refer to 5.11.3, “Current data for PDU+ power managed
objects” on page 178.
Figure 5-146 Active Energy Manager Current Data view for a PDU+ power managed object
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The way a PDU+ manages power depends on whether or not the connected devices support
Active Energy Manager functionality:
򐂰 Devices that do not support Active Energy Manager functionality
The PDU+ reports power usage at the load group level, not by outlet. Therefore, we
recommend that you only connect one device per load group (pair of outlets). Otherwise,
you cannot distinguish the power consumption of one device connected to a load group
compared with another device connected to the same load group. In this case it is
important that you consider which devices to connect to each power outlet of the PDU+ to
obtain meaningful data.
򐂰 Devices that support Active Energy Manager functionality
Power can be monitored at the outlet level. A child node for each outlet, rather than for
each load group, is present under the PDU+ node in the Active Energy Manager console
display.
Figure 5-147 shows an example of a rack with four managed system drawers whose power is
supplied by PDU+s installed in the sides of the rack. Each of the power supplies in each of the
drawers is connected to a separate PDU+ load group. This is recommended but not
mandatory.
Figure 5-147 Example of a rack with four PDU+s supplying power to four drawers
5.18.1 Supported PDU+ models
Support for the PDU+ is new with Active Energy Manager 3.1. At the time of writing this
publication, the following PDU+s are supported:
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
IBM DPI C13 PDU+ (IBM part number 39M2816)
IBM DPI C13 3-phase PDU+ (IBM part number 39M2817)
IBM DPI C19 PDU+ (IBM part number 39M2818)
IBM DPI C19 3-phase PDU+ (IBM part number 39M2819)
For detailed information about these PDU+s refer to the installation and maintenance guide
which can be found at the following URL:
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/systems/support/system_x_pdf/43v6030.pdf
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IBM DPI C13 PDU+ and IBM DPI C13 3-phase PDU+
The IBM DPI C13 PDU+ and IBM DPI C13 3-phase PDU+ models have 12 power outlets for
connecting devices. Figure 5-148 shows the components and controls on the front of the DPI
C13 PDU+ and the DPI C13 3-phase PDU+.
Figure 5-148 Front view of DPI C13 PDU+ and the DPI C13 3-phase PDU+
IBM DPI C19 PDU+ and IBM DPI C19 3-phase PDU+
The IBM DPI C19 PDU+ and IBM DPI C19 3-phase PDU+ models have 9 power outlets for
connecting devices such as workstations, servers, and printers. Figure 5-149 shows the
components and controls on the front of the DPI C19 PDU+ and the DPI C19 3-phase PDU+.
Figure 5-149 Front view of DPI C19 PDU+ and the DPI C19 3-phase PDU+
Figure 5-150 shows the power outlets on the rear of the DPI C19 PDU+ and the DPI C19
3-Phase PDU+.
Figure 5-150 Rear view of DPI C19 PDU+ and the DPI C19 3-phase PDU+
For a description of the terms used in Figure 5-148, Figure 5-149, and Figure 5-150, refer to
the installation and maintenance guide:
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/systems/support/system_x_pdf/43v6030.pdf
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5.18.2 PDU+ load groups
PDU+ power outlets are combined together into load groups. Each load group is protected by
one of the PDU+ circuit breakers. If the power being drawn by the outlets associated with a
load group exceeds the rating of the circuit breaker, the breaker trips and power is cut to the
load group.
Table 5-8 shows the power outlets associated with each load group of the DPI C13 PDU+ and
DPI C13 3-phase PDU+ as shown in Figure 5-148 on page 231.
Table 5-8 Load groups of the DPI C13 PDU+ and DPI C13 3-phase PDU+
Circuit breaker (load group) number
Associated front power outlets
1
1 and 2
2
3 and 4
3
5 and 6
4
7 and 8
5
9 and 10
6
11 and 12
Table 5-9 shows the power outlets associated with each load group of the DPI C19 PDU+ and
DPI C19 3-phase PDU+ as shown in Figure 5-149 on page 231 and Figure 5-150 on
page 231.
Table 5-9 Load groups of the DPI C19 PDU+ and DPI C19 3-phase PDU+
232
Circuit breaker (load group)
number
Associated front power outlet
Associated rear power outlet
1
1
1A
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
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3A
5A
5.18.3 Connecting the PDU+ to a LAN
By connecting the PDU+ to a Local Area Network (LAN), you can monitor the PDU power
outlets and digital outputs over a network through the PDU+ Web interface. Connect a router
or switch to the RJ-45 LAN connector on the PDU+ using an Ethernet cable as shown in
Figure 5-151. You can then monitor the PDU+ from a computer that is connected to the same
TCP/IP network.
Figure 5-151 Connecting the PDU+ to a LAN
5.18.4 Connecting an environmental monitoring probe to the PDU+
The environmental monitoring probe has a built-in temperature and humidity sensor and
enables you to remotely monitor the temperature and humidity of the environment that the
probe is operating in. The probe comes with the PDU+, except for the DPI C13 3-phase
PDU+. For the DPI C13 3-phase PDU+, you can order the environmental monitoring probe at
the time of purchase. Connect the environmental monitoring probe to the RJ-45 console
connector on the PDU+, as shown in Figure 5-152.
Figure 5-152 Connecting the environmental monitoring probe to the PDU+
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5.18.5 Configure a PDU+
The trending data that is reported to Active Energy Manager by a PDU+ depends on how the
PDU+ is configured. Therefore, care should be taken to connect devices to the PDU+ so that
the trending data is meaningful. To configure a PDU+, perform the following steps:
1. From Active Energy Manager console, select the PDU+ that you want to configure.
2. Click the Configure PDU icon ( ) on the Active Energy Manager console or select the
Configure PDU option on the managed object context menu shown in Figure 5-153.
Figure 5-153 Starting the PDU configurator from the managed object context menu
3. In the Device Name field of the Configure PDU window shown in Figure 5-154 on
page 235, enter the name of the device associated with each power outlet.
The Configure PDU window displays options to associate specific power outlets of a
PDU+ with power managed objects and other devices of which Active Energy Manager is
not aware.
A graphic of a PDU+ is shown at the top of the window in Figure 5-154 on page 235. This
model of the PDU+ (DPI C13 PDU+ or DPI C13 3-phase PDU+) contains twelve power
outlets labelled J1–J12 for connection to power-using devices. The twelve power outlets
are grouped into adjacent pairs called load groups, numbered one to six.
Make sure that the power using devices you want the PDU+ to manage are connected to
the outlets. For devices that do not support Active Energy Manager functionality, we
recommend that you connect one device only per load group because the PDU+ reports
power trending data per load group, not by outlet.
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Having connected the devices, you configure the PDU+ by associating devices, whose
power consumption you want to monitor, with a PDU+ power outlet. When you connect up
a device to an outlet on the PDU+, you can enter a Device Name, Description, and
Location for it (Figure 5-154).
In the example shown in Figure 5-154, the devices connected to power outlets J3 and J4
correspond to two separate power supplies in the system unit of a 9117-MMA System p
570.
Figure 5-154 PDU+ configurator: Basic options
On initial discovery, the PDU+ automatically retrieves information from the devices
connected to its power outlets, assuming that the devices are enabled for power
management. In this case, the PDU+ inserts text into the Description field as shown in
Figure 5-154.
Alternatively, if the device connected to a power outlet is an IBM Systems Director
managed object, you can click the Browse button to select it from a list of IBM Systems
Director managed systems and associate the object with the selected power outlet, as
shown in Figure 5-155 on page 236. If the device is not an IBM Systems Director
managed object, you can manually enter a name for the device associated with the outlet.
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Figure 5-155 Browsing for a managed system connected to the PDU+
4. As shown in Figure 5-154 on page 235, you can also enter a description for the device in
the Description field, and its physical location in the Location field. This additional
information can help you keep track of the devices plugged into the PDU+.
5. Click OK to save your settings and close the Configure PDU window or click Cancel to exit
without saving any changes.
6. (Optional) You can access advanced PDU+ configuration options by clicking the
Advanced button in Figure 5-154 on page 235. This starts the advanced PDU
configuration interface in the default Web browser on your workstation. For example, you
would use the advanced PDU configuration interface to set up the environmental
monitoring probe.
Tip: Your default Web browser must have the Java plug-in installed to use the advanced
PDU+ configuration interface.
Figure 5-156 on page 237 shows a graphical representation of the advanced PDU+
configuration interface. Note the following features:
– The graphic in the right pane shows the status of the outlets, input voltage, output
voltage, frequency, current and power, watt-hour consumption, and cumulative kilowatt
hour power consumption. If you connect the optional environmental monitoring probe,
the temperature and humidity environment conditions are also displayed.
– The left pane shows the configuration menus and submenus. Click a menu to display
the menu choices, expand the menu items, and modify the menu choices as required.
You can type text into the Description and Location fields to more fully describe the
devices connected to the power outlets and their physical locations. Changes to these
fields are not reflected in the Configure PDU configuration panel within Active Energy
Manager. Therefore, we recommend that you use the Active Energy Manager Configure
PDU task to change the descriptions that appear in the Active Energy Manager console.
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Figure 5-156 PDU+ configurator, Advanced options
For more information about the advanced PDU configuration interface, refer to the
installation and maintenance guide:
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/systems/support/system_x_pdf/43v6030.pdf
5.19 Refreshing the data view
The Active Energy Manager console obtains its information from the Active Energy Manager
server and then stores the information for display. The default setting in the Active Energy
Manager console is to gather new data from the Active Energy Manager server automatically
and display it approximately every 20 seconds. The Refresh task forces an immediate update
of the data in the right pane of the Active Energy Manager console display, as long as there is
new information about the Active Energy Manager server. If there is no new information, the
data is not refreshed. You can refresh the following types of data:
򐂰 Current data
򐂰 Trend data as chart
򐂰 Trend data as table
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During the refresh operation, the status bar at the bottom of the Active Energy Manager
console window displays the message Getting information from server... to indicate that
the operation is running.
One way to refresh the data in the right pane of the Active Energy Manager console is to click
the Refresh icon ( ) on the Active Energy Manager console tool bar.
The Active Energy Manager console usually refreshes quickly, but the following factors can
cause the refresh to take longer:
򐂰 A large number of power managed objects in the Active Energy Manager console
The larger the number of objects that require updating, the longer the refresh takes. We
recommend that you do not manage more objects than necessary in the Active Energy
Manager console. In other words, only open the Active Energy Manager console for the
objects that you really want to manage.
򐂰 A small polling interval
By default, the Active Energy Manager server polls the power managed objects every
minute. Because the server only sends changed data to the console, increasing the
polling interval, reduces the number of changes to the Active Energy Manager database.
In this case, the amount of data that needs to be refreshed on the console, and therefore
the time taken to perform the refresh, are reduced. We recommend that you set the polling
interval to the largest value that still enables you to collect meaningful data.
5.20 Getting help for Active Energy Manager
There are several ways you can access help for Active Energy Manager:
򐂰 Using the help available on the Web
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/extensions/actengmrg.html
򐂰 Using the Active Energy Manager console
Click Help → Using Active Energy Manager on the Help drop-down menu.
You see the window shown in Figure 5-157 on page 239.
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Figure 5-157 Active Energy Manager help
򐂰 Using the IBM Systems Director console
Click the down arrow next to the Active Energy Manager icon on the tool bar and select
Help for Active Energy Manager as shown in Figure 5-158.
Figure 5-158 IBM Systems Director console, Active Energy Manager help option
5.21 Using the Active Energy Manager command line interface
Some of the Active Energy Manager functions available through the Active Energy Manager
command line interface (CLI) can be customized and automated.
You can access basic information about the Active Energy Manager CLI through the IBM
Systems Director console by clicking Console → Active Energy Manager → Help for
Active Energy Manager → Reference → Active Energy Manager commands.
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Active Energy Manager CLI commands are invoked through the standard IBM Systems
Director CLI mechanism. Table 5-10 lists the supported Active Energy Manager CLI
commands. The commands are the same for Windows and Linux.
Table 5-10 Active Energy Manager CLI commands
Command
Description
lscollect
Lists the status of data collection for the specified objects.
startcollect
Starts data collection for the specified objects.
stopcollect
Stops data collection for the specified objects.
lspowerlast
Displays the summary average watts for the specified objects.
getpcap
Gets the current Pcap values for the specified objects.
setpcap
Sets the current Pcap values for the specified objects.
getpsaver
Gets the current power saver values for the specified objects.
setpsaver
Sets the current power saver values for the specified objects.
For more information about using the Active Energy Manager CLI refer to the following IBM
Systems Software Information Center Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/index.jsp?topic=/diricinfo_5
.20/fqm0_t_starting_the_ibm_director_command-line_interface.html
5.21.1 CLI commands versus supported hardware matrix
Table 5-11, and Table 5-12 on page 241, lists the CLI commands supported for each Active
Energy Manager provider. These tables are accurate at the time this publication was written,
but will change over time as additional systems are supported.
Table 5-11 CLI commands versus supported hardware matrix 1
Power managed object
lscollect
lspowerlast
startcollect
stopcollect
PDU+
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
7998 60X-IBM BladeCenter
JS12 Express server2
7998 61X-IBM BladeCenter
JS22 server
X
X
X
X
IBM x86 architecture blade servers1
X
X
X
X
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9406 MMA-System i 570
9117 MMA-System p 5702
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 5502
9117 MMA-Power 5702
9125 F2A-Power 575
9119 FHA-Power 595
IBM System x rack and tower
servers1
򐂰
򐂰
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Power managed object
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
System z10 EC E12
System z10 EC E26
System z10 EC E40
System z10 EC E56
System z10 EC E64
lscollect
lspowerlast
startcollect
stopcollect
X
X
X
X
1
For a list of IBM x86 architecture systems that support the CLI, refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_managed_systems.html
2
Power Saver mode is only available on those models whose POWER6 processors are rated at greater than or equal to
4.0 GHz, and only if feature code 1800 (GX dual port RIO-2 attach) is not present.
Table 5-12 CLI commands versus supported hardware matrix 2
Power managed object
getpcap
setpcap
getpsaver
setpsaver
X
X
X
X
X
X
7998 60X-IBM BladeCenter
JS12 Express server2
7998 61X-IBM BladeCenter
JS22 server
X
X
X
X
IBM x86 architecture blade servers1
X
X
PDU+
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
9406 MMA-System i 570
9117 MMA-System p 5702
9407 M15-Power 520
9408 M25-Power 520
9409 M50-Power 550
8203 E4A-Power 520
8204 E8A-Power 5502
9117 MMA-Power 5702
9125 F2A-Power 575
9119 FHA-Power 595
IBM System x rack and tower
servers1
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
򐂰
System z10 EC E12
System z10 EC E26
System z10 EC E40
System z10 EC E56
System z10 EC E64
1 For
a list of IBM systems that support the CLI, refer to the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_r_HW_reqs_managed_systems.html
2 Power
Saver mode is only available on those models whose POWER6 processors are rated at greater than or equal to
4.0 GHz, and only if feature code 1800 (GX dual port RIO-2 attach) is not present.
Chapter 5. Using Active Energy Manager
241
5.22 Automating the power saver function
There is a Java program available that enables you to turn power saver mode on and off
dynamically, depending on the current utilization of the POWER6 processor. Access this
program from the following Web site:
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_wh/n/PSW03033USEN/PSW03033USEN.PDF
Refer to Appendix III of the referenced PDF.
5.23 Running other power-related tasks
In this section we describe other tasks that are not specific to Active Energy Manager, but you
may find useful in managing the power requirements of your IBM systems.
5.23.1 Using the Power load calculator
The Power load calculator can estimate the power consumption of POWER6
processor-based system units. Through the Power load calculator you can specify the actual
hardware contained in the POWER6 processor-based system unit and calculates the
approximate power requirements under normal operating conditions. Access the Power load
calculator from the following Web site:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/systems/scope/hw/index.jsp?topic=/iphdl/s
ystemcalculators.htm
242
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
A
Appendix A.
Troubleshooting
This appendix provides information about how to troubleshoot known problems and
workarounds for IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
243
Active Energy Manager not appearing in IBM Systems Director
The Active Energy Manager function does not appear in the IBM Systems Director console if
IBM Systems Director was installed using the Express installation of IBM Systems Director.
Full operation of Active Energy Manager requires prerequisites that only a custom or full
installation of IBM Systems Director provides.
Solution
In order for IBM Systems Director extensions such as Active Energy Manager to function
properly, you must install IBM Systems Director using the Standard installation option.
Active Energy Manager properties not saved across sessions
on Linux
On Linux, the Active Energy Manager properties are not saved across Active Energy
Manager sessions when the user does not have proper authority on the operating system. For
example, the price/kwh settings in the Watt-Hour Meter dialog box is not saved from one
session to the next.
Solution
To save Active Energy Manager properties across Active Energy Manager sessions, ensure
that the operating system account you are using has local root authority.
Active Energy Manager tasks do not launch
Active Energy Manager tasks appear in the IBM Systems Director console, but they do not
execute when clicked.
Solution
This can occur when a system has IBM Systems Director console installed, but does not have
Active Energy Manager console installed. Active Energy Manager console and IBM Systems
Director console must both be installed to complete Active Energy Manager tasks through
IBM Systems Director console.
Error 1603: Error installing Windows Installer engine
During the installation of Active Energy Manager, the following message is displayed:
1603: Error installing Windows Installer engine
This error message indicates that a file which needs to be replaced might in use. Close all the
applications and try the installation again.
244
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Solution
Click OK and continue with the installation. If this does not solve the problem, one or more of
the following fixes may resolve the error:
򐂰 Insufficient disk space. Increase your hard disk space.
򐂰 Temp directory is not clean. Clean the Temp directory.
򐂰 A certain file on the machine is locked. Close all applications running in the background.
Reboot your computer and run the installation again.
򐂰 Use Microsoft’s Windows Installer Cleanup utility to remove traces of previous
installations. This utility does not remove files installed by the installation, which may need
to be removed manually. For more information, refer to Microsoft’s Knowledge Base.
Error: Device not supported by Active Energy Manager:
<system name>
Active Energy Manager displays the following message on a system known to support Active
Energy Manager:
The following device is not supported by Active Energy Manager: <system name>
Solution
The system may have an advanced management module Service Processor (SP), which has
its own Ethernet port, and, therefore, its own IP address. IBM System Director will talk to this
SP. But this SP does not have Active Energy Manager support. Only the on-board Base
Management Controller (BMC) has Active Energy Manager support. The BMC is on the
system board and shares the Ethernet port with the system. For Active Energy Manager to
display the system, you must configure the BMC from the F1 BIOS Setup window.
Exporting data to a network share fails
On Windows, saving exported data to a network share may sometimes fail with an error
stating that the file already exists even though it may have been deleted on the actual share.
Solution
Use a different filename to export data or reboot the machine to clean the network file cache
information.
Full Scale Power exceeded on LS21 and LS41 blade servers
The LS21 and LS41 blade servers have a known limitation in their power meter hardware.
The maximum value that the power meter circuit can measure, FSP, can be exceeded on fully
configured servers when running high performance computing applications. Under such
operating conditions, the measured power displayed by the Active Energy Manager console
will remain saturated at FSP and will not reflect the actual power drawn by the blade.
Additionally, setting the power capping limit to a value higher than FSP may lead to a failure in
capping server power, under such operating conditions. The maximum value of the power
capping limit is based on nameplate power of the blade server and is higher than the FSP.
Appendix A. Troubleshooting
245
Solution
Do not set power capping limit above FSP. The FSP value is 388 W (246 W for blade hardware Rev 4). Throttling may occur when capping the system at FSP in this case. If throttling is
not desired, do not enable power capping for this configuration.
License fails on Linux
The Active Energy Manager licensing on Linux systems fails to activate after installing.
Solution
Ensure that you have a compatible level of the compat-libstdc++ runtime package.
Power capping fails on HS20 server blades
On HS20 server blades, there is a known limitation on setting power capping at or close to
minimum power capping value on fully configured servers when running high performance
computing applications. A failure in power capping may occur when power capping value is
within 20 W of the minimum power capping value.
Solution
Do not set power capping limit within 20 W of the minimum power capping value in these
configurations.
Systems not appearing in Active Energy Manager console
Active Energy Manager console does not display any systems even though the system that
has Active Energy Manager installed supports Active Energy Manager.
Solution
Active Energy Manager only communicates out of band through the network to the
management processor on the system. Even though you have one Ethernet cable into the
system on the Ethernet 1 port, you will have two IP addresses, one for the on board BMC and
one for the operating system. For Active Energy Manager to display the system on which it is
installed, you must add the BMC address to IBM Systems Director as a physical platform. If
any devices were selected in IBM Systems Director console when you started Active Energy
Manager, only those systems will appear in Active Energy Manager. If you want all devices
displayed in Active Energy Manager, either select them all, or de-select them all, in the IBM
Systems Director console, then start Active Energy Manager again.
246
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
B
Appendix B.
Effect on POWER6 performance
metrics of processor throttling
This appendix discusses the impact on POWER6 performance metrics reported by the
various performance analysis tools of processor throttling which occurs when the IBM
Systems Director Active Energy Manager power saver and power cap functions are active.
Historically, CPU time on server systems was used to measure both processor utilization
(processing time versus idle time) and accounting (processing time). On a given system,
every tick of CPU time represented the same processing capacity and processing performed,
because the processor operated at relatively constant speed. IBM POWER6
processor-based systems with EnergyScale introduce variable processor power, and with it,
variable processing capacity. A tick of CPU time at reduced power can represent a small
fraction of the processing capacity of a tick of CPU time at full power. Consequently, CPU time
alone cannot uniformly measure both processing capacity and processing performed. To
address this challenge, the IBM POWER6 processor includes a new CPU timekeeping facility
that can be used to normalize the relationship between CPU time and processing capacity in
a variable processor power environment.
Prior to the development of POWER6 processors, CPU time usage on IBM POWERTM
processors was measured by the Processor Utilization Resource Register (PURR). Every tick
of PURR represented the same processing capacity, so PURR-based CPU time can be used
for both processor utilization and accounting. The POWER6 processor also includes a scaled
PURR (SPURR) to measure scaled CPU time, which is CPU time proportional to processor
speed. When the POWER6 processor is operating at full speed, the PURR and SPURR tick
in lockstep; when the POWER6 processor is operating at reduced speed, the SPURR ticks
slower than the PURR; when the POWER6 processor is operating in excess of full speed, the
SPURR ticks faster than the PURR. For example, when the POWER6 processor is operating
at half speed, the SPURR ticks at half the rate of the PURR.
The CPU time and scaled CPU time have several uses alone and in combination. The CPU
time remains an accurate measure of processor utilization. The CPU time is the time that the
processor was used productively as opposed to being idle. However, because the CPU time
does not reflect relative processor speed, it does not necessarily reflect potential capacity
utilization. For example, if the processor is running at half speed, then CPU time indicates the
capacity used at half speed, but it does not indicate the capacity that would be used at full
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
247
speed. The scaled CPU time provides this additional information. The scaled CPU time is a
measure of processing capacity used at full speed. If the processor is running at full speed,
then CPU time and scaled CPU time are the same. The ratio of scaled CPU time to CPU time
is the relative processor speed.
While the addition of scaled CPU time provides the information necessary to measure
accurate CPU utilization and accounting in the variable processor speed environment, it does
not address the ambiguity of CPU time in the historical context. Simply stated, whether a CPU
time value in an existing interface should represent PURR-based CPU time or SPURR-based
CPU time is open to interpretation. In some contexts, such as when processor utilization data
is to be used to determine how many more jobs should be started to consume idle capacity,
PURR-based CPU time is appropriate. In other contexts, such as when process accounting
data is used for billing purposes, SPURR-based CPU time may be more suitable. There is no
single best answer to handle all cases, and in fact, the issue has not been uniformly
addressed by all Operating Systems. In i5/OS and Linux, CPU time remains PURR-based.
The result is that i5/OS and Linux performance tools that use CPU time remain accurate, but
they don't reflect processor speed variations. Versions of i5/OS and Linux that are
EnergyScale “Ready” provide additional SPURR-based scaled CPU time in some APIs and
performance tools that also provide PURR-based CPU time. In AIX, CPU time is
SPURR-based rather than PURR-based, which means that accounting and performance
tools are accurate irrespective of processor speed variations. AIX also continues to make
PURR-based information available through some performance tools and APIs.
248
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
C
Appendix C.
What’s new in Active Energy
Manager version 3.1.1
This appendix discusses the new features and enhancements that are available in IBM
Systems Director Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1. For more information about IBM
Systems Director Active Energy Manager V3.1.1, see the IBM Systems Software Information
Center:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/index.jsp?topic=/aem_310/frb
0_main.html
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
249
Metering Devices folder
Previously, an intelligent power distribution unit (PDU+) folder or node existed in the
navigation pane of the Active Energy Manager console. In version 3.1.1, this folder has been
replaced by a Metering Devices folder. This folder contains both PDU+s and SynapSense
sensor nodes.
Support for SynapSense sensor nodes
Support has been added for SynapSense sensor nodes, which create a wireless sensor
network architecture. These nodes can be placed in proximity to each other and to a gateway
node, which is connected to a computer and collects data from the wireless sensor nodes at
configured intervals. Active Energy Manager monitors these nodes through the SynapSense
SNMP agent, collecting and trending power and temperature data they report, and SNMP
traps they generate.
Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1 only provides monitoring. It does not support
association of other devices with SynapSense sensors, nor does it allow configuration of
SynapSense sensor networks from within Active Energy Manager.
Exporting data
The following enhancements are provided in Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1 for
exporting data:
򐂰 Current data
The exporting of current data has been enhanced. All tables in a view are exported for all
devices, except for BladeCenter chassis. For BladeCenter chassis, the tables for chassis,
power domain, and slot are exported.
򐂰 Trend data
The exporting of chart trend data has been enhanced. All data in the right pane of the
Active Energy Manager console is exported when the data is exported as a JPEG file.
Managing collection of trend data
The following enhancements are provided in Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1 for
managing collection of trend data:
򐂰 Polling interval for collection of trend data
The polling interval for the collection of historical trend data can now be set globally for all
objects, as well as individually for Active Energy Manger objects, which overrides the
global settings.
򐂰 Number of days to keep trend data
You can specify the number of days to store trend data on the Server tab of the
Preferences window.
250
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Active Energy Manager console refresh rate
With Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1, you can set the rate, in minutes, at which the
Active Energy Manager console is automatically refreshed.
Event viewer
You can view Active Energy Manager events in the Active Energy Manager Event viewer.
Event viewer can be used to display SNMP trap events from Emerson-Liebert SiteScan,
PDU+s, and SynapSense devices.
Support for additional PDU+s
Support has been added for additional PDU+s. A PDU+ is an electrical device that controls
power distribution, provides circuit protection, and monitors the power use of attached
devices and temperature of the surrounding environment. A PDU+ can also enable power
and thermal monitoring for existing systems that do not have those capabilities. The
supported PDU+s are a form of power strip into which the hardware in a rack environment
can be plugged.
The following additional PDU+s are supported with Active Energy Manager 3.1.1:
򐂰 IBM Ultra™ Density Enterprise PDU C19 PDU+ (part number: 71762MX)
򐂰 IBM Ultra Density Enterprise PDU C19 3 phase 60A PDU+ (part number: 71763MU)
Additional hardware support
The following additional hardware is supported in Active Energy Manger version 3.1.1:
򐂰 POWER6
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
8203-E4A
9407-M15
9408-M25
8204-E8A
9409-E8A
9125-F2A-6316 (air-cooled)
9125-F2A-7298 (water-cooled)
9119-FHA
򐂰 System z servers
–
–
–
–
–
System z10 EC E12 (2097 E12)
System z10 EC E26 (2097 E26)
System z10 EC E40 (2097 E40)
System z10 EC E56 (2097 E56)
System z10 EC E64 (2097 E64)
Appendix C. What’s new in Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1
251
򐂰 PDU+s
– IBM Ultra Density Enterprise PDU C19 PDU+ (part number: 71762MX, model:
43v5967)
– IBM Ultra Density Enterprise PDU C19 3 phase 60A PDU+ (part number: 71763MU,
model: 43v5968)
򐂰 SynapSense sensor nodes
– SynapSense version 3.0 nodes
252
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Related publications
The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a more detailed
discussion of the topics covered in this paper.
IBM Redbooks
For information about ordering these publications, see “How to get Redbooks” on page 255.
Some of the documents referenced here may be available in softcopy only.
򐂰 Implementing IBM Director 5.20, SG24-6188
Other publications
These publications are also relevant as further information sources:
򐂰 IBM Systems IBM Director Hardware Management Console extension Release Notes for
Version 5.20
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/hmc_5.20/dir5.20_do
cs_hmc_relnotes.pdf
򐂰 Active Energy Manager Installation and User’s Guide
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/frb0_aem3.1
_docs_user.pdf
򐂰 EnergyScale for IBM POWER6 microprocessor-based systems White paper
http://researchweb.watson.ibm.com/journal/rd/516/mccreary.pdf
򐂰 IBM EnergyScale for POWER6 Processor-Based Systems White paper
ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_wh/n/PSW03033USEN/PSW03033USEN.PDF
Online resources
These Web sites are also relevant as further information sources:
򐂰 IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager version 3.1.1 Information Center
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/index.jsp?topic=/aem_310/
frb0_main.html
򐂰 Active Energy Manager homepage:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/extensions/actengmrg.html
򐂰 IBM Energy Efficiency Services
http://www.ibm.com/systems/optimizeit/cost_efficiency/energy_efficiency/service
s.html
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2008. All rights reserved.
253
򐂰 IBM Green Initiative and Project Big Green
http://www.ibm.com/systems/optimizeit/cost_efficiency/energy_efficiency/
http://www.ibm.com/press/greendatacenter
򐂰 IBM Cool Blue portfolio
http://www.ibm.com/systems/optimizeit/cost_efficiency/energy_efficiency/technol
ogy.html
򐂰 STG Lab Services Data Center Services
http://www.ibm.com/systems/services/labservices/labservices_datacenter.html
򐂰 The Green Grid
http://www.thegreengrid.org/
򐂰 Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Energy (DSIRE) project at North
Carolina State University
http://www.dsireusa.org/
򐂰 IBM BladeCenter JS12 Express server
http://www.ibm.com/systems/bladecenter/hardware/servers/js12/index.html
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/cgi-bin/ssialias?infotype=AN&subtype=CA&htmlfid=8
97/ENUS108-233&appname=USN
򐂰 IBM BladeCenter JS22 server
http://www.ibm.com/systems/bladecenter/hardware/servers/js22e/index.html
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/cgi-bin/ssialias?infotype=AN&subtype=CA&htmlfid=8
97/ENUS107-679&appname=USN
򐂰 IBM Systems Director home page:
http://www.ibm.com/systems/management/director/
򐂰 IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager version 3.1 release notes:
http://publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/eserver/v1r2/topic/aem_310/aem3.1_docs
_relnotes.pdf
򐂰 IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager for POWER version 3.1 announcement
letter:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/9/897/ENUS207-289/ENUS207289.PDF
򐂰 IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager for x86 version 3.:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/7/897/ENUS207-287/ENUS207287.PDF
򐂰 IBM Systems Director for x86 V5.20 announcement letter:
http://www.ibm.com/common/ssi/rep_ca/0/897/ENUS206-290/ENUS206290.PDF
254
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
How to get Redbooks
You can search for, view, or download Redbooks, Redpapers, Technotes, draft publications
and Additional materials, as well as order hardcopy Redbooks, at this Web site:
ibm.com/redbooks
Help from IBM
IBM Support and downloads
ibm.com/support
IBM Global Services
ibm.com/services
Related publications
255
256
Going Green with IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager
Back cover
Going Green with IBM
Systems Director Active
Energy Manager
Understand power
and energy efficiency
on IBM Systems
Learn about IBM
Green technology and
offerings
Manage IBM Systems
with Active Energy
Energy efficiency of data centers is a critical priority for IT managers.
As energy and power costs become a significant portion of IT costs,
understanding and investing in energy management has never been
more important. IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager, an
extension of IBM Systems Director, helps you to monitor and manage
the power usage of systems. Originally designed to support IBM
BladeCenter and System x, Active Energy Manager now supports the
power management of additional IBM systems, including POWER6
processor-based systems, as well as storage devices through the
intelligent Power Distribution Unit (PDU+).
Active Energy Manager can effectively monitor and control power in
the data center at the system, chassis, or rack level. By enabling these
power management technologies, data center managers can more
effectively power manage their systems while lowering the cost of
computing.
Active Energy Manager helps determine the proper power allocation
for each system in the data center. It can assist in determining how to
allocate power to existing systems more efficiently so that additional
systems can be accommodated without the need for additional power
and cooling. When power is constrained, chargeable optional features
of Active Energy Manager allow power to be rationed on a
system-by-system basis, enabling available processing power to
match current workload closely.
This IBM Redpaper publication is intended for system administrators to
help them effectively monitor and manage the power usage of systems
in a data center. This paper introduces energy management concepts
and technologies, and then provides a step-by-step guide to planning
for, installing, configuring, and using Active Energy Manager.
REDP-4361-00
®
Redpaper
™
INTERNATIONAL
TECHNICAL
SUPPORT
ORGANIZATION
BUILDING TECHNICAL
INFORMATION BASED ON
PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
IBM Redbooks are developed
by the IBM International
Technical Support
Organization. Experts from
IBM, Customers and Partners
from around the world create
timely technical information
based on realistic scenarios.
Specific recommendations
are provided to help you
implement IT solutions more
effectively in your
environment.
For more information:
ibm.com/redbooks
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