Office of Financial Management Washington State Major Project Status Report June, 2015

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Office of Financial Management
Washington State Major Project Status Report
June, 2015
Agency Number: 699
Project Number: 08-1-222
School/Campus: Green River Community College
Project Title: Green River CC Trades Replacement Project
Bill Reference(s):
Contact name, phone number, email:
Sam Ball, (253) 288-3316
[email protected]
Agency: SBCTC
Project Description:
The Green River Community College Trades and Industry Complex (TI) is comprised of five
aging buildings, TI-A, TI-B, TI-C, TI-D, and TI-E, which house the automotive, auto body,
carpentry, manufacturing, and welding educational programs. TI-A, B, and C were built in 1966
and TI D and E in 1976. The complex is one of the original low cost, “cottage style” facilities at
Green River - built quickly to meet an immediate program need, without much regard for
longevity.
The TI Complex, with the exception of TI-D which was renovated in 2002, is a prime candidate
for replacement. The 2005 Facilities Condition Survey score of 662 greatly exceeds the Replace
threshold of 475 and supports the College’s own assessment that the buildings have exceeded
their life cycles. The 2005 score compared to the 502 score in 2003 demonstrates a dramatic
increase in the rate of deterioration of the Trades Complex. Today, the condition of the TI
Complex is one of the most severe in the system; they are inadequate to support instructional
program needs.
The TI Complex is inadequate to support current FTE demand for the trades programs.
Throughout the complex, the aging trades-related built-in equipment is dependent on outdated
facility infrastructure. Life safety and health issues abound; and there is no room for expansion.
The buildings do not have adequate support spaces for female students, and many of the program
areas do not meet ADA accessibility requirements. The lack of expansion capability impedes the
growth of trades-related programs. Enrollment data shows that the GRCC trades & industry
programs grew steadily at 18 percent a year until 2002-2003 when limited, inefficient space
began to impede growth. Yet local employers and advisory groups continually demand more
graduates for their work force. These programs train students for high demand, high wage
careers and need additional space to accommodate demand.
Primary Project: The Trades Replacement Project addresses all of the problems listed above.
The new facility will house general classrooms and specialized labs. New systems will be
constructed that meet and/or exceed today’s standards and code requirements. The layout
includes ‘right sized’ classrooms, labs, and offices, open study areas, better circulation, and will
be ADA compliant. The project is designed and constructed to achieve a LEED Silver rating.
New Square Feet: 71,559
Secondary Project: Renovate TI-D and Demolish TI-A, B, C, and E
1
The TI-D HVAC and structural systems were replaced following the Nisqually earthquake and
are currently in good condition. The College plans to move the campus shipping and receiving
facility currently located in the Social Science (SS) building to TI-D prior to demolition of the
SS building. TI-D is ideally located to serve shipping and receiving as it borders the main
campus pedestrian corridor and is in close proximity to the campus’s main entryway.
Renovated Square Feet: 7,282
Scope changes: The College negotiated the acquisition of 9 + acres of land across the street from
the north side of the main campus. (See "Trades Replacement North Site" plan below)
Transfer of ownership and land use processes were completed in December, 2011. The site is
ideally suited for the construction of the Trades Replacement Project and removes some inherent
challenges with the site identified in the pre-design.
The severe economic downturn significantly reduced the funds available for state capital
projects. This factor delayed the construction allocation for the Trades Replacement Project
from the planned 2011-2013 to a future biennium. The college elected to complete the design
process through Design Documents and mothball the project until the biennium targeted for
construction funding is confirmed. The Appropriation History below reflects fulfilling design
agreements through Design Documents only.
Phase: Through DD
Predesign
Design
Construction
Total Through Mothball
Biennium
2007-09
2009-11
TBD
Appropriation
I26
J08
TBD
Amount
$138,000
$1,707,000
$1,845,000
Project Status and discussion of Critical Path for Construction:
In spring 2012, the SBCTC informed the college that a request for construction funding for the
Trades project would be submitted to the 2013 legislature and the economic forecast indicated a
strong likelihood that funding would be approved. They recommended that the college request
approval to use local college funds to re-start the design process in anticipation of receiving
construction funding in July, 2013. The Green River Board of Trustees and the SBCTC Board of
Trustees approved the request to use up to $2,000,000 in local funds and the design process was
re-started in summer 2012.
In July, 2013, the Legislature allocated $26,774,000 for construction, a reduction of $3,855,000
from the original request. It was anticipated that local funds would be needed to backfill the
reduction.
The project was advertised for bids on September 10, 2013 and bids were opened on October 15,
2013. The apparent low bidder was nearly $1.5M over the estimate. All bids were rejected.
2
Non-instructional program value engineering options were considered and the project was re-bid
in January, 2014 with bids opened February 6, 2014. The low bid became the new MACC and a
new total project estimate determined the need for an addition of $4,000,000 in local funds to
keep the project whole. The college and SBCTC boards approved a $4,000,000 request.
The budgets and fund sources are outlined below
Phase: Restart Project
PreDesign
Design
Restart Design
Primary Construction: Trades
Primary Construction: Trades
Total Trades Replacement Project
Biennium
2007-2009
2009-2011
2012-2013
2013-2015
2013-2015
2013-2015
Appropriation
I26
J08
Local Funds
S00
Local Funds
Amount
$138,000
$1,707,000
$2,000,000
$26,774,000
$2,227,526
$32,846,526
Secondary: TID Renovation, Demo
2015-2017
Local Funds
$1,772,093
Total Project
$34,618,619
Primary MACC: $22,316,000
Secondary MACC: $779,160
Schedule:
Start Predesign
Start Design
Re-Start Design
Primary Project: Trades
Bid Date (Bids rejected)
Second Bid Date
Notice to Proceed
50% Complete
Substantial Completion
Final Acceptance
Secondary: TID, Demo
Bid Date
Notice to Proceed
50% Complete
Substantial Completion
Final Acceptance
Budget Schedule
7/2007
7/2/2009
8/1/2012
10/15/2013
2/6/2014
3/15/2014
10/15/2014
6/29/2015
7/29/2015
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
3
Actual/Forecast
7/2007
7/2/2009
8/1/2012
Variance (wks)
0
0
0
10/15/2013
2/6/2014
4/3/2014
10/15/14
0
0
3 Behind
0
Contract Award History (Project when mothballed)
A/E Agreement
Construction Contract (excl. sales tax)
Original Agreement $470,337
Bid Award Amount $0
Amendments
$552,485
Change Orders
$0
Pending Changes
$0
Pending Changes
$ ________
Total $1,022,822
Total
$
Current Design
Current Construction
Contingency
$0
Contingency
$
Contract Award History (Project is Re-started): Primary Project: Trades Replacement
A/E Agreement
Construction Contract (excl. sales tax)
Original Agreement $541,600
Bid Award Amount $22,316,000
Amendments
$1,753,556
Change Orders
$1,568,185
Pending Changes
$0
Pending Changes
$ 0 ________
Total $2,295,156
Total
$23,884,185
Current Design
Current Construction
Contingency
$0
Contingency
$726,439
Contract Award History: Secondary Project TID Renovation, TIA, B, C, E Demolition
A/E Agreement
Construction Contract (excl. sales tax)
Original Agreement $
Bid Award Amount $
Amendments
$27,747
Change Orders
$
Pending Changes
$
Pending Changes
$ ________
Total $27,747
Total
$
Current Design
Current Construction
Contingency
$
Contingency
$
Potential for Project Cost Overruns/Claims
No overruns or claims have occurred.
Discussion of Project Quality
The Trades replacement project is both a product of the campus master planning process and a key
element in implementing the master planning. It is being designed using campus building standards,
county codes and regulatory requirements, along with current sustainable design and energy
standards. A systematic faculty, staff, and design team approach will assure that critical
programmatic needs of the college are met.
Project Photographs: see photos below
4
Entrance to Automotive Shop
5
Automotive Shop
6
Entrances to Welding, Manufacturing Shops
7
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