Welcome to the 2014 WVDE Spring School Counselor Conference

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Welcome to the
2014 WVDE Spring
School Counselor Conference
Parking Lot and Sharing
• Use your post-its to write questions, concerns, etc.
• Place them in the parking lot/playground.
• Questions/concerns will be addressed at lunch, end of day or
with a follow-up email after the conference.
Conference Requests
ITL - in text lingo
POV ˜ Phone on vibrate or turn off
BHN ˜ Be here now; try to stay focused though the presenters may be boring;
pretend if you have to…
VATTP ~ THANK the presenters
TTW ~ VISIT and THANK the exhibitors
Have a great conference!
Handouts:
http://wvde.state.wv.us/counselors/wor
kshops/2014-Spring-CounselorsWorkshop/handouts.php
Today’s Agenda
and
Logistics
Policy 2510 - Assuring the Quality of Education:
Regulations for Educational Programs
• Major repeal and replace version
• Focus on more developmentally effective practice
• Increasing standards for programming while reducing regulatory
mandates
• Very important opportunity for districts to establish high
expectations from the local level based upon the needs of your
students
Policy 2510 - Assuring the Quality of Education:
Regulations for Educational Programs
• Public comment extended due to changes based on previous
comments
– Sections 5 and 13 only
– Deadline March 17th with action April 9th with an effective date of July 1st
• Many provisions removed from policy and placed in guidance
documents
– Initial review today
– Released as DRAFT
– Official release following April 9th adoption by the WVBE
State Board Goal
The West Virginia Board of Education will provide a
statewide system of education that ensures all students
graduate from high school prepared for success in highquality postsecondary opportunities in college and/or
careers.
Rationale
The future quality of life for the citizens of West Virginia is directly linked to the
performance of our students. Today's students are tomorrow's wage earners and tax
payers. Low student achievement levels, decreasing graduation rates and ranking
among the nation's lowest levels of post-secondary transition are all bleak predictors of
West Virginia's future. We must strive to prepare our graduates to meet the
requirements of high quality jobs needed within West Virginia and nationally. In
addition to career preparedness, many systemic public issues like obesity, drug
dependence, teen pregnancy, and crime are statistically linked to the overall level of
education. Thus, unless our education system improves and our young people are
prepared to be productive and responsible members of our society, the state will have
decreasing resources to support the infra-structure and services essential to attracting
economic growth and elevating the overall quality of life of its citizens.
WHAT IS THIS THING
WE CALL COLLEGE-ANDCAREER READINESS?
College and Career Readiness
College and Career Readiness means that students exit high school prepared for success in a wide range of high-quality post-secondary
opportunities. Specifically, college and career readiness refers to the knowledge, skills, and dispositions needed to be successful in
postsecondary education and/or training that lead to gainful employment. Today’s workplace requires that all workers be lifelong learners
in order to advance in their careers. Therefore, it is necessary that there be a common set of knowledge and skills that all individuals
acquire to successfully transition into postsecondary education or the workplace. As individuals select specific career paths, they will then
have to focus on the amount and type of additional knowledge and skills they should acquire to be successful in their chosen field. A
student’s goals, desires, and interests influence the precise knowledge and skill profile necessary to be ready for success in their chosen
postsecondary endeavors and the level of postsecondary education needed to accomplish a student’s individual career aspirations. All
students should exit high school with a full understanding of the career opportunities available to them, the education necessary to be
successful in their chosen pathway, and a plan to attain their goals.
AGREED-UPON
DEFINITION
College Readiness
Career Readiness
College readiness involves being prepared to enroll in and
successfully complete entry-level, credit-bearing, academic
collegiate programs at two- and four-year postsecondary schools
without remedial work or assistance, as well as being equipped with
the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to make that transition
successfully. This entails having mastered rigorous content
knowledge, demonstrated ability to apply knowledge through
higher-order skills and the ability to navigate the pathways and
systems that will gain access to positive postsecondary
opportunities.
Career readiness involves three major areas: core academic skills
and the ability to apply those skills in concrete situations in order to
function in the workplace and in routine daily activities;
employability skills (such as critical thinking and responsibility) that
are essential in any career area; and technical, job-specific skills
related to a specific career pathway. These skills allow students to
enter true career pathways that offer gainful employment and
opportunities for advancement.
Knowledge and Skills
Knowledge and Skills
A college-ready person is proficient in the core academic subjects,
as well as in specialized topics in their selected areas of interests.
This foundational knowledge base includes competence in a broad
range of academic subjects grounded in rigorous internationally
benchmarked standards. Prerequisite skills and capabilities include,
but are not limited to, proficiency in reading a range and type of
material, with an emphasis on informational texts; fluent writing in
several modes, most notably expository, descriptive and
argumentative; quantitative literacy through algebra and including
geometry, combined with the ability to understand and interpret
data; a understanding of the scientific method and some insight into
the organization of knowledge in the sciences; an awareness of how
social systems operate and how they are studied; basic proficiency
in a second language and awareness that languages reflect cultures;
and experiences in and appreciation of creative and expressive arts.
While not every person needs exactly the same proficiency in each
of these areas, as student’s interests influence the precise
knowledge and skill profile necessary for postsecondary studies.
A career-ready person is proficient in the core academic subjects, as
well as in technical topics. This foundational knowledge base
includes competence in a broad range of rigorous internationally
benchmarked standards. It also includes a level of technical-skill
proficiency aligned to a chosen career field and pathway, and the
ability to apply both academic and technical learning in the context
of a career.
The essential knowledge and skills for initial career readiness are
defined in the following categories: Academic foundations
(minimally, the state’s graduation requirements), technical skills,
communications, problem solving and critical thinking, information
technology applications, systems, safety, health and environmental,
leadership and teamwork, ethics and legal responsibilities, and
employability and career development While not every person
needs exactly the same proficiency in each of these areas, as
student’s interests influence the precise knowledge and skill profile
necessary for postsecondary studies.
Dispositions
While there may be specific dispositions necessary for individual careers, the basic dispositions for postsecondary success are essentially
the same for both college and career readiness. Supported by research as strongly predictive of academic and lifelong success, these
dispositions can be defined broadly as:
 Self-efficacy
 Collaboration
 Initiative
 Working in Teams and Independently
 Integrity
 Clear and Effective Communication
 Intellectual Curiosity
 Problem Solving
 Adaptability
 Critical Thinking
 Time and Goal Management
 Self-Awareness
 Leadership
 Self-Control
 Ethical Decision Making and Social Responsibility
 Applied Knowledge
 Resilience
 Social and Personal Responsibility
Four Guiding Questions
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Who are the students we serve?
For what are we preparing them?
How well are we doing?
What should we do differently?
Policy 2510: Middle Level Programmatic
Changes
• Grade 5 was moved to Early Learning Programming
• Renaming of programmatic levels (Early, Middle Grade and
Adolescent)
• Content areas no longer have times associated as to how long they
are required to be taught daily
• Name Change from ISTP (Individualized Student Transition Plan) to
a PEP (Personalized Education Plan)
• Student Mentoring /Advising - Greater emphasis on an
collaborative whole-school approach to integration of school and
career readiness skills, career exploration and early goal setting
Middle Level Education (Grades 6-8)
• The programs of study will be taught by a team of qualified teachers. A
diverse set of developmentally appropriate instructional strategies will
scaffold students to mastery and beyond of the grade level content
standards and objectives. The principal and a team of teachers will
determine an adequate amount of time necessary to achieve mastery
of the approved content standards and objectives for each program of
study and effectively address the academic needs of all students in the
literacy skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening and language in all
content areas.
The Governor’s Commission on the Middle Grades:
Promote a more systemic approach during the
school day that allows students time to explore
future career options including new and emerging
careers in West Virginia.
Policy 2510:
Adolescent Level Programmatic Changes
• Renaming of programmatic levels (Early, Middle Grade and
Adolescent)
• More decision making at the local level (Policy and Local
Concentrations and Service Learning)
• Name Change from ISTP (Individualized Student Transition
Plan) to a PEP (Personalized Education Plan)
• Student Mentoring /Advising - Greater emphasis on an
collaborative whole-school approach to integration of school
and career readiness skills, career exploration and early goal
setting
Graduation Requirements
Mathematics
4 credits
English Language Arts
4 credits
•
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•
•
•
•
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Math I
Math II
Math III STEM, or Math III LA or Math III TR
Math IV or Math IV TR or Transition Mathematics
for Seniors* or any other fourth course option
(Chart V)
An AP® Mathematics course may be substituted for
an equivalent course or any fourth course option.
•
English 9
English 10
English 11
English 12 or English 12 CR or Transition English
Language Arts for Seniors*
An AP® English course may be substituted for any of
the above courses.
Graduation Requirements
Science
3 credits
Social Studies
4 credits
• Physical Science (Grade 9)
• Biology or Conceptual Biology or AP® Biology
(Grade 10)
• One additional lab science course or AP®
science course (Chart V)
• World Studies (Grade 9) or an AP® Social
Studies course
• United States Studies (Grade 10) or an AP®
Social Studies course
• Contemporary Studies or an AP® Social Studies
course
• Civics for the Next Generation or AP®
Government and Politics.
Graduation Requirements
Physical Education
1 credit
Health
1 credit
• Physical Education 9-12 (WV Education
Information System [hereinafter WVEIS
course 6609]). At least 50 percent of
class time for physical education
should be spent in moderate to
vigorous-intensity physical activity.
• Health 9-12 (WVEIS course 6909)
Graduation Requirements
The Arts
1 credit
Personalized Education Plan (PEP)
6 Credits
4 Personalized
(CTE or Non-CTE Concentrations)
2 Electives
World Languages
Communicating in a global society requires
students to apply appropriate language strategies
through embedded opportunities to explore and
gain an understanding of the world around them.
Undergraduate admission to West Virginia fouryear colleges and universities include the
completion of two units of the same world
language.
Course Codes
New Course Codes
• Submit the following information to Dewayne Duncan,
[email protected]
• Name of Course
• Standards and Objectives for Course
• Content Teacher(s) who will be teaching course (endorsement code)
• Documentation of local board approval (board minutes)
Embedded Credit
• For courses that have already been approved for embedded credit
through WVDE policy or a county waiver, no further action is needed.
Students can still receive one credit and meet course requirements for
the other course.
• In order to offer two credits for a single, embedded credit course or to
establish new courses with embedded credit, counties will need to
establish policy explicitly outlining how the course requirements are
being met and submit to WVDE for approval.
Office of Early Learning
Lynn Baker, NBCT
WVDE, Office of Early Learning
[email protected]
OEL Programmatic Levels
Early Learning Readiness (Grades Pre-K-Kindergarten)
Early Learning Primary (Grades 1-2)
Early Learning Intermediate (Grades 3-5)
Foundations for High-Quality Early
Learning Programming (Grades Pre-K-5)
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Developmentally Appropriate Standards Focused Curriculum
Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Physical Health and Wellness
Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Global Competence
Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Formative Assessment
Processes
• Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Technology Integration
• Developmentally Appropriate Foundations for Student Success and
Career Readiness
Early Learning Webpage
Listserv
• Kindergarten Listserv
• Office of Early Learning Listserv
Contact Wendy McCoy [email protected]
Development comes from within. Nature
does not hurry but advances slowly.
Fred Rogers
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