T U N C

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T HE U NIVERSITY OF N ORTH C AROLINA AT C HAPEL H ILL

S CHOOL OF S OCIAL W ORK

C OURSE N UMBER : SOWO 835 Room 114, Mondays 9:00-10:20am

C OURSE T ITLE , S EMESTER AND Y EAR : Poverty Policy Spring 2011

I NSTRUCTOR : Dan Hudgins, MSW, ACSW

School of Social Work, UNC Chapel Hill

Office 138, Tate-Turner & Kuralt Building, 301 Pittsboro St., CB 3550.

Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3550

Phone: 919-962-5163 Fax: 919-962-3653 Email: danhudgins@unc.edu

OFFICE HOURS: Monday and Tuesdays, 12:00-2:00 or by appt.

C

OURSE

D

ESCRIPTION

: This course will provide students with a framework for advanced policy analysis and strategies for policy change, with a focus on national and state poverty policy, focusing on legal, socio-political, and economic factors influencing financing, access, and service delivery. This course explores skills and strategies for policy analysis and change.

C

OURSE

O

BJECTIVES

: The student who successfully completes this course should be able to demonstrate understanding of the following issues in regard to poverty policy.

1.

Identify the principles, foundation and provisions of the primary social welfare programs that affect Poverty Policy.

2.

Demonstrate the analytic, theoretical and value assessment skills that enable social workers to evaluate policies and apply change strategies.

3.

Apply concepts and principles of human rights, social justice, and social work ethics to policy analysis, development and change strategies.

4.

Understand different national definitions and trends in poverty and income and wealth inequality.

5.

Explain the intended and actual consequences of the major US poverty policies.

6.

Discuss ethical issues in current poverty policy, including individual and family rights, issues of distributive justice, and issues of power, discrimination, and oppression, particularly with regard to racial and ethnic minorities.

7.

Understand the specific features of US poverty policy in contrast with other nations.

8.

Develop leadership strategies for planning, developing, and changing poverty policies in a context of empowerment and partnership with individuals, families and communities.

E

XPANDED

D

ESCRIPTION

:

The ability to understand the complexities of poverty policy development and implementation is crucial for successful professional social work practice settings. This is the case because social workers shape policy, implement programs, respond to systemic inequities and assure that services are available for individuals and families who need them. This course will examine critically a number of relevant poverty policies in the US in a cross-national perspective.

R EQUIRED T EXTS /R EADINGS

Hacker, Jacob S., Pierson, Paul. (2010) Winner-Take-All Politics. New York, New York,

Simon and Schuster.

Sacks, Jweffrey D. (2005). The End of Poverty, New York, New York, Penguin Books.

T EACHING M ETHODS

Class participation: In order to maximize everyone’s learning, we will rely on the contributions and insights of all students when issues are discussed. The participation of each student is essential, and responsibility for class discussion is shared. Class participation includes attendance, being prepared to discuss readings and assignments, sharing your opinions on the topic at hand, facilitating the participation of other students, and engaging with guest speakers.

Attendance: Attendance is crucial to both your learning experience and the learning of your colleagues. Students with more than one unexcused absence will not earn an H.

Reading assignments: You are responsible for reading all assigned material before the class date for which the readings are assigned. Students will be required to submit a discussion question from the readings that are to be emailed by noon on the Friday before class each Monday class. The questions are to be emailed to danhudgins@unc.edu

.

C LASS A SSIGNMENTS

1. Write an opinion/editorial piece that is a 500 to 750 word response to a current social issue, program or policy designed to be submitted to a newspaper or other publication. The submission can address a problem on the local, state, or national level relevant poverty reduction. The submission should catch the attention of the reader using relevant data or a case example, provide background on the issue and propose a solution. Students are required to submit their op-ed for publication. Extra credit will be provided if the student has the op-ed piece published.

2. Students will complete 2 writing reflection assignments due at the beginning of classes on February 7 th

and March 21st. Students can explore any topic of interest that relates to course content from any of the class sessions.

Reflections can stem from class discussion, course readings, from a journal or news publication. Or perhaps a recent film sparked thoughts and relates back to course content. Each reflection should be 2-3 pages and needs to demonstrate the student’s ability to think critically about policy that impact poverty in a variety of contexts. Students may want to consider the following kinds of questions when writing their reflections:

What are the main economic issues and related policies under discussion?

Who is affected most? How and why?

What are the article’s main conclusions? If you saw a film, how did it relate to poverty?

What additional questions does this work raise? What are the ethical considerations to be aware of?

What are the implications for social work and other healthcare professionals?

Was the information biased/flawed or did it serve as a model to be emulated? How, so?

Let these points serve as ideas to get your reflection started; not every point needs to be addressed. Reflections do not need to written in APA format with outside literature or research. Think of this as a critical reflection that synthesizes this material and your own thoughts.

3. Policy Brief Assignment: You will team up with classmates based on a shared interest in a policy issue that has an impact on domestic poverty.

Examples of these policies are the Earned Income Tax Credit, asset development initiatives, TANF, Social Security, and Medicaid. Each group will prepare a policy brief and prepare a 30 minute presentation that will be presented in one of the last two class sessions, April 18 th

or 25 th

. Each group will prepare a Power Point presentation giving the foundation for the policy, the benefits of the policy, a critical analysis of the policy, and any ethical issues that are identified. Examples of policy briefs will be shared with the class.

Assignment Grading

OP-ED Assignment

First Reflection Paper

20 points

20 points

Second Reflection Paper 20 points

Policy Brief 20 points

Class Presentation

Participation

10 points

10 points

Total: 100 points

G RADING S YSTEM

H

P

L

Clear Excellence

Entirely Satisfactory

Low Passing

Failed F

94-100 points

80-93 points

70-79 points

<70 points

P OLICY ON A CADEMIC D ISHONESTY

Students are expected to complete assigned and independent readings, contribute to the development of a positive learning environment, and demonstrate your learning through written assignments and class participation. Original written work is expected and required. The University of North Carolina has a rich and longstanding tradition of honor.

If you have not yet done so, carefully read the Student Code of Honor. All submitted work must conform to the Honor Code of the University of North Carolina. For information on the Honor Code, including guidance on representing the words, thoughts, and ideas of others, please see: http://instrument.unc.edu

Please note that plagiarism is defined in the Code as “the intentional representation of another person’s words, thoughts, or ideas as one’s own.” Violation of the Honor Code will result in a grade of 0 points for the assignment, referral to the Honor Court.

From the Code: “It is the responsibility of every student to obey and support the enforcement of the Honor Code, which prohibits lying, cheating, or stealing when these actions involve academic processes or University, student or academic personnel acting in an official capacity. Students will conduct all academic work within the letter and spirit of the Honor Code, which prohibits the giving or receiving of unauthorized aid in all academic processes.”

You must submit your assignments electronically (by email) with only your PID number

(not your name) on them. However, I will provide an Honor Code statement for you to sign in class. Work will not be graded for which this affirmation is not submitted. The statement reads as follows:

I have neither given nor received any unauthorized assistance on this assignment.

P

OLICY ON

A

CCOMMODATIONS FOR

S

TUDENTS WITH

D

ISABILITIES

To obtain disability-related academic accommodations, students with disabilities must contact the instructor and the Department of Disability Services as soon as possible. You may reach the Department of Disability Services at 919-962-8300 (Voice/TDD) or http://disability services.unc.edu

Pursuant to UNC policy, instructors are not permitted to give accommodations without the permission and direction of the Department of Disability Services. Students must obtain such permission in advance of the due date for the first assignment.

C

OURSE

O

UTLINE

January 10

Introductions and course overview

Poverty policy in the larger context of US policy

Who are poor people in the US?

Video: Poverty Definition

Exercise: In-class quiz-No grade

Readings:

Sacks, Jeffery, The End of Poverty (Text) Introduction and Chapter 1 pp 1-25.

January 24

Review of policy analysis framework

Exercise: Applying Policy Analysis Framework

Readings:

Gilbert, Neil and Terrell, Paul (2002 ). “A Framework for Social Welfare

Policy Analysis,” in Dimensions of Social Welfare Policy, 6th Edition,

Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson Education, Inc. pp.55-88. (In E-reserves and Davis Library).

January 31

Older adults, the Social Security Act, and poverty reduction

Readings:

Furman, Jason: “Policy Basic: Top Ten Facts on Social Security’s 70

Anniversary”, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. th http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=531 http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3260

February 7

Welfare Reform and Assistance to Families and Children

Readings:

Testimony of Sharon Parrott, CBPP Director of Welfare Reform and

Income Support Policy, on the Impact of TANF Ten Years After Implementation http://www.cbpp.org/7-19-06tanf-testimony.pdf

Micklewright, J. (2002). Social exclusion and children: A European view for a

US debate. Center for Analysis and Social Exclusion paper #51 (February), London

School of Economics: 1-35. http://sticerd.lse.ac.uk/dps/case/cp/CASEpaper51.pdf

.

Conduct a web search on current demographic trends affecting the American

Family that you are interested in. Bring information to class.

February 14

Poverty in America

Readings:

Blackboard.

Rector & Johns on, “Understanding Poverty in America”. Posted on

February 21 Op/Ed Assignment Due

Poverty in Developing Countries

Video:

Mohammad Yunus, “Creating a World Without Poverty”

Readings:

Sacks, Jeffery, The End of Poverty (Text) Chapters 2, 3, 4 pp 26-89.

February 28

Community Approach to Poverty: Durham County

Readings:

Hacker and Pierson, Winner-Take-All Politics (Text) Chapter 10, pp 253-288.

Guest Speakers: Sharon Hirsch, Assistant Director, Durham County DSS

March 14

Ending Child Poverty in the U.K.

Readings:

Sacks, Jeffery, The End of Poverty (Text) Chapters 11-12, pp210-243.

The UK Commitment: Ending Child Poverty by 2020,

Center for Law and Social Policy, http://www.clasp.org/publications/uk_childpoverty.pdf

Review the Website of The Clearinghouse on International Development in Child, Youth and Family Policies at Columbia University. Be prepared to discuss one of the benefits comparing the provision of these benefits from an international perspective. http://childpolicyintl.org/

March 21

African Poverty

Video: Dead Aid: Dambiso Moyo Lecture at UNC on Nov. 11, 2009

Readings :

Sacks, Jeffery, The End of Poverty (Text) Chapter 10, pp 188- 209; Chapter 16, pp 309-328.

March 28

Asset Development and the Benefit Bank

Readings:

Hacker and Pierson, Winner-Take-All Politics (Text) Conclusion, pp 289-309.

Review the web site for the Benefit Bank:

http://www.thebenefitbank.com/node

.

Guest Speakers: Ralph Gildehaus, JD, MDC Inc., Chapel Hill, NC

Andrea Taylor, Research Instructor, UNC-CH School of Social Work

April 4

Center on Poverty, Work, and Opportunity: UNC-CH School of Law

Readings:

Review the web site: http://www.law.unc.edu/centers/poverty/default.aspx

Sacks, Jeffery, The End of Poverty (Text) Chapters 8 and 9. pp 148-187.

Guest Speaker: Gene Nichol, J.D., Professor and Director, Center on Work and

Opportunity

April 11

Ending Poverty

Sacks, Jeffery, The End of Poverty (Text) Chapters 13-15, pp 244-308.

April 18

Readings:

Class Presentations

Readings:

Sacks, Jeffery, The End of Poverty (Text) Chapters 17-18, pp 329-368.

April 25

Class Presentations and Course Evaluation

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