North Carolina Department of Public Instruction Division of Accountability Services

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North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
Division of Accountability Services
North Carolina Testing Program
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Public Schools of North Carolina
State Board of Education
Department of Public Instruction
Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-2825
www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/testing
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
The guiding mission of the North Carolina State Board of Education is that every public school student
will graduate from high school, globally competitive for work and postsecondary education and
prepared for life in the 21st Century.
HOWARD N. LEE
Chairman :: Raleigh
KATHY A. TAFT
Greenville
ROBERT “TOM” SPEED
Boone
WAYNE MCDEVITT
Vice Chair :: Asheville
KEVIN D. HOWELL
Raleigh
MELISSA E. BARTLETT
Statesville
BEVERLY PERDUE
Lieutenant Governor :: New Bern
SHIRLEY E. HARRIS
Troy
JOHN A. TATE III
Charlotte
RICHARD MOORE
State Treasurer :: Kittrell
EULADA P. WATT
Charlotte
PATRICIA N. WILLOUGHBY
Raleigh
NC DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION
June St. Clair Atkinson, Ed.D., State Superintendent
301 N. Wilmington Street:: Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-2825
In compliance with federal law, NC Public Schools administers all state-operated educational programs,
employment activities and admissions without discrimination because of race, religion, national or ethnic origin,
color, age, military service, disability, or gender, except where exemption is appropriate and allowed by law.
Inquiries or complaints regarding discrimination issues should be directed to:
J.B. Buxton, Deputy State Superintendent :: Office of Innovation and School Transformation
6301 Mail Service Center :: Raleigh, NC 27699-6301 :: Telephone 919-807-3200 :: Fax 919-807-4065
Visit us on the Web:: www.ncpublicschools.org
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
This manual was prepared by:
Mildred Bazemore, Chief
Test Development Section
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
Division of Accountability Services
Jim Kroening, Performance Assessments Director
Test Development Section
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
Division of Accountability Services
Akia Beverly-Worsley, Writing Content Specialist
North Carolina State University
Technical Outreach for Public Schools
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Table of Contents
Section I Purpose/Background
ƒ Introduction ...................................................................................... 1
ƒ Background ....................................................................................... 1
ƒ Writing Advisory Committees ........................................................... 3
ƒ Timeline for NC Writing Assessments .............................................. 5
Section II Scoring Information
ƒ Scorers ............................................................................................... 6
ƒ Distributed Scoring ............................................................................ 7
ƒ Reliability Standards for Distributed Scoring ...................................8
ƒ Reader Bias ...................................................................................... 10
ƒ Total Writing Score Calculation Examples....................................... 11
ƒ Achievement Levels (General Assessment) ...................................... 11
ƒ Achievement Level Descriptors (General Assessment)................... 12
Section III Score Reporting
ƒ State Data ......................................................................................... 13
ƒ School and Student Data.................................................................. 13
Section IV Composing Features
ƒ Content component..............................................................................
o Focus ..................................................................................... 14
o Organization...........................................................................15
o Support and Elaboration .......................................................15
o Style ........................................................................................15
ƒ Conventions component ......................................................................
o Sentence Formation.............................................................. 16
o Usage ..................................................................................... 16
o Mechanics ............................................................................. 16
ƒ Content Rubric for NC General Writing Assessment.......................17
ƒ Conventions Rubric for NC General Writing Assessment .............. 18
ƒ Examples of Common Conventions Errors .................................... 19
Section V Scoring Rubric Applications
ƒ Guide Set for Grade 4 General Assessment … ........................... 20-32
o 2008 Writing Prompt for Grade 4 General Assessment
o Student Exemplars (anchor papers) ….....................................
o Guide Set Annotations (score explanations) … ........................
ƒ
Training Set for Grade 4 General Assessment …........................33-45
o Score Tally Sheet: Training Set ................................................
o Student Exemplars (sample papers) ........................................
o Training Set Annotations (score explanations)........................
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ƒ
Qualification Set for Grade 4 General Assessment …................ 46-52
o Score Tally Sheet: Qualification Set..........................................
o Student Exemplars (sample papers) ........................................
o Qualification Set Annotations (score explanations) ................
ƒ
Contact Information ….........................................................................
o Accountability Division…...................................................... 53
o Instructional Services Division….......................................... 53
o Evaluation Sheet ................................................................... 54
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INTRODUCTION
This training has been designed to deepen your understanding of the North Carolina
Writing Assessment and the test development process. This is accomplished through
historical perspective and the explanation of field testing, prompt review, prompt
selection criteria, scorer qualifications, scoring procedures, and rubric application to
student responses.
It is not the intent of this manual to neither represent nor reflect classroom practice in
the teaching of writing to students. Quality writing instruction is based on sound
pedagogy from which student performance is reflected. The North Carolina Department
of Public Instruction Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
provides this manual and training material for use in understanding the writing
assessment and the application of the rubric to selected student responses. The student
responses represent a range of potential score points that demonstrate the performance
of features indicative of those being assessed. The responses do not represent the only
way a student’s response might attain a particular score point. It is important to read
the annotations for each sample to understand how the rubric was applied to that
particular response.
BACKGROUND
The North Carolina General Assembly in 1977 enacted legislation directing the State
Board of Education (SBE) to evaluate annually the educational progress of North
Carolina students in the first, second, third, sixth, and ninth grades. “A Plan for the
Measurement of Writing in North Carolina” was presented to and approved by the SBE
in November, 1982. As described in that plan, a field test of sixth and ninth graders was
conducted in the spring of 1983, and formal administrations in both grades occurred in
January of 1984. In 1985-86, the writing assessment at grade 9 was reassigned to grade
8. The program was expanded in 1991-92 to include a grade 10 writing assessment as an
English II End-of-Course test and again in 1992-93 to include writing at grade 4. In
1995-96 the program was reduced to the assessment of writing at grades 4, 7, and 10.
Currently, students are administered writing assessments at grades 4, 7, and 10.
In 2000, the SBE commissioned a Writing Assessment Task Force to offer suggestions
to the NCDPI on ways to redesign the Writing Assessment at Grades 4, 7, and 10. The
program was redesigned effective with the 2002-2003 school year. The redesign
included eliminating the focused-holistic method of hand scoring which had been used
by the North Carolina Program since its inception. In addition, the redesign eliminated
the grade 10 English II Writing Assessment and instead requires a once-a-year writing
assessment, administered in the spring of grade 10, which focuses on informational
writing. The mode of writing for grade 4 remains narrative, while the grade 7 mode of
writing has changed from expository to argumentative. The Writing Assessment at
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Grades 4, 7, and 10 is scored (effective with the 2002-2003 school year) using the North
Carolina Writing Assessment Scoring Model Rubrics for Content and Conventions.
Grade Levels and Types of Writing by Year
Year
198384
198485
198586
198687
198788
198889
198990
199091
199192
199293
199394
199495
199596
199697
199798
199899
199900
200001
4
6
7
8
9
Descriptive
Persuasive
Expository
Expository
10
Expository
Persuasive
Descriptive
Expository
Expository
Persuasive
Descriptive
Expository
Expository
Persuasive
Descriptive
Expository
Expository
Expository
Persuasive
Expository
Narrative
Descriptive
Expository
Expository
Narrative
Expository
Persuasive
Expository
Expository
Expository
Narrative
Narrative
Expository
Expository
Narrative
Expository
Expository
Narrative
Expository
Expository
Narrative
Expository
Expository
Narrative
Expository
Expository
Narrative
Expository
Expository
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200102
200203
200304
200405
200506
200607
200708
Narrative
Expository
Narrative
Argumentative
Informational
Narrative
Argumentative
Informational
Narrative
Argumentative
Informational
Narrative
Argumentative
Informational
Narrative
Argumentative
Informational
Narrative
Argumentative
Informational
The North Carolina Writing Assessment at Grades 4, 7, and 10 has undergone
significant changes in the past several years. The changes continue to reflect the
importance of writing as a part of quality instruction, the changes in the
English/Language Arts Standard Course of Study, and the desire of stakeholders to
encourage the use of standard grammatical features in student writing.
WRITING ADVISORY COMMITTEES
During the summer, prior to the start of the school year, North Carolina educators are
recruited to participate on the Writing Advisory Committees.
There are currently six Writing Advisory Committees: Grade 4 General, Grade 4
NCEXTEND2, Grade 7 General, Grade 7 NCEXTEND2, Grade 10 General, and Grade
10 NCEXTEND2 OCS.
Committee membership is based on staggered terms and consists of (at least):
• six grade level specific practicing classroom teachers (3 year term)
• five grade-span specific practicing classroom teachers (2 year term)
• one professional from the English/Language Arts department of NCDPI
• one post secondary professional with experience relevant to the specific grade
level of the committee (3 year term)
• one professional in the area of special education (2 year term)
• one professional in the area of limited English proficiency (2 year term)
• one professional from the Test Development Section of NCDPI
Committee members are qualified individuals who are divergent thinkers, possess
leadership skills, which support the NC Writing Assessment at Grades 4, 7, and 10, have
a positive record of service, and will devote the necessary time required to the Writing
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Advisory Committee to ensure that the objectives of the committee are achieved. Efforts
are made to ensure that the committees reflect the racial and ethnic diversity of North
Carolina’s fourth, seventh and tenth grade student populations and that the major
geographic regions in the state are represented.
The primary purpose of the Writing Advisory Committee(s) is to make
recommendations based not on what students can do, but what students should be
expected to do as outlined in the NC Standard Course of Study (SCS) for
English/Language Arts. Another duty of the Writing Advisory Committees is to provide
advice and input for the selection of prompts, sample papers, and annotations to be
used in the scoring of student responses.
In September of each school year, the Writing Advisory Committees meet to select the
operational and alternate prompts for the current school year, as well as prompts
necessary for field testing. The committee examines each potential prompt using
statistical data from the field tests. All prompts are reviewed for socioeconomic,
racial/ethnic, gender, regional, and religious biases before being selected for statewide
administration. Each prompt is also reviewed for accessibility in order to ensure that all
prompts are appropriate for the NCEXTEND2 Writing Assessment student population.
In February, the Writing Advisory Committees are convened to conduct the first round
of range-finding. Range-finding is a major step in the scoring process. The rangefinding process involves the scoring contractor, Writing Advisory Committees, NCDPI
Accountability Services/Test Development Section Staff, NCSU-TOPS staff, NCDPI
Instructional Services, English/Language Arts staff, and NCDPI Exceptional Children
staff. The contractor provides samples of student field test responses. The Writing
Advisory Committees view and score the student field test responses to establish
“anchor papers.” All committee members must come to consensus and unanimously
agree on the Content and Conventions score given to each response.
The Anchor papers represent examples of particular score points and are referenced by
the scorers during the scoring process. They are used in conjunction with scoring
rubrics to help in deciding what score points student responses are assigned. This helps
to ensure that consistency in standards is applied to all responses.
In March, days after the operational administration, range-finding occurs again. Round
two of the range-finding process is the same as above EXCEPT that the samples
gathered from students are “Live” responses. “Live” student responses refer to
responses that students wrote during the operational test administration. In order to
obtain sample responses, a representative sample of schools is contacted and asked to
send test materials to NCDPI instead of returning them to the contractor. The
contractor uses these samples of student responses to conduct the final range-finding
prior to the start of the scoring project.
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WRITING ASSESSMENTS TIMELINE
September
NC Writing Advisory Committees meet to
select Field Test, Operational, and Alternate
prompts
February
NC Writing Advisory Committees meet for RangeFinding meetings (Round–One)
March
Operational Administration (Second Tuesday)
[Exception: When Easter is in March, then first Tuesday]
NC Writing Advisory Committees meet for RangeFinding meetings (Round-Two)
Late March –
End of April
Operational Assessment Scoring Window
Conducted by Pearson Educational Measurement
May – June
Scores uploaded, reports generated, project
closes, and training materials are developed.
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Scoring Information
Scorers
The scoring project occurs after training materials are assembled using the papers
scored during the range-finding process. For the project, there is a minimum of five
days of training and qualifying. The training materials consist of a scoring rubric, a set
of guide (anchor) papers, three training sets, and three qualifying sets. After training
and qualifying, scoring begins. There are over 300,000 responses that are scored across
all three grades and six assessments. Each response is 100% second scored, meaning
that two scorers, independent of each other, assign content and convention scores for
each response.
Individuals who score the North Carolina Writing Assessments (general and
NCEXTEND2) must successfully complete a variety of activities prior to scoring
student responses.
First, a potential scorer must have the necessary qualifications. A post-secondary
degree is required of all applicants. Scorers must have documented experience in the
field of English, Writing, or Education. Scorers must also pass a preliminary
grammatical and written exam. Many who score the North Carolina Writing
Assessment at Grades 4, 7, and 10 have prior scoring experience and exceed the
minimum requirements. When initial employment is granted, scorers receive training
from the contractor specific to bias and large scale assessment. Examples of reader bias
are reviewed with the scorers, and the information has been included in the Reader Bias
chart following this section.
Next, potential scorers must successfully complete the training and qualifying phase
specific to the North Carolina project. Training and qualifying of potential scorers takes
approximately one week. Scorers who have had extensive experience scoring the North
Carolina project are trained as scoring supervisors. These scoring supervisors are given
additional training to act as an initial resource when scorers have questions. They assist
in the monitoring of scorers.
Those individuals trained as scorers are given the scoring rubrics, narrative composing
features, and application sets. They are not supplied with additional materials such as
the NC Standard Course of Study as this leads to individual interpretation of the
curriculum and would impact the validity and reliability of scoring. Readers are trained
using those student responses that were scored by the North Carolina Writing Advisory
Committee to understand how the rubric is to be applied to student responses.
After readers are trained, they must qualify to score. Qualification involves applying the
rubrics and guide set to selected student responses. Potential scorers have three
opportunities to accurately assign both content and conventions scores to at least
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seventy percent of the student responses. Readers must go through all three
opportunities regardless of when in the process they qualify.
Finally, those readers who have passed the qualification requirements are provided with
student responses that they score with another qualified scorer. This “partner score”
allows scorers to ease into the scoring process and permits scoring supervisors and
scoring directors to monitor and retrain when necessary.
Scorers are monitored by both the scoring contractor and NCDPI on a daily basis
throughout the project. Any scorer that begins to drift from the 70% reliability
requirement is retrained or dismissed. Any responses scored by readers who are
dismissed, are sent back into the pool of responses to be scored and any assigned scores
are removed from those students’ records.
Data is collected throughout the course of the scoring process and is reviewed each day
by NCDPI Accountability/Test Development Section and NCSU-TOPS staff. This data is
compiled and analyzed for several purposes, including but not limited to, validity,
reliability, and frequency (score point and Total Writing Score) distributions.
Distributed Scoring for 2008
Since receiving recommendations from the Writing Assessment Task Force in 2001, the
NCDPI has worked toward the goal of involving North Carolina educators in the scoring
process for the Writing Assessments. The advancement of modern technology has
enabled NCDPI to transition from a regional-based scoring model to a distributed
scoring model (remote web-based secure access system) for the North Carolina General
Writing Assessments at Grades 4, 7, and 10. Using a distributed scoring model, trained
North Carolina educators, who qualified, were given the opportunity to score the North
Carolina General Writing Assessments along with qualified professional scorers.
Many North Carolina educators were interested in the opportunity to score the general
writing assessments; however the number of scoring positions was limited.
Approximately 20 percent of the scorers who participated in the training and
qualification process at each grade level were North Carolina educators (see table
below).
Grade 4
Grade 7
Grade 10
87 NC
Educators
77 NC
Educators
87 NC
Educators
444 Total
Scorers
397 Total
Scorers
440 Total
Scorers
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Summer 2008
19.6%
19.4%
19.7%
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Distributed Scoring utilizes the process of scanning the handwritten student responses
into the vendor’s computerized database system, which distributes them securely to
scorers using the web-based password-protected system. Computer technology enabled
scorers to securely download the necessary computer applications and score student
responses.
Traditionally, the NCDPI has contracted with a vendor to score the large-scale writing
assessments in regional scoring centers. The vendor operated these regional scoring
centers and supervised the scorers under strict quality control measures. All training
sessions for scorers, however, were conducted by NCDPI Test Development and NCSUTOPS staff who were present at these scoring centers. The NCEXTEND2 Writing
Assessments continued to be scored in this manner due to the small population size and
modified nature of the assessments.
Pearson, the vendor for these projects, maintained a central headquarters to supervise
the distributed scoring and regional scoring operations. In addition, NCDPI personnel
monitored scorers and the scoring process through secure online web access. The
NCDPI generated real-time scoring reports and daily data statistics.
Reliability Standards for Distributed Scoring
All scorers, including North Carolina educators who applied to become scorers, had to
meet the rigorous requirements set forth by the NCDPI as in previous years. Scorers
first had to meet the eligibility criteria, sign Test Security and Confidentiality
Agreements, pass the necessary training requirements, and qualify for a scoring
position.
After qualifying to score the assessments, scorers were required by NCDPI to maintain
the industry standard inter-rater perfect agreement (reliability) of 70 percent. Scorers
also had to maintain a 70 percent validity standard (agreement with “true scores”
assigned to responses by the Writing Advisory Committees and NCDPI Test
Development Staff). All scorers who did not meet or exceed the 70 percent standards
(inter-rater and validity) were removed from the project and all scores assigned to
student responses were invalidated. These student responses were subsequently
rescored by two qualified scorers.
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Grade Level
4 General
4 General
Rubric Trait
Content
Conventions
IRR*
71.3
74.1
Validity
80.9
78.7
4 NCEXTEND2
4 NCEXTEND2
Content
Conventions
77.0
78.4
73.7
75.4
7 General
7 General
Content
Conventions
75.1
71.6
85.2
87.1
7 NCEXTEND2
7 NCEXTEND2
Content
Conventions
77.1
75.1
84.6
78.9
10 General
10 General
Content
Conventions
71.9
77.1
78.1
79.4
10 NCEXTEND2 OCS
10 NCEXTEND2 OCS
Content
Conventions
75.9
76.0
80.8
71.5
*IRR refers to inter-rater perfect agreement (reliability).
Note: The inter-rater perfect agreement (reliability) when combined with the
adjacent agreement exceeded 99 percent.
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Reader Bias
Reader Bias refers to personal factors that may affect a reader’s perception of a student’s
response, but have no basis in a scoring guide. Below are factors that affect some readers
but must not be allowed to have an impact on scoring.
Appearance of
Response
Length of
Response
Repetition of
Response
Offensive or
Disturbing
Content
Unusual
Approaches to
the Prompt
Response to
Prompt
Reactions to
Style
Writer
Personality
Reactions to
Performance
Assessments
The quality of the handwriting, the use of cursive or printing, margins,
editing marks, cross-outs, and overall neatness are not part of the scoring
criteria.
The length of a student’s paper is not part of the scoring criteria. Readers
should take into consideration only whether the finished piece feels
complete and has the components required. The size of a student’s
handwriting can make a paper look longer or shorter on the page than it
actually is.
Although readers may tire of reading several papers on the same topic, it is
important to remember that for each student the response represents a
unique attempt.
If a student uses vulgar language, adopts a sexist or racist point of view, or
perhaps takes a naïve or narrow approach to a topic, readers should not
let the student’s point of view affect the score. Likewise, readers should
not let a student’s lifestyle or maturity level influence them either positively
or negatively regarding their writing.
It is tempting to want to reward an especially creative approach to a
prompt, a poem for example, or a slant on the topic no one else has used.
Readers should remember that an unusual or creative attempt alone does
not necessarily constitute an upper level paper. The overall attempt must
be successful.
Likewise, an unusual approach handled successfully
should not be scored punitively.
In the classroom, there may be a “correct” response to a writing
assignment. For this assessment, students are free to respond any way
they choose. There is no right or wrong “answer” as long as it is clear the
student is attempting to reply to the prompt.
A reader’s own grammatical biases should not play a part in assigning a
score if the student has not violated standard writing conventions. In
other words, beginning a sentence with “and”, the absence of a formal
thesis sentence, the use of first or second person, or an informal tone are
not necessarily wrong in this type of assessment.
Writers may come across as brash, sassy, cute, self-aware, shy, surly, flat,
honest, or naïve. Readers are scoring the written passage, not the writer’s
personality.
Some readers may approach writing assessments with their own biases in
favor of one type of assessment over another. Or, they may feel as though
the standards used in an assessment violate their own sense of good
writing. It is important for each reader to set aside his/her own biases in
order to keep the scoring as standardized and as fair to each student as
possible.
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Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Total Writing Score Calculation Examples
TWS = 2 X (R1 Content + R2 Content) + (R1 Conventions + R2 Conventions)
Example 1
Reader 1 Content
2 Reader 2 Content
3 Total Content Score
Conventions 1
Conventions 2 Total Conventions Score
(Total Content Score x 2) + Total Conventions Score = Total Writing Score
5 x 2 = 10
+ 3
=
13 Achievement Level III
5
3
Example 2
Reader 1 Content
3 Reader 2 Content
3 Total Content Score
Conventions 0
Conventions 0 Total Conventions Score
(Total Content Score x 2) + Total Conventions Score = Total Writing Score
6 x 2 = 12
+ 0
=
12 Achievement Level III
6
0
Example 3
Reader 1 Content
2 Reader 2 Content
2 Total Content Score
Conventions 2
Conventions 2 Total Conventions Score
(Total Content Score x 2) + Total Conventions Score = Total Writing Score
4x2=8
+ 4
=
12 Achievement Level III
4
4
Achievement Levels:
NC General Writing Assessment at Grades 4, 7, and 10
On October 2, 2003, the State Board of Education approved the Writing Assessment
Achievement Levels for grades 4, 7, and 10. The Achievement Levels for the General
Assessments are as follows and can be found in the State Board of Education Policy Manual
listed as HSP-C-018:
Subject/Grade
Writing
4, 7, & 10
Level I
Level II
Level III
Level IV
4-7
8-11
12-16
17-20
According to State Board of Education policy, the standard for proficiency is a test score
of Achievement Level III or above on the North Carolina General Writing Assessment.
NOTE: The approved Achievement Level ranges and descriptors for the NC General
Writing Assessments at Grades 4, 7, and 10 are posted on the NC State Board of
Education website: http://sbepolicy.dpi.state.nc.us/.
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Achievement Level Descriptors—Grade 4 General Writing Assessment
Achievement Level I:
Students performing at this level do not have sufficient mastery of knowledge and skills in this
subject area to be successful at the next grade level.
Students performing at Achievement Level I have made an attempt to address the task and provide
some sense of story. The narrative lacks a sense of logical progression, the topic/subject is not
developed, and there is a lack of control of organizational structure and details. The students
display an insufficient knowledge of vocabulary and skills in conventions necessary to be
successful at the next grade level.
Achievement Level II:
Students performing at this level demonstrate inconsistent mastery of knowledge and skills in this
subject area and are minimally prepared to be successful at the next grade level.
Students performing at Achievement Level II have unevenly developed narratives with some
lapses in the logical progression and the connections between and among ideas. There are some
inappropriate and/or sparse details and elaboration provided and readability may detract and/or
interfere with the focus on the topic/subject of the narrative. The students display a lack of ability
to appropriately use vocabulary and conventions and are minimally prepared to be successful at the
next grade level.
Achievement Level III:
Students performing at this level consistently demonstrate mastery of grade level subject matter
and skills and are well prepared for the next grade level.
Students performing at Achievement Level III have effectively employed a strategy that connects
the beginning, middle, and end of the narrative. The ideas presented are relevant and the
elaboration is sufficient, resulting in a reasonable sense of completeness. The students display an
appropriate use of vocabulary and conventions and are well prepared for the next grade level.
Achievement Level IV:
Students performing at this level consistently perform in a superior manner clearly beyond that
required to be proficient at grade level work.
Students performing at Achievement Level IV have effectively crafted a narrative that
demonstrates a strong sense of story that progresses logically from one developed idea to another,
resulting in a sense of overall completeness. The students display a skillful use of precise and
purposeful vocabulary clearly beyond that required to be proficient at grade level work.
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Score Reporting
State Data
Data is reported at the state level. Results are disaggregated by subgroups, i.e. gender,
disability or ability (AIG), Title I, and free-reduced lunch. Scores are reported by the total
population tested, percent of students at proficiency, and results by achievement level. A
writing report is generated each year compiling a summary of all writing assessment
results, including general scoring observations.
School and Student Data
Each school is provided with rosters listing student results by class. The information is
provided by the scoring contractor to LEAs on CD. Each CD contains class rosters with
individual student results, as well as, the imaged student responses by class.
School CD’s are shipped to each LEA test coordinator along with two copies of the
Individual Student Report (ISR). The ISR is a paper report of the individual student
results. The report lists the total content score, total conventions score, total writing
score, and corresponding achievement level for each student. The ISR also provides an
explanation of the composing features, information about scoring procedures, and
definitions of the four achievement levels specific to the grade level and particular
assessment.
More information about the state testing results can be found on the NCDPI website at:
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/testing/shared/statetestsresults
More information about the reports of academic performance can be found on the NCDPI
website at:
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/testing/reports/writingandopenended
More information about the writing assessments can be found on the NCDPI website at:
http://www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/testing/writing/.
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Summer 2008
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
COMPOSING FEATURES
The narrative response at Grade 4 tells a story or what happened. The narrative focuses
on the sequencing of events within the overall action. There are two types of narrative
responses: Personal and Imaginative.
•
In the personal narrative, the student recounts events that he/she has
experienced, read, or heard about.
•
In the imaginative narrative, the student writes about a situation or story based
upon his/her imagination.
NOTE: The composing features that are to be observed assume specific meanings when
applied to student responses. In order to demonstrate a reasonable level of control in any
of the features below, the students must have written a sufficient amount. The North
Carolina Writing Assessments have two components for which scores are given: Content
and Conventions. An explanation of each feature and its application to the responses
are provided below.
CONTENT COMPONENT:
Focus, Organization, Support and Elaboration, and Style
FOCUS
Focus is the topic/subject established by the writer in response to the writing task. The
writer must clearly establish a focus as he/she fulfills the assignment of the prompt. If the
writer retreats from the subject matter presented in the prompt or addresses it too
broadly, the focus is weakened. The writer may effectively use an inductive organizational
plan, which does not actually identify the subject matter at the beginning and may not
literally identify the subject matter at all. The presence, therefore, of a focus must be
determined in light of the method of development chosen by the writer.
•
If the reader is confused about the subject matter, the writer has not effectively
established a focus.
•
If the reader is engaged and not confused, the writer probably has been effective in
establishing a focus.
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
ORGANIZATION
Organization is the progression, relatedness, and completeness of ideas. The writer
establishes for the reader a well-organized composition, which exhibits a constancy of
purpose through the development of elements forming an effective beginning, middle,
and end.
•
The writer establishes relationships between and among ideas and/or events
throughout the response.
•
The response demonstrates a clear progression of related ideas and/or events and
is unified and complete.
SUPPORT AND ELABORATION
Support and Elaboration is the extension and development of the topic/subject. The
writer provides sufficient elaboration to present the ideas and/or events clearly. Two
important concepts in determining whether details are supportive are relatedness and
sufficiency.
•
Relatedness: To be supportive of the subject matter, details must be related to the
focus of the response. Relatedness has to do with the directness of the relationship
that the writer establishes between the support and elaboration and the
topic/subject. Supporting details should be relevant and clear. Effective use of
concrete, specific details strengthens the response.
•
Sufficiency: Sufficiency has less to do with the amount and more to do with the
specificity and effectiveness of the support and elaboration provided. The writer
must present his or her ideas with enough power and clarity to cause the support to
be sufficient. Undeveloped details, redundancy, and the repetitious paraphrasing of
the same point often characterize insufficiency. Effective use of concrete, specific
details strengthens the response.
STYLE
Style is the control of language that is appropriate to the purpose, audience, and context
of the writing task. The writer's style is evident through word choice and sentence fluency.
•
Skillful use of precise, purposeful vocabulary enhances the effectiveness of the
composition through the use of appropriate words, phrases and descriptions that
engage the audience.
•
Sentence fluency involves using a variety of sentence styles to establish effective
relationships between and among ideas, causes, and/or statements appropriate to
the task.
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Summer 2008
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
CONVENTIONS COMPONENT:
Sentence Formation, Usage, and Mechanics
CONVENTIONS
Conventions involve correctness in sentence formation, usage, and mechanics. The writer
has control of grammatical conventions that are appropriate to the writing task. Errors, if
present, do not impede the reader's understanding of the ideas conveyed.
•
Sentence Formation is the complete expression of an assertion,
explanation, proposal, question, or command.
•
Standard usage includes agreement, tense, and case.
•
Mechanics involve the use of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
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Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Content Rubric
Points
4
3
Descriptions
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
2
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
NS
•
•
•
•
Topic/subject is clear, though it may or may not be explicitly stated
Maintains focus on topic/subject throughout the response
Organizational structure establishes relationships between and among ideas and/or events
Consists of a logical progression of ideas and/or events and is unified and complete
Support and elaboration are related to and supportive of the topic/subject
Consists of specific, developed details
Exhibits skillful use of vocabulary that is precise and purposeful
Demonstrates skillful use of sentence fluency
Topic/subject is generally clear, though it may or may not be explicitly stated
May exhibit minor lapses in focus on topic/subject
Organizational structure establishes relationships between and among ideas and/or events,
although minor lapses may be present
Consists of a logical progression of ideas and/or events and is reasonably complete, although
minor lapses may be present
Support and elaboration may have minor weaknesses in relatedness to and support of the
topic/subject
Consists of some specific details
Exhibits reasonable use of vocabulary that is precise and purposeful
Demonstrates reasonable use of sentence fluency
Topic/subject may be vague
May lose or may exhibit lapses in focus on topic/subject
Organizational structure may establish little relationship between and among ideas and/or
events
May have major lapses in the logical progression of ideas and/or events and is minimally
complete
Support and elaboration may have major weaknesses in relatedness to and support of the
topic/subject
Consists of general and/or undeveloped details, which may be presented in a list-like fashion
Exhibits minimal use of vocabulary that is precise and purposeful
Demonstrates minimal use of sentence fluency
Topic/subject is unclear or confusing
May fail to establish focus on topic/subject
Organizational structure may not establish connection between and among ideas and/or events
May consist of ideas and/or events that are presented in a random fashion and is incomplete or
confusing
Support and elaboration attempts to support the topic/subject but may be unrelated or
confusing
Consists of sparse details
Lacks use of vocabulary that is precise and purposeful
May not demonstrate sentence fluency
This code may be used for compositions that are entirely illegible or otherwise
unscorable: totally blank responses, responses written in a foreign language, exact
restatements of the prompt, and responses that are completely off- topic or
incoherent.
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Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Conventions Rubric
Points
2
Descriptions
Exhibits reasonable control of grammatical conventions appropriate to
the writing task
•
•
•
1
Exhibits minimal control of grammatical conventions appropriate to the
writing task
•
•
•
0
Exhibits reasonable control of sentence formation
Exhibits reasonable control of standard usage including agreement, tense,
and case
Exhibits reasonable control of mechanics including use of capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling
Exhibits minimal control of sentence formation
Exhibits minimal control of standard usage including agreement, tense, and
case
Exhibits minimal control of mechanics including use of capitalization,
punctuation, and spelling
Lacks control of grammatical conventions appropriate to the writing
task
•
•
•
Lacks control of sentence formation
Lacks control of standard usage including agreement, tense, and case
Lacks control of mechanics including use of capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
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Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Examples of Common Convention Errors
Sentence Formation:
A sentence is an expression of an assertion, explanation, proposal, question, or
command.
Fragment
Run-ons
•
•
•
•
Phrases or clauses used incorrectly which interfere
with the meaning of the sentence.
•
•
When I go to school.
Then I started to write.
I think they need to get up earlier so they
can get ready for school and have time to
eat breakfast they need to get up at an
earlier time.
I knew that I would never get away with it
and plus I had two tests that day and I
didn’t really want to go.
While sleeping, they need to go to bed
earlier.
Drinking my milk, the cookies seemed
irresistible.
Usage:
Standard usage includes agreement, tense, and case.
Incorrect use of verbs
Pronoun misuse
Incorrect formations
Failure to use a word according to its standard
meaning (homophone)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Students is very disruptive.
People was laughing at the guy’s answers.
The girls went to play with there own teams.
Between you and I, the test was hard.
hisself, theirselves, bestest
How did you no (know)?
Tell them to right (write) a letter home.
Mechanics:
Mechanics involves the use of capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.
Incorrect Capitalization
Incorrect Punctuation
Pattern of misspellings of common words or incorrect
pluralization.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Did he give It away?
The teacher’s name is tom evans.
Jose and i went to the store.
George eats Bananas and Oranges.
Why did she go home early.
John plays golf tennis and baseball.
“Tom said Go to the store.”
freind for friend
boxs for boxes
droped for dropped
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Guide Set
GRADE 4
Content & Conventions
Scoring Rubric
Applications
Note: Papers are ordered by Content, not Total Writing Score
This publication and the information contained within must not be used for personal or
financial gain. North Carolina LEA school officials and teachers, parents, and students
may download and duplicate this publication for instructional and educational purposes
only. Others may not duplicate this publication without prior written permission from the
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) Division of Accountability
Services/North Carolina Testing Program.
© 2008 All Rights reserved. This document may not be reproduced by any means, in whole
or in part, without prior written permission from the North Carolina Testing Program,
Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-2825.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
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2008 North Carolina Testing Program
Writing, Grade 4
Do Not Reproduce—NCDPI
Imagine one day you were playing outside and you found a shiny rock. When you
picked up the rock, it opened and you found something inside. Write a story about
what happened when you found something inside a shiny rock.
As you write your story, remember to
❑ Focus your story on what happened when you found something inside a shiny rock.
❑ Use details to support the topic/subject of your story.
❑ Make sure your story is complete and has a beginning, middle, and end.
❑ Check to be sure that you are writing good paragraphs.
❑ Use your best grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.
Use the blank sheet of paper given to you by your teacher to plan your story.
Anything you write on the blank sheet will not be scored. You must write the final
copy of your story on pages 3 and 4 of your test booklet.
Write the final copy of your story on pages 3 and 4 of your test booklet.
© 2008 All rights reserved. This document may not be reproduced by any means, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the North Carolina
Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, N.C.
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
GUIDE SET ANNOTATIONS
Paper
Score
Content/Conventions
G-1
1/0
Notes
(TWS=Total Writing Score)
Guide Paper 1 (TWS =4)
Content Score 1
This response establishes the topic of “something shiny”
and attempts to provide support with a few ideas about
what happened when “it cracked and something fell out.”
Details are sparse (It looked like a blue emerald), and the
story lacks an effective ending, returning abruptly to the
beginning of the story. Vocabulary lacks precision (. . .
something fell out but I couldn’t find it so I kept looking
for it. A couple seconds later I found it), and the response
does not demonstrate sentence fluency.
Conventions Score 0
The response demonstrates a lack of control of sentence
formation, which impedes the reader’s understanding.
Most sentences are run-ons that either lack boundary
punctuation (A couple seconds later I found it it looked
like a blue emerald), or are constructed of too many
conjoined clauses (So I walked over and picked it up and it
cracked and something fell out but I couldn’t find it so I
kept looking for it). Given the density of errors in this short
sample, the writing is insufficient to demonstrate control
of conventions.
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-2
1/0
Guide Paper 2 (TWS =4)
Content Score 1
The response establishes the topic of a necklace and note
found in a shiny rock, but ideas are presented randomly (So I
was reading the nekles it said famce soccer plaery Birthday
Decemberr the 14th. The neklaes was Derty and it had
markes on it. So It was time for me to go so I put the Nekles
and the Note in the shiny rock) and in repetitive phrases
(shiny rock, nekles and a note, famce soccer plaery) that
make the writing confusing. The limited ideas make support
insufficient. Vocabulary is limited, and sentences lack
fluency (I wonder who else will fin the shiny rock with the
Note and a nekles in it).
Conventions Score 0
The response demonstrates a lack of control of grammatical
conventions that impedes the reader’s understanding of the
ideas. Most of the sentences in the response are run-ons.
Also present are errors in usage (soccer plaery BirthDay
Decemberr the 14th), and numerous errors in mechanics,
including some random capitalization and the misspelling of
common words (afternown, heding, plaery, Dateid, neklees,
Derty).
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-3
1/1
Guide Paper 3 (TWS =6)
Content Score 1
This response establishes a focus on the gold found inside
a rock, but the brief progression of ideas stops when the
gold melts. At that point, the focus shifts from telling a
story to listing some poorly connected and repetitious
thoughts about the loss of the gold (Nooo! not melt. I want
to keep you. but it as to late. I have no gold. It was so
delakit), weakening the ending to the story. Purposeful use
of vocabulary is limited to a few descriptions of the gold
(sparcling, like a sun shinning so bright, delakit).
Sentences are frequently short and choppy, and lack
fluency.
Conventions Score 1
The response demonstrates minimal control of
grammatical conventions. Verb tense is mostly controlled
(I wish that piece of gold as still mine. I would be so rich).
Punctuation is used inconsistently, with some correct use
of end-of-sentence punctuation (Ouch! What was that?)
and commas inside a sentence (Oh, heres a bag. I carefuly
put the piece of gold in, but it started to melt), as well as
incorrect use of periods that creates sentence fragments
(Nooo. Not melt. I want to keep you. but it was to late).
Some common words are misspelled (shinny, smoot,
sparcling, carefuly). This mix of correct and incorrect
sentence formation, usage and mechanics indicates
minimal control.
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-4
2/1
Guide Paper 4 (TWS =10)
Content Score 2
The response addresses the topic and maintains focus in
this minimally complete narrative. There is a little
development of some details at the beginning of the story
(. . . it cracked a load of dust surrounded us. At once a
gennie appeared as a matter of fact it was a magic gennie.
He made my brother jump out of his pants. The gennie was
trembling in fear.), but major lapses in the story make
events difficult to follow. Ideas at the end of the story are
undeveloped and unclear as the story ends abruptly (When
we woke up he was goin he must have thought it was safe.
I ran outside and grab the rock. Nothing happed it must
have been safe). The student uses a small amount of
purposeful vocabulary (as you know, load of dust
surrounded us, trembling in fear, mighty kings of ants), but
sentence styles show little variety.
Conventions Score 1
Capitalization and end punctuation are generally correct in
this response, and there is no pattern of misspellings, as
these are mostly of less common words (gennie, villiage).
However, several of the sentences are run-ons (One hot
sunny summer my brother and I was out side playing You
can’t catch me, as you know that is a game we made up),
creating a density of errors in this short paper. The
response is insufficient to demonstrate more than minimal
control of conventions.
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Summer 2008
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-5
2/0
Guide Paper 5 (TWS =8)
Content Score 2
This response maintains some focus on a story about
finding gold in a rock, and the beginning of the story,
about finding and opening the rock, is given some
development (she said sher why not so we went to a place
called the big rock it took use atless 9 hours to crack it).
Details become more general and there are major lapses in
progression in the second half of the story, as the
characters visit a scientist’s lab (sintes labe) to confirm
that it is gold (but she said to come back to marow. I was
about 1:00 pm wene we got there it took her an hour to
figer it out). Events become a list of undeveloped and
poorly connected details (so the next day we bougt an yout
[yacht] then Melony had to go home but she brough her
yout. So the next day I came over I brout my yout we rode
it in her big humgis lake) as the story comes to an
ineffective end (then I had to go back home so after that
everthing was back to normele).
Conventions Score 0
The writing exhibits serious errors and an overall lack of
control of grammatical conventions. The writing shows no
control of sentence boundaries. Most of the sentences are
run-ons, and there is also inappropriate punctuation in the
middle of sentences (Melony helped me up wene I looked
at it. I said . . .) and (. . . I amost quit but Melony. Cracked
it she said . . .). Usage is generally correct, but a pattern of
errors in the spelling of common words (intived [invited],
wene, triped, wount, tire [try], sher) impedes the reader’s
understanding.
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-6
2/2
Guide Paper 6 (TWS =12)
Content Score 2
This narrative about a visit to a strange planet shows little
evidence of a plan. The focus shifts from a description of
the planet, to shopping, eating, and the return home, with
these parts only weakly related to one another.
Development consists of a list of events and details that
describe colors and costs (I went to one store and brought
a space helment for two jelly beans. The space helment
was red, and blue. After that, I went to an other store to
buy a spacesuit. It was red and white. I brought it for five
jelly beans). The use of purposeful vocabulary is limited
almost entirely to colors (purple over growing grass, a red
blood sky). Transitions are limited and repetitive (then,
when, after that), and contribute little to connecting ideas
or to sentence fluency, which is characterized by sentences
that are short and simple in structure.
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions appropriate to the writing task. Sentences are
well controlled. The student has attempted to punctuate
dialogue and use commas inside sentences, which are
more advanced skills for fourth grade students. There are a
few errors in usage (then it open, it look like a dump to me,
I brought it for five jelly beans), and spelling, but these
errors do not affect the reader’s understanding of the ideas.
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Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-7
2/1
Guide Paper 7 (TWS =10)
Content Score 2
This writer maintains overall focus on a genie called “the
magical wish granter 3000” who emerges from a lamp in
the shiny rock. Organized around the events of the day,
support of the topic is list-like, general and not developed
enough to be quite clear (Right after that a laptop was
right in my face I loved what I found in that shiny rock! I
took him everywhere to school! I wanted to make one wish
there to and it was no more work). There are major lapses
in the progression of ideas that create surprises for the
reader (. . . after all he is a robot). Vocabulary is simple
throughout, but minimally appropriate (It was a magic
genie lamp so I rubbed it and a giant genie popped out of.
I was thrilled).
Conventions Score 1
The response includes several run-on sentences and a
number of dropped words (I was still holding [it], a giant
genie popped out of [it], I didn’t want water to get on
[him],this [is] what I did, put [it] on [the] shelf). These
errors, along with some errors in usage (I took him
everywhere to school! I wanted to make one wish there to)
and spelling (belive, tommarow), create a density of errors
that indicates limited control of grammatical conventions.
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-8
3/2
Guide Paper 8 (TWS =16)
Content Score 3
This response is clearly focused on an alien attack that
occurs after the rock opens. The organizational structure,
including some effective transitional phrases, establishes
relationships among ideas (When we reached the spot
where I’d seen the shining object, Eliza cried, “That’s the
shinyest rock I’ve ever seen!” I reached down to pick up
the shiny rock. As soon as It was in my hand, it opened up,
like a clam. I dropped the rock in fear). Although the
writing does not include much elaboration of the topic,
ideas progress logically to the humorous ending, and the
support includes enough specific details to give a
reasonable sense of completeness to the story. Some
precise and purposeful language engages the audience
(Suddenly, the small alien pulled a blue squirt gun out of
it’s pocket. It took a step foreward, and it began to squirt
us wildly with water). The response demonstrates
reasonable sentence fluency with a variety of sentence
styles.
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits good control of sentence formation,
usage, and mechanics. Despite a few minor errors in
spelling and punctuation, the student is more correct than
incorrect in the use of mechanics, and nothing impedes the
reader’s understanding.
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Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-9
3/2
Guide Paper 9 (TWS =16)
Content Score 3
Focused on an encounter with a fairy, the response has an
organizational structure that creates a reasonably effective
beginning, middle, and end. Ideas progress logically,
although there are minor lapses (Without warning it was
summer! We were in the park, and we were having a
picnic. I wonder how we got here, and why are we having
a picnic?). Many ideas are developed with some relevant
and specific details (About fifteen minutes later half the
food was gone and I was stuffed. Since Lila was still there
I offered her some, but she would not eat it. Lila just
wanted some ice cream so she poofed some up and
gobbled it down). Sentences show fluency in their variety,
and help to establish relationships among ideas. Language
is appropriate and adds to the effectiveness of the
composition (franticly waved her wand, without warning,
gobbled, zoomed, big frown of dissapointment).
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits good control of grammatical
conventions. There are some minor spelling errors in the
response, mostly of less common words (farie, franicly,
niether, dissapeared).
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G-10
3/2
Guide Paper 10 (TWS =16)
Content Score 3
The response maintains focus on a visit to a fairy city, and
the progression of ideas is logical and careful, though
minor lapses occur (I sat in the chair and it rose rapidly).
Some specific details strengthen the response (The wand
shimmered in the light, changing colors all the time. She
made a fasinating gesture with the wand, then tapped my
head lightly with the wand), although details are more
general toward the end of the story (I went to all sorts of
parties and festivals. They were all so fun). The response
demonstrates reasonable sentence fluency and appropriate
language (Once I had jumped in I found myself on a red
carpet. At the end of the carpet was a chair, fit for a
queen), although sentence structures occasionally lack
variety (Soon a whole bunch of fairyes appeared a t my
feet. They started to feed me all kinds of fruits. Then they
started to bow down to me).
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions appropriate to the task. The student handles
indirect speech and verb tense well (He said to me in a
deep voice that the would like me to be their fairy queen. I
said to them that I didn’t want them to wait on me like
servants).
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Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-11
4/2
Guide Paper 11 (TWS =20)
Content Score 4
The response maintains consistent focus on the threatening
ooze that emerges from the shiny rock. Ideas are clearly
organized and progress logically, setting up the events in
the story (When I picked it up, I felt it wobble. I quickly
dropped it and stepped back. Slowly it cracked open. What
I saw made my jaw drop) and providing a sense of
completeness. Specific, related details provide sufficient
support of the topic (When I hoisted it up it felt as smooth
as water. Even though it was black, it glittered in the sun
light. For its size, it was pretty heavy). Skillful use of
precise and varied vocabulary contributes to the
elaboration of details and engages the reader (. . . the ball
changed from solid to liquid and oozed through my finger
then it slithered over to the machine and completely
engulfed it). Sentence fluency is skillfully used to connect
ideas (Like an eagle, it constantly swooped in on me. On
its third swoop it sliced off a few strands of hair. Thats
when I got an idea).
Conventions Score 2
The response demonstrates reasonable control of
grammatical conventions. Minor errors in mechanics
(spelling, capitalization and punctuation) are present, but
do not impede the reader’s understanding.
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Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
G-12
4/2
Guide Paper 12 (TWS =20)
Content Score 4
The student maintains clear focus on a mission to capture
“the evil Lord Licorice” in Candyland. The clear
organization of the story establishes relationships between
and among ideas and events (Ginger told me I was in
Candy Land. Then she asked me if I would accompany her
on a mission she was given by the King). The writer’s
control of the story is evident in the progression of ideas
and the consistent use of specific, developed details.
Varied sentence styles are skillfully used to connect ideas
(We also passed through the Lollipop Woods where Lolly
the lollipop fairy gave us trapping lollipops, and the
Chocolate Swamp where Gloppy the chocolate ghost gave
us a sticky chocolate net. Finnaly we reached the Licorice
Forest. I felt excited, nevous and scared all at the same
time), and vocabulary is precise and purposeful.
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits good control of sentence structure,
usage and mechanics, with very few errors in this lengthy
paper. The correct use of commas and punctuation of
quotations demonstrate the writer’s exceptional control of
mechanics.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
32
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Training Set
GRADE 4
Content & Conventions
Scoring Rubric
Applications
This publication and the information contained within must not be used for personal or
financial gain. North Carolina LEA school officials and teachers, parents, and students
may download and duplicate this publication for instructional and educational purposes
only. Others may not duplicate this publication without prior written permission from the
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) Division of Accountability
Services/North Carolina Testing Program.
© 2008 All Rights reserved. This document may not be reproduced by any means, in whole
or in part, without prior written permission from the North Carolina Testing Program,
Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-2825.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
33
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Score Tally Sheet: Training Set
You may use this sheet to practice scoring the following student responses. Record your
scores for Content and Conventions and then compare them against the actual scores located
at the end of this section.
PAPER #
My
Content
Score
My
Conventions
Score
State
Content
Score
State
Conventions
Score
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
% Agree 1
1
In order to maintain industry standard and NC scoring requirements of at least 70%, you
must have an exact agreement in Content and Conventions for 11 of the 15 responses.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
34
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TRAINING SET ANNOTATIONS
Paper
TA-1
Score
Content/Conventions
1/1
Notes
Training Set A, Paper 1
Content Score 1
This response addresses the topic with a brief, organized
series of events (It was a shiny rock. I pick it up and it
open. Inside there was a gold ring). Ideas are too few and
details too sparse for sufficient support of the subject (I
turn around and everything was flying. Houses, buildings,
cars, and even me). Vocabulary is limited and imprecise (I
tried to make the ring do somthing. but nothing happen).
Sentences are short and choppy, and lack fluency.
Conventions Score 1
Sentence formation is mostly controlled, although there is
one sentence fragment (Houses, buildings, cars, and even
me!). Mechanics are generally correct, but the response
includes a number of verb tense usage errors (I pick it up
and it open). The density of errors in this brief response
indicates minimal control of grammatical conventions.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
35
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-2
2/2
Training Set A, Paper 2
Content Score 2
The student quickly establishes the topic of finding a “time
engine” in a shiny rock in a pool, and tells a minimally
complete story of time travel. Events are loosely
connected, with major lapses in the progression from
visiting George Washington to flying with Amelia Earhart
(I thought it was going backwords but it wasnt going
backwords). Elaboration shows weakness in support of
some ideas (There was bomds and guns and . . . and I
don’t know what else! There were men and weman that
were dieing beause they was’nt paying attention), and
weaknesses in relatedness in the odd repetitive ending
sequence of going to bed, waking up the next day and
going to bed again. The response shows occasional use of
purposeful language (Instantly there was a gun shot, the
police killed an inasint little child rite in front of my face).
Conventions Score 2
The response demonstrates reasonable control of
conventions appropriate to the writing task. As a first draft,
the response is not perfect, and errors occur in sentence
formation, usage, and mechanics (The nexted day my mom
came into my room and woke me up my sister came in to).
In all aspects of writing conventions, however, the writer
is more correct than incorrect.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
36
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-3
3/2
Training Set A, Paper 3
Content Score 3
The response is focused on the baby dragon that emerges
from “a huge and shiny rock.” The story is clearly
organized, and ideas are generally well connected,
although there are minor lapses in the progression of ideas
(I stared at the rock and glanced at the dragon trying to
see how it happened. After a few minutes of trying to see
what happened I decided to give up). Support is
sufficiently developed with some specific details to give
the story some sense of completeness. The student uses
appropriate language and reasonable sentence fluency to
engage the reader (It was hilarious when he would make
fire go all over the seat. Mom didn’t think that was funny
at all).
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits reasonable control of sentence
formation, usage, and mechanics appropriate to the writing
task.
TA-4
2/0
Training Set A, Paper 4
Content Score 2
This response has just enough focus and organizational
structure to tell a minimally complete story about a trip to
“a world of dimonds.” Ideas are poorly connected and
details are undeveloped, except for a little description of
the diamond land (I wasn’t in my yard it was a world of
dimonds dimonds the size of a sky scraper. I had been rich
filty rich I was jumping around like a rabbit they were
even green, blue and red dimonds). Purposeful language is
minimal (the size of a sky scraper, filty rich, the size of
your pinkie).
Conventions Score 0
The response includes a pattern of serious sentence
boundary errors, including both run-on sentences and
fragments (I reached in my pocket and still had the
dimonds I felt like a king and. I wised I could go back
there one day). Errors in spelling (dimond, filty, wised) and
usage (I had been filty rich I was jumping around like a
rabbit they were even green, blue and red dimonds) also
demonstrate a lack of control of grammatical conventions.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
37
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-5
1/0
Training Set A, Paper 5
Content Score 1
This response establishes some focus on the topic at the
beginning of the narrative (I saw a rock and It open and I
had find some money), but rapidly retreats from the topic
to a long list of random events and details (. . . and went to
Play with my friends they names are ty CJ BJ AJ rob Nate
and We went to my house and Played My P2 and we
played NBA 07 and Nfl 07 and we ate Dinner at my house
we ate hamburge and fries and we ate cake to). The lack
of focus and organization results in a confusing and
incomplete story.
Conventions Score 0
The response shows patterns of errors that demonstrate a
lack of control of grammatical conventions across all
features. Sentences lack boundaries, showing no control of
sentence formation. Usage errors in verb agreement (It
open and I had find some money, he give it back),
possessives (It was somebody money, I friend), and word
use (beside of us, we had I sleep over, played football and
my backyard) are evident. In mechanics, there are
misspellings (lvie, hamburge, sceren), random
capitalization, and no punctuation, except for a single
period at the end of the paper.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
38
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-6
3/2
Training Set A, Paper 6
Content Score 3
The subject of this response is generally clear, and the
organizational structure establishes relationships between
ideas and events with only minor lapses caused by some
slightly confusing use of dialogue toward the end of the
story (“I won’t let you do this Shenron” “Fenron!” “Yes, I
sealed you in that moonstone. . ). Story progression is
logical, and support for the topic is aided by the use of
specific details (I went over to dig it up, but it was a little
bigger than it looked when it was stuck in the asphalt, so it
took me a little while to get it out of the ground).
Vocabulary is appropriate, and sentence fluency helps to
establish relationships among events (To my surprise, the
peculiar sound came back even louder than both of the
others. I turned around to see a a wierd liquid coming
from the rock, and taking form of unimaginable creatures).
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions appropriate to the writing task. There are few
errors in this lengthy writing sample. The student attempts
dialogue punctuation and the use of commas, but not
always correctly, which results in a few sentences
separated by commas rather than periods (comma splices)
(I had finally got it out of the ground and got a nice look at
it, it had all the colors of the rainbow and maybe even
more).
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
39
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-7
4/2
Training Set A, Paper 7
Content Score 4
The topic of this response is clear, and focus is maintained
throughout the response. An organizational structure
establishes relationships among events (All of a sudden the
frog jumped out of my hands and started hopping around
my back yard! ”Oh no I’ve got to catch him!”), and the
logical progression of the story is complete and unified.
Support is clear, and details are specific (“Not the house!
Anything but the house!” I screamed I had to to save my
house! I dashed through tree trunks; praying to save the
day!). Vocabulary is precise and purposeful (It shimmered
with a gleaming sparkle! It was magnificent, and it was in
the palm of my hand), and skillful use of sentence fluency
is evident.
Conventions Score 2
This response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions appropriate to the writing task. There are few
errors in this lengthy writing sample, and the student
effectively punctuates dialogue. The additions to the text
that appear at the end of the writing are part of a revision
strategy the student has been taught to use.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
40
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-8
2/2
Training Set A, Paper 8
Content Score 2
The overall focus of this response emerges slowly and
remains vague. Major lapses in the progression of ideas
leave connections among important ideas in the story
missing, including the connection between the monster
that comes out of the rock and the burning of the school
(The school was burned into ashes. Mrs. Winkletine said
“there must be something wrong. But there’s no such thing
as monsters). The writer’s poor control of an ambitious
story is indicated by the disappearance of the second
character, Jaylen. Details are general and list-like (The fire
alarm went off. All the children started coming out of
school. A fire happened. The school was burned into
ashes), and are occasionally only weakly related to the
subject (The whole school went home by their mom or
dad’s car). The student attempts to use descriptive
vocabulary (It was as red as the sun burning) without
much effectiveness, and there are some awkward phrases
(It was creepy, scary, and a monster). Many sentences are
short, but there is some variety in sentence styles.
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions appropriate to the writing task. Mechanics are
generally well controlled, including and attempt to
punctuate dialogue, and errors that are present do not
affect the reader’s understanding.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
41
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-9
1/1
Training Set A, Paper 9
Content Score 1
This response addresses the topic with a few organized
ideas that create an outline of a story (All of a sudden I
spoted a shiny rock under a tree. Then I went under a tree
and picked up the shiny rock, next it opened and I saw a
tiny monster. The tiny monster said, this isn’t my home).
Details are sparse and repetitive (Finally I tell the tiny
monster how it can get back home. It want to know how he
can get back home), resulting in support that is insufficient
and somewhat confusing to the reader. The response lacks
purposeful or fluent use of language.
Conventions Score 1
This response exhibits minimal control of grammatical
conventions. The student shows some control of
mechanics, capitalizing correctly, marking sentence
boundaries with periods, and attempting punctuation of
dialog. Also present are sentence formation errors (It tell
me that it’s home is planet home is Mars) and usage errors
(all of sudden, It want to know how he can get home). The
density of errors in this brief writing sample makes it
insufficient for a higher conventions score.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
42
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-10
2/1
Training Set A, Paper 10
Content Score 2
The response establishes and maintains overall focus on
Buttercup, a horse that emerges from the shiny rock. The
organizational structure establishes little relationship
between and among ideas (I thought that she had blue eys
but she relly had Black eys. One day a snake came up and
was going to bite her and she steped on the snake and
keled the snake. Me and Butter cup would jump poles and
then she would rest), creating little sense of progression or
completeness at the ending of the story. Details are simply
listed. Similes are used purposefully but not effectively (as
shiny as the sun, as hevy a horse, as tall as a tree).
Sentence styles are limited in variety.
Conventions Score 1
The response demonstrates a mix of correct and incorrect
conventions that indicates minimal control. Sentences are
correctly formed at the beginning of the response, but
some run-ons appear in the last third of the paper (I was
lokind at the sky I saw Buttercup in a could [cloud]. I was
not felling to good ether my self. Then I felt tears going
down my cheak I was kiring [crying] because Buttercup
was getting to old). Spelling errors occur throughout the
paper, but mechanics are otherwise controlled. Usage also
shows a few errors (me and Buttercup, not felling to good).
TA-11
4/2
Training Set A, Paper 11
Content Score 4
The response is clearly focused on an adorable little
dragon named Killer, and that focus is maintained
throughout the response. Organizational structure is
evident, and ideas progress logically to a developed ending
that gives the story unity and completeness. Details are
elaborated, specific, and supportive of the topic. Sentences
generally show fluency, and vocabulary, while purposeful,
is marred by some overuse of descriptive language that
occasionally leads to awkwardness (Beautiful like crystals
swarmed the rock like hugging someone and not letting
go).
Conventions Score 2
This response exhibits very good control of all
grammatical conventions. A few errors do not affect the
reader’s understanding.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
43
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-12
3/2
Training Set A, Paper 12
Content Score 3
The response is clearly focused on an encounter with a
troublesome monkey that emerges from the shiny rock.
The paper is organized and progresses logically, and the
story seems reasonably complete despite a weak ending
(After that, we drove home, and I went to bed). Details,
while somewhat sparse, are clearly related to and
supportive of the topic (By the time we caught up to the
monkey, he had crashed my bike into a thornbush. We
tried to take the bike and football back, but the monkey
wouldn’t let go). Vocabulary is appropriate, and use of
transitional phrases helps to connect ideas (When I looked
at the rock, I saw it opening. Then all of a sudden, a
monkey jumped out, and grabbed the football).
Conventions Score 2
This response exhibits good control of grammatical
conventions appropriate to the writing task. A minor
overuse of commas does not affect readability.
TA-13
2/0
Training Set A, Paper 13
Content Score 2
The subject of this response emerges as the discovery of a
time traveling watch in the shiny rock. Ideas progress
logically enough to give the story a minimal sense of
completeness, but support is provided as a long list of
undeveloped details (. . . when I whind it up something
weird happend I saw myself back in my room watching
cartoon network so I whinded it back up again and this
time), or details that are not well related to the story (one
of my favorite is the spike tail because it had a lot of spikes
to protect it’s self). Vocabulary is generally appropriate
(this time it took me to when I got my first shot I was
sceaming all over the it was kind of sad to me it made me
cry), but the lack of clarity in the expression of ideas
interferes with fluency and readability.
Conventions Score 0
The response indicates a complete lack of control of
sentence formation, as every sentence is a run-on. There
are also frequent usage errors, especially in verb tense (I
look out the window, it broked, I whinded it back up, I had
to do say where I wanted go), as well as spelling errors
(suddenly, golding, herd, blick). These errors throughout
the paper impede the reader’s understanding.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
44
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
TA-14
4/2
Training Set A, Paper 14
Content Score 4
Ideas progress logically, if slowly, and details are
sufficiently developed to support the topic and give the
story a sense of unity and completeness. Details are related
to the topic and elaborated with description (There was a
tiny silver flower charm that had a topaz glued onto it. It
was so pretty. My eyes were buldging with amazment).
Vocabulary is appropriate, though not varied enough to
engage the audience (Then, I picked myself up and crawled
up to where I had tripped to see what I had tripped on.
Vanessa followed close behind. “Wow” I said in an exited
voice when I reached the spot where I had tripped. “Wow”
I said agian). Sentences are well controlled and show
some variety in style.
Conventions Score 2
This response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions appropriate to the writing task. Errors in
spelling and punctuation are present that do not affect the
reader’s understanding.
TA-15
2/2
Training Set A, Paper 15
Content Score 2
The topic of this response remains somewhat vague, as
ideas progress slowly through hiding the shiny rock under
leaves and then showing it to friends. When the rock
finally opens, ideas are undeveloped and poorly connected
(A strange creature came out of the rock. I kept it in a
cage in my room for a pet. I was really happy when I got
this creature. I think it came from out of space from a
planet. I also think that I should put it in the muesum), and
the story ends with only a minimal sense of completeness
(So I have a strange creature. I will be famous one day. I
will become a scientist and study things). Sentence fluency
is limited.
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions appropriate to the writing task. There are
occasional errors in usage (I thought that should I show my
friends about the shiny rock), spelling and punctuation, but
these do not interfere with understanding.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
45
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Qualification Set
GRADE 4
Content & Conventions
Scoring Rubric
Applications
This publication and the information contained within must not be used for personal or
financial gain. North Carolina LEA school officials and teachers, parents, and students
may download and duplicate this publication for instructional and educational purposes
only. Others may not duplicate this publication without prior written permission from the
North Carolina Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) Division of Accountability
Services/North Carolina Testing Program.
© 2008 All Rights reserved. This document may not be reproduced by any means, in whole
or in part, without prior written permission from the North Carolina Testing Program,
Raleigh, North Carolina 27601-2825.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
46
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Score Tally Sheet: Qualification Set
You may use this sheet to practice scoring the following student responses. Record your
scores for Content and Conventions and then compare them against the actual scores located
at the end of this section.
PAPER #
My
Content
Score
My
Conventions
Score
State
Content
Score
State
Conventions
Score
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
% Agree 2
2
In order to maintain industry standard and NC scoring requirements of at least 70%, you
must have an exact agreement in Content and Conventions for 7 of the 10 responses.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
47
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Qualification Set Annotations
Paper
Score
Notes
Content/Conventions
QI-1
2/2
Qualification Set 1, Paper 1
Content Score 2
The response establishes the topic of a shocking rock,
but the organizational structure establishes little
relationship among events. There are major lapses in the
progression of events that leave the story only minimally
complete (I put the crystal in the handle and out came a
green light with the sound of a lightsaber. I immediately
knew it was a lightsaber, from that point on I knew I had
to save the galaxy from evil. Because now I know my
destiny was to become a jedi). Language shows some
purposeful use of vocabulary (“Heh, Josh come here”! I
yelled from one end of the court to the other still feeling
the shock of energy).
Conventions Score 2
This response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions. A few errors are present that do not
interfere with the reader’s understanding of the writing.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
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North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
QI-2
3/2
Qualification Set 1, Paper 2
Content Score 3
This response is focused on finding birthstone necklaces in
the shiny rock. The organizational structure establishes
relationships among ideas (We were on the jungle gym
when it happened. There I was on the top of the ginormas
jungle gym, when suddenly I saw something flickering in
the light). Support includes some specific details, giving a
reasonable sense of completeness to the story. The writer
attempts to engage the audience with some purposeful
vocabulary (Beep, beep, my mom was waving. We skipped
to the car with grins). The response demonstrates
reasonable sentence fluency with a variety of sentence
styles.
Conventions Score 2
The response exhibits good control of sentence formation
and usage. There are few errors in this lengthy response.
QI-3
4/2
Qualification Set 1, Paper 3
Content Score 4
The response is well focused on a lucky discovery of gold.
The story is clearly organized, and dialogue is used with
some skill to advance the story and develop ideas (I
handed the gold to her. She looked at it closely. “It’s
real!” she said. The manager walked out. “Oh my,” said
the manager. “How much will you sell that for? Ten
hundred-thousand? One million?) Ideas progress logically
and the story seems complete, although there is a small
lapse at the end of the story when the writer fails to
explain how the mother discovered the rock was worthless.
Language and sentence fluency show some skill.
Conventions Score 2
The writing demonstrates strong control of grammatical
conventions.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
49
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
QI-4
1/0
Qualification Set 1, Paper 4
Content Score 1
The topic of this response is vague (Then the next moning I
weak up and at was not a shiny rock but mom side go take
it outsind). Ideas are repetitive and confusing (My mother
side you need to go the my mom side and I side ok). Poor
control of language prevents the writer from engaging the
audience.
Conventions Score 0
This response lacks control of grammatical conventions.
Errors in sentence formation, usage and mechanics impede
the reader’s understanding.
QI-5
2/1
Qualification Set 1, Paper 5
Content Score 2
This response is focused on finding a topaz stone that
leads to an opportunity for popularity. The story shows
some complexity in its ideas, but support of the topic is
flawed by the unattributed dialogue that requires the reader
to interpret story events (Maybe you can find me some
topaz and we could be twins we could wear the same
clothes, and we could do the same things, and go to they
same classes. But if you don’t want to be popular, or twins
I can understand, no of corse I can get you some topaz.
Good bring it tomorrow and here’s my phone number call
me to night and tell me wout you are wearing tomorrw so
we can be twins by). These lapses result in a story that is
only minimally complete.
Conventions Score 1
This response demonstrates minimal control of
grammatical conventions. Many sentences are spliced
together with a comma. Dialogue is not properly
punctuated, and there is a pattern of errors in spelling
(whent, past, tolled, facke).
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
50
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
QI-6
3/2
Qualification Set 1, Paper 6
Content Score 3
The focus of this narrative emerges and the relationships
among ideas become clear as the story builds through a
series of realizations. Support shows some minor
weaknesses (I zoomed as I rushed to put on some clothes. I
put on some clothes . . .), but the details are clearly related
to the topic. The writer demonstrates use of vocabulary
that is sometimes simple but is used purposefully (I
realalased another thing I was an adult and if I was an
adut then these were my children and that man laying in
the bed must be my husband and that must be my maid and
this must be my room and this must be my house!).
Conventions Score 2
Sentence formation is generally correct, although there are
some awkward sentences (I look on the [calendar] until I
saw what the date for today). Errors in spelling occur in
some less common words (realalasted, amazmon,
awesom).
QI-7
2/0
Qualification Set 1, Paper 7
Content Score 2
This response establishes a focus on finding and visiting a
princess inside a rock. The story is generally organized,
but details are general and presented as a list (The fivthe
clue was to find the dey it was hard. I looked everywhere
in houses and the hole town. Findly I found It the queen
had it. I unlocked the rock). Sentence fluency and
purposeful vocabulary are minimal.
Conventions Score 0
This response lacks control of grammatical conventions.
Some sentences are formed correctly, but there are
numerous run-on sentences, as well as errors in verb tense
usage, spelling and capitalization.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
51
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
QI-8
4/2
Qualification Set 1, Paper 8
Content Score 4
In this clearly focused response, a strong organizational
structure establishes relationships among events (I turned
around to see Sarah standing behind me holding the ball.
The ball! I had forgotten all about it! Well at least Sarah
got it). Elaborated details help to paint a picture for the
reader, giving the story a sense of completeness. The
writing is fluent and demonstrates skillful use of precise
and purposeful vocabulary (She was trying to sound
casual, but I knew she was bursting with excitement).
Conventions Score 2
This response exhibits strong control of grammatical
conventions.
QI-9
2/2
Qualification Set 1, Paper 9
Content Score 2
The writer attempts much in this story about a dragon’s
egg, but the details are general and undeveloped, creating a
disjointed and list-like progression of ideas (A baby
dragon came out! All of a sudden the dragon starts
following me everywere. The dragon thought I was its
mom. I fed the dragon eggs and carrots). There is little
sentence variety.
Conventions Score 2
This response exhibits reasonable control of grammatical
conventions, although there are some errors in verb tense
and spelling.
QI-10
1/1
Qualification Set 1, Paper 10
Content Score 1
The response begins to establish a topic (The rock opened
and found a diamond inside), but the focus becomes less
clear as the writing continues. Ideas are confusing and
presented randomly (I kept it hid from my uncles. But it is
visible everyone can see it. Even my uncles can see it), and
details are sparse.
Conventions Score 1
The writing contains a few errors in sentence formation,
usage, and mechanics. Given the brevity of the response
and the presence of these errors, the paper is sufficient
only to demonstrate minimal control of writing
conventions.
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
52
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
CONTACT INFORMATION
ACCOUNTABILITY DIVISION
Jim Kroening, NCDPI, Senior Education and Evaluation Consultant
for Performance Assessments
JKroening@dpi.state.nc.us
Akia Beverly-Worsley, NC State University – Technical Outreach for Public Schools
(TOPS), Education Consultant for NC Writing Assessments
Akia_Worsley@ncsu.edu
Additional Writing Assessment information and resources may be found at:
www.ncpublicschools.org/accountability/testing/writing
INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES DIVISION
Tara Almeida, NCDPI, English/Language Arts Consultant
Grades K-5
TAlmeida@dpi.state.nc.us
Lisa Llewellyn, NCDPI, English/Language Arts Consultant
Grades K-5
Lllewellyn@dpi.state.nc.us
Carolyn Southerland, NCDPI, English/Language Arts Consultant
Grades K-5
CSoutherland@dpi.state.nc.us
Phyllis Blue, NCDPI, English/Language Arts Consultant
Grades 6-8
PBlue@dpi.state.nc.us
Patricia Chalmers, NCDPI, English/Language Arts Consultant
Grades 6-8
PChalmers@dpi.state.nc.us
Bob Alexander, NCDPI, English/Language Arts Consultant
Grades 9-12
BAlexander@dpi.state.nc.us
Vinetta Bell, NCDPI, English/Language Arts Consultant
Grades 9-12
VBell@dpi.state.nc.us
Freda Lee, NCDPI, Exceptional Children’s Division Consultant
Grade 10 OCS
FLee@dpi.state.nc.us
Additional Instructional information and resources may be found at:
www.learnnc.org/dpi/instserv.nsf
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
53
North Carolina General Writing Assessment
at Grades 4, 7, and 10
Grade 4 Trainer Manual 2008
Training Evaluation
Tell me about it…
I came expecting…
I got…
As a result of this session, I will…
I especially
appreciated…
I would like
to suggest…
Other comments?
NCDPI Division of Accountability Services/Test Development Section
Summer 2008
54
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