Faculty-of-IT-Design-version-20141217

advertisement
Faculty of IT & Design – Faculty Guide
1
Welcome
We take great pride in our partnerships around the world and are very happy to welcome exchange students
in our programme. This guide provides you with the information on our study subjects and when they are
offered.
We hope that all our guest students enjoy their stay in The Netherlands and that they will thrive from the
challenges and opportunities the Faculty of IT & Design has to offer them. We shall certainly do everything
possible to make their stay with us rewarding and look forward to having you here.
2
Table of contents
Page number
4
6
Subject list
Communication and Multimedia Design:
Photography in Focus
Communication and Multimedia Design:
International Semester, part I
8
Communication and Multimedia Design:
International Semester, part II
8
Communication and Multimedia Design:
Internet marketing tools
10
Communication and Multimedia Design:
Technology Enhanced Educational Design
Information Technology:
Development for a mobile world
Information Security Management:
Compliance and Audit
Information Security Management:
Implementation of Security Management
Information Security Management:
Software security
Information Security Management:
Security awareness
Technical Information Technology
(from 2015: Networks and Systems
Engineering):
Game development and simulation
Faculty of IT & Design
Dutch Language and Culture 1 and 2
Disclaimer
14
17
18
20
22
24
26
30
31
3
SUBJECT LIST
Subject 1)) / Location 2)
Communication and Multimedia Design:
Photography in Focus
(location: The Hague)
Communication and Multimedia Design:
International Semester, part I 3) + 4)
(location: The Hague)
Communication and Multimedia Design:
International Semester, part II 3) + 4)
(location: The Hague)
Communication and Multimedia Design:
Internet marketing tools 3)
(location: The Hague)
Communication and Multimedia Design:
Technology Enhanced Educational Design
Information Technology:
Development for a mobile world 3)
(location: block 1: Zoetermeer,
Block 2 and 4: The Hague)
Information Security Management:
Compliance and Audit 3)
(location: Zoetermeer)
Information Security Management:
Implementation of Security Management 3)
(location: Zoetermeer)
Information Security Management:
Software security 3)
(location: Zoetermeer)
Information Security Management:
(Security) Awareness
(location: Zoetermeer)
Networks and Systems Engineering:
Game development and simulation
(location: Delft)
Faculty of IT & Design
Dutch Language and Culture 1
(location: The Hague)
Faculty of IT & Design
Dutch Language and Culture 2
(location: The Hague)
Number of
ECTS
15
15
Offered in
Semester 1
Block 1
(Sep –
Nov)
Course
offered
Block 2
(Nov – Feb)
Course
offered
15
Course
offered
15
Course
offered
15
Course
offered
Course
offered
Course
offered
Block 4
(Apr – Jul)
Course
offered
Course
offered
15
Offered in
Semester 2
Block 3
(Feb – Apr)
15
Course
offered
Course
offered
Course
offered
Course
offered
15
Course
offered
15
Course
offered
15
Course
offered
15
Course
offered
Certificate
Course
offered
Certificate
See notes on next page, please.
4
Course
offered
Course
offered
Course
offered
Course
offered
1)
Note: Some courses are offered in one block period (half semester) per year only, other courses are offered twice a year.
2)
Delft and Zoetermeer are cities in the direct environment of The Hague. Travel costs are applicable if the student lives in one city
and takes courses in another city.
3)
Note: For this course, an entry level is required. Please check the block description.
4)
Note: The CMD courses “International Semester, part I” and “International Semester, part II” can each be chosen as a separate
course. They can also be chosen in combination as an International Semester.
5
COMMUNICATION AND MULTIMEDIA DESIGN – PHOTOGRAPHY IN FOCUS
Title & language of minor
Minor description
Photography in Focus
Organising department/ faculty
Location of course
Faculty IT & Design, CMD department
The Hague
General objectives
The minor ‘Photography in Focus’ is an introduction to the world of photography. The main
focus of this minor is “learning to see”. The aim of the minor is that “seeing” will lead to
meaningful images, images that give shape to the ideas of the maker. In order to achieve this
aim, knowledge of photography techniques is essential and these (basic) techniques will be
dealt with extensively in the minor. Aside from this practical knowledge, attention will also
be paid to photography from a historical and theoretical perspective.
What does an image mean? Is this meaning unequivocal? Can it be directed?
The minor “Photography in Focus” comprises both practical and theoretical elements.
Summary of contents
Practice
This minor involves eleven practical assignments. Based on these assignments you will
continuously research the possibilities from specific photographical perspectives. Examples
of this are: in the ‘Pinhole’ assignment, you will build your own camera whereby you will
learn to apply the basic principles of photography. In the ‘Movement’ assignment, you will
look at the visual possibilities of blurring. In ‘Texture and Rhythm’ the focus is on the
correlation between light and camera angle. And in ‘Sequence’ the focus is on making a
series of images based on an act or on change.
The photography techniques required to complete the assignments will be dealt with in the
workshops. Progress made in carrying out the assignments will be displayed in a digital
portfolio on Blackboard.
The digital portfolio will offer insight into the progress of your work. All try-outs,
experiments and results are visible here. Your portfolio is shared with fellow students and
your teacher and forms the basis for feedback, both online and during workshops.
Theory
In the theoretical part of this minor you will work on the weekly assignments that are
relevant to photography from a historical or theoretical perspective. You will write reports
on visits to exhibitions and you will study and report on the work of a photographer/artist.
The lectures, both online and at the university, will provide you with the basic knowledge to
get started on the assignments. You will learn to recognise and describe different styles of
photography such as documentary and snapshot photography and you will learn about the
historical development of photography.
The assignments will be explained and discussed in small groups in the workshops.
Target group
All the theoretical reports and assignments will be displayed in the digital portfolio described
above, in the same manner as the practical assignments. This forms the basis for feedback
from fellow students and the teacher and makes your work progress more visible.
All students interested in the creative use of images and image culture.
Entry requirements
None
6
Objectives/Competency levels
The following 4 competencies are central to this minor:




Creative ability: The student develops the ability to assess situations from different
perspectives and to make conclusions based on the knowledge and skills acquired in
the lessons.
Ability for critical reflection: the student can evaluate his/her own work and that of
others.
Organisational ability: The student can organise internal and external factors for the
purposes of an effective and inspiring work and research process.
Communicative ability: the student is able to present and justify his/her own work
and personal development.
Attention will be paid to these competencies at various stages in the minor and they will be
translated in the following learning objectives:







Description of tests and minimum
pass rate
The student can transpose a concept into a photographic image.
The student can effectively employ different (basic) photography techniques.
The student can effectively use photo editing software such as Photoshop, InDesign
and Lightroom in his/her work at a basic level.
The student is aware of historical developments in photography and can analyse
and comment on such.
The student can illustrate his/her vision on contemporary photography or graphic
arts.
The student can reflect on his/her development verbally (presentations) and in
writing (logbook).
The student can complete the assignments in time in accordance with the content
and product criteria (two books of a specified size and format).
Practice (75%)
The student will complete eleven practical assignments, which are presented in the digital
portfolio in Blackboard. The teacher will assess the work and give the student feedback.
In week 8 it will be determined whether or not the student has completed the digital
execution of the assignments satisfactorily. If satisfactory, the student may participate in the
verbal assessment in week 10. During this assessment the student will present the
assignments in two photo books. The first of these comprises the results of the ten
compulsory practical assignments. The second book comprises the result of the free
assignment ‘Fascination’. The teacher and an external professional will determine the grade.
Competencies: Creative and communicative ability.
Theory (25%)
The student submits written assignments weekly via the digital portfolio in Blackboard. The
teacher will assess this work and give the student feedback. In week 9 all assignments should
be submitted and assessed (pass/fail).
Competencies: Ability for critical reflection and communicative ability.
Study aids
Blackboard reader, work files and a selection of relevant websites. Software and computer
hardware is available at the HHS.
The student requires a good digital camera (preferably DSLR) and a simple tripod.
Minimum- and maximum
participation
Minimum: 16
Maximum: 50
Miscellaneous
The material cost of the minor is approximately 150 euro per student.
The minor is educationally constructed in accordance with the principles of ‘Blended
Learning’.
7
COMMUNICATION AND MULTIMEDIA DESIGN
INTERNATIONAL SEMESTER, PART I AND II
Introduction:
Communication & Multimedia Design CMD is a comprehensive, topical and interesting study programme in the field of
design that offers a unique combination of interaction design, visual design, ICT, media and communication. The CMD
student trains to become an interaction designer. This is a broad basic role within the context of digital interactive
applications. A CMD student can specialise and become a user-experience designer, usability researcher, web designer,
visual interface designer or front-end developer. An interaction designer designs an interface that ensures optimum
interaction between people and systems. The design principles are based on user needs and the client’s objectives,
typically referred to as the business requirements.
Location of
course
The Hague
Level:
Bachelor
Language:
English
ECTS Earned:
30
Prerequisites:
Knowledge of Interaction Design; basic skills in front end programming and visual design; able to read,
speak, write (in) English. Basic skills in Photoshop and Illustrator.
Costs
Depends on agreement between the universities.
For Whom:

For students who study

Interaction Design-programs or

Another education program in which they learn to develop and produce digital media.
Modules:

Service Design : a project beyond interactive systems with topics including : design
thinking, service design, new media and innovation.

Information Visualisation 2: time based media, narratives, image editing, visualisation
techniques, interface techniques.

Sustainable Design: designer responsibilities in creating new needs, making sense with
designs, contributing to a sustainable society with sensible design.

Design Methods: organizing design processes, collaborative design, design management.

Project: individual and autonomous design project; selecting a design problem, generating
ideas, creating a concept, realizing the concept and testing, reflecting and evaluating

Trends and Forecasting: media history and trends, media culture, communication in the
21st century

Cultural Design in an international context, intercultural aspects, visual culture
Learning methods:
The semester is divided in two blocks of ten weeks. The first block is preparatory for the last. The students will participate
in lectures, tutorials, workshops and studios, and work individually and in teams on assignments and projects.
8
Learning goals:
At the end of the semester the students master these competencies in a rather complex situation acting independently.
1 Look & Listen: analyzing and understanding the assignment, defining business goals and user needs, context study
2 Create Concepts: creating design directions in concept, materialize concepts
3 Design Details: designing information architecture, interaction concepts, user interfaces, visual designs, prototyping
4 Realize: producing a functional prototype, taking into account the technical requirements and the context of the digital
product
5 Evaluating and testing in all phases of the design process
6 Choosing the approach: method(s) and techniques for a user centered design process, choosing a project management
method, reflecting on the approach
7 Gaining insight in (new) domains of application
8 Functioning as a knowledge worker, applying research results, doing practice-oriented research
9 Taking responsibility for oneself and other persons, defining own ways of learning, handling social responsibility
10 Functioning in an (international) organization, finding ones way in an organization, working in projects
11 Thinking and acting as a designer
Assessment:
Tests take the form of assessments, written examinations as well as oral and practical tests.
9
COMMUNICATION AND MULTIMEDIA DESIGN
MINOR DESCRIPTION: INTERNET MARKETING TOOLS
Elements of the minor
description
Title & language
Category of minor
Minor description
Internet Marketing Tools (English)
x
Introduction minor (no entry requirements)
O
Specialisation minor (entry requirements)
Organising faculty /programme
Faculty of IT & Design /Communication and Multimedia Design
Location
The Hague
Contact person
Theo Zweers, [email protected]
General objectives
To be able to determine and use online communication tools, media and
technologies for a certain target group in order to achieve specific
communication objectives.
Summary of contents
Knowledge of online communication tools will be acquired by means of
lectures and by examining case studies. Subjects:
- Internet marketing management
- Online Value Proposition
- Customer relationship marketing
- Webvertising
- Search engine marketing
- Media and Social Media
- Affiliate marketing
- E-mail marketing
- Paid advertising
- Viral marketing
- Mobile marketing
- Reputation management
- Online Marketing Communications Plan
Students will work in a group to write an online marketing
communications plan for a web shop/website.
Background: Internet marketing or online marketing has become an
essential part of an organisation’s policy. In addition, consumer
behaviour has undergone dramatic changes. This combination of factors
substantiates the importance of acquiring knowledge about the various
ways of reaching a target group online. In recent years, new
10
technologies (internet, search machine marketing, remarketing) and
new media (mobile phones, tablets, social media) have become
available. As a result, communication tools such as advertising and
direct mail have undergone change and updating. Organisations create a
marketing communications plan that describes the target group, the
objectives, as well as the tools, media and technologies to be used.
Student target group
All students attending THUAS, students with an affinity for marketing,
communications and the internet
Entry requirements
Students who are advised to declare this minor are also enrolled in a
commercial or communications-related degree programme and have an
affinity for computers, the internet and digital media.
Competence levels
1. Develop an online marketing and communications plan for a
nationally or internationally operating organisation and be able to
support the choices made.
2. Draw up, implement and adjust online plans as based on an
organisation’s marketing policy.
3. Be knowledgeable about the developments in internet technology
(and the opportunities it offers) and the infrastructure and use of
databases.
Description of assessments and
minimum pass mark
Mark for Practical Assignment
The practical assignment mark is a group assessment for the marketing
communications plan which is submitted and presented to a group that
will include external parties. The plan itself counts as 70% of this mark
and the presentation counts as 30%.
Supporting Education: Mark for Theory
The final mark for is based on four individual assignments related to the
subject matter covered in the course (50%) and the writing of an essay
(50%).
The practical assignment will be submitted during the ninth week. Resits
can be taken during week 1 of the following block. The individual
assignments and the essay will be submitted during weeks 2 through 7.
Final Mark: The final mark is the weighted average between the mark
11
for practical assignments (53%) and the mark for theory (47%) in which
all four listed components must have received a mark equal to or higher
than 4.5.
Teaching methods + study load
Lectures, workshops, individual assignments, a group assignment,
pressure cooker days, blog writing, essay writing, giving a presentation.
This is a full 15 ECTS minor.
Activities:
Lectures, workshops, peer-to-peer: 76 hours
Time devoted to feedback: 8 hours
Blog writing: 4 x 5 = 20 hours
Pressure cooker days: 2 x 8 = 16 hours
Total
120 hours
Individual assignments: 4 x 12.5 hours
Essay writing
50 hours
40 hours
Marketing communications plan and
presentation
Contact hours
Study aids
210 hours
4 during the first week, 12 during weeks 2 through 7. Week 8 will be
spent preparing for the Essay and the practical assignment.
Chaffey, D., Ellis-Chadwick, F. (2012) Digital Marketing. Essex: Pearson
Education Limited. ISBN: 978 0 273 74610 2
Partners
No partners, but there will be guest lecturers.
Minimum and maximum
participation
Minimum: 12
Fulltime / parttime and Term
Fulltime, 2nd period
Subject themes (more than one
possible)
Maximum: 32
x
Economics and
Marketing
O
Humanities
O
Health and Sports
O
Law, Safety and
Society
x
ICT and the Media
O
Technology and
Design
12
O
International themes
x
Management and
Organisation
O
Work, Health and
Education
Miscellaneous
There are many vacancies at organisations for online marketers, internet
marketers, SEO specialists, social media consultants. This minor gives
students this kind of knowledge and insight and will make an important
contribution to their CV.
OSIRIS code
ICTM-43
FOOTER: OB&A / IVD
13
COMMUNICATION AND MULTIMEDIA DESIGN
TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED EDUCATIONAL DESIGN
Minor description
Title & language of minor
Categorie of minor
Technology Enhanced Educational Design
Introduction minor (no entry requirements)
Organising faculty/program
Faculty of IT & Design
Contact person
Ir. Drs. Suzanne Hallenga-Brink, [email protected]
General objectives
How can we make digital learning both fun and effective? Ten weeks long students immerse
themselves in the process of designing technology enhanced educational materials, whether
for primary, secondary, tertiary or professional education, for formal, informal or social
learning. User-centered interaction design, experience design and graphic design are
combined with learning theories, e-learning development and technological opportunities to
come to innovative and communicative educational concepts and prototypes.
Summary of contents
In research classes students share in-depth insight into learning theories (cognitive load
theory, learning strategies, motivation), approaches (flip the classroom, serious gaming), and
trends (augmented reality, social (peer) learning, etc.) by presenting outcomes of their
desktop/literature studies to the class. Current technology enhanced educational materials
are tried and tested and the results are discussed. User needs are collected. These classes
are concluded with writing an essay on (near) future opportunities in technology enhanced
learning in week 6.
Parallel to these activating theoretical classes run hands-on design classes. Teams are formed
to design e-learning materials, using the knowledge constructed in the research classes. In
case of a diverse group, multidisciplinary teams will be formed of ICT, design and pedagogic
students. There will be different design challenges to choose from: students deliver a hi-fi
prototype for either a publisher, design agency, educational organization or the Hague
University itself (lectorates, courses). Students use educational design methods (ASSURE
Model of Instructional Technology, ADDIE cycle) to structure their process. They can share
their design argumentation with and ask for feedback from their project supervisor on a
weekly basis. They report to their clients frequently. In week 7 technical experts review their
design on technical feasibility. In week 8 students test their prototype on the real target
group. In week 9 they improve their prototype and individually write an advisory report with
foreseen learning benefits and implementation recommendations of the design for their
clients. In week 10 during the assessments the prototypes are exhibited for the clients,
students and assessors.
Indication of target group
This minor is interesting for design students (CMD, IPO), other ICT students as well as
pedagogic (PABO) students, both national and international. Within the minor multidisciplinary teams can be formed so students can learn from each other’s prior knowledge on
either learning theories, technical possibilities or (multimedia) design.
Entry requirements
None.
14
Competence levels
Look and listen:



Students are able to do desk research/literature research at HBO level
Students are able to form a motivated opinion on the results of their research
Students are able to translate research results into design requirements
Create concepts:


Students are able to work user-centered in their design process
Students are able to think up concepts for educational designs for a real client
Design details:

Students are able to prototype an educational design.
Make it real:

Description of tests and
minimum pass rate
Students are able to think their design process through till the implementation
phase.
Essay = minimally a 5.5 (graded individually), deadline week 6. (40%)
Advisory report = minimally a 5.5 (graded individually), deadline week 9 (10%)
Design = minimally a 5.5 (group grade, established during assessment), deadline week 10
(50%)
The individual tests can be reassessed individually in week 9 of the next quarter.
The design is an integrated test of the multiple facets of a design: graphic design fit for target
group 40%, information architecture & interaction design support designated learning effect
40%, technical solution 20%. If it’s graded below 5.5, the group needs to improve their
design and they can get a re-assessment in week 9 of the next quarter.
Teaching methods + studyload
There are working classes, lab sessions and feedback sessions. Because the research classes
stop in week 6, students can focus on their design activities fully from that moment on.
Besides the working classes and session, students are expected to work in teams at the
THUAS.
Contact hours
The first 5 weeks there are two gatherings per week: research class at the start of the week
(3 hours) and design class at the end of the week (3 hours). In between 2x 2 hour labsessions are planned where all students doing the minor work in their multidisciplinary
teams, with a teacher present for questions and feedback (one teacher on two classrooms).
From week 6 there’s still the 3 hours of lab, and the 3 hours of design class, completed with 1
hour of design feedback. The assessments in week 10 last 4 hours.
Study aids
Students need to do research about e-learning, but do not need to buy books (library!). A
reader will be offered with discussion papers. For the designing, students need a computer
with Illustrator, Photoshop en InDesign and an html editor. Computers with the right
software are available for those who do not have their own. Online prototyping software can
be used as well.
15
Partners
Educational publishers and design agencies will be involved as clients. But also lectorates
within the HHS can be clients, as well as course developers. Collaboration with elementary
and secondary schools in the region is also desirable.
Minimum- and maximum
participation
Minimum 8 students, maximum 64 students (in two groups).
Fulltime
Block-minor in 2nd and the 4th quarter (CMD offers it twice a year, also to international
students during the international semester)
Subject themes
Economics and Marketing
ICT and the Media
Technology and Design
Work, Health and Education
Miscellaneous
None.
OSIRIS code
ICTM-HMVT14-K59
16
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: DEVELOPMENT FOR A MOBILE WORLD
Introduction:
The course focuses on application development for mobile devices. It has two tracks, one focusing on the Android platform, the
other on developing for Apple’s iOS. The course comprises all aspects needed for developing and distributing mobile applications.
Location of
course
Course in the first block period: Zoetermeer
Level:
Bachelor
Language:
English
ECTS Earned:
15
 A thorough understanding of an object oriented programming language. Concepts on for example
inheritance, polymorphism, generics and overloading should be well known. Also the observer pattern,
which is used in the Java event model, should be known.
 XML (Basics, knowing how to read an XML document is enough)
 Basic knowledge of the Unified Modeling Language (UML). Class diagrams and sequence diagrams are in
this case the most important ones.
 Basic knowledge of the Structured Query Language (SQL).
Prerequisites:
Costs
Course in the fourth block period: The Hague
Depends on agreement with partner university
For Whom: Bachelor students in IT who have passed their propaedeutic exam and meet the prerequisites as described above.
The following subjects are covered:
Modules:




Commercial feasibility
o meeting publisher demands
o added value of an app for the customer
Development, depending on platform
o Android: Different aspects of the android platform are treated such as activities, views,
intents, content providers, preferences, background services, multithreading aspects and
deployment.
o iOS: Different aspects of the iOS platform are treated such as ViewControllers,
Storyboarding, delegates, data persistance, device libraries, app-switching
Device sensors such as GPS and camera
Performance
o prolonging battery life
o benchmarking of the application
Human computer interaction
Learning methods: The student will gain knowledge and experience through workshops, practicals and project work.
Learning goals:
The student is able to design and develop an application for a mobile device, taking into account

Commercial feasibility

Different aspects of either Android platform or iOS platform

Device sensors such as GPS and camera

Performance
Assessment:
Theory: individual assessment, written examination.
Practice: the project group hand in an app including documentation. The project is assessed by an oral exam.
17
INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT – COMPLIANCE AND AUDIT
Introduction:
Information Security Management, or ISM, is a multidisciplinary study programme. The information security programme
covers: people and their behaviour, organisations and their culture, IT resources and use of IT – and skills that an
information security specialist should master here to keep information and information systems secure.
The course Compliance and Audit focuses on:

Compliance: Why is it important for an organisation to observe laws and rules? What laws and rules are important?
How to implement all different rules and how to stay in control?

IT-auditing: How to examine qualities of business process with use of IT or IT system? How to provide assurance?
Location of
course
Zoetermeer
Level:
Bachelor
Language:
English
ECTS Earned:
15
Prerequisites:
Bachelor IT or BA: Propaedeutic exam
Costs
Depend on agreement with partner university
For Whom:
The course Compliance and Audit covers very actual and interesting subjects that are of interest for students from
different backgrounds who want to know more about the IT governance of organisations, relevant laws and rules,
managing risks as well as how to examine IT objects – all from an information security point-of-view. The course could be
interesting for students in very different areas like

Any IT study

Accounting

Business or Economics

Law
Modules:
The course will focus on the following components:

Legislation and regulations. Which laws have an (in)direct influence on the information
provision and ICT.

What is compliance. Which controls will be required on the basis of current legislation and
regulations. Students will assess which legislation and regulations are relevant. How do
businesses manage their risks. Which techniques, regulations and knowledge are relevant to
the subject of compliance. How do businesses report on their responsible business practices.

Ethics and integrity. Researchers frequently deal with privacy issues and sensitive business
information.

Setting policy. Once measures and irregularities have been determined, the following step may
consist of: adjusting or setting policy. Which process will this require. Which stakeholders
should be consulted.

Auditing. Planning and conducting an audit (assessing whether a company is sticking to the
rules).
Learning methods:
Compliance and Audit is partly a “blended learning” course.
Theory is available as a set of e-books. Lectures, partly in video, explain the basic concepts. Peer learning is stimulated via
working in groups. Support is given in coaching and expertise sessions.
18
Practice: three group assignments: 1) audit of a business process; 2) policy making – and policy checking; 3) small research
project and presenting of results via a scientific poster. A “beauty contest” of all scientific posters on a symposium is
included here.
Learning goals:
After completing the course, the junior professional can demonstrate his/her ability to:




Prepare or help to prepare and maintain an information security policy (strategic level);
Translate laws, regulations and company (information security) policies into technical, organisational and HR-related
guidelines and procedures;
Prepare a standards framework and conduct an information security audit on the basis of an assessment framework;
Transfer information security knowledge to stakeholders.
Assessment:
Theory: individual assessment, written examination.
Practice: Within the practical part, a differentiation is made between the different tasks that have to be carried out:
assignment one, assignment two, assignment three, as well as the reflection/evaluation and final assessment.
19
INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT – IMPLEMENTATION OF SECURITY MANAGEMENT
Introduction:
Information Security Management, or ISM, is a multidisciplinary study programme. The information security programme
covers: people and their behaviour, organisations and their culture, IT resources and use of IT – and skills that an
information security specialist should master here to keep information and information systems secure.
The course Implementation of Security Management focuses on:

Implementation challenges with regard to information security management: How to create policies? How to realise
that these documents really contribute to implementing a sufficient information security level?

IT architecture challenges from an information security point-of-view: What is a security architecture? How to realise
such an architecture?
Location of
course
Zoetermeer
Level:
Bachelor
Language:
English
ECTS Earned:
15
Prerequisites:
Bachelor IT or BA: Propaedeutic exam
Plus affinity with Information Management
Costs
Depend on agreement with partner university
For Whom:
The course Implementation of Security Management covers management subjects that are of interest for students from
different backgrounds who want to know more about how to implement information security management in an
organisation, from an organisational and from an architectural point-of-view. The course could be interesting for students
in very different areas like

Any IT study

Accounting

Business or Economics

Law
Modules:
The course will focus on the following components: the structure of an organisation’s security
management system, which may or may not be based on a security architecture. The block will be
based around the following central themes: security policy and architecture. These aspects will be
explored on the basis of a case study. The various aspects of security policy, architecture and
organisation will be explored on the basis of real-life assignments, which students must carry out
independently. An intake interview will be conducted in order to determine the actual/target situation,
and gather information for the Gap analysis. An implementation plan will be prepared and – upon
request – partially implemented. The commissioning organisation will be provided with documentation
at all times.
Learning methods:
Theory is available in form of books and electronic documents. Live lectures explain the basic concepts. Peer learning is
stimulated via an online forum. Support is given in coaching and expertise sessions.
Practice: some group assignments: in principle, one assignment within the university environment and one assignment in
cooperation with an outside company.
20
Learning goals:
After completing the course, the junior professional can demonstrate his/her ability to:






Design and implement a consultancy process;
Engender support for the implementation of information security policy, guidelines and procedures;
Prepare or help to prepare and maintain an information security policy (strategic level);
Translate information security policy into security architecture or components thereof, or harmonise the two;
Design information security solutions at technical, organisational and HR level;
Preparing and/or carrying out a plan for the implementation of information security guidelines, procedures and
solutions.
Assessment:
Theory: individual assessment, written examination.
Practice: Within the practical part, a differentiation is made between an assignment within the university environment
and assignment for an external company.
21
INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT – SOFTWARE SECURITY
Introduction:
Information Security Management, or ISM, is a multidisciplinary study programme. The information security programme
covers: people and their behaviour, organisations and their culture, IT resources and use of IT – and skills that an
information security specialist should master here to keep information and information systems secure.
The course Software Security focuses on the challenge, how to realise “Security by Design” with regard to software,
especially sensitive software like a web site that is exposed to many threats via the internet. This challenge will tackled
from two viewpoints: a) the perspective of secure developing; b) the hacker’s perspective – by exploring vulnerabilities.
Location of
course
Zoetermeer
Level:
Bachelor
Language:
English
ECTS Earned:
Prerequisites:
15
Bachelor IT or CS: Propaedeutic exam
plus kowledge of programming languages and Information Technology infrastructures
Costs
Depend on agreement with partner university
For Whom:
The course Software Security covers subjects that are of interest for students from different backgrounds who want to
know more about how to create secure software, especially: web sites, to prevent incidents due to insecure programming.
The course could be interesting for students who have some knowledge about programming, but who want to know more
about how to implement security. Some possible backgrounds of students here are:

Informatics

Computer Media & Design

Computer Science

Software Engineering
The course will focus on the following components:
Modules:

OWASP philosophy and working methods

Quality standards and guidelines (including ISO25010 )

Developing skills in the area of hacking tools

Ethical principles

Configuration management

Highly competitive practical assignment

Students work together in an interdisciplinary team (students from different study programs
form a team)

A must for software engineers seeking to develop reliable web sites
Learning methods:
Software Security is a course with some “blended” elements, like video clips in which a photographer whose web site has
been hacked orders students to carry out tasks for him.
Theory is available in our secure software environment. Lectures are partly given via video clips. Support is given in
coaching sessions.
Practice: several group assignments. For example, every group has22
to create a secure web site. Then, another group is
testing the web site on vulnerabilities. Depending on findings of the testing group, the tested group fixes the
vulnerabilities found to create a stable, secure website.
Learning goals:
After completing the course, the junior professional can demonstrate his/her ability to:





Develop a web application that complies with government security guidelines;
Prevent the ten most common software vulnerabilities in a web application (OWASP top ten);
Apply guidelines and standards frameworks on the configuration of web applications;
Identify vulnerabilities in web applications using a range of different software tools;
Hacking a website within the framework of ethical rules (ethical hacking).
Assessment:
Theory: individual assessment, written examination.
Practice: Within the practical part a differentiation is made between the different assignments of this study block.
23
INFORMATION SECURITY MANAGEMENT – (SECURITY) AWARENESS
Introduction:
Information Security Management, or ISM, is a multidisciplinary study programme. The information security programme
covers: people and their behaviour, organisations and their culture, IT resources and use of IT – and skills that an
information security specialist should master here to keep information and information systems secure.
The course Security awareness focuses on a main vulnerability in all organisations: people, and their behaviour. Many
incidents happen due to not observing information security rules or not being aware of the importance of these rules.
Study elements of the course are, among others: to develop insight into human behaviour, insight into behaviour change
models and strategies, insight in organisation cultures and drafting an awareness campaign plan.
Location of
course:
Zoetermeer
Level:
Bachelor
Language:
English
ECTS Earned:
Prerequisites:
15
Bachelor IT or CS or BA: Propaedeutic exam
Costs
Depend on agreement with partner university
For Whom:
The course Security Awareness covers subjects that are of interest for students from different backgrounds who want to
know more about how to make employees aware of the necessity to observe information security rules, to change
employee behaviour to realise that they are not intended to avoid possibly complex rules, and to make employees aware
of methods used to influence people. The course could be interesting for students in very different areas like

Any IT study

Accounting

Business or Economics

Law
Modules:
This block will focus on: people and their thoughts, feelings, behaviour patterns (general human
psychology), and behaviour within a group (group dynamics). The block will also focus on various special
themes, such as: awareness, ethical dilemmas, standards and values, the interpretation of information,
perception and learning, organisational cultures and dealing with change, resistance and conflicts.
Learning methods:
Theory: Lectures and pressure-cooker sessions . Students learn in what ways the behaviour of people working in
organisations can be influenced, for example in order to realise working in more secure ways. A focus point here is drafting
a (security) awareness campaign plan. By means of
Practice: Two assignments in projects.
1) Drafting a (Security) Awareness Campaign Plan for an external client.
2) Writing and presenting a white paper on an awareness-related subject.
Learning goals:
After completing the course, the junior professional can demonstrate his/her ability to:






Gather insight in the behaviour of people.
Gather insight in behaviour change models and strategies.
Gather insight in organisational cultures.
Drafting an awareness campaign plan.
Mapping out a target group.
Making use of research.
24

Wrting a white paper in the field of (security) awareness.
Assessment:
Theory: individual assessment, written examination.
Practice: A major task will be to try to gather sensitive information by way of an explicitly written strategy and influencing
employees to hand over this information, against the rules. Results of this assignment will be kept confidential.
25
NETWORKS AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING – GAME DEVELOPMENT AND SIMULATION
Components of the minor
description
Titel v.d. minor
Minor description: text
Game Development & Simulation
Title
Categorie minor
Please check one of the following options:
Type of minor
O
Institution-wide
x
Cross-academy minor with entry
Aanbiedende academie / opleiding /
lectoraat
requirements
Faculty of IT and Design, Computer Science (Delft campus)
Organising faculty
Contactpersoon
Dave Stikkolorum ([email protected])
Contact person
Algemene doelstelling
General objectives
Korte weergave inhoud
Summary of contents
The development of a simulation and/or game with an open
source engine in C++.
In this minor students will develop a simulation and/or game
in C++ with the use of an open source game engine. The course
will offer students concrete tools to place a 3D model in an
environment (map) in a game. The effects created by the
environment (e.g. friction or gravity) will be simulated with a
physics engine, a reusable software component.
The success of developing a good game greatly depends on a
well-thought-out idea and students will be advised about the
best approach. Specific design patterns will be used to build up
the game in terms of its technical structure.
The minor will be supported with lectures, workshops and
practical training. The topics to be discussed will include
Introduction to 3D modelling, Game Development and
Simulation, 3D Math, Physics, Artificial Intelligence and others.
Einddoelen / competenties
-
Competency levels
-
Developing a simulation and/or game on an existing
engine
Applying design patterns in a game environment
Applying basic Artificial Intelligence in a game
environment
Using a physics engine in a game for simulation and
environment effects (e.g. gravity)
Creating a basic 3D model and enabling it to ‘come to
life’ in a game
Performing calculations in the 3D domain
26
Performing calculations of physics-related
phenomena used in simulations
- Mastering basic techniques for scenes, resources and
rendering
Students wishing to gain experience in the development of
simulations and/or games through a practical approach.
-
Doelgroep
Indication of target group
Samenwerkingspartners
Partners
Ingangseisen
Students must have a basic knowledge of:
Entry requirements
- Object-oriented programming (e.g. C++ or Java).
- Maths at higher general secondary education (HAVO) level
These entry requirements are recommended; they will not be
tested. Participation in the course is up to the students’
individual discretion. In case of doubt, students should get in
touch with the contact person for the minor.
Werkvormen + verdeling van de
studielast
The minor will be taught using a number of different methods:
lectures, workshops, practical training and a group project.
Teaching methods + study load
The study load is 40 hours a week. In the first three weeks,
most of this time will be spent on theory, practical training and
workshops. Starting in Week 4 the students will concentrate
exclusively on their projects.
Overview of the study load:
Week 1
Workshop: 20 hrs
Project start-up: 16 hrs
Theory lectures: 2 hrs
Independent study: 2 hrs
Weeks 2 + 3
27
Theory lectures, practical training: 13 hrs
Independent study: 10 hrs
Project: 17 hrs
Starting in Week 4
Project: 40 hrs
The portion of the course reserved for projects includes
supervision by the lecturer and feedback sessions in which the
students will present their projects and critically assess their
fellow students’ work.
Contacturen per week
8 hours a week
Contact hours per week
Toetsing en minimumeisen voor een
voldoende
Description of tests and minimum pass
rate
Practical training
Assessment based on project file, comprising:

Presentation of the project results

Individual defence of the content of the project file
Supporting education
The ITO(overall exam) consists of a knowledge-based exam.
Finally a mark is awarded for the practical training (8x) and a
mark awarded for the ITO (7x).
Leer(hulp)middelen
Blackboard, practical training facilities, tutoring
Study aids
Minimum- en maximumdeelname
Four participants at minimum and twenty four at maximum
Minimum- and maximum participation
Blok / lint en periode van uitvoering
Period 1
Fulltime / part-time and Term
Indien lintminor: dag en tijdstip
In case of part-time minor: weekday and
28
time
Themavelden (meerdere keuzes
mogelijk)
Please mark one or more of
the following options:
O
People and Culture
Subject themes (multiple themes can be
selected)
O
Economy and the
Market
O
Health and Sport
O
Law, Security and
Society
X
IT and Design
O
Technology and Design
O
International issues
O
Work, Welfare and
Education
O
Management and
Organisation
O
Other (please specify):
..... ……
(Please note: your text
will be regarded as a
suggestion for additional
themes)
Bijzonderheden
The minor will be taught at the new campus in Delft (at the
Computer Science programme).
Miscellaneous
Code (voor OSIRIS)
ICTM-HMVT09-K35
OSIRIS code
29
FACULTY OF IT AND DESIGN – DUTCH LANGUAGE AND CULTURE 1 AND 2
FACULTY OF IT & DESIGN DUTCH LANGUAGE & CULTURE
Course description
Title & language of course
Dutch Language and Culture
Language of instruction is English
Category
Introduction course to Dutch Language and Culture
Organising faculty/program
Faculty of IT & Design
Contact person
Ms. Berber Hartman, MA
[email protected]
Location
The Hague
General objectives
After completing Dutch Language and Culture 1 & 2 the student will have basic
competences and knowledge of Dutch. The student has also learned about different
kinds of aspects of Dutch culture.
Summary of contents
The student will learn to understand and use familiar everyday expressions and basic
phrases aimed at the satisfaction of needs in a given concrete situation. He will learn
to introduce himself and others and to ask and answer questions about personal
details such as where he lives, people he knows and things he has. He will learn to
interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is
prepared to help.
Indication of target group
The course is meant for international students who would like to learn (some) Dutch to
be able to communicate in a simple but effective way.
Entry requirements
For course 1 there are no entry requirements. For course 2 it is necessary to have
completed course 1 or be able to show some basic knowledge of Dutch. Please contact
Ms. Berber Hartman if in doubt about your level.
Description of tests and minimum
pass rate
After the course the student will receive a certificate (provided he has attended at
least 80% of the classes).
Teaching methods + studyload
Lectures, discussions, group work, excursion(s). Studyload is 90 minutes of class plus
90 minutes for homework/preparation.
Contact hours
90 minutes of class.
Study aids
To be announced.
Partners
None.
Minimum- and maximum
participation
Minimum: 8
Maximum: 24
Subject themes
Humanities
Miscellaneous
Course is offered from February 2015.
OSIRIS code
To be announced.
30
DISCLAIMER
The information contained in this guide is, to the best of our knowledge, true and accurate at the time of publication and is solely for
information purposes. Changing circumstances may cause alterations in its outline at any time. The Faculty of IT & Design, The
Hague University, accepts no liability for any loss or damage howsoever arising as a result of use or reliance on this guide or on the
information thereon or in respect of information accessed via any links from the web pages.
31
Download