Pottsgrove High School
AP Biology Course Syllabus 2015 - 2016
Mrs. Federoff
Contact Information
Email - [email protected]
Phone – 610-326-5105; voice mail- 6502; extension- 7012
Website – www.pgsd.org/afederoff
Course Overview
This year in AP Biology we will be focused on the major concepts included in the 4 big ideas
in biology that make up the AP Biology Curriculum Framework. This course is designed to be an
equivalent to an introductory college level biology class in order to prepare students for the AP
Biology Exam. Students will work towards making connections between the 4 big ideas (Evolution,
Energy Processes, Information, and Interactions) by completing inquiry-based labs and
corresponding activities to develop a deep conceptual understanding. At least one of the big ideas
will be addressed in every lesson. As students work towards this understanding they will be utilizing
the 7 science practices and will be given the opportunity to connect their biological knowledge to
major social issues.
Students will be given a list of enduring understandings and big ideas before each unit to
serve as an overview of the content about to be covered in class. Throughout the unit (in labs and
discussion) students will be encouraged to add supplemental notes, connections, and questions to
this list to guide their understanding. Quizzes on unit content will be used frequently to guide
instruction for both teacher and student.
Students will need to be prepared to connect unit content to major social issues (Stem Cells,
Antibiotic Resistance, GMO’s, Use of Genetic Information, Etc.) once a month by engaging in a
discussion on a current event article. This will give students the ability to become scientifically
literate and to see biology at work in their own daily lives.
The AP Exam
This year the AP Biology Exam will be given on Monday, May 9th, 2016 at 8am
Required Materials
- 3-ring binder
- Lab Notebook Folder – This will be provided for you. In addition, you must only use a blue or
black pen on graph paper with this notebook.
- Internet access
- A simple four-function calculator with square root function (no graphing or scientific
calculator). This can be provided for you in class.
- Textbook: 10th AP Edition of Biology by Campbell & Reece. Students will receive a hardcopy
and an online access code. Please cover the textbook.
Textbook/Resources
- Reece, Jane, et al., Campbell Biology, 10th Edition, 2014, Pearson.
-
AP Biology Investigative Labs: an Inquiry Based Approach, as well as other laboratory
investigations (as deemed necessary).
Laboratory Investigations
The laboratory investigations in this course are centered on student directed lab practices
and will make up at least 25% of this course. Our 8 laboratory investigations (2 for each big idea) will
represent all four levels of inquiry to ensure student ownership on content material. Using inquiry
labs, students will be actively engaged in the process of science, which increases their critical
thinking and problem solving abilities. Labs emphasize the development and testing of a hypothesis,
collection, analysis and presentation of data, as well as a discussion of results to reveal how error,
next steps and unanswered questions. Additional supplemental labs will also be inquiry based to
further enhance student understanding. Throughout these investigations students will utilize all 7science practices, and will use at least one science practice in each lab investigation. Following lab
investigations lab reports, projects, posters and abstracts will be completed to allow students to
develop, record and communicate their findings.
Assessments
Tests – There will be one test for each unit completed. Tests will be modeled on the AP exam and
include multiple choice, mathematical “grid-in” questions, and constructed response questions.
Labs – You are required to compete every lab we conduct. These lab activities will be major, longterm experiences that will involve the development of a particular protocol to answer a question of
your own creation, the collection of data and the generation and publishing of a documentation of
your lab experiences (typically a lab report, or a presentation)
Quizzes – will be announced and unannounced. Many will cover content from reading homework
assignments. This is to check understanding and make sure students are keeping up with the
material.
General Assignments – All other work that is done in this class falls into this general category.
These are not always graded, but feedback will be provided.
Missing Work: It is strongly recommended that you attend class every day in a timely fashion.
Excessive lateness or absences will make it very difficult for you to keep up with the workload of
this course. If you are absent, it is your responsibility to makeup all assignments. “I was absent” is
not an excuse for missing an assignment (unless I excuse you). All assignments are posted on the
class calendar, which is accessible from all course websites. Please discuss missed work with me as
soon as you return to class. Work done during absences is due one day after your return to class.
You must also make arrangements to makeup any labs, quizzes or tests as soon as you return to
school.
Study Tips – A note about the Exams
The AP Biology exam will assess your ability to think like a scientist, along with your understanding
of the course content (what’s in the textbook). This will also be true of any in-class assessments, and
many of the in- class projects. To that end, there will be situations and content on exams that will
not be specifically discussed in class prior to their appearance on exams. This is may be very
different than many other types of courses you might have taken.
A good rule of thumb is that any content covered in the material you are responsible for
reading/viewing/watching in the content homework could appear on an exam, regardless of whether
or not we have discussed it specifically in class. The take-home message for you is that independent
reading/viewing/watching is absolutely crucial, and must be done if you want to succeed.
Grading Policy
90% - Demonstrating Knowledge (tests, quizzes, projects )
10%- Building Knowledge (Homework, Classwork, and lab reports)
Homework – It is important students complete homework on time in order to
build their knowledge. If a homework assignment is late 10% will be
deducted for each day. Students will not have the opportunity to submit late
homework for credit once answers have been reviewed in class.
Assessment – Unit tests and projects are key summative assessments. All final
unit assessments must be taken in the order assigned. If a student fails to complete
the final unit assessment before the end of the next unit, the student will receive
70% of the earned grade once its completed. Failure to complete an assessment
will result in an incomplete for the marking period. Students will have two weeks
to complete the assessment.
The Big Ideas
Each Big Idea from the College Board is broken down into Enduring Understandings, Essential
Knowledge and Learning Objectives
Science Practices
As an AP Biology student you are expected to demonstrate competence in science practices that
scientists engage in. Which include:
1. The student can use representations and models to communicate scientific phenomena and
solve scientific problems.
2. The student can use mathematics appropriately.
3. The student can engage in scientific questioning to extend thinking or to guide investigations
within the context of the AP course.
4. The student can plan and implement data collection strategies appropriate to a particular
scientific question.
5. The student can perform data analysis and evaluation of evidence.
6. The student can work with scientific explanations and theories.
7. The student is able to connect and relate knowledge across various scales, concepts and
representations in and across domains.
Units of Instruction
Unit Topic
Unit 1 - The
Chemistry of Life
& Introduction
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution, Energy,
Interactions
Discussion Topics
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Introduction to the four big ideas and enduring
understandings
The Science Process Reviewed
Emergent Properties of Water
The Impact of Carbon as the “Backbone of Life”
Monomers Making Polymers
1-5
Labs
AP Lab 12 – Animal
Behavior
Water Lab
1.
Unit 2 - Evolution
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution,
Information,
Interactions
How natural selection serves as a mechanisms for
evolution
2. Scientific evidence supporting evolution
3. Hardy-Weinberg concept
4. How allele frequencies can be altered in a
population
5. Concepts of speciation
6. Origin of Life; Fossil Records
7. Events in the “history of life” (origin of single-celled
and multicellular organisms; mass extinctions;
adaptive radiations)
Chps
Unit 3 - The Cell
1.
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution, Energy,
Information,
Interactions
2.
Unit 4 - Cellular
Energy
BIG IDEAS:
Energy,
Information,
Interactions
Unit 5 - Cell
Communication &
The Cell Cycle
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution, Energy,
Information
Unit 6 - Genetic
Examples of organelles that are membrane bound to
compartmentalize their functions.
Membrane structure and function.
AP Lab 1 –
Artificial Selection
22-25
AP Lab 3 – BLAST
Strawfish & HardyWeinberg
6-7
AP Lab 4 Diffusion and
Osmosis
Microscope Lab
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
An Introduction to Metabolism
Laws of Energy Transformations
How ATP powers cellular work
Enzyme structure and function
Harvesting chemical energy: glycolysis, citric acid
cycle, oxidative phosphorylation
6. Light reactions and the Calvin Cycle
7. Evolution of alternative mechanisms of carbon
fixation
Evolution of cell signaling
Reception, transduction, response
Apoptosis
How mitosis produces genetically identical daughter
cells
5. Evolution of Mitosis
6. How the eukaryotic cell cycle is regulated by a
molecular control system
7. Origin of cell communication
AP Lab 13 - Enzyme
Catalysis
8-10
AP Lab 6 – Cellular
Respiration
1.
2.
3.
4.
1.
Genes are passed form parents to offspring by the
AP Lab 5 Photosynthesis
11-12
AP Lab 7 – Cell
Division: Mitosis
and Meiosis
13-15
Genetics of
Basis of Life
2.
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution,
Information,
Interactions
3.
4.
5.
inheritance of chromosomes
How meiosis reduces the number of chromosomes
(diploid to haploid)
Evolutionary significance of genetic variation that
results from sexual life cycles
Concepts of Mendelian genetics (laws of probability,
inheritance patterns)
Genes are located along chromosomes (concepts of
gene linkage, mapping distance between genes,
causes of genetic disorders)
1.
Unit 7 - Gene
Activity &
Biotechnology
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution, Energy,
Information,
Interactions
Unit 8 - Biological
Diversity
DNA is the genetic material (historical experiments,
DNA structure and function, DNA replication)
2. Flow of genetic information (genetic code, role of
other polymers, transcription, translation)
3. Mutations
4. Gene Expression
5. Virus structure and activity
6. Restriction enzymes, plasmids and transformation
7. DNA technology (how gel electrophoresis works and
application of this technology)
Drosophila
1.
2.
AP Lab 8 – Bacterial
Transformation
16-21
Biotechnology
Restriction Enzymes
Phylogenetics
Cladograms
26-34
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution,
1.
Unit 9 - Form and
Function (Plants
and Animals)
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution, Energy,
Information,
Interactions
10.
Evolutionary trends (endosymbiosis, adaptations that
allowed plants to move form water to land,
reproductive adaptations of angiosperms,
environmental roles of fungi, animal body plans,
progressively complex derived characters in animal
groups)
Unique features of the angiosperm life cycles
Signal transduction pathways (animal and plant
hormones)
Phototropism in plants
Feedback control loops in animals
Thermoregulation in animals
Energy allocation and use in animals
Examples of functioning units in mammal systems
(alveoli in lungs, villi of small intestines, nephrons in
kidneys)
Structure and function in nervous systems (neurons,
resting potential, action potential, synapses)
Structure and function of the human brain
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Aspects of animal behavior
Aspects of biomes
Models describing population growth
Regulation of population growth
Community interactions
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Unit 10 - Ecology
BIG IDEAS:
Evolution, Energy,
Information,
Phlyogenetics
Cladogram
Construction
35-39
Organism response
to stimuli
51-56
Food Webs &
Biological
Magnification
Interactions
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
Species diversity and composition
Community biodiversity
Energy flow and chemical cycling in ecosystems
Primary productivity
Energy transfer between trophic levels
Human activities that threaten biodiversity
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AP Biology Syllabus 2015-2016