PERALTA COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT COURSE
OUTLINE
COLLEGE:
Berkeley City College
ORIGINATOR: Mary Jennings
DATE OF OUTLINE
DATE OF CURRICULUM
COMMITTEE APPROVAL:
06/27/2012
EFFECTIVE
Spring 2013
START DATE:
DIVISON/DEPARTMENT:
MATH
1.
REQUESTED CREDIT CLASSIFICATION:(check one only)
Community Services
Degree Credit
Non-Degree Credit Non-Credit
(Fee-based)
[X]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
2.
DEPT/COURSE NO:
MATH 206
4. COURSE:
BCC New Fee
Based Course[ ]
3. COURSE TITLE:
Algebra for Statistics
BCC Course
Changes in
Catalog Info[ ]
5. UNITS: 5 HRS/WK LEC: 6 Total: 105
BCC New
Course[X]
BCC Course
Changes only in
Non-Catalog
Info[ ]
HRS/WK LAB: 0 Total: 0
TOP NO. 1
HRS/WK TBA: 0
AVERAGE ENROLLMENT: 35
6.
NO. OF TIMES OFFERED AS SELECTED TOPIC:
7.
JUSTIFICATION FOR COURSE
As the number of levels of pre-transfer-level mathematics an entering community college student must
complete increases, the likelihood that the student will ever successfully complete a transfer-level
mathematics course decreases according to large research studies conducted both inside and outside of
California. By offering “Algebra for Statistics” the mathematics department aims to provide students w
opportunity to follow a more fruitful path into transfer-level Math 13, Introduction to Statistics.
Contextualizing the algebra curriculum and focusing instruction on the skills, methods and ways of thin
needed for understanding statistical applications is expected to ignite student interest, increase retention
success, and prepare students to succeed in Math 13 the following semester. Not for science, technology
engineering, mathematics, nursing or business majors.
8.
COURSE/CATALOG DESCRIPTION
Integrated mathematics for statistics: Exploratory data analysis and principles of data collection and
calculation; ratios, rates, and proportional reasoning; fractions, decimals and percents; evaluating expre
analyzing algebraic expressions of statistical measures; modeling bivariate data with linear and exponen
functions; graphical and numerical descriptive statistics for quantitative and categorical data. Not for sc
technology, engineering, mathematics, nursing or business majors.
9.
OTHER CATALOG INFORMATION:
a. Modular: Yes [ ] No [X] If yes, how many modules:
b. Open entry/open exit: Yes [ ] No [X]
c. Grading Policy: Both Letter Grade or Pass/No Pass [ ] Pass/No Pass [ ] Letter Grade Only [
d. Eligible for credit by Exam: Yes [ ] No [X]
e. Repeatable according to state guidelines: Yes [ ] No [X] If yes, number of allowable repeats:
f. Required for degree/certificate (specify):
g. Meets GE/Transfer requirements (specify):
h. Are there prerequisites/corequisites/recommended preparation for this course? Yes [X] No [ ]
Date of last prereq/coreq validation: 06/27/2012
LIST STUDENT PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES (EXIT SKILLS): (Objectives must define the e
skills required of students and include criteria identified in Items 12, 14, and 15 - critical thinking, essay
10. writing, problem solving, written/verbal communications, computational skills, working with others,
workplace needs, SCANS competencies, all aspects of the industry, etc.)(See SCANS/All Aspects of
Industry Worksheet.)
Students will be able to:
1. formulate questions that can be addressed with data, then collect, organize, display, and
analyze relevant data to address these questions and communicate findings.
2. use the properties of algebra to simplify expressions, solve equations and answer questio
context.
3. apply numerical, algebraic and geometric reasoning skills to statistical analysis.
4. construct, use, and interpret mathematical models, including linear and exponential funct
that represent relationships in quantitative data.
COURSE CONTENT: (List major topics in sequence; address objectives listed in #11 above. Degree
applicable course must be taught at college level; see definition. List percent of time spent on each topi
11A.
Also, differentiate content of each level, when levels are assigned.) Lecture and lab content are to be lis
separately.
LECTURE CONTENT:
10% Review of Relevant Arithmetic
A. Recognizing and finding equivalent forms of fractions, decimals and percents
B. Comparing fractions, decimals and percents
D. Graphing fractions, decimals and signed numbers on a number line
E. Unit measure and conversion between units
F. Ratios and rates
G. Operations with real numbers
H. Absolute values
I. Exponents and roots
J. Scientific notation
20% Introduction to Algebra
A. Variables and formulas
B. Summation notation, including subscripts
C. Sketching and interpreting graphs in the Cartesian plane including those of points, lines and probab
distributions
D. Finding the equation of a line given its graph or its slope and one point on the line or two points on
line.
E. Solving systems of linear equations in two or three variables
F. Solving quadratic equations
G. Solving simple rational and square root equations
H. Introduction to functions
I. Linear functions
J. Exponential and logarithmic functions
10% Introduction to Logic
A. Venn diagrams
B. The scientific method
15% Categorical Variables
A. Constructing and reading graphs of distributions of categorical data: bar graphs, line graphs and pie
charts
B. Analyzing two-way tables; rules of probability; mutually exclusive and independent events; calcula
joint, marginal and conditional probabilities
15% Quantitative Variables
A. Graphs of univariate distributions of quantitative data: histograms and boxplots
B. Measures of central tendency: mean, median and mode
C. Descriptions and measures of spread: variance, standard deviation, quartiles, percentiles
D. Measure of symmetry: skewness
10% Geometric and Graphical Interpretation of Algebraic Structures
A. Signed distance from the mean
B. Geometric interpretation of standard deviation
C. Symmetry
10% Bivariate Distributions of Quantitative Variables
A. Creating and analyzing scatterplots
B. Intuitive introduction to least squares regression using linear and exponential models
C. Intuitive and graphical introduction to correlation coefficient r
10% Data Collection
A. Sample surveys
B. Observation vs. experiment
11B.
LAB CONTENT:
12. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION (List methods used to present course content.)
1. Lecture
2. Discussion
3. Projects
13. ASSIGNMENTS: 10 hours/week. (List all assignments, including library assignments. Requires two (2
hours of independent work outside of class for each unit/weekly lecture hour. Outside assignments are n
required for lab-only courses, although they can be given.)
Out-of-class Assignments: Problem sets including problems equivalent to those covered in lectures and
original problems which require the synthesizing of various concepts. Research project and paper
summarizing statistical findings.
ASSIGNMENTS ARE: (Check one. See definition of college level):
[X] Primarily college level
[ ] NOT primarily college level
STUDENT ASSESSMENT: (Grades are based on): (Check as many boxes as are applicable. Note: Fo
14. degree credit, AT LEAST ONE of the first three boxes must be checked. If "ESSAY" is not checked, pl
explain why here.)
ESSAY (Includes "blue book" exams and any written assignment of sufficient length and
[X] complexity to require students to select and organize ideas, to explain and support the ideas,
demonstrate critical thinking skills.)
Why "ESSAY" is not checked:
[X] COMPUTATION SKILLS
NON-COMPUTATIONAL PROBLEM SOLVING (Critical thinking should be demonstrat
[X]
solving unfamiliar problems via various strategies.)
[X] SKILL DEMONSTRATION
[X] MULTIPLE CHOICE
[ ] OTHER (Describe)
15. TEXTS, READINGS, AND MATERIALS:
A.
Textbooks:
Date of
Publicatio
Utts, Jessica M
Seeing Through Statistics (3rd/e). Brooks Cole,
(2009).
Additional class activities and materials for this course are currently under development by BCC Mathemati
department faculty in collaboration with colleagues at other Bay Area community colleges and a 2011-2012
consortium organized by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
Author
Title and Edition
Publisher
*Date is required: Transfer institutions require current publication date(s) within 5 years of outline addition/u
B.
Additional Resources:
Library/LRC Materials and Services:
1.
The instructor, in consultation with a librarian, has reviewed the materials and se
of the College Library/LRC in the subject areas related to the proposed new cour
Are print materials adequate?
Yes [X]
No [ ]
Are nonprint materials adequate?
Yes [X]
No [ ]
Are electronic/online resources available?
Yes [X]
No [ ]
Are services adequate?
Yes [X]
No [ ]
Specific materials and/or services needed have been identified and discussed.
Librarian comments:
Joshua Boatright. Action: Reviewed 09/13/2011
2.
C.
Other Resources: Identify types, location, and availability of other resources and
materials required for this course.
Readings listed in A and B above are: (Check one. See definition of college level):
[X] Primarily college level
[ ] NOT primarily college level
16. Designate Occupational Code (check ONE only):
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
[X]
A
B
C
D
E
Apprenticeship
Advance Occupational
Occupational
Possible Occupational
Non-Occupational
SUPPLEMENTAL PAGE
Use only if additional space is needed. (Type the item number which is to be continued, followed by "contin
Show the page number in the blank at the bottom of the page. If the item being continued is on page 2 of the
the first supplemental page will be "2a." If additional supplemental pages are required for page 2, they are
numbered as 2b, 2c, etc.)
1a. Prerequisites/Corequisites/Recommended Preparation:
PREREQUISITE(S):


MATH 253: Pre-Algebra
or
appropriate placement through multiple measures assessment process
Subject course and pre/corequisite is: