Fayetteville State University
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Natural Sciences
I.
II.
LOCATOR INFORMATION
Semester:
Year:
Course No. & Name:
Semester Hours of Credit:
Lecture time/location:
Laboratory time/location:
Prerequisite:
Instructor:
Office location:
Office phone:
Office hours:
Email:
Summer I
2005
CHEM 140-02, General Chemistry I
4
MTWRF 1:00 - 2:50 PM / LS 304 West
T&R 3:00-5:50 PM / LS 302
MATH 123 or 129
Cevdet Akbay
LS 227
672-1943
MTWR 10:00 AM- 12:00 PM or by appointment
[email protected]
Laboratory manager:
Laboratory manager office location:
Laboratory manager phone:
Laboratory manager e-mail:
Ivy Rittenhouse
305
672-1054
[email protected]
COURSE DESCRIPTION
A study of atomic theory, bonding, molecular structure and geometry, stoichiometry, thermochemistry and the three
states of matter, with laboratory activities investigating mole-mass relationships, gas laws, and measurement of
thermochemical phenomena.
III.
TEXTBOOK
Brown, Theodore L.; LeMay, H. Eugene Jr.; Bursten, Bruce E.; Burdge, Julia R. Chemistry: The Central Science, 9th
Edition. Pearson Education (2003).
Nelson, John H.; Kemp, Kenneth C. Chemistry: The Central Science, 9th Ed., Laboratory Experiments. Pearson
Education (2003).
IV.
COURSE OBJECTIVES
Chemistry 140, General Chemistry I, is the first part of a two semester (one year) course in college-level chemistry. It
is a broad-based course in chemical principles, designed primarily for students having career interests in chemistry,
biology, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, physics, engineering, environmental, agricultural, and forensic sciences. The
chemical principles which will be introduced in this course are: atomic theory, bonding, molecular structure and
geometry, thermochemistry, the states of matter, with laboratory activities investigating mole-mass relationships, gas
laws, and chemical reactions.
Students should gain knowledge of the concepts of chemistry and an understanding of how these concepts connect with
everyday life. Through study of these topics, hands-on experience in the laboratory, and practice in written
communication, the chemical mode of thinking that is central to so many sciences will become more familiar. Students
will gain preparation for careers in not only chemistry itself, but in biology, engineering, and health-related fields.
V.
EVALUATION CRITERIA
The progress of each student will be evaluated by means of three one-hour examinations given during the semester,
quizzes, homework, laboratory reports, and a final examination. The exams, quizzes, homework, and lab reports are
graded out of 100-scaled points, whose grade equivalent is in Section B below.
A. Grade Distribution
Exams
Homework and quizzes
Laboratory reports
Final examination
Class attendance
Total
40
20
15
20
5
100
A
B
C
D
F
B. Grading Scale
90-100
80-89
70-79
60-69
59 or below
VI.
COURSE OUTLINE
WEEK OF
May 23
May 30
(Independence Day,
May 30, no classes)
June 6
June 13
June 20
TOPIC
Introduction: Matter and Measurement
Atoms, Molecules, and Ions
Stoichiometry: Calculations with Chemical formulas and
Equations
Gases
Aqueous Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry
Thermochemistry
Electronic Structure of Atoms
Periodic Properties of the Elements
Basic Concepts of Chemical Bonding
Molecular Geometry and Bonding Theories
Intermolecular Forces, Liquids, and Solids
June 24, last day of class
LABORATORY SCHEDULE
WEEK OF
Page
Number
May 23
May 30
June 6
June 13
June 20
VII.
p. 25 - 40
p. 41 - 52
p. 67 - 82
Hand Out
p. 83 - 100
p. 101 - 112
p. 113 - 126
Hand Out
CHAPTER
1
2
3
10
(Sections 10.1-10.6)
4
5
6
7
8
9
11
Experiment Title
Check In/Safety Briefing
Identification of Substances by Physical Properties
Separation of the Components of a Mixture
Chemical Formulas
Quantitative solution Preparation (Molarity)
Behavior of Gases: Molar Mass of a Vapor (Part B, p. 88)
Chemical Reactions of Copper and Percent Yield
Chemicals in Everyday Life: What are they and how do we know?
Chromatography
Make-up labs and Check Out of Lab
COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Learning strategies: Curiosity and open-mindedness are virtues in this and any other college course. Whether you
are new to chemistry or had it before, make an effort to put aside any prejudices or emotional baggage associated with
the subject and make a fresh start at it. Asking questions is critical in this course (even more so than taking notes).
Don’t be shy to ask them: no matter how dumb you think your question is. Finally, learning chemistry by relying solely
on listening to lectures and reading the book is like trying to learn a musical instrument by watching somebody else
play it. Focus on doing, whether it is in-class exercises, homework, or practice problems in the book.
Laboratory: There is no substitute for the “hands-on” learning in the laboratory. That is why, even as more and more
content can be delivered electronically, chemistry courses still include laboratories in spite of the considerable trouble
and expense. As you carry out an experiment, be observant, because the things you see can often not be explained any
other way. I will be circulating around the lab to assist you in what to look for as you do the experiment, but make an
effort to notice things yourself. The laboratory manual has a procedure for each experiment: make sure to read it
before coming to the lab and while in the lab make sure you follow the procedure. You have to answer the pre-lab
questions and hand them on before you begin the experiment. If you do not have the pre-lab answers, or if you are late
more than 10 minutes, you will not be allowed to attend the lab. No exceptions.
Laboratory reports: Please see the CHEM Lab format document on BlackBoard (“Course Documents” section). All
reports must be written according to the lab format detailed in this document.
The final exam will be cumulative, that is, the questions will cover all the chapters covered during the entire semester.
Date of the final will be announced later.
VIII.
TEACHING STRATEGIES
I will make every attempt to present the material clearly and to encourage discussion by making it interesting, utilizing
opportunities to connect chemistry to everyday life. Some lecture time will be used for group work on certain problems
(where I circulate around to see how people are doing). Demonstrations, where appropriate, will be used as well.
IX.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
1) J. W. Hill, R. H. Petrucci. General Chemistry: An Integrated Approach. 2nd Ed. Prentice Hall (1999); 2) R.
Chang. Chemistry. 6th Ed. McGraw-Hill (2000); 3) P. Atkins, L. Jones. Chemistry: Molecules, Matter, and Change
3rd Ed. Freeman (1998); 4) S. S. Zumdahl, S. A. Zumdahl. Chemistry. 5th Ed. Houghton Mifflin (2000).
X.
DISCLAIMER
To accommodate emergent circumstances, the professor reserves the right to make reasonable changes in the syllabus while the course is in progress.
Any understandings between a student and the professor including, but not limited to, changes, expectations, or modifications to course requirements or
procedures must be in writing and must be signed by both parties. Any question of interpretation of course requirements or of understandings between a
student and the professor will be at the discretion of the professor.
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Course Syllabus - Fayetteville State University