Brisbane City Council
Annual Report
2012-13
Brisbane City Council is the largest local government in Australia. Our responsibility is to provide
leadership and good governance for the people of Brisbane and manage our resources to
create a vibrant city now, and for the future.
This report is divided into a number of sections: an overview of Council and the organisation;
progress and performance; governance and disclosures and detailed financial reporting.
This Annual Report references the Corporate Plan
2012/13-2016/17.
In August 2013, Council adopted a refreshed long- term community plan Brisbane Vision
2031.
© 2013 Brisbane City Council
This work is copyright. Permission to reproduce information contained in this
report must be obtained from:
BRISBANE CITY COUNCIL
GPO Box 1434, Brisbane Qld 4001
Phone: +61 7 3403 8888
Web: www.brisbane.qld.gov.au
On the cover
Brisbane City Council is getting on with the job and planning for the future.
The Brisbane cityscape represents our city’s continued growth, with Council’s focus
areas displayed through the use of text.
Design and typesetting
Brio Group
2
Contents
Brisbane City Council Annual Report 2012-13
Our Vision Our Values .................................................................................................................. 5
Brisbane at a glance ..................................................................................................................... 6
Brisbane in profile ........................................................................................................................ 7
Corporate Plan scorecard ........................................................................................................... 10
Strategic planning ....................................................................................................................... 17
Our Council ............................................................................................................................... 25
Lord Mayor’s Report ................................................................................................................... 26
Chief Executive Officer’s Report ................................................................................................. 28
Our elected representatives ........................................................................................................ 30
Civic Cabinet .............................................................................................................................. 38
Organisational structure .............................................................................................................. 41
Our people .................................................................................................................................. 45
Awards and recognition .............................................................................................................. 48
Progress and performance – programs .................................................................................. 50
Program 1: Sustainable, Green and Clean City........................................................................... 51
Program 2: WaterSmart City ....................................................................................................... 60
Program 3: Moving Brisbane....................................................................................................... 67
Program 4: Future Brisbane ........................................................................................................ 75
Program 5: Your Brisbane .......................................................................................................... 80
Program 6: Public Health and Safety .......................................................................................... 89
Program 7: Economic Development ............................................................................................ 95
Program 8: Customer Focus ..................................................................................................... 102
Program 9: City Governance..................................................................................................... 108
Progress and performance – businesses ............................................................................. 118
Brisbane Transport ................................................................................................................... 119
Field Services Group ................................................................................................................ 125
City Parking .............................................................................................................................. 130
Community financial report ................................................................................................... 133
Revenue and expenses: ........................................................................................................... 134
Assets and liabilities.................................................................................................................. 137
Mesures of financial sustainability ............................................................................................. 138
Queensland Urban Utilities: Water distribution retailer .............................................................. 138
Rates: Fair and equitable rates and rates concessions ............................................................. 138
Corporate governance............................................................................................................ 140
Risk management ..................................................................................................................... 142
Assurance, security and ethical standards ................................................................................ 142
Brisbane City Council Audit Committee..................................................................................... 144
The Queensland Audit Office .................................................................................................... 145
Complaints management .......................................................................................................... 146
Right to Information and Information Privacy access requests .................................................. 147
National Competition Policy ...................................................................................................... 147
Code of Conduct ....................................................................................................................... 150
Disclosures ............................................................................................................................. 151
Councillor remuneration ............................................................................................................ 152
Councillor expenses reimbursement ......................................................................................... 153
Councillor attendance, suspensions, conduct and complaints .................................................. 156
Executive remuneration ............................................................................................................ 158
Overseas travel......................................................................................................................... 159
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Registers kept by Council ......................................................................................................... 161
Land, reserves and controlled roads ......................................................................................... 163
Grants to community organisations ........................................................................................... 164
Councillors’ discretionary funds ................................................................................................ 164
Annual Financial Statements ................................................................................................. 209
Glossary .................................................................................................................................. 210
Index ........................................................................................................................................ 210
Contact details ........................................................................................................................ 228
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Our Vision Our Values
Our Shared Vision
Brisbane is a youthful and enthusiastic city – spanning city and bush to hills and bay. It is
appreciated by residents and visitors for its friendliness and optimism, and respected for its
leadership and achievements.
Brisbane’s leadership in civic governance and technology will deliver active and healthy
communities, drive a strong economy, sustain a clean and green environment, create a city of
cultural vibrancy and provide an enduring legacy of liveability for future generations.
Council’s and residents’ shared vision for our city is based on the principles of shared
responsibility for the future of our city, and sets a path that will maintain and improve the
lifestyle and quality of life for residents, both now and in the future.
Our Values
Council undertakes business with the following values in mind:
• passion for Brisbane
• responsive customer service
• respect for people
• courage to make a difference
• working together
• getting things done
• value for money.
5
Brisbane at a glance
A snapshot of the Brisbane local government area in figures as at 30 June 2013.
Brisbane’s Local Government Area (LGA)
Residential population
Population by age
0-4
5-19
20-64
65-100+
Population demographics
Indigenous
Australian born
Overseas born
International students
(including Tertiary, TAFE, technical and English language
institutions)
What’s Brisbane like
Geographical area
Length of the Brisbane River within the Brisbane City
boundary
Average daily high temperature
Average daily low temperature
Council facilities and infrastructure
Libraries
Community halls
Sites leased to community organisations and sports clubs
Swimming pools
Cemeteries and crematoria
Parks (natural areas and urban parks)
Playgrounds
Picnic grounds
Dog off-leash areas in parks
Cross river bridges (excludes
CLEM7 Tunnel)
Cross River Ferries
CityCats
Buses
Bus stops
Wharves, jetties, pontoons and boat ramps
Natural areas managed by Council
Area of sports parks owned and managed by Council
Length of constructed and formed roads
Length of bikeways
Length of paths and walkways
1,109,664
6%
18%
64%
12%
1.5%
69%
29.5%
72,000
1338.1 km²
114 km
24.9 °C
14.9 °C
33
14
585
20
12
2074
1014
551
122
8
9
19
1255
6575
75
8493.9 ha
1178.6 ha
5690 km
1143 km
4324 km
6
Brisbane in profile
Our history
Brisbane is named after Sir Thomas Brisbane, a noted astronomer and the sixth Governor of New
South Wales.
Before European settlement, Aboriginal people lived in the Brisbane area. The land surrounding
the river was rich with life, with pockets of rainforest, scrub and coastal plains featuring swamps
and lagoons.
In 1823, Sir Thomas dispatched a party led by Lieutenant John Oxley to find a remote outpost
suitable for housing repeat offending convicts. Oxley sailed into Moreton Bay, discovered the
mouth of the Brisbane River and explored its length.
In 1824, a penal settlement was established nearby in Redcliffe. In 1825, it moved to the area now
known as North Quay. Despite word quickly spreading to England that Brisbane’s fertile land was
suited to agricultural settlement, free settlement was not declared until 1842.
From that point Brisbane grew quickly. The new agricultural industry, discoveries of gold and
Brisbane being named the capital of the colony of Queensland laid the foundations of our modern
city.
Our city
Today, Brisbane is a thriving and progressive city steadily building its reputation as Australia’s
New World City.
The city is home to more than one million people and is renowned for its riverside location,
distinctive subtropical climate and friendly relaxed lifestyle – all of which attract businesses,
workers and tourists from across the world.
It is predicted that Brisbane will be the fastest growing economy of the mature cities worldwide
from 2012-2020.1
Jones Lang Lasalle, “A New World of Cities”, World Winning Cities Global Foresight Series
2012.
1
7
Geographically, the city covers 1338.1 km² and stretches from Brighton in the north and Manly in
the east to Forest Lake in the south and Mount Crosby in the west.
Our river
Brisbane is often referred to as the River City.
The Brisbane River is at the heart of the city and serves as the backdrop for social and cultural
excursions, weekend picnics and the annual River Festival.
It is the longest river in South East Queensland. In 2011, for the first time in 40 years, the river
burst its banks deluging 94 suburbs, more than 7600 businesses and 22,000 homes. In spite of
the heartache and extensive damage caused, Brisbane bounced back. Today, it’s difficult to see
any signs of the flood. CityCats glide along the river, and joggers and walkers make the most of
its scenic bank walkways.
Our people
Brisbane is rapidly emerging as a diverse and energised global city with a $135 billion economy
and a proudly multicultural population.
Almost 30% of Brisbane residents were born overseas and more than 20% of households speak
two or more languages at home. Apart from English, the languages most frequently spoken in
Brisbane are Mandarin, Vietnamese, Cantonese, Italian and Spanish.
Brisbane’s thriving economy is driving continued population growth in the region. By 2031, the
city’s population is projected to reach 1.27 million.
Our Council
In 1859, Brisbane was declared a municipality – a city with its own local government. The city’s
first election took place in October of that year and John Petrie, a noted builder and stonemason,
became the first mayor.
The origins of the present day Brisbane City Council lie in 1924 when, almost 100 years after
Brisbane was founded, State Parliament passed the City of Brisbane Act, setting up a single,
citywide local government for the whole of Brisbane. Before this, the area had been divided into
20 local authorities and joint boards. 2
The newly elected Council was headed by Brisbane’s first Lord Mayor, William Jolly, who took
office on 1 October 1925 and served until 1931. Since then Brisbane has elected 15 lord mayors
including the incumbent Lord Mayor Graham Quirk.3
Brisbane City Council. (2013) “Council History”, [Online] http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/aboutcouncil/council-information-and-rates/council-history/index.htm
3
Brisbane City Council. (2013) “Brisbane’s Lord Mayors”, [Online]
http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/about-council/council-information-andrates/councilhistory/brisbanes-lord-mayors/index.htm
2
8
Today, Brisbane City Council is the largest local government in Australia, both in population and
budget.
Our City Hall
Although Brisbane became a municipality in 1859, it was 71 years before a suitable city hall was
built. Building City Hall was a major undertaking in the 1920s. At time of construction City Hall
was one of the most expensive Australian buildings ever built, with a price tag of nearly £1 million
it was the second largest construction of its time. 4 It ranked only behind the Sydney Harbour
Bridge.5
City Hall took 10 years to build and was officially opened in April 1930. Today, the classically
inspired building of local sandstone and timber is one of Queensland’s most significant heritage
and cultural icons.
On Saturday 6 April 2013, City Hall was rededicated to the people of Brisbane after closing for a
three-year, $215 million restoration and repair project.
Over the years, the building has played an important role in the lives of Brisbane’s local
community in times of war, peace, celebration and refuge. This has earned City Hall the title of
the ‘People’s Place’.
The careful restoration of City Hall uncovered a number of important archaeological items
including a cobblestone drain and paving dating back to the late 1880s, and a signature wall
featuring more than 150 signatures from World War II veterans. 6
Our goals
Brisbane City Council aims to:
• enhance the quality of life of the people of Brisbane, build vibrant communities, and improve the
quality and value of services
• support the sustainable development of the regional economy and improve the city’s
infrastructure
• protect and enhance the city’s natural and built environments
• ensure the financial success of Council.
4
McBride, F.et.al. (Eds.). (2009) Brisbane 150 Stories 1859-2009. Brisbane: Brisbane City
Council, 161.
5
Hogan, (1982) Living History of Brisbane. Brisbane, 105.
6
Brisbane City Council. (2013) “City Hall archaeological discoveries”, [Online]
http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/facilities-recreation/parksand-venues/city-hall/city-hall-historyand-heritage/archaeologicaldiscoveries/index.htm
9
Corporate Plan scorecard
About our scorecard
This scorecard summarises progress towards achieving the medium-term objectives of the
Corporate Plan2012/13-2016/17. Progressing these is central to achieving our long-term
community plan.
Overall performance is determined by measuring our achievement against performance
indicators and the progress of major initiatives.
We use the ratings:
Delivered: objective is achieved or completed
On track: work is continuing as planned and budgeted
Monitor closely: progress is being made but is not matching what was planned and budgeted, or
progress is difficult to measure
Action required: work has stopped or progress is insufficient to achieve the objective.
Program 1: Sustainable, Green and Clean City
Our medium-term objectives
1.1 Sustainability leadership
Reduce Council’s greenhouse gas emissions.
Implement a continual improvement program in the area of energy efficiency
and carbon abatement, to minimise the required purchase of GreenPower and
offsets.
Reduce the environmental risks of Council’s activities and operations.
1.2 Sustainable Brisbane
Reduce greenhouse emissions and the environmental footprint of Brisbane
homes.
Reduce the greenhouse emissions of Brisbane businesses.
1.3 Biodiverse city
Recognise and promote the wealth of Brisbane’s biodiversity.
1.4 Parks, gardens and recreation
Extend and improve capacity of the city’s street and park tree assets to deliver
attractive and shaded pathways and public spaces.
Develop subtropical boulevards along main arterial roads.
Ensure an accessible, diverse and connected network of public and private
open space.
Continue to plan, design and deliver a range of park types and facilities that
reflect the needs of our growing city.
Provide a hierarchy of parks and park facility maintenance consistent with the
parks asset management plan.
1.5 Pollution-free city
Improve Brisbane’s air quality.
Lower the environmental risks associated with Brisbane’s 150 closed landfill
sites.
Improve the air quality performance of Council’s activities and operations.
1.6 Managing and reducing Brisbane’s waste and litter
Reduce waste disposal to landfill by 25% by 2014 (against 2008 baseline).
Status
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
Monitor closely
10
Increase recycling of municipal solid waste by 50% by 2014 (against 2008
baseline).
Reduce waste generation by 5% by 2014.
Reduce on-ground litter levels in the CBD and Fortitude Valley to less than 60
pieces of litter per litter count area by 2017. This equates to a minimum 37%
reduction in on-ground litter compared to July 2009 baseline.
Improve the Clean Communities Assessment Tool cleanliness range in the
CBD and Fortitude Valley from 3.7 (average cleanliness) to 4.0 (very clean).
Achieve a rating of 3.0 or above, 95% of the time (service delivery standards –
CBD and Fortitude Valley).
Monitor closely
On track
On track
On track
On track
Program 2: WaterSmart City
Our medium-term objectives
2.1 Sustainable water management
Develop a framework that guides development within our catchments to
ensure our built environment minimises adverse impacts and maximises the
benefits the community receives from our local water resources.
Maintain or improve the community’s awareness of water smart concepts and
water smart behaviour.
Council’s asset policy and planning, natural resource management and
development assessment staff will progress water-smart initiatives in their daily
responsibilities including asset planning and management.
2.2 Focus on the river, bay and waterways
Maintain performance against local waterway health indicators of riparian
cover and in-stream habitat diversity.
Develop a sustainable framework of funding and action to maintain and
improve the health of regional waterways and the bay.
85% of Brisbane’s community recognise and value the contribution Brisbane’s
waterways make to the liveability of the city.
2.3 Flood management
Council will develop and implement a risk based approach to plan for, manage
and build capacity to respond to flooding across the city.
Brisbane’s residents will better understand their risk of flooding and will be
better prepared and more resilient to flooding.
Council will continue to reduce the likelihood and consequences of flooding to
ensure Brisbane can continue to effectively function before, during and after a
flood.
Status
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
Program 3: Moving Brisbane
Our medium-term objectives
3.1 Promoting active transport
Active transport to achieve more than 16% share of all journeys in Brisbane by
2018.
Provide a well-connected network of safe and continuous bikeway routes.
3.2 Public transport
By 2018, bus patronage will increase to more than 90 million trips per year.
By 2018, ferry patronage will increase to seven million trips per year.
Bus and ferry services will be more accessible to people with a disability.
3.3 Transport network
Continue delivery of the Road Action Program.
Continue to implement the TransApex plan and Local Road Network program.
Reduce traffic congestion by ensuring the best performance of the transport
Status
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
Delivered
On track
On track
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network.
Improve road safety for all road users and reduce trip times.
Maintain and improve the condition of transport network assets.
On track
On track
Program 4: Future Brisbane
Our medium-term objectives
4.1 Planning for a growing city
Continue to implement planning that integrates built and natural environment,
social, economic and infrastructure priorities.
Recognise and plan for areas where citywide regulations may be altered to
better suit local circumstances.
By 2017, the Priority Infrastructure Plan will align Council’s infrastructure plans
with the growth forecasts for the city.
Work collaboratively to benefit Brisbane and the South East Queensland
region by contributing to the revision of the South East Queensland Regional
Plan 2009-2031.
Enhance provisions for a range of housing options to respond to changes in
Brisbane’s population.
4.2 Enhancing the city’s liveability
Continue to provide opportunities for communities to have a say in how their
neighbourhoods are planned and developed.
Integrate commercial and residential development and renewal projects to
deliver high quality places that help Brisbane compete regionally and
internationally as Australia’s New World City.
4.3 Approving quality development
Maintain assessment times and standards at high levels.
Maintain and enhance Brisbane’s heritage in balance with growth and new
development through more effective design mechanisms.
Status
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
Program 5: Your Brisbane
Our medium-term objectives
5.1 Thriving arts and culture
Achieve 75% resident satisfaction with Council’s provision of arts and cultural
facilities and events.
Achieve 75% resident satisfaction with significant festivals such as Brisbane
Festival and the Queensland Music Festival.
The Brisbane Powerhouse will attract more than 300,000 visitors per year.
Signature festivals like Brisbane Festival and the Queensland Music Festival
will attract increased patronage.
5.2 Libraries for an informed community
Council’s libraries will have 400,000 members.
Maintain a 90% customer satisfaction with Council’s library services.
Brisbane libraries will hold 17,000 Council archival records.
Council’s libraries will have 100,000 parents and children attending children’s
reading and literacy programs each year.
Council’s libraries will have six million visits each year.
More than 150,000 people will attend learning and cultural events at libraries
each year.
5.3 Active and healthy communities
Achieve 75% resident satisfaction with Council’s provision of fitness activities
in which residents can participate.
Achieve 70% resident awareness of Council’s active and healthy lifestyle
Status
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
12
programs.
80% of sporting and recreation clubs leasing Council properties are positive
about Council’s engagement with them.
5.4 Social inclusion
Achieve 60% resident satisfaction with Council’s provision for assisting people
in need.
70% of community organisations (customers) will rate Council positively for its
provision of services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Communities,
young people, seniors, people with a disability, the homeless, multicultural
communities and refugees.
Implement social inclusion initiatives.
5.5 Well-managed community facilities
80% resident satisfaction with Council’s provision of sporting and recreational
facilities such as pools, golf courses, halls and sports grounds.
80% of customers are satisfied with Council’s management of major venues,
such as the Planetarium, Riverstage, Council pools and golf courses.
Achieve patronage target of two million people for Council pools.
Implement the Disability Access program across Council pools.
80% of leased Council facilities achieve a Council ‘C’ rating and are fit for
purpose.
Condition audits are completed on 20% of leased Council facilities each year.
Condition audits are completed on 25% of leased Council sports fields
annually.
Undertake an annual review of 95% of all sporting, recreational and community
lessees of Council facilities.
75% of lessees are satisfied with Council’s management of its community
facilities.
5.6 City icons
City Hall will be restored as the ‘People’s Place’.
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
Delivered
Program 6: Public Health and Safety
Our medium-term objectives
6.1 Public health
Reduce cases of vaccine-preventable and mosquito-borne diseases in the
community.
Maintain and enhance Brisbane’s amenity.
Improve community health and safety outcomes through public health
licensing and regulatory services.
Protect the community from public health risks and disease outbreaks.
6.2 Citizens’ security
Maintain a high level of actual safety in the community.
Achieve a high level of perceived safety in the community.
Improve safety by engaging, educating and involving the community.
6.3 Cemeteries
Deliver quality and cost-effective cemeteries and crematoria to reflect the
diversity of Brisbane residents.
Status
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
Program 7: Economic Development
Our medium-term objectives
7.1 Growing Brisbane’s economy
Regional offices of international companies will increasingly establish in
Brisbane.
Status
On track
13
Brisbane will be a city where it is easy to do business, with world class
infrastructure and services responsive to business needs.
Brisbane will continue to create jobs that satisfy its growing business sector.
7.2 Removing barriers to growth
Public sector capital investment will support Brisbane’s projected employment
and population growth.
The community will be able to access free Wi-Fi on public transport networks
and in public places.
Brisbane will have an efficient private, public and active transport network that
supports the needs of the community and workers.
7.3 A city of many skills
Highly skilled workers will choose to live in Brisbane because of its exciting
employment opportunities, its high amenity and attractive lifestyle.
Continue to support Brisbane’s intake of international students.
Brisbane businesses can access the skills they require.
7.4 Promoting productive precincts
Office floor space in Brisbane’s inner city will keep pace with demand.
Brisbane’s industrial businesses are able to grow and expand in locations such
as Australia TradeCoast and in the southwest industrial gateway.
Ensure the city’s land assets support business demand in employment growth
locations.
7.5 Capturing Brisbane’s unique window of opportunity
Brisbane will be rated as Australia’s New World City of economic, social,
cultural and lifestyle achievement.
Brisbane will attract a growing number of domestic and international visitors,
and international visitors will increase their length of stay.
Grow the number of high yield, visitor-attracting events to bring increased
delegate visitor days and spend to the city.
7.6 Export market development
Brisbane will maintain strong export growth.
Promote a customer-focused culture within Council.
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
Program 8: Customer Focus
Our medium-term objectives
8.1 Engagement
54% of residents rate Council ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ in providing residents with
opportunities to participate in consultation about issues affecting Brisbane.
75% of residents rate Council as being ‘good’ or ‘excellent’ in reporting back to
residents following consultation.
60% of residents are aware of the Your City Your Say initiative.
8.2 Service delivery
Council will make it easier for customers to interact with us through a range of
channels. We will improve the experience of all customers who interact with
Council.
Meet the service standards of Council’s Customer Charter.
Maintain high levels of overall satisfaction with Council’s service delivery
channels for both residents and businesses.
8.3 A Council easy to do business with
Customers will be satisfied Council understands their needs.
Promote a customer-focused culture within Council.
Status
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
14
Program 9: Corporate Governance
Our medium-term objectives
9.1 Civic administration and support
Council is committed to being an effective and transparent government.
Council will consult widely and openly with the community.
9.2 Regional and international activities
Foster international relationships that offer economic development
opportunities.
Work with other governments and organisations for the benefit of the local
community, city and region.
9.3 Strong and responsible financial management
Remain a financially sustainable organisation.
Ensure Council’s programs and services meet the current and future needs of
the community.
9.4 Value for money
Reduce procurement costs while maintaining value.
9.5 Risk management
Provide effective risk management.
Protect Council assets, people and the environment.
9.6 Managing Council’s business
Ensure Council’s plans, practices, processes and the capabilities of its people
are aligned to deliver the long-term community plan and Council’s Corporate
Plan.
9.7 Employer of choice
Council will have a cost-effective, adaptable and capable workforce to
implement the Vision for the city.
Council will be an employer of choice.
9.8 Corporate communication
Align corporate communication with Council’s plans.
Maintain or increase Brisbane residents’ awareness that Council has a Vision
for the future of the city.
Maintain and improve employee satisfaction via consistent internal
communication.
9.9 Information and communications technology
Council’s business performance will be supported and improved through
information and communication technologies (ICT).
Increase organisational satisfaction with ICT service delivery.
The benefits delivered by ICT projects are identified and delivery of these is
monitored.
9.10 Disaster response and recovery
Ensure Council remains compliant with Queensland’s Disaster Management
Act 2003.
Deliver disaster planning and preparedness to reduce the impact of future
disasters.
Build a more robust and resilient community.
Status
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
On track
City Projects Office
City Projects Office will provide leadership, advice and professional services to
create innovative solutions for the delivery of community assets and economic
infrastructure for Brisbane.
On track
Brisbane Transport
Continue to meet customer needs and contribute to congestion reduction and
accessibility by delivering frequent, reliable and safe services.
On track
15
Field Services Group
Provide high quality and value for money services to Council.
Deliver programmed services on time and within scope and budget.
Field Services Group’s workforce will be highly skilled and motivated, and will
have a uniform focus on safety as a critical business enabler.
On track
On track
On track
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Strategic planning
Council’s strategic planning integrates our planning and delivery of services and projects to
achieve our Vision.
Council’s strategic planning framework
The diagram below illustrates the key elements of Council’s strategic planning framework and
associated reporting.
Council’s strategic planning encompasses long-term, medium-term and annual horizons.
Integrated financial, asset, land use, infrastructure and service planning is necessary to ensure
the achievement of outcomes together with effective and efficient delivery of community services.
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Long-term planning
Our Vision was developed in consultation with a broad cross-section of Brisbane residents.
Council has adopted it as its long-term community plan. It identifies eight themes which reflect
Council’s and the community’s shared priorities for making Brisbane a liveable city with a
sustainable future.
•
Friendly, safe city
•
Clean, green city
•
Well designed, subtropical city
•
Accessible, connected city
•
Smart, prosperous city
•
Active, healthy city
•
Vibrant, creative city
•
New World City
Financial management
Council’s budgets include long-term financial forecasts and a number of measures of financial
sustainability. Included are the three measures of financial sustainability mandated under the City
of Brisbane Regulation 2012:
•
asset sustainability ratio
•
net financial liabilities ratio
•
operating surplus ratio.
Council’s current year and long-term financial sustainability statements are included with
Council’s annual financial statement later in this report.
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Financial ratios
Ratio
Formula and
Explanation
2012-13
Actual
2013-14
Proposed
2014-15
Proposed
2015-16
Proposed
2016-17
Proposed
2017-18
Proposed
2018-19
Proposed
2019-20
Proposed
2020-21
Proposed
2021-22
Proposed
2022-23
Proposed
43.4%
43.3%
37.4%
47.8%
49.1%
49.3%
49.3%
49.3%
49.3%
49.3%
49.3%
1.9 times
2.2 times
5.1 times
2.1 times
2.1 times
2.7 times
2.8 times
3.0 times
3.3 times
3.5 times
3.7 times
Revenue Ratio
Net rates and
utility charges
revenue / total
revenue
Council’s
dependence on
rate income
Debt Servicing
Cover
Operating
capability increase
+ debt servicing
costs / debt
servicing costs
Extent to which
debt servicing cost
requirements are
covered by the
increase in
operating
capability
Debt Servicing
Ratio
19
Debt servicing and
redemption cost /
total revenue
6.0%
9.7%
32.0%
9.8%
9.7%
9.4%
9.3%
9.0%
8.8%
8.7%
8.6%
105.8%
117.5%
82.4%
98.7%
93.4%
91.5%
87.2%
82.0%
80.0%
77.4%
74.9%
7.7 to 1
6.7 to 1
7.3 to 1
7.2 to 1
7.4 to 1
7.4 to 1
7.5 to 1
7.7 to 1
7.7 to 1
7.8 to 1
7.8 to 1
13.7%
22.3%
85.6%
20.4%
19.7%
19.1%
18.8%
18.2%
17.8%
17.6%
17.5%
The capacity of the
Council to service
its outstanding
debt
Net Debt /
Revenue Ratio
Net debt / total
revenue
Council’s
borrowing ability
Debt Exposure
Ratio
Total assets / total
liabilities
Council’s exposure
to debt
Debt Commitment
Ratio
Debt servicing and
redemption costs /
net rate and utility
charges revenue
Identifies Council
debt redemption
strategy
20
Net Debt Per
Capita
Working Capital
Ratio
$1783
$2084
$1771
$1733
$1668
$1668
$1629
$1570
$1573
$1562
$1552
Current assets /
current liabilities
0.6
0.5
0.3
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.3%
0.5%
2.7%
1.1%
1.2%
5.6%
6.1%
6.7%
7.8%
9.0%
9.8%
137.1%
158.4%
138.0%
135.2%
128.1%
125.0%
120.4%
114.0%
110.9%
107.7%
104.7%
Extent to which
Council has liquid
assets available to
meet short term
financial
obligations
Operating Surplus
Ratio
Net operating
surplus / total
operating revenue
Extent to which
revenues raised
cover the
operational
expenses only or
are available for
capital funding
purposes
Net Financial
Liabilities Ratio
Total liabilities less
current assets /
total operating
21
revenue
Extent to which the
net financial
liabilities of Council
can be serviced by
its operating
revenue
Interest Coverage
Ratio
Net interest
expense on
debt service / total
operating revenue
1.1%
3.8%
4.5%
3.6%
3.6%
3.4%
3.2%
3.0%
2.9%
2.8%
2.7%
95.2%
93.5%
50.6%
61.2%
85.7%
82.4%
79.1%
77.1%
75.5%
72.7%
74.6%
Extent to which
Council’s operating
revenues are
committed to
interest expense
Asset
Sustainability
Ratio*
Capital
expenditure on the
replacement of
assets (renewals)
/ depreciation
expense
Approximation of
the extent to which
the infrastructure
22
assets managed
by Council are
being replaced as
these reach the
end of their useful
lives
Asset
Consumption Ratio
Written down value
of infrastructure
assets / gross
current
replacement cost
of infrastructure
assets
75.5%
77.2%
75.2%
75.1%
75.2%
75.3%
75.3%
75.3%
75.3%
75.3%
77.1%
The aged condition
of a Council’s
stock of physical
infrastructure
assets
* The Asset Sustainability ratio above includes depreciation for infrastructure assets whereas the ratio of the same name included in the Financial
Sustainability Statement includes depreciation for all assets to comply with the definition included in the Department of Local Government guidelines.
23
Long-Term Asset Management Plan
Council provides, owns and manages much of Brisbane’s infrastructure. Council has asset
management plans covering major infrastructure classes including transport, stormwater, bridges,
buildings and park assets. Council’s adopted Long- Term Asset Management Plan acknowledges
these.
Corporate Plan
Council has adopted the Corporate Plan 2012/13-2016/17. It sets Council’s medium-term
priorities and objectives. These serve as targets and milestones on a path to our Vision. The
Corporate Plan provides a bridge between Council’s long-term plans and our Annual Plan and
Budget.
Annual Plan and Budget
In June each year, the Lord Mayor presents and Council adopts the Annual Plan and Budget.
The Annual Plan and Budget delivers to Corporate Plan objectives across annual horizons. It
aligns program contributions to Council’s long-term community plan and allocates budget to
program outcomes and to the services, activities and projects that contribute to it.
Reporting
Each year an Annual Report is prepared and adopted by Council. The Annual Report is the
principal mechanism by which Council reports to the community and other stakeholders. It charts
our achievements and challenges for the past financial year, and reports against the Annual Plan
and Budget and the Corporate Plan. The report also provides Council’s longer term and detailed
annual financial reporting, governance information and disclosures required by legislation.
24
Our Council
In this section
Lord Mayor’s Report
Chief Executive Officer’s Report
Our elected representatives
Civic Cabinet
Organisational structure
Executive Management Team
Our people
Awards and recognition
25
Lord Mayor’s Report
In 2012-13, Council remained committed to delivering value for money to ratepayers while
growing Brisbane’s economy to ensure the future prosperity of our city.
With our sights set firmly on economic development, this year Council continued to support all
measures that attracted more events, visitors and investment to Brisbane. At the same time, we
ensured the day-to-day needs of the city were met with ongoing funding for roads, bikeways,
waste management, park upgrades and community facilities. Council also remained mindful of
the need to accommodate Brisbane’s future growth with strong investment in infrastructure, city
planning and public transport.
Economic growth and development
In July 2012, I appointed a Chief Digital Officer to drive Brisbane’s digital economy and
encourage the uptake of digital technology amongst local businesses to enhance productivity. It
is our hope that over the next five years we can kick-start a business revolution that puts
Brisbane in the slipstream of online innovation.
As the city’s largest export industry, a significant focus has been towards advancing Brisbane’s
international student market. This year I began hosting regular Friendship Ceremonies to thank
international students for choosing Brisbane as their study destination and to encourage them to
remain lifelong friends of the city. This initiative complements our successful International
Student Ambassador program and our Brisbane Welcomes International Students event, which
attracts more than 4000 students each year.
City Plan
This year Council introduced a draft planning document that will help shape how our city should
grow. The draft new City Plan provides details about building and development in Brisbane. It will
help us plan for the infrastructure needed to support our business and population growth, while
continuing to protect our city’s green spaces, waterways and local community.
Community consultation has been an integral part of this draft plan, so much so that I decided to
double the statutory formal submission period from 30 to 60 business days.
Flood recovery and mitigation
Brisbane’s resilience towards severe weather events was once again tested with the Australia
Day Storm Event 2013. Having learnt from our experiences during the January 2011 Flood and
The Gap storms in 2008, Council and residents were able to swiftly and effectively work together
to clean up the city and assist those in need.
Over the past 12 months, extensive work has been performed on the city’s stormwater network
and drainage systems, as well as the installation of 18 backflow prevention devices. Brisbane’s
26
FloodSMART Future Strategy 2012-2031 was also released. This outlines Council’s new
approach to managing Brisbane’s flood risk.
Access and inclusion
Council continues to roll out its Access and Inclusion Plan 2012-2017, with considerable
investment towards upgrading community facilities to ensure accessibility for all residents.
The City Hall Mobility Centre opened in April to provide free mobility aids such as wheelchairs for
visitors to City Hall and the city. Pedestrian mobility has been improved for people with vision
impairments through the installation of 59 tactile street signs in the CBD, Fortitude Valley and
suburban hotspots, as well as 19 wayfinding devices in the Queen Street Mall. Almost 90% of
Brisbane’s bus fleet now features low floors allowing people of all mobilities to get on and off the
buses easily. Planning work for the City Botanic
Gardens all abilities playground has also commenced.
Internally, we have corrected more than 40% of identified accessibility issues on Council’s
website and expanded 50% of all Council campaigns to reach the city’s culturally and
linguistically diverse residents.
Keeping Brisbane moving
Map of Australia with Queensland and Brisbane’s location within the state highlighted.
Keeping Brisbane moving In 2012-2013, the Legacy Way tunnel project reached the halfway
mark with tunnel excavation complete, nine traffic black spots were fixed to improve safety and
work commenced on two open level crossing replacement projects at Geebung and Bracken
Ridge.
As part of Council’s balanced approach to keep Brisbane moving, this year a free inner city ferry
service, the CityHopper, was introduced as well as the Maroon CityGlider bus service running
from Paddington to Stones Corner. Our bikeway network benefited from an investment of more
than $26 million to build key missing links in our suburbs, and 90 new buses were delivered for
the city.
City Hall
Three years ago Council took on the massive task of saving City Hall. On Saturday 6 April 2013,
the restoration of this grand old building was complete and the doors were opened to the public
once again.
It has truly been a landmark project, and my sincere thanks goes out to everyone involved
including the residents and donors who gave so generously to the City Hall Appeal. This
restoration has, without doubt, been a long and challenging process. However, leaving City Hall
to crumble into dust was never an option and I am proud that we have saved this historic building
for future generations.
Graham Quirk
Lord Mayor
27
Chief Executive Officer’s Report
Over the past financial year, Brisbane City Council has continued to focus on delivering best
quality services for the people of Brisbane in a tough economic environment.
There has been a strong emphasis on maintaining and enhancing frontline services, with a new
Corporate Plan released in 2012 outlining Council’s mediumterm goals and deliverables to 2017.
The Corporate Plan 2012/13-2016/17 outlines the objectives of each Council program area and
business unit, explaining how their work over the next five years will contribute to the goals
outlined in our long-term community plan.
Council is on track and making good progress in implementing the Corporate Plan, as reported in
the Corporate Plan Scorecard. The Annual Plan was also successfully delivered, with outcomes
outlined in the progress and performance section of this report.
Effective, efficient work practices
Council continued to forge ahead with the Future Council Organisational Strategy, which aims to
deliver more innovative, efficient and cost-effective ways of doing business.
As part of Future Council, the new Corporate Culture Change Plan was developed and
implemented, driving a culture of high performance across the organisation. This year, a record
80.6% of staff participated in the Your Voice 2012 employee survey, with 73% of employees
satisfied with their job.
Council continued to roll out initiatives aimed at improving information management and service
delivery including Business and System Efficiency (BaSE) and TRIM, an electronic document and
records management system.
Disaster response and recovery
The Australia Day Storm Event 2013 brought severe winds and heavy rainfall which caused
extensive damage across the city. Council put into practice disaster response lessons learned
from the January 2011 Flood, allowing for a prompt and effective response and clean-up.
I pay tribute to all the staff and volunteers who worked in difficult conditions to ensure public
safety and protection during the storm event. Council’s contact centre responded to more than
25,330 calls, and approximately 120,000 m³ of green waste was collected from across the city.
The storm event put added pressure on the city’s finances and flood restoration bill at a time
when we were still working to recover from the January 2011 Flood. Despite these challenges,
Council continued to deliver essential flood recovery and resilience works to prepare Brisbane for
any future severe weather events.
•
Backflow prevention devices were installed in Tennyson, Chelmer, Bulimba, New Farm,
West End, Milton and the CBD benefiting more than 400 properties affected by backflow
flooding during the January 2011 Flood.
•
The Voluntary Home Purchase Scheme bought 11 properties at risk of flooding.
•
Council adopted and delivered the FloodSMART Future Strategy 2012-2031.
•
Reconstruction commenced on the city’s Riverwalk.
28
Getting on with business
Council prioritised frontline service delivery, community safety and preparation for a growing
population.
•
Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE was launched in October 2012.
•
447 roads were resurfaced and 134,786 km of roads swept across the city.
•
105,040 m² of footpath and 9843 m² of bikeways were repaired or replaced.
•
Works commenced on the replacement of Telegraph Road and Robinson Road open
level crossings.
•
Pedestrian countdown timers were installed at 12 sites and a trial commenced on variable
flashing speed signs.
•
Tunnelling was completed on the Legacy Way tunnel.
•
90 new rigid equivalent buses were introduced to the city’s fleet.
•
More than 15,600 shade trees were planted across the city.
•
Council worked with the community to finalise seven neighbourhood plans.
•
Work commenced on the new ferry terminal at Milton and upgrades to the Bulimba Ferry
terminal.
•
The new South Regional Business Centre was opened in July 2012.
Listening to our customers
The role of Council is to work with and for the community to ensure Brisbane is a great place to
live, work and do business.
This year, Council conducted extensive community consultation to ensure residents and
businesses were included in important decisions affecting our city. I am pleased to say thousands
of people contributed to long-term plans and strategies including the Draft Strategy for Young
People 2013-2018, Brisbane’s draft new City Plan, the City Centre Master Plan, the River’s Edge
Strategy and Brisbane Vision 2031.
Significant strides were also made to improve accessibility. Council worked toward compliance
with level AA of the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0, with more than 40% of identified
accessibility issues on our website corrected. We also installed foreign language wayfinding signs
in both Queen Street Mall and South Bank.
In April we saw the rededication of City Hall to the Brisbane community, and I acknowledge the
staff who worked on this intensive three-year restoration project and re-opening.
I thank the Lord Mayor Cr Graham Quirk, members of Civic Cabinet and councillors for their hard
work and commitment to making Brisbane the city of choice for residents, tourists and
businesses.
I also acknowledge and extend gratitude to my Executive Management Team and Council
employees for their determination and dedication to providing best service delivery.
Colin Jensen
Chief Executive Officer
29
Our elected representatives
Councillors as at 30 June 2013
Lord Mayor
Cr Graham Quirk (LNP)
Office of the Lord Mayor
GPO Box 2287, Brisbane Qld 4001
(07) 3403 4400
[email protected]
Elected as Councillor 1985
Appointed as Lord Mayor April 2011
Elected as Lord Mayor April 2012
Bracken Ridge
Cr Amanda Cooper (LNP)
Bracken Ridge Ward Office
Cnr Bracken and Barrett Streets, Bracken Ridge Qld 4017
(07) 3667 6000
[email protected]
Appointed to Council 2007
Elected 2008
Number of voters 26,612
30
Central
Cr Vicki Howard (LNP)
Central Ward Office
Shop 11, 31 Duncan Street, Fortitude Valley Qld 4006
(07) 3403 0254
[email protected]
Elected 2012
Number of voters 27,518
Chandler
Cr Adrian Schrinner (LNP)
Chandler Ward Office
Shop 8, Millennium Centre,
14 Millennium Boulevard, Carindale Qld 4152
(07) 3407 1400
[email protected]
Elected 2005
Number of voters 26,210
Deagon
Cr Victoria Newton (ALP)
Deagon Ward Office
Cliff Street, Sandgate Qld 4017
(07) 3667 6011
[email protected]
Elected 2000
Number of voters 25,609
Doboy
Cr Ryan Murphy (LNP)
Doboy Ward Office
Shop 5, 1181 Wynnum Road, Cannon Hill Qld 4170
(07) 3407 8800
[email protected]
Elected 2012
Number of voters 26,795
31
Enoggera
Cr Andrew Wines (LNP)
Enoggera Ward Office
102 Samford Road (Cnr Cole Street), Alderley Qld 4051
(07) 3407 2510
[email protected]
Elected 2008
Number of voters 26,746
Hamilton
Cr David McLachlan (LNP)
Hamilton Ward Office
42 Racecourse Road, Hamilton Qld 4007
(07) 3403 1095
[email protected]
Elected 2006
Number of voters 27,279
Holland Park
Cr Ian McKenzie (LNP)
Holland Park Ward Office
Suite 6, 737 Logan Road, Greenslopes Qld 4120
(07) 3403 2101
[email protected]
Elected 2008
Number of voters 26,279
Jamboree
Cr Matthew Bourke (LNP)
Jamboree Ward Office
Shop 146A, Mt Ommaney Shopping Centre,
171 Dandenong Road, Mt Ommaney Qld 4074
(07) 3407 7000
[email protected]
Elected 2008
Number of voters 23,863
32
Karawatha
Cr Kim Marx (LNP)
Karawatha Ward Office
Shop 53, Level 2 (PO Box 1991)
Sunnybank Hills Shoppingtown, Cnr Compton and Calam Roads, Sunnybank Hills Qld 4109
(07) 3407 0566
[email protected]
Elected 2012
Number of voters 26,496
MacGregor
Cr Steven Huang (LNP)
MacGregor Ward Office
Sunnybank Centre, 121 Lister Street, Sunnybank Qld 4109
(07) 3407 8500
[email protected]
Elected 2012
Number of voters 23,893
Marchant
Cr Fiona King (LNP)
Marchant Ward Office
North Regional Business Centre
960 Gympie Road, Chermside Qld 4032
(07) 3407 0707
[email protected]
Elected 2008
Number of voters 27,285
McDowall
Cr Norm Wyndham (LNP)
McDowall Ward Office
Shops 5 and 6, Rode Shopping Centre
271 Appleby Road, Stafford Heights Qld 4053
(07) 3403 7690
[email protected]
Elected 2004
Number of voters 25,974
33
Moorooka
Cr Steve Griffiths (ALP)
Moorooka Ward Office
Shop 2, 122 Beaudesert Road, Moorooka Qld 4105
(07) 3403 1730
[email protected]
Appointed to Council 2003
Elected 2004
Number of voters 26,188
Morningside
Cr Shayne Sutton (ALP)
Morningside Ward Office
Ground floor, 63 Oxford Street, Bulimba Qld 4171
(07) 3407 8200
[email protected]
Elected 2004
Number of voters 26,509
Northgate
Cr Kim Flesser (ALP)
Northgate Ward Office
Banyo Library, 284 St Vincents Road, Banyo Qld 4014
(07) 3403 2210
[email protected]
Elected 1997
Number of voters 26,142
Parkinson
Cr Angela Owen-Taylor (LNP)
Parkinson Ward Office
Shop 10 Central Park Medical Centre,
168 Algester Road, Algester Qld 4115
(07) 3131 7022
[email protected]
Elected 2008
Number of voters 26,846
34
Pullenvale
Cr Margaret de Wit (LNP)
Pullenvale Ward Office
Kenmore Library Building,
9 Brookfield Road, Kenmore Qld 4069
(07) 3407 0220
[email protected]
Elected 1997
Number of voters 26,792
Richlands
Cr Milton Dick (ALP)
Leader of the Opposition Richlands Ward Office
Inala Library Building, Cnr Wirraway Parade
and Corsair Avenue, Inala, Qld 4077
(07) 3407 1211
[email protected]
Elected 2008
Number of voters 24,595
Tennyson
Cr Nicole Johnston (IND)
Tennyson Ward Office
Fairfield Gardens, 180 Fairfield Road, Fairfield Qld 4103
(07) 3403 8605
[email protected]
Elected 2008
Number of voters 25,229
The Gabba
Cr Helen Abrahams (ALP)
The Gabba Ward Office
2/63 Annerley Road (Cnr Crown Street), Woolloongabba Qld 4102
(07) 3403 2165
[email protected]
Elected 1991-1994
Appointed to Council 2003
Elected 2004
Number of voters 25,944
35
The Gap
Cr Geraldine Knapp (LNP)
The Gap Ward Office
477 Waterworks Road, Ashgrove Qld 4060
(07) 3407 1900
[email protected]
Elected 1997
Number of voters 25,804
Toowong
Cr Peter Matic (LNP)
Toowong Ward Office
50 High Street, Toowong Qld 4066
(07) 3403 2520
[email protected]
Appointed to Council 2007
Elected 2008
Number of voters 24,443
Walter Taylor
Cr Julian Simmonds (LNP)
Walter Taylor Ward Office
70 Station Rd, Indooroopilly Qld 4068
(07) 3407 0005
[email protected]
Elected 2010
Number of voters 24,499
Wishart
Cr Krista Adams (LNP)
Wishart Ward Office
Ground floor, 2072 Logan Road
Upper Mt Gravatt Qld 4122
(07) 3403 7791
[email protected]
Elected 2008
Number of voters 24,918
36
Wynnum Manly
Cr Peter Cumming (ALP)
Wynnum Manly Ward Office
3a/212 Bay Terrace (Cnr of Pine Street) Wynnum Qld 4178
(07) 3403 2180
[email protected]
Elected 1994
Number of voters 25,359
37
Civic Cabinet
as at 30 June 2013
Civic Cabinet is also known as the Establishment and Coordination Committee.
Council has seven standing committees made up of, and chaired by, councillors. Each committee
considers Council policy, provides advice to Council and delivers results for the people of
Brisbane across a range of areas such as infrastructure, public transport, development and the
environment.
Civic Cabinet acts with Council’s authority in a range of matters including procurement, reporting
and policy development. Civic Cabinet also reviews and makes recommendations to full Council
on major plans, corporate documents and city finances.
The members of Civic Cabinet are the Lord Mayor (Chairman) and all seven committee
chairmen. The Chief Executive Officer acts as secretary of Civic Cabinet, provides executive
advice and reports back to Council as an organisation.
Civic Cabinet meets each Monday morning.
Councillor Graham Quirk
Lord Mayor
Elected in 1985.
Member of Civic Cabinet 1988-1991, 2004-present.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
•
•
•
•
Elected leader of Brisbane City Council
Chairman of Civic Cabinet and an ex officio member of all Council committees
Spokesperson for the Council to the media or at community events
Carrying out ceremonial duties such as citizenship ceremonies and opening new facilities
Working with the Chief Executive Officer on Council business
Delivering Brisbane City Council’s Annual Plan and Budget
Councillor Adrian Schrinner
Deputy Mayor Chairman, Infrastructure Committee
Elected in 2005.
Member of Civic Cabinet since 2008.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Infrastructure asset management and optimisation
City projects
Transport infrastructure
Transport strategy and planning
Road upgrades
Road-use management
Congestion reduction
38
Councillor Krista Adams
Chairman, Brisbane Lifestyle Committee
Elected in 2008.
Chairman of Council 2010-2012.
Member of Civic Cabinet since 2012.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Vibrant and caring local communities
Customer services
Promoting an active and healthy lifestyle
Libraries
Cultural activities for Brisbane residents
Community partnerships
Community safety
Environmental health risks and minimising safety hazards
Brisbane State Emergency Service
Local laws and regulation
Councillor Matthew Bourke
Chairman, Environment, Parks and Sustainability Committee
Elected in 2008.
Member of Civic Cabinet since 2012.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
•
•
•
Parks
Brisbane’s environment including the Brisbane River, waterways, biodiversity, air quality
and natural areas
Energy efficiency
Integrated water management
Minimising environmental risks
Councillor Amanda Cooper
Chairman, Neighbourhood Planning and Development Assessment
Committee
Appointed to Council in 2007.
Elected in 2008.
Member of Civic Cabinet since 2008.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
•
•
•
•
Planning for sustainable development
Protection of Brisbane’s unique character and heritage
Development assessment processes
Neighbourhood plans, urban renewal projects and strategic planning across Brisbane
Planning for resilience to natural hazards such as flooding
Infrastructure planning to support development
39
Councillor Peter Matic
Chairman, Public and Active Transport Committee
Appointed to Council in 2007.
Elected in 2008.
Member of Civic Cabinet since 2008.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
•
Public transport
Active transport
Public transport planning and strategy
Councillor David McLachlan
Chairman, Field Services Group Committee
Elected in 2006.
Member of Civic Cabinet since 2008.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Civil construction
Quarry products
Asphalt manufacture and laying
Waste management
Park maintenance
City cleansing activities
Councillor Julian Simmonds
Chairman, Finance, Economic Development and Administration
Committee
Elected in 2010.
Member of Civic Cabinet since 2011.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
•
•
Financial management of Australia’s largest Council
Economic development to ensure business and jobs growth
Corporate services including procurement, risk management, legal services, human
resources, communication, information and technology
Disaster management and preparedness
Councillor Margaret de Wit
Chairman of Council
Elected in 1997.
Chairman of Council 2008-2010, 2012-present.
Member of Civic Cabinet 2010-2012.
Areas of responsibility
•
•
Control of the Council Chamber and surroundings
Presiding officer at all meetings of Brisbane City Council
40
Organisational structure
41
Executive Management Team
as at 30 June 2013
Council’s Executive Management Team is made up of the Chief Executive Officer, divisional and
executive managers.
Colin Jensen
Chief Executive Officer
Joined Council in 2010.
Significant achievements
•
•
•
Extensive public sector career in Queensland Government including Director-General of
the Department of Infrastructure and Planning, and Coordinator-General for Queensland.
Named one of Australia’s top 100 most influential engineers by Civil Engineers Australia
magazine for the last six years.
Received the Queensland University of Technology Chancellor’s Outstanding Alumnus
Award and the Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering Outstanding Alumni Award
for 2011.
Qualifications
Bachelor of Civil Engineering (Honours).
Vicki Pethybridge
Divisional Manager, City Planning and Sustainability
Joined Council in 2010.
Significant achievements
•
•
•
•
Career spanning more than 20 years across several areas of Australian Government
including General Manager Defence Service Homes Insurance Scheme, and Assistant
Commissioner GST Policy for the Australian Taxation Office.
Participated in the Australian Government’s LAFIA program undertaking a study of Pacific
Island nations.
Directorships: International River Foundation; City Parklands Transition Services Pty Ltd;
Australia TradeCoast.
Divisional Manager, Brisbane Lifestyle 2010-12.
Qualifications
Bachelor of Laws, Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.
Paul Salvati
Divisional Manager, Brisbane Lifestyle
Joined Council in 2009.
Significant achievements
•
•
•
•
Work experience spans all tiers of government in Australia and the private sector.
Consulted both domestically and abroad on service delivery transformation.
Director of Channel Management at Smart Service Queensland, winning several awards
at both the state and national levels.
Previously Council’s Manager, Customer Services.
42
Qualifications
Bachelor of Business Management, Master of Business Administration.
Alan Warren
Divisional Manager, Brisbane Transport
Joined Council in 1996.
Significant achievements
•
•
•
•
More than 23 years experience in Australian and state governments.
Manager, Financial Planning in Brisbane City Council 1996-2000.
Chief Finance Officer in Brisbane Transport 2000-2005.
Divisional Manager, Brisbane Transport 2005 – present, managing an annual budget of
more than $370 million, 2780 staff members and a fleet of more than 1200 buses.
Qualifications
Bachelor of Arts (Accounting).
Greg Evans
Divisional Manager, Organisational Services
Joined Council in 2009.
Significant achievements
•
•
•
•
Responsible for the finance and strategic services functions of the Ergon Energy Group.
Refinancing Ergon Energy’s debt during the global financial crisis and leadership of
several process improvements which achieved efficiencies.
Leading Council’s negotiations with unions to implement a new EBA.
Project sponsor for Council’s Business and Systems Efficiency (BaSE) Project.
Qualifications
Bachelor of Business (Accountancy), Master of Business (Finance and Accounting).
Scott Stewart
Divisional Manager, Brisbane Infrastructure
Joined Council in 2005.
Significant achievements
•
•
•
More than 23 years work experience in Australia, Asia and Europe.
Senior roles in the private and public sectors including 15 years with Arup Consulting
Engineers.
Experienced in the planning, delivery and operation of large, complex and challenging civil
and transport infrastructure projects.
Qualifications
Bachelor of Engineering (First Class Honours), Master of Engineering Science (Project
Management), Chartered Engineer, Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors,
INSEAD Advanced Management Program.
43
Geoffrey Beck
Executive Manager, Field Services Group
Joined Council in 2009.
Significant achievements
•
•
•
•
Significant public sector experience in Commonwealth Government including
Defence – Director-General Capital Infrastructure and Head of Defence Infrastructure.
Private sector roles with Raytheon and GHD.
Extensive military career including operational roles in Namibia.
Qualifications
Bachelor of Engineering (Civil), Master of Applied Science, Graduate Diploma of Management,
Graduate Diploma of Strategic Studies, graduate of Army Command and Staff College, Joint
Services Staff College and Centre for Defence and Strategic Studies.
Peter Rule AM
Executive Manager, Office of the Lord Mayor and CEO
Joined Council in 2004.
Significant achievements
•
•
•
Extensive executive career in the public sector including child and family welfare, juvenile
justice and corrective services.
Awarded the Reserve Forces Decoration for part-time service in the Australian Defence
Force.
Appointed a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in 1989.
Qualifications
Bachelor of Social Work, Master of Administration, Fellow of the Australian Institute of
Management (Qld branch), Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.
44
Our people
Brisbane City Council is committed to being an employer of choice and offers many different
types of jobs.
Attractive employer
Council is nationally recognised as an attractive employer offering a wide variety of jobs and
careers that include great benefits, work-life balance and the opportunity to make a difference to
the city.
In recognition of its high standards in workforce management, Council placed third in the
Association of Graduate Employers survey (an annual survey of the top 100 graduate employers
as voted by graduates). Council was also a finalist at the Australian Association of Graduate
Employers Awards for the quality of its development program.
In 2012-13, Council received more than 14,000 applications for vacancies. Council’s Your Voice
2012 employee survey found 73% of staff were satisfied with their jobs and two thirds would
recommend Council as a great place to work.
Highlights
Almost 7700 full-time equivalent employees
More than 200 different occupations
Flexible work options
Council continued to foster contemporary workplace arrangements through cooperative
relationships between managers, team leaders, employees and their representatives.
Council offers a variety of flexible work options that meet business and workforce needs including
flexible working hours, compressed working weeks, part-time and job-share arrangements, and
telecommuting. Additionally, Council provides employee support services including referral
services for childcare and aged care, carers’ rooms and leave entitlements such as mid-career
breaks, study leave, parental leave, and cultural and ceremonial leave.
Developing a skilled workforce
Council continues to build a workforce that reflects the community it serves and delivers learning
outcomes that maximise workforce efficiency.
Key activities for 2012-13
•
Increased participation in online training resulting in more than 20,000 registrations across
Council’s suite of learning programs. Council offered 73 online training programs in 201213 with more than 50% of all development activity now in the online environment.
•
Developed 31 new online programs for aspiring team leaders, corporate orientation,
diversity competence and cultural awareness.
•
Delivered group coaching for middle managers.
45
•
Launched a new Corporate Orientation program with more than 300 attendees. The
program achieved a 94% satisfaction rating among participants.
•
51 staff participated in the CEO Executive Development program, undertaking
development assessment, developing learning plans and participating in targeted
development programs and group learning forums.
•
Increased participation in management and leadership learning and development from
251 in 2011-12 to 610 in 2012-13.
•
Recruited 30 new apprentices.
•
Supported and provided training and development for 130 apprentices.
•
Managed and supported 57 graduates on the Corporate Graduate program, with 23
graduates achieving permanent placement in Council.
Supportive working environment
Council provided a positive and supportive working environment to employees, and worked
closely with staff to assist with workplace transitions.
Key activities for 2012-13
•
Developed a 10-year Talent Management Strategy.
•
Incorporated performance leadership into all team leader development, with 89 team
leaders and managers participating in training to develop skills in performance leadership.
•
Delivered 31 workshops to more than 300 employees working in areas going through
change.
•
Delivered one-on-one coaching to 152 staff to assist with workplace transitions.
•
Conducted the Your Voice 2012 employee survey with a record response rate of 80.6%.
•
Implemented initiatives to improve organisation performance including Performance
Leadership training and One Council partnership building across the organisation.
Valuing a diverse workforce
Council is an equal opportunity employer and values the diversity of its people.
Council’s Workforce Equity and Diversity Framework 2011-2015 outlines its equity and diversity
commitments, and guides the organisation in achieving its equity and diversity objectives. It also
assists Council to comply with anti-discrimination and equal employment opportunity legislation.
Key activities for 2012-13
•
Launched an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultural awareness program, with 100
enrolments and 96% satisfaction rate.
•
Established a recruitment talent pool for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants.
46
•
Established a recruitment pool and refreshed the Advisory Group for people with a
disability.
•
Provided job assistance to 30 multicultural residents each month through the Multicultural
Employment Infrastructure Program.
•
Increased the number of culturally and linguistically diverse employees to 15.74% of
Council’s workforce.
Well, safe and healthy workforce
Council is committed to being a Zero Harm organisation and to the creation of a workplace that is
injury, illness and incident free. Zero Harm is not just about preventing accidents, it is about
promoting and helping to deliver a healthy and active way of life for all staff, thereby reducing the
risk of accidents and workplace incidents.
Key activities for 2012-13
•
Developed the Organisational Zero Harm Strategy 2013-2016.
•
Through internal communication channels, promoted and increased awareness of Zero
Harm as being wellness and health as well as safety.
•
Achieved Council’s lowest recorded Lost Time Injury Frequency rate of 8.82 injuries per
million hours worked.
•
Conducted bi-monthly information and awareness campaigns across Council on topics
including ‘near miss’ reporting, personal health and hygiene, and hazardous manual
tasks. These were delivered through a range of internal communication channels
including CEO blogs, What’s News, posters and toolbox sessions.
•
Performed quarterly internal audits of Council divisions to ensure compliance with the
Organisational Zero Harm Management System and self-insurer requirements.
•
Developed and delivered targeted wellness programs and initiatives including:
o
wellness expos and mobile office program providing assessments, knowledge and
tools for 1050 employees to encourage better long-term health behaviours
o
10,000 Steps program to support an active and healthy lifestyle with 764
employees in 94 teams.
Council’s commitment to Zero Harm is confirmed by positive employee opinion expressed in the
Your Voice 2012 employee survey, with 80% of employees agreeing Council provides a safe
workplace in which safety rules and procedures are followed. Results demonstrate clear staff
satisfaction and understanding of Zero Harm, and reflect well on the commitment demonstrated
by the organisation.
47
Awards and recognition
Council employs staff with diverse skills in providing the wide range of services required by the
Brisbane community. Brisbane City Council continues to develop a culture that recognises,
encourages and celebrates excellence to achieve the best possible outcomes
for the city.
Council received a range of industry awards in 2012-13.
Awardee
93 volunteer members of
Brisbane City State
Emergency Services (SES)
Acacia Ridge Leisure
Centre
Active School Travel
Program
All Abilities Play project
Brisbane Access and
Inclusion Plan 2012-2017
Brisbane City Council
Brisbane City Council
Brisbane City Council
Brisbane City Council
Annual Report 2011-12
Brisbane Economic
Development Plan 20122031
Brisbane Economic
Development Plan 20122031
Bulimba Heritage Trail,
Neighbourhood Planning
Brisbane
City Hall
Corporate Communication
Corporate Communication
Award
National Emergency Medals
Awarding body
The Australian Honours
Secretariat
Winner – Best Sporting Facility
Award for 2012 Inclusive
Community Champion Awards
Excellence in Road Safety
Commendation at the National
Awards for Local Government
Finalist – Best Leisure,
Recreation, Entertainment Venue
or Precinct for 2012 Inclusive
Community Champion Awards
Winner – Best Government
Department for 2012 Inclusive
Community Champion Awards
Winner – Queensland Employer
Award 2012 in the category of
‘Partnership’
Finalist – Award for Best
Graduate Development Program
(small organisations) 2012
Third Place – Top 100 Employers
of Graduates
Spinal Injuries Association
Winner – Bronze Award
Department of Regional
Australia, Local Government,
Arts and Sport
Spinal Injuries Association
Spinal Injuries Association
Commonwealth Rehabilitation
Services (CRS) Australia
Australian Associates of
Graduate Employers (AAGE)
Ltd
Australia Associates of
Graduate Employers (AAGE)
Ltd
Australasian Reporting Awards
Commendation – Best Planning
Ideas Award for Large, Regional
or Urban Project
Winner – 2012 Strategic Planning
Regional Category
Planning Institute Australia
Bronze, Highly Commended –
National Trust Queensland
Heritage Award
Winner – 2013 Security Industry
Award for Excellence
Finalist – Best Practice in Local
Government
National Trust (Queensland)
National Finalist – Best Digital
Marketing
Economic Development
Australia
Australian Security Industry
Association Limited (ASIAL)
2012 Institute of Public
Administration Australia
Awards (IPAA) Queensland
Public Sector Excellence
Awards
Australian Marketing Institute
Awards
48
Corporate Communication
Corporate Communication
Development Assessment
Branch
Green Heart Schools
Program
Information Services
Branch
Local Centres and Main
Streets Planning Guideline
and Toolbox, Urban
Renewal Brisbane
Museum of Brisbane and
project partner Sunnybank
Plaza
Sir Thomas Brisbane
Planetarium
Urban Renewal
Urban Renewal
Urban Renewal
West End Ferry Terminal
upgrade
West End Ferry Terminal
upgrade
Individual recognition
Michael Byrne, Chief
Procurement Officer
Patricia Reeves, Bus
Operator, Brisbane Transport
Paul Wyles, Manager
Organisational Wellness,
Safety & Health
Sharan Harvey, Manager
Library Services
Queensland winner – Best Digital
Marketing
Winner – Best Digital Media
Innovation and Excellence Award
Nominated – Minister’s Award for
Leadership in Sustainability 2013
Premier’s Sustainability Awards
Winner – Organisational
Excellence in Information Security
Certificate of Commendation,
Best Planning Ideas Award –
Small or Local Project, Planning
Institute of Australia Queensland
Awards for Excellence in
Planning
Queensland winner – Toyota
Community Award
Winner – Best Tourism
Accommodation Provider for
2012 Inclusive Community
Champion Awards
Finalist – Best Practice in Local
Government
Finalist – The Pierre L’Enfant
International Planning
Achievement Award 2013
Finalist, Highly Commended –
Partnerships Category, National
Award for Economic
Development Excellence 2012
Category Two winner,
Queensland
Regional Commendation for
Brisbane region for Small Project
Architecture in the 2013
Queensland Architecture Awards
Winner – Procurement
Professionals Award 2013
Winner – Rising Star Award
2013
Highly Commended – Senior
Manager Category, Inaugural
Healthy Leader Awards 2012
Queen’s Birthday Honours
2013 Public Service Medal for
outstanding public service to
the Brisbane City Council,
particularly the Brisbane City
Council Library Service
Australian Marketing Institute
Awards
Government Communications
Australia Awards
Property Council of Australia
Department of Environment
and Heritage Protection
AusCERT
Planning Institute of Australia
(Qld)
Australia Business Arts
Foundation Queensland
Awards
Spinal Injuries Association
Institute of Public
Administration Australia
Awards
American Planning
Association
Economic Development
Australia
Civil Contractors Federation
Annual Earth Awards
Australian Institute of
Architects, Queensland
Chapter
Local Buy
Queensland Bus Industry
Council
Local Government Association
Queensland
Governor-General of Australia
49
Progress and performance – programs
In this section
Program 1: Sustainable, Green and Clean City
Program 2: WaterSmart City
Program 3: Moving Brisbane
Program 4: Future Brisbane
Program 5: Your Brisbane
Program 6: Public Health and Safety
Program 7: Economic Development
Program 8: Customer Focus
Program 9: City Governance
50
Program 1: Sustainable, Green and Clean City
A sustainable green and clean city that reflects our subtropical lifestyle and the value of the
environment, providing parks and spaces available to all and used by many.
What we do
•
Protect and restore Brisbane’s natural assets
•
Parks planning and policy
•
Manage and maintain a diverse range of parks
•
Take action to reduce Council’s greenhouse gas emissions
•
Provide sustainability programs for Brisbane residents and businesses
•
Improve Council’s environmental practices
•
Prevent and manage pollution
•
Provide environmental regulatory services
•
Manage and reduce Brisbane’s waste
Highlights
57.7 ha purchased under the Bushland Acquisition program
5.99 ha acquired for new parks
>450,200 visitors to Brisbane Botanic Gardens, Mount Coot-tha
>50,000 residents with a user-pays green waste service
12,528 green waste recycling bins delivered across the city
642,534 tonnes of waste managed through transfer stations and landfills
839,000 vehicles visited Council’s four transfer stations
10,729 tonnes of waste deposited following the Australia Day Storm Event 2013
Overview
The Sustainable, Green and Clean City program enhances Brisbane’s liveability and
demonstrates leadership in sustainability.
As Australia’s largest local government, Council has a unique capability to take action on
sustainability. Through the Sustainable, Green and Clean City program, Council uses its
capabilities and resources to make Brisbane Australia’s most sustainable city, as well as carbonneutral, by 2026.
51
The program protects the city’s natural values and provides recreational opportunities to enrich
the lives of residents and visitors. It works in partnership with residents, schools, communities
and business on practical and affordable ways to manage and reduce their environmental
impacts.
The program manages more than 2000 parks, covering more than 6000 ha in urban parks and
more than 8000 ha in conservation reserves. It protects native bushland and biodiversity
providing attractive and shady parks, open spaces and streetscapes that reflect our subtropical
character and suit the diverse needs of a growing city.
The program minimises noise and pollution impacts, ensuring best practice waste management
systems to keep our streets, roadways and public spaces clean and litter free.
Performance
1.1
Sustainability leadership
Brisbane City Council will focus on the performance of our activities and operations to ensure we
are a sustainable, low-carbon and legislatively compliant organisation that:
•
responds effectively and appropriately to maximise sustainability outcomes, reduce
greenhouse emissions and support the achievement of a carbon-neutral city, by 2026
•
is recognised as a leader in sustainability and uses its capacity to influence and support
citywide and regional sustainability outcomes
•
manages Council’s environmental performance effectively.
Key activities for 2012-13
•
Reduced Council’s greenhouse gas emissions by approximately 90,150 tonnes a year by
purchasing 100% GreenPower.
•
Purchased 122,675 tonnes of accredited carbon offsets to neutralise carbon emissions
from Council’s bus, ferry and vehicular fleets, and stationary gas use.
•
Commenced the retrofit of 25,000 Brisbane street lights with more energy efficient lamps
to reduce electricity use by 40% over the next two years.
•
Improved Council’s Corporate Environmental Management System by delivering new
environmental training for Council staff.
1.2
Sustainable Brisbane
Council engages and works in partnership with residents, schools and community groups to
guide and empower changes to lifestyles and practices that contribute to achieving sustainability
targets and environmental outcomes.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Received $2.9 million in grant funding through the Australian Government’s Low Income
Energy Efficiency Program to develop and deliver an energy saving program to 2000 lowincome Brisbane seniors.
52
•
Engaged with 45,000 homes monthly through the Green Heart environmental
engagement program to inform and encourage residents to reduce their environmental
impacts.
•
Delivered sustainable home displays at Council’s Green Heart events, including two
Green Heart fairs and 15 community events.
1.3
Biodiverse city
Brisbane will value, protect and sustain its diversity of habitat, animal and plant life.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Secured 57.7 ha through the Bushland Acquisition program including endangered
ecosystems along the Brisbane River, koala habitat at Burbank, bushland adjoining Mount
Coot-tha, Toohey and Karawatha forests, and a key corridor linkage between Whites Hill
Reserve and Bulimba Creek.
•
Provided $3.4 million through the Conservation Reserves Management program to
enhance Brisbane’s conservation reserves. This included habitat restoration, fire
preparedness, track construction and rehabilitation, fencing and visitor facility upgrades.
•
Continued to manage invasive weed species in high value conservation areas over an
area of more than 1095 ha under the Wipe Out Weeds project.
•
Provided more than $250,000 through the Lord Mayor’s Community Sustainability and
Environmental Grants program for community organisations and individual wildlife carers
working on a range of environmental and sustainability projects.
•
Continued to deliver the 24 hour, seven day a week Native Animal Ambulance service
responding to an average of 130 calls per month.
•
Continued to protect terrestrial native wildlife with 748 invasive animal captures, including
a high number of foxes and feral cats.
•
Continued to deliver the Community Conservation Partnerships program to support the
community environment sector, with assistance and training provided to 650 landholders,
126 Habitat Brisbane groups and 11 catchment groups.
•
Welcomed more than 32,000 visitors to the Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre.
•
Reopened 17 natural areas impacted in the Australia Day Storm Event 2013, with repair
works undertaken on walking tracks, fire management tracks and natural area boundary
and fauna fencing.
1.4
Parks, gardens and recreation
Brisbane’s parks and public open spaces reflect our subtropical lifestyle and are available to all.
Our parks and open spaces are attractive and shady spaces providing valued visual, recreational,
heritage and cultural amenity to a diverse Brisbane.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Opened the new Ken Fletcher Park at Tennyson featuring accessible and inclusive play
equipment, mosaic artwork created by local school children, an amphitheatre, pontoon,
interpretive signs, public plaza and amenities with a ‘changing places toilet’.
53
•
Acquired 5.99 ha of land for new parks to meet future community sport and recreation
needs bringing the total amount of parkland purchased since 2008 to 86.5 ha. This
included land at Carseldine to expand the existing park at Presidents Place and the first of
five properties at MacGregor for a future informal park to support the growth planned in
the Mt Gravatt Corridor Neighbourhood Plan.
•
Completed the acquisition phase of 14 ha of land for the Southern District Sports Park at
Rochedale Road, Rochedale delivering on the Rochedale Urban Community Local Plan.
•
Commenced construction of the Whites Hill play project, an upgraded playground with
improved access and amenities for people of all abilities.
•
Completed 120 improvement and rehabilitation projects in 95 parks across Brisbane to
improve access and inclusion. This included playground refurbishment, visitor facility
installations and park enhancements.
•
Planted more than 15,600 shade trees across Brisbane with 30% planted by the
community at Neighbourhood Shadeways events in Tingalpa, Belmont, Calamvale,
Stafford, Nudgee and Fig Tree Pocket.
•
Re-opened 87 parks fully or partially closed as a result of the Australia Day Storm Event
2013, responding to damage caused by fallen trees, flooding or overland water flow. Also
completed restoration works on Wynnum Wading Pool and Nudgee Boardwalk.
•
Undertook refurbishment works at Brisbane Botanic Gardens, Mount Coot-tha including
repair of Bonsai House, installation of automated irrigation, pathway upgrades, seating
replacements and the renewal of the wedding lawns and event precincts.
1.5
Pollution-free city
Brisbane residents enjoy a clean and healthy environment. Environmental pollutants,
contaminated land, closed landfills and dangerous goods are managed to prevent and minimise
their impact
on the community and the environment.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Continued to develop noise and air quality modelling.
•
Responded to 3627 noise, odour, air and light pollution complaints.
•
Conducted a review of the risks posed by businesses and industries that store and use
chemicals to identify ways of minimising impacts in the event of a flood.
•
Responded to 67 industrial fires, spills and accidents to prevent contamination of
waterways.
•
Conducted remediation works at eight former landfills including:
o
Albert Bishop Park, Nundah
o
Bacton Road, Chandler
o
Boundary Road, Whites Hill
o
Anzac Park, Toowong
54
•
1.6
o
Cemetery Road, Upper Kedron
o
Downey Park, Windsor
o
Nudgee Road, Nudgee
o
Whites Road, Chermside.
Conducted environmental audits of 925 industries to ensure pollution prevention
standards were being maintained.
Managing and reducing Brisbane’s waste and litter
•
Manage Brisbane’s waste streams and waste infrastructure
•
Maximise resource recovery
•
Reduce waste to landfill
•
Promote waste minimisation initiatives
•
Keep the streets, roadways and footpaths of the city clean and litter free
Key results for 2012-13
•
Reached a milestone of more than 50,000 residents with a user-pays green waste
service.
•
Expanded the larger domestic recycling service to an additional 2477 residents who took
up the offer of a bin to allow for extra recycling capacity.
•
Opened the city’s second Tip Shop at Geebung on 1 December 2012 with a total of 236
tonnes of recycled products sold through both Tip Shops.
•
Delivered the second Tip Shop Competition to raise awareness and encourage visitors to
explore options for re-use and recycling of second-hand items, with 18 artists exhibiting.
•
Provided 214 business premises with 249 recycling bins.
•
Collected 289,877 tonnes of refuse and 92,515 tonnes of recycling from the kerbside
collection.
•
Retrieved 9986 tonnes of furniture, white goods, household appliances, carpet, wood
products and bicycles as part of the large item kerbside collection.
•
Expanded the multi-unit dwelling recycling service by 180 recycling bins yielding 4021
tonnes of recycling.
•
Installed an additional 80 public place recycling bin enclosures across the city and the
suburbs.
•
Collected 1252 tonnes of e-waste at transfer stations.
•
Continued to implement the Towards Zero Waste and Litter Prevention strategies, with
more than 9000 penalty infringement notices issued to litter offenders across the city.
55
Challenges
Regenerating former landfill sites
Many of Brisbane’s parks and sports fields are located on former landfills. These can degrade
due to natural causes, weather events or wear-and-tear. This presents an ongoing maintenance
challenge to Council.
Council continues to invest in a rolling program of remediation works to maintain safety and
reduce impacts on community groups using these sports fields.
Weather impact on invasive species and Moreton Island transfer stations
Above average rainfall over the past year has resulted in challenging conditions for weed and
invasive
animal management across natural areas in Brisbane. Favourable growing conditions have seen
a rapid growth in weeds providing near-perfect habitat and breeding conditions for deer and
foxes.
Weather conditions impacted on Moreton Island beaches causing substantial access issues to
transfer stations. The Sustainable, Green and Clean City program continues to work with the
Queensland Government and National Parks to develop solutions.
56
57
58
Ken Fletcher Park
Council raised the bar for accessibility standards through the delivery of the Ken Fletcher Park
development in Tennyson, which opened in December 2012. On the river adjacent to Tennis
Queensland’s headquarters, the park is named in honour of Brisbane’s tennis great Ken Fletcher.
The park is part of Council’s broader commitment to providing more recreation and play
opportunities for adults and children of all abilities.
The 2.9 ha park features accessible and inclusive play equipment and informative signage –
some written in braille – and toilets with a changing place cubicle. It also has an amphitheatre, a
public plaza, picnic facilities with barbeques and a public pontoon for non-motorised craft.
Users of mobility devices are able to get around the park on wide accessible paths. Seating and
picnic settings that can accommodate wheel or power chairs have also been provided.
The site has a rich history, housing an historic mansion called Hayslope in the late 1800s and
being the site for the Tennyson Power Station from 1953 to 1986. The power station site lay
dormant for almost 20 years until 2007, when construction began on the Queensland Tennis
Centre.
History has been incorporated into the design of the park through signage, artwork and the re-use
of some of the existing structures. While history and accessibility were core considerations in its
planning, the park has also been designed to be flood resilient.
Council collaborated with a range of community groups, support agencies and local schools to
deliver an inclusive space for all abilities where everyone can play together in a safe and
stimulating environment. To celebrate these partnerships, community artwork was installed in and
around the play area.
Students from the Yeerongpilly Special Education Development Unit, Tennyson Special School
and MontroseAccess worked alongside community artist Stephanie Outridge Field to create the
colourful mosaics.
59
Program 2: WaterSmart City
Brisbane will be a WaterSmart City, a city that supports its liveability by managing water
sustainably.
What we do
•
Integrated water cycle management
•
Protect waterway health
•
Manage access and use of waterways
•
Flood management
•
Stormwater management
•
Sustainable water management
Highlights
>$11 million spent on protecting waterways
>$48 million spent on stormwater construction and maintenance
$4.3 million spent on the clean-up and repair of waterways, waterway access and stormwater
assets after the Australia Day Storm Event 2013
327,094 FloodWise Property Report downloads from the Council website
85% compliance with erosion and sediment control on building sites
11 properties purchased through the Voluntary Home Purchase Scheme
Overview
Brisbane is a water smart city that leads the way in sustainable water management.
The WaterSmart City program manages urban water resources and the health of the city’s
waterways including the Brisbane River and Moreton Bay. It takes a total water cycle
management approach to ensure decisions about the future of our city are made with water in
mind.
The program prioritises healthy waterways and promotes sustainable water use. It takes a risk
management approach to reduce the continual possibility of flooding through recognising,
minimising and controlling flood hazards to people and property. The program also responsibly
manages the city’s water resources to plan for future population growth.
As Brisbane continues to recover from the January 2011 Flood and the Australia Day Storm
Event 2013, the WaterSmart City program works towards achieving a healthy river and bay, and
sustainable water use.
60
Performance
2.1
Sustainable water management
In partnership with the Brisbane community, Council sustainably manages Brisbane’s water
resources through the integrated management of our water supply, wastewater, stormwater and
waterways. Our integrated approach will require Council to work in close partnership with
Queensland Urban Utilities to maximise community benefit, and help ensure liveability and
economic prosperity for the city and South East Queensland.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Completed the Norman Creek 2012-2031 Master Plan and commenced design works in
priority precincts including the Coorparoo Creek corridor, Kingfisher Creek and Hanlon
Park.
•
Purchased four properties for the Coorparoo Creek Park project to reinstate part of
Coorparoo Creek. This will support the redevelopment of the Coorparoo Junction precinct
by managing local flood impacts, and create a new active transport connection for
pedestrians and cyclists between Old Cleveland Road and Stanley Street.
•
Continued to implement the Stormwater Harvesting program and secured $5.39 million in
Australian Government grant funding to construct seven stormwater harvesting sites by
2016. The sites are estimated to collect 185 ML of stormwater per annum and include:
•
2.2
o
C.B. Mott Park, Holland Park
o
Sexton Street Park, Tarragindi
o
Ekibin Park East, Greenslopes
o
Langlands Park, Coorparoo
o
Whites Hill Sports and Recreation Reserve, Norman Park and Camp Hill
o
Downey Park, Windsor.
Contributed to the development of the draft new City Plan including the Stormwater code,
environmental values section, Flood overlay code and Waterway corridors overlay code.
Focus on the river, bay and waterways
The river, bay and waterways are resilient, healthy and function well. They support the liveability
of Brisbane and are widely used, enjoyed and appreciated by the community as recreational,
economic and environmental resources. They are actively protected and enhanced
by all stakeholders including Council. The value of these assets includes biodiversity protection,
open space, active transport corridor uses, visual amenity, recreation and flood conveyance.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Commenced a four-year trial of creek filtration systems to enhance waterway health at the
following locations:
o
Oxley Creek
61
o
Kedron Brook
o
Norman Creek
o
Toowong Creek.
This year construction was undertaken on two sites in Norman Creek (adjacent to the busway
station at Greenslopes and Glindemann Park in Holland Park) and a third site in Kedron Brook
(Kirralee Crescent, Ferny Grove).
•
Invested more than $11 million to protect waterways and improve urban amenity
including:
o
•
$2.15 million on waterway health enhancement works at:

Cottonvale Street, Coopers Plains

McGregor Way, Ferny Grove (part funded by an Australian Government
Caring for our Country grant)

New Cleveland Road, Wakerley

Selkirk Crescent, Ferny Grove (part funded by an Australian Government
Caring for our Country grant).
o
$6.8 million on the open drainage/waterway maintenance program
o
$1.5 million on stormwater quality improvement
o
$1.1 million on the compliance program for erosion and sediment control.
Continued January 2011 Flood recovery works to repair damaged waterways and river
banks:
o
Undertook creek remediation works at the following sites:

Bert Saint Clair Oval, Graceville

Counihan Road, Seventeen Mile Rocks

Ferny Grove Picnic Ground area, Ferny Grove

Kooringal Avenue, Jindalee

Mornington Street, Alderley

Ryland Street, Keperra

Westlake Drive, Westlake.
o
Replaced the Jindalee pontoon at Mount Ommaney Drive, Jindalee and the
pontoon and gangway at Sir John Chandler Park, Indooroopilly
o
Repaired river walls and banks at:

Wendouree Crescent, Westlake

Sir John Chandler Park, Indooroopilly
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
Kookaburra Park, Karana Downs.
•
Improved compliance with erosion and sediment controls on building sites regulated by
development approval to 85%.
•
Continued to support the South East Queensland Healthy Waterways Partnership with
funding for the Healthy Waterways clean-up program to collect litter from waterways and
raise public awareness of litter issues.
2.3
Flood management
Manages the continual risk of flooding through minimising, accepting and controlling flood risks to
people and property. Brisbane will be prepared for flooding, and will respond and recover
effectively from flood events.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Continued to deliver Council’s Flood Action Plan and implement improvements to disaster
management arrangements.
•
Adopted and released Brisbane’s FloodSMART Future Strategy 2012-2031, providing an
integrated plan for flood risk management and confidence in development and investment
in Brisbane.
•
Commenced the Brisbane River Flood Study in partnership with the Queensland
Government, Ipswich City Council, Somerset Regional Council and Lockyer Valley
Regional Council. Brisbane City Council will contribute $1.7 million to the study over the
next three years.
•
Completed flood studies for Kedron Brook, Oxley Creek, Cabbage Tree Creek and Lota
Creek.
•
Commenced flood risk management plans for Bulimba Creek and Kedron Brook
catchments.
•
Invested more than $1 million in hydrometric telemetry gauge network maintenance and
rehabilitation works across Brisbane suburbs, and designed a new telemetry gauge to
read higher flow events.
•
An extended suite of flood information tools resulted in 327,094 FloodWise Property
Report and 280,218 Flood Flag Map downloads from Council’s website.
•
Installed 18 backflow prevention devices in Tennyson, Chelmer, Bulimba, New Farm,
West End, Milton and the CBD to benefit more than 400 properties affected by backflow
flooding during the January 2011 Flood.
•
Developed a draft Flood code, including new Flood overlay code maps for the draft new
City Plan to increase Brisbane’s resilience to flooding.
•
Invested $15.7 million on local and major drainage works benefiting 65 residential
properties as well as roads affected by flooding.
•
Invested $5 million in the Voluntary Home Purchase Scheme purchasing 11 flood affected
properties. Since the scheme began in 2006, more than $39 million has been spent
purchasing 84 flood affected properties.
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•
Invested $27 million in stormwater network rehabilitation and maintenance including $4
million on cleaning and repairing the stormwater network following the Australia Day
Storm Event 2013.
Challenges
Regional impacts on water quality
The Brisbane River catchment covers approximately 15,000 km² and flows through five local
government areas. This presents both challenges and opportunities for Council as we work with
our neighbours to improve the water quality of our creeks, river and bay.
Sediment in our waterways remains the greatest challenge for Brisbane and the region in
improving the health of our waterways. High sediment loads in our waterways can have
significant environmental and economic impacts, as seen during the Australia Day Storm Event
2013 when the Mount Crosby Water Treatment Plant closed for three days due to high levels of
sediment. Reducing the amount of sediment leaving our backyards, streets, and building and
construction sites is an ongoing challenge for Brisbane.
The health of Brisbane’s waterways, Brisbane River and Moreton Bay cannot be improved
without the cooperation of all South East Queensland councils. It is therefore essential that
Brisbane City Council works in close partnership with neighbouring councils to plan, promote and
implement strategies to improve water quality.
Existing built environment
Brisbane is largely a developed urban centre. This requires that Water Sensitive Urban Design
(WSUD) occurs within the constraints of an existing urban form. This challenges Council to be
innovative in applying WSUD principles in a way that reduces pollutants, erosion and flow while
minimising any burden to infill development and renewal.
Managing flood risk
Brisbane’s subtropical climate and its location on a flood plain means flooding is a natural part of
our environment. The risks of flooding are real and, while we cannot eliminate these events, we
can be a city that lives well with flooding and is prepared, safe and ready for it.
Managing and minimising the impacts of flooding continue to be a priority for Council,
demonstrated by the release of Brisbane’s FloodSmart Future Strategy 2012-2031.
The FloodSmart Future Strategy provides a vision for a city that is safe, confident and ready for
flooding and provides residents, industry and future business with the confidence that Brisbane
has an integrated plan to respond to flood risk. The strategy leads the way in ensuring
sustainable planning, economic development and growth. It adopts a risk based approach to
manage flooding and ensures flooding is expected, designed and planned for.
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Brisbane’s flood smart future
Like many cities around the world, Brisbane has been built on a floodplain. While we will never be
able to eliminate flooding, it is imperative we have a strategy in place to plan for it.
Brisbane’s FloodSmart Future Strategy 2012-2031 is an integrated flood risk management plan
which Council has developed as part of its longstanding commitment to prepare
for and manage the city’s identified flood risks. These include more frequent low impact events
that occur during the annual summer storm season, as well as rarer events like the January 2011
Flood.
By ensuring Brisbane is safe and prepared for flooding, the strategy also contributes to the
economic growth and development of the city. It provides residents, business, industry
and investors with confidence that Brisbane has a plan for flood management and can respond
quickly and effectively when flooding occurs.
Brisbane’s FloodSmart Future Strategy 2012-2031 is based on national and international best
practice. It calls for the coordinated delivery of flood management tools to reduce flooding
impacts on people and property.
In order to manage the range of possible flood events in Brisbane, the strategy is based on
measures including structural flood mitigation, a hazard-based approach to land-use planning,
the provision of good quality flood information and world class emergency management.
The strategy builds on and complements previous work to reduce flood impacts in Brisbane. This
includes a $500 million investment in flood management by Council over the past four years,
including extensive drainage works, backflow devices and making flood information available
online.
As part of the implementation of Brisbane’s FloodSmart Future Strategy 2012-2031, Council will
continue to invest in flood mitigation infrastructure to reduce the impact of flooding. We will also
continue to respond to flood risk by applying smart land-use planning principles and smart
building design.
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Program 3: Moving Brisbane
Brisbane’s transport network enables efficient and sustainable movement of people and freight.
The city’s accessibility and liveability is maintained and all have access to a high quality road
network, high quality bus and ferry services and active travel alternatives, with an understanding
that investment in each transport mode is required to cater for the differing needs of users.
What we do
•
Active transport
•
Bikeway and shared path network
•
Cycling infrastructure
•
Ferry services and infrastructure
•
Bus infrastructure
•
Strategic transport planning
•
Transport network management
•
Local roads
Highlights
447 roads resurfaced
5.9 million passengers carried on the ferry network
>1 million passengers carried on new CityHopper service
90 new rigid equivalent buses delivered to the bus fleet including 15 high-capacity vehicles
4.6 kms of tunnelling completed for Legacy Way
Overview
As Brisbane continues to grow, Council’s ongoing commitment to the planning, development and
operation of our transport network makes it easier for residents and visitors to move around our
city.
The planning, development and operation of Brisbane’s transport network is guided by the
Transport Plan for Brisbane 2008-2026 and implemented by the Moving Brisbane program.
The program provides access to a high quality road network (including 5690 km of Council
controlled roads), a public transport (bus and ferry) network, and walking and cycling facilities to
support the safe, efficient and sustainable movement of people and freight.
Engaging the community in active transport alternatives, improving our public transport network
and investing in our roads to reduce traffic congestion are all integral to effective road networks,
green and active transport and active and healthy communities.
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Performance
3.1
Promoting active transport
Council is reducing congestion and encouraging sustainable travel through the promotion of
cycling and walking as healthy and environmentally sustainable alternatives to car travel.
Brisbane residents who embrace active travel alternatives are not only reducing congestion, they
are also helping Brisbane to become a healthy, sustainable and accessible city.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Continued improvement of Council’s bikeway infrastructure including works to improve
black spot locations and provide supporting infrastructure at key destinations and public
transport interchanges. This included commencing or completing connecting bikeway
links to key destinations/public transport interchanges at:
o
Cubberla Creek
o
Gateway North
o
Kedron Brook area 4, Bage Street
o
Bulimba Creek Wishart stage 3
o
Zillman Waterholes
o
Moggill Creek Bikeway stage 1
o
Roxwell Street
o
Lilly Pilly, Fitzgibbon.
•
Commenced the upgrade of stage 3 of the Bicentennial Bikeway from Park Road to Land
Street.
•
Continued stage 3 of the Cabbage Tree Creek Bikeway.
•
Repaired or replaced 105,040 m² of constructed footpath surfaces and 9843 m² of
bikeways.
•
Registered 224,765 trips on CityCycle, contributing to 434,232 registered trips since the
program commenced in October 2010.
•
Improved bikeway safety with the installation of safety signage and lighting at key
locations on the network including:
o
Ridge Street, Holland Park
o
Ekibin Road East
o
Wynnum Road/Bognor Street intersection, Tingalpa
o
Shaw Road, Wavell Heights
o
Victoria Bridge bike underpass.
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•
Expanded the Active School Travel program to an additional 20 schools bringing the
number of participating schools to 134. Initiatives included dedicated active travel days,
‘park and stride’, bike and scooter skills training and road safety sessions. At participating
schools:
o
car trips decreased from 74% to 56%, while students walking to school increased
from 16% to 40%
o
car-pooling increased from 4% to 7%
o
scooter trips in schools participating for the first time increased from 1% to 2%.
The results of the Active School Travel program in 2012-13 equate to a 1.92 million km reduction
in private vehicle travel.
3.2
Public transport
Council provides high quality public transport services through the provision of a modern bus and
ferry fleet and accessible public transport infrastructure.
This contributes to the reduction of road congestion, increases options for sustainable and
environmentally friendly transport, and increases ease of travelling around Brisbane.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Installed CCTV cameras and emergency call points at Apollo Road, Hawthorne, Norman
Park and Thornton Street ferry terminals.
•
Provided ongoing education to rowers, coaches and ferry masters, including an initiative
where rowing coaches accompanied ferry masters on CityCat services to experience
firsthand the difficulty in seeing rowing craft in low and reflective light and near dark
conditions.
•
Delivered accessibility upgrades to one monohull ferry and eight Generation 1 CityCats to
achieve Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA) compliance.
•
Carried approximately six million passengers on the ferry network.
•
Launched a new CityHopper ferry service to provide a free, half-hourly service between
Sydney Street and North Quay carrying more than 1.2 million passengers since
launching.
•
Delivered 90 new rigid equivalent buses to the fleet including 15 buses measuring 14.5 m
to offer greater passenger capacity on busier routes.
•
Launched the Maroon CityGlider resulting in a 15% patronage increase in the western
corridor or an extra 15,000 passenger trips.
3.3
Transport network
Brisbane continues to develop a quality transport network that supports safe and efficient
movement of people and freight.
Key results for 2012-13
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•
Continued patronage growth on the Go Between Bridge, with more than 4.2 million trips
recorded in 2012-13, and 12 million trips recorded since the bridge opened in July 2010.
•
Progressed construction on the Legacy Way road tunnel with tunnel excavation
completed and construction commenced on the Moggill Road/ Western Freeway
interchange.
•
Commenced work on two open level crossing replacement projects at:
•
o
Robinson Road, Geebung
o
Telegraph Road, Bracken Ridge.
Addressed nine black spots at busy road intersections across the city:
o
Miles Platting Road, McKechnie Drive and Buckingham Place, Eight Mile Plains
o
Sandgate Road and Collins Street, Nundah
o
Ann Street and Gipps Street, Fortitude Valley
o
Gipps Street and Wickham Street, Fortitude Valley
o
Oxley Road and Clewley Street, Corinda
o
Jane Street and Montague Road, West End
o
Commercial Road and Doggett Street, Newstead
o
Wynnum Road and Bognor Street, Tingalpa
o
Jack Flynn Memorial Drive and Waminda Street, Morningside.
•
Delivered Safe School Travel (SafeST) facilities at 10 schools. Funded in partnership with
the Queensland Government, the program improves safety for school students and
families travelling to and from school. It provides facilities including pedestrian and bicycle
infrastructure as well as passenger loading areas.
•
Delivered Safer Routes to School (SRTS) infrastructure at six schools to improve safety
for school students and parents travelling to and from school, with facilities including
extended foot paths, new passenger refuges and removal of unsafe crossing points.
•
Resurfaced 447 roads across Brisbane.
•
Resurfaced the Walter Taylor Bridge.
•
Continued to manage traffic and reduce congestion by delivering CCTVs, variable
message signs, bluetooth sites and eight arterial road infrastructure improvements
including:
o
Wynnum Road right turn lane extensions at its intersections with Belmont Road,
Creek Road and Beverley Street
o
A right turn lane extension at the intersection at St Paul’s Terrace with Brookes
Street
o
Realignment and relocation of a loading zone in Queen Street
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•
•
o
Removal of T2 lanes on Tiber Street, Canara Street and Crown Street
o
Intersection improvement works at Toombul Road and Melton Road intersection
o
Extension of the right turn lane on Boundary Road at its intersection with
Chatsworth Road.
Continued to partner with the Queensland Government to operate the Brisbane
Metropolitan Transport Management Centre (BMTMC). The BMTMC oversees more than
6500 km of road network and 23.3 km of busway, and manages
7500 transport-related incidents per month.
•
Trialled pedestrian countdown timers at five sites and expanded the program to an
additional seven sites following face-to-face interviews with 1170 pedestrians.
•
Installed more than 100 new free motorcycle parking spaces in Brisbane CBD, Fortitude
Valley, South Brisbane and Dutton Park.
Congestion report
The Congestion Reduction Unit continued to implement a program of initiatives to monitor traffic
flow and manage and mitigate congestion on the transport network. This included the introduction
of:
•
six additional CCTVs
•
two variable message signs
•
63 Bluetooth sites.
Council’s ability to monitor and report on the performance of the road network has improved with
the introduction of Bluetooth technology. Bluetooth monitoring on 15 critical corridors for 2012-13
showed:
•
a 7.4% reduction in travel times during the am peak and 5% during the pm peak
•
travel speed on the same corridors increasing by approximately 8% in the am peak and
7.1% in the pm peak.
The corridors include:
•
Stanley Street (Cavendish Road to Vulture Street)
•
Vulture Street (Stanley Street to Cavendish Road)
•
Fairfield Road-Annerley Road (Sherwood Road to Stanley Street)
•
Ipswich Road (Hamilton Road to River Terrace)
•
Kelvin Grove Road (Samford Road to Ithaca Street)
•
Kingsford Smith Drive (Sugarmill Road to Cooksley Street)
•
Logan Road (Klumpp Road to Old Cleveland Road)
•
Lutwyche Road (Norman Avenue to Gregory Terrace)
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•
Milton Road (Croydon/Morley streets to Petrie Terrace).
Council is continuing to refine the Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS) to
support congestion management.
These projects assist improved management of Brisbane’s transport network through intelligence
gathering and fine tuning network performance.
Challenges
Improving flood resilience
Following the January 2011 Flood, Council had to restore Brisbane’s CityCat and CityFerry
services. To return service quickly, seriously damaged terminals were replaced with temporary
terminals built to pre- flood standards. Council is rebuilding these temporary terminals with
permanent facilities with improved flood resilience. The project completion date is June 2015.
The January 2011 Flood also caused the downstream section of the New Farm Riverwalk to be
washed away. The design of a replacement Riverwalk has been completed. It involves a fixed
walkway with piers driven into the rock below the river bed. Construction of the New Farm
Riverwalk replacement has commenced and completion is scheduled for mid-2014.
Improving ferry accessibility
Council owns and maintains extensive public transport infrastructure which requires an upgrade
to improve accessibility, particularly for people with disabilities or mobility issues and parents of
young people.
The DDA mandates 100% compliance of public transport infrastructure by December 2022 and
significant investment is being made to meet this requirement. In 2012-13, Council undertook
upgrade works at 13 ferry terminals with works taking place outside of operating hours to
minimise impact on passengers. The upgrade includes the installation of new and upgraded
handrails, grabrails, kickrails, lighting, signage, street furniture including seating and tactile
ground surface indicators.
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Active School Travel Program
Active School Travel (AST) is a Brisbane City Council program that educates and motivates
students, parents and teachers to leave the car at home and travel actively by walking, riding or
using public transport.
Recent surveys of primary schools undertaken by Council indicate that up to 85% of children are
now driven to and from school every day.
AST promotes sustainable, safe and healthy school travel modes as part of Council’s plan to
keep Brisbane moving.
The program started in 2004 with eight schools, and to date has been implemented in 134
primary schools across Brisbane. Schools join the program for three years. The schools that
joined in 2012 achieved an 18% reduction in sole family car trips, which equated to an annual
saving of more than 1.92 million vehicle km and 520 tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions.
During the three-year partnership, Council provides AST schools and their communities with
information to change travel behaviours through a variety of initiatives. Participating schools are
supported by Council officers who provide guidance, support and resources to help organise
interactive assemblies, road safety awareness sessions, bike and scooter skills training, inter and
intra school competitions, active travel day events and a reward program.
The AST program benefits the school and local community by reducing congestion and improving
road safety around schools, improving health and fitness and reducing greenhouse gas
emissions. The program also contributes to healthier, more alert students and improved
community networks.
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Program 4: Future Brisbane
The Future Brisbane program is committed to encouraging the city’s continued growth and
prosperity and facilitating quality development. Our goal is to ensure Brisbane – Australia’s New
World City, is well designed and efficiently serviced, with a distinctive subtropical character.
What we do
•
City and regional planning
•
Neighbourhood planning and urban renewal
•
Strategic land-use planning
•
Coordination of infrastructure planning
•
Priority Infrastructure Plan and infrastructure agreements
•
Brisbane improvement projects
•
Urban renewal
•
Development assessment
•
Development regulation and compliance
•
Conservation of heritage places and character housing
Highlights
7 neighbourhood plans adopted and 8 notified
23 City Centre Master Plan Ideas Fiesta events with 16,405 attendees and 1,287,768 Twitter
and Facebook impressions
5 Vibrant Laneways projects completed
100 consultation events on the draft new City Plan, >53,233 website visitors and 16,154
factsheets downloaded
>5800 built environment applications assessed
>31,000 commercial and domestic plumbing inspections
>3100 high-level development applications lodged, with fast tracked assessment of 43%
Overview
The Future Brisbane program manages Brisbane’s growth and development.
Council’s goal is to ensure Brisbane – Australia’s New World City has a distinct subtropical
character and is well designed, economically prosperous and efficiently serviced.
75
Through the Future Brisbane program, Council plans for economic, employment and population
growth while enhancing lifestyle opportunities and protecting heritage buildings, parks and natural
environment.
Council engages with the community to plan for the future to ensure our lifestyle is enhanced and
employment opportunities are created.
The Future Brisbane program contributes to effective growth management and a well designed
and responsive built environment.
Performance
4.1
Planning for a growing city
Council’s planning approach will acknowledge the sophistication and maturity of our community,
and people’s strong desire to ‘have a say’ and be involved in planning for the future of Brisbane
and the region.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Commenced public notification of the draft new City Plan.
•
Established a natural history trail and installed new public art at C.T. White and James
Warner parks, Kangaroo Point.
•
Installed landmark gateway artwork signage at Stones Corner.
•
Made two amendments to the current Priority Infrastructure Plan (PIP) to make the
document more user friendly and ensure road corridors are accurately shown during
development assessment.
•
Delivered the draft second PIP to ensure the draft new City Plan is compliant with
legislation. The PIP ensures coordinated infrastructure delivery across all Council
programs including the draft new City Plan and neighbourhood plans.
•
Implemented the Brisbane Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution (No. 2) in
accordance with the Sustainable Planning Act 2009 to enable Council
to levy and collect charges for both Council and Queensland Urban Utilities infrastructure
networks identified in the PIP.
o
•
4.2
Delivered and implemented the Hotels Subsidy Administrative Policy waiving
infrastructure charges for four and five star hotels in accordance with Council’s economic
development objectives.
Enhancing Brisbane’s liveability
Council enhances Brisbane’s character and liveability through neighbourhood planning and urban
renewal.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Adopted seven neighbourhood plans in City Plan 2000 (Council’s planning scheme)
including:
o
Mt Gravatt Corridor
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•
o
Toombul Nundah
o
Mitchelton Centre
o
Racecourse Precinct
o
River Gateway
o
Richlands Wacol Corridor
o
Moggill/Bellbowrie District.
Continued development of nine neighbourhood plans including:
o
Chermside Centre
o
Pinkenba/Eagle Farm
o
Darra Oxley District
o
Lower Oxley Creek South
o
Lower Oxley Creek North
o
Howard Smith Wharves
o
Paradise Wetlands
o
Taringa
•
Released the City Centre Master Plan vision.
•
Launched four Suburban Centre Improvement Projects (SCIPs) in Highgate Hill, St Lucia,
New Farm and Alderley.
•
Delivered the City Centre Master Plan Ideas Fiesta, a three-week program of community
consultation events to generate ideas for the future of Brisbane’s city centre.
•
Undertook community consultation on the draft River’s Edge Strategy.
•
Provided facilitation for developments including projects such as Newstead Riverpark, 1
William Street (Queensland Government Precinct), Coorparoo Transit Oriented
Development, Bakery Lane, Eagle Farm/Doomben Racecourses and Myrtletown Future
Industry Area.
•
Provided development facilitation and infrastructure delivery at Rochedale in line with the
Rochedale Urban Community Local Plan. This has resulted in 50% of 6500 lots and units
currently approved or in pre-lodgement meeting discussions.
•
Approved subdivision applications for stages two and three of FKP Property Group’s
Rochedale development, delivering more than 352 residential lots.
•
Completed the Archerfield Wetlands Master Plan to guide the improvement and
rehabilitation of the wetlands.
•
Continued to negotiate with industry located along Oxley Creek with a view to securing 22
ha of land for rehabilitation.
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4.3
Approving quality development
Developments will be approved in accordance with City Plan 2000 and will contribute to
Brisbane’s subtropical lifestyle and maintain its heritage, character, safety and prosperity.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Continued with service and procedure improvements that place Council’s development
assessment process at the forefront of local government, including the introduction of
online training videos, industry announcements and video conferencing.
•
Processed 43% of high-level applications through fast-track processes.
•
Introduced the SealSMART fast-track program for plan sealing processing and approval.
•
Continued to protect Brisbane’s heritage buildings by introducing the Temporary Local
Planning Instrument 01/13 to protect residential buildings constructed prior to 1911.
•
Offered 26 heritage incentive scheme grants in relation to conservation projects worth
more than $1.6 million in project cost.
•
Recovered $3.48 million in unpaid developer contributions associated with the conditions
of development approvals.
Challenges
Facilitating development in challenging economic times
Neighbourhood Planning and Urban Renewal continue to work closely with business and
industry to ensure plans for future development are feasible. Future Brisbane also partners with
Brisbane Marketing to promote opportunities for investment and economic development.
Council needs to plan for growth and protect the liveability and character of Brisbane’s suburbs
while maximising the economic opportunities for the city. Council also caters for a range of
community needs by enabling different housing types and living options.
The community is encouraged to have their say with Neighbourhood Planning and Urban
Renewal developing innovative ways to engage people in planning for the future, including social
media and events like the City Centre Master Plan Ideas Fiesta.
Planning reforms initiated by the Queensland Government are driving a dynamic policy
environment, with infrastructure charges legislation under review.
The development assessment team continues to work with town planners and developers at the
pre-lodgement stage to ensure timely, cost-efficient decisions that result in good outcomes for the
city.
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A year of consultation
Brisbane – Australia’s New World City is growing rapidly. Located at the centre of the fastest
growing region in Australia, Brisbane is predicted to be the fastest growing economy of mature
cities worldwide from 2012 to 2020 (Jones Lang LaSalle 2012) and Council’s Future Brisbane
program is responsible for managing this growth.
In 2012-13 Council publicly released the draft new City Plan, one of the largest public
consultation and planning projects for Brisbane in more than a decade.
Released online in December 2012, the draft new City Plan is based on community input
received including feedback on 36 neighbourhood plans and the opinions of the thousands of
people who commented on CityShape 2026. The draft plan has focused on promoting
sustainable economic growth of the city.
In February 2013, Council commenced an extensive program of face-to-face consultation across
the city. Between February and June 2013 more than 100 engagement events took place across
the city, featuring information kiosks, ‘Talk to a Planner’ sessions and targeted business,
community, heritage and education forums. More than 53,000 people have viewed the draft plan
online and in excess of 16,000 factsheets have been downloaded. A further 2800 people have
attended an information session or provided written feedback on the draft new City Plan.
To increase accessibility, Council delivered a new interactive mapping tool – an industry first.
Covering natural hazards like flooding as well as character housing and zoning, the mapping tool
enables users to view specific properties or areas to see what impact, if any, the draft plan may
have. To encourage feedback from the city’s multicultural community, Council also translated the
draft new City Plan’s webpage introduction, information on feedback sessions and the online
submission form into four languages.
Like all Council plans, the draft new City Plan is being developed in consultation with the
community. Council is committed to working with residents and businesses to manage the city’s
growth.
The draft new City Plan and Interactive mapping is Council’s first full plan that is completely
online.
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Program 5: Your Brisbane
Brisbane is a vibrant, 24 hour, seven day, New World City with opportunities for all residents,
workers and visitors to participate in cultural and recreational activities, which foster inclusion and
stronger communities.
What we do
•
Vibrant and caring local communities
•
Promoting an active and healthy lifestyle
•
Libraries, archives, museums and exhibitions
•
Cultural activities, festivals and events
•
Community partnerships and development
•
Access and inclusion initiatives
•
Indigenous aspirations
•
Homelessness initiatives
•
Community grants
•
Facilities planning, management and leasing
•
Sport and recreation capacity building
•
Golf courses
•
Community pools
•
Community halls
•
City Hall, Planetarium, Riverstage
•
Council Wi-Fi in parks
Highlights
$215 million restoration of City Hall completed
>1.7 million people used Council’s city pools
6.18 million visits to libraries
17 community organisations funded to improve access and inclusion
742,832 Wi-Fi sessions in parks and libraries
55,000 residents participated in Council’s Active and Healthy program
66 sponsored community and multicultural festivals across Brisbane
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Overview
The Your Brisbane program aims to ensure Brisbane is a vibrant place to live with opportunities
for residents to participate in cultural, learning and recreational activities that foster inclusive,
informed and resilient communities.
The program ensures all residents have access to relevant community resources, services and
facilities, and our city’s high standard of living is maintained.
Throughout 2012-13, Your Brisbane worked in partnership with the community, other spheres of
government and the private sector to deliver a range of activities, programs and events which
celebrate and strengthen our quality of life and community spirit.
Community grants were provided to foster local talent, artists and performers.
Our libraries and the outreach activities they support remained popular and our community
resources, services and facilities continued to be accessible and well patronised, particularly
those aimed at assisting the more disadvantaged in the community. High quality sporting and
recreational services were provided, and our venues remained popular.
The program contributes to inclusive and caring communities, learning and informed communities
and active and healthy communities.
Performance
5.1
Thriving arts and culture
Brisbane’s community is innovative, creative and provided with opportunities to actively
participate in the cultural life of our diverse and vibrant city.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Sponsored 66 community and multicultural festivals across Brisbane, attended by more
than 480,000 residents and visitors.
•
Hosted more than 600 free community entertainment and participation programs
throughout the city, attracting more than 370,000 attendees.
•
Sponsored the Brisbane Festival, providing 103 events and 474 performances for more
than one million people.
•
Opened the revitalised Museum of Brisbane in City Hall, attracting more than 40,000
visitors in the first month.
•
Continued to provide Brisbane residents with opportunities to access arts and cultural
experiences through the sponsorship of six iconic Brisbane based cultural organisations:
o
Brisbane Eisteddfod
o
Brisbane Philharmonic Orchestra
o
Brisbane Writers’ Festival
o
Queensland Ballet
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o
Queensland Choir
o
Queensland Symphony Orchestra.
•
More than 690,000 visitors attended in excess of 900 events at the Brisbane Powerhouse
precinct.
•
Funded 17 Creative Sparks grants estimated to have generated almost $1 million in arts
and cultural activity.
5.2
Libraries for an informed community
Brisbane’s libraries provide access to information and opportunities for learning, recreational
reading and cultural activities. They are integral to a new world city.
Key results for 2012-13
•
468,221 current library members.
•
Increased visits to libraries by more than 2.8% to 6.18 million.
•
Implemented the first Lord Mayor’s Writers in Residence program with 29 high-profile
authors at 44 events attended by 3611 people.
•
Delivered 18 writers’ workshops to 430 attendees.
•
Increased attendance at library programs by 29% to 302,961 attendees.
•
Increased Wi-Fi usage in libraries by 220%, or more than 336,168 sessions.
•
Introduced Wi-Fi in parks providing 406,664 sessions in the first year.
•
Delivered children’s literacy progams at libraries to 150,150 children and parents.
•
Completed the $1.39 million refurbishment and extension of Mitchelton Library.
•
Extended Brisbane Square Library, with additional quiet reading areas, more seating,
improved toilet facilities and a 150-seat event space.
•
Established social media channels for Brisbane libraries.
•
Transitioned the library collection to a mix of digital and physical items, resulting in a
growth in eBook usage of 108% (more than 150,000 loans).
•
Introduced free downloadable music through the library catalogue eLibCat.
•
The first year of operation of the new Carindale Library resulted in 500,564 visits, more
than any other year in the library’s 14-year history.
•
Achieved a 93% customer satisfaction rating for libraries.
5.3
Active and healthy communities
Brisbane is an active and healthy city with high quality facilities and programs providing a range
of sport, leisure and recreational opportunities.
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Key results for 2012-13
•
Continued to partner with the Heart Foundation to provide Council’s Gonewalking
program to more than 9800 residents during 4400 walks.
•
Supported more than 260 Chillout program activities during the school holidays in which
some 3000 residents aged from 10 to 17 years learned new skills and met new people.
•
Continued to offer activities to improve health, fitness and wellbeing of people aged 50
and over through GOLD (Growing Older and Living Dangerously) and GOLD n’ Kids, with
almost 12,500 people participating in more than 1750 activities.
•
Increased participation in Council’s Active Parks program resulted in more than 48,000
participants enjoying in excess of 3400 free Active Parks activities across 50 local
Brisbane parks.
•
Worked with Auslan to provide interpreters for mixed hearing and deaf participants of the
Active Parks and GOLD programs.
•
Worked with more than 550 community and sporting organisations leasing Council
facilities, providing advice and assistance to organisations on club sustainability and
governance, facility and asset management, and grant funding. Council assistance
included:
o
the installation of toilets for the disabled
o
access ramps
o
rain tanks
o
irrigation systems
o
solar panels.
•
Provided support to more than 70 community lessees who were affected by the Australia
Day Storm Event 2013.
•
Provided grant funding to 109 local organisations to help develop sporting facilities and
services.
5.4
Social inclusion
Brisbane is an inclusive city in which diversity is valued and groups at greater risk of exclusion
are supported to participate fully in community life.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Worked with community organisations to facilitate Black Diamonds – a sport, recreation,
arts and culture-based activity program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
Nearly 200 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people attended the two Black
Diamonds camps.
•
Provided financial support and partnered with the National Stolen Generation Alliance
group to upgrade Aboriginal cultural infrastructure in public spaces
and support Reconciliation Sorry Day events.
•
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•
Partnered with 19 community organisations to assist with the delivery of Black History
Month and National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC),
showcasing 34 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander activities and events to more than
29,000 attendees.
•
Hosted the 2013 Homeless Connect event with a record 68 service providers and more
than 1400 guests. Guests were provided with free medical and dental consultations and
housing and legal support, as well as meals, clothes and shoes.
•
Installed 19 wayfinding devices in Queen Street Mall for people with vision impairment.
•
Provided more than 58,000 return trips in Council Cabs.
•
Improved pedestrian mobility for people with vision impairment through the installation of
59 tactile street signs in the CBD and Fortitude Valley. The signs were also installed near
Vision Australia, Coorparoo and Guide Dogs Queensland at Sandgate.
•
Opened the Mobility Centre in City Hall to provide free loans of manual wheelchairs,
wheeled walkers and prams for visitors to City Hall and the CBD.
•
Released the Draft Strategy for Young People 2013-2018 for public consultation.
•
Facilitated the Lord Mayor’s Youth Advisory Council, with more than 120 year 10 students
meeting with the Lord Mayor to gain an understanding of Council’s role and
responsibilities. They also contributed to Council’s Draft Strategy for Young People 20132018.
•
Conducted disability audits on 33 Council facilities with high community use to assist DDA
compliance.
•
Upgraded 20 Council community facilities to improve accessibility including installation of
access ramps, accessible toilets and disability parking.
•
Provided funding to 17 community organisations to improve access and inclusion for
people with a disability.
•
Provided three month supervised work experience opportunities for eight participants with
a disability.
•
Transported more than 22,000 passengers under the Personalised Public Transport
program.
•
Housed more than 100 people who were homeless or at risk of homelessness through the
Community Housing Partnership project.
•
Funded 26 local community organisations under Council grants for:
•
o
Community development
o
Capacity building
o
Men’s Shed program
o
Housing support program.
Conducted water safe swimming programs for 266 women and students from migrant and
refugee communities and schools through the Aqua English program.
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•
Continued to provide support to the multicultural radio station Radio 4EB. The station has
more than 50,000 listeners from all age groups and broadcasts in more than 50
languages.
•
Hosted the My Mother’s Kitchen – World Kitchen initiative at 10 Council libraries with 325
people attending.
•
Delivered the inaugural Hoarding and Squalor Brisbane Forum 2012 in partnership with
Centacare and Communify, welcoming 200 participants from government and community
sectors in South East Queensland and northern New South Wales.
5.5
Well-managed community facilities
Brisbane residents have access to a broad range of well-managed, quality community facilities
providing sporting, recreational, social and cultural opportunities.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Refurbished 12 community and sporting facilities across Brisbane increasing sporting and
recreation opportunity to Brisbane’s local communities.
•
Remediated 24 existing grass netball courts in partnership with the Downey Park Netball
Association.
•
Inspected 270 sports fields across Brisbane resulting in 91 fields undergoing aeration,
‘weed wiping’, fertilising and top dressing.
•
Installed new ramp access and pool heating at the Jindalee Pool and completed
construction on the new entry and amenities block at Bellbowrie Swimming Pool.
•
Received more than 320,000 patrons at the Hibiscus Sports Complex.
•
Attracted a capacity crowd of 9000 to the Riverstage at the City Botanic Gardens for the
2012Lord Mayor’s Christmas Carols.
•
Refurbished Sunnybank and Upper Kedron community halls to provide disability access,
playground equipment and parking.
•
Completed $1.06 million upgrade of Sir Thomas Brisbane Planetarium including a new
state-of-the- art optical star projector.
5.6
City icons
Council’s iconic City Hall is fundamental to the city’s identity, government, and cultural and
community life.
City Hall has been restored and upgraded, and will
be conserved and maintained as a well-loved heritage building for future generations.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Completed the $215 million restoration of City Hall and officially re-opened the building to
the community on 6 April 2013. Highlights of the restoration include:
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o
significant assessibility improvements with 13 disability access toilets, braille
signage and audio looping throughout the building, and lifts with accessible
controls
o
increased space for community use
o
achievement of a four-star green rating.
•
Received more than 15,000 visitors to City Hall over the rededication weekend, at which
approximately 300 entertainers performed.
•
Hosted more than 3252 people on a City Hall tour and 4217 people on a clock tower tour
during the first month of City Hall re-opening.
•
Appointed commercial venue operator Epicure to manage event and catering services for
City Hall’s 12 newly refurbished function rooms.
Challenges
Ongoing community organisation support
Council provides support to local community and sporting organisations through grants programs
and access to resources that enable capacity building and financial sustainability.
As the number of organisations requesting support continues to grow, Council officers work
directly with community organisations to strengthen their operations and ability to deliver services
and activities to their local communities.
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Restoring two iconic Brisbane venues
Council delivered major refurbishments to two iconic Brisbane venues in 2013 – Brisbane City
Hall and the Sir Thomas Brisbane Planetarium.
In late March 2013, following a $1.063 million upgrade, a modern and refreshed Planetarium was
revealed to the community. It attracted visitor numbers not seen since the venue first opened in
1978. More than 41,000 people have enjoyed the upgrades, which include a new state-of-the-art
optical star projector that recreates a stunningly realistic night sky on a 12.5 m diameter
projection dome.
On 6 April, Lord Mayor, Councillor Graham Quirk rededicated City Hall to the people of Brisbane
after a $215 million, three-year restoration project.
The City Hall restoration project began in November 2008 after an independent report identified
the building was suffering from serious structural, electrical, mechanical, hydraulic and safety
problems.
Viewed as a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to restore the building to its original design intent, the
City Hall restoration became the largest heritage project ever to be undertaken by a council in
Australia.
The project’s heritage architects went to great lengths to balance the building’s original 1930s
‘old world charm’ with modern features such as 8500 light-emitting diode (LED) lights above the
main auditorium, a large industrial kitchen beneath it and four new function rooms.
A purpose built gallery with three new exhibition spaces was also constructed on the top level of
the building to house the Museum of Brisbane.
The $215 million restoration project not only saved the building, it provided modern upgrades and
increased space for community use. City Hall now meets the requirements of current building
codes, and measures have been taken to achieve greater sustainability and accessibility
throughout the building.
City Hall, which is also known as the ‘People’s Place’, received 40,000 people through its doors
in April.
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Program 6: Public Health and Safety
The health and safety of Brisbane’s community will be protected and enhanced.
What we do
•
Graffiti management and reduction
•
Free infant immunisation clinics
•
School-based vaccinations
•
Mosquito and rodent control services
•
Food licensing and compliance
•
Community safety and crime prevention planning and services
•
Support Brisbane’s State Emergency Service (SES)
•
Improve water safety and regulate swimming pool inspections
•
Cemetery and crematorium services
•
Local law enforcement and animal management
Highlights
128,916 m2 of illegal graffiti removed across Brisbane
$3 million spent on graffiti management and mitigation
95,715 dogs registered
570 free community immunisation clinics delivered
62,413 vaccinations delivered through the School- based Vaccination program
18% increase in compliance across Brisbane’s food premises through Eat Safe Brisbane
>200 jobs responded to within the first 36 hours of the Australia Day Storm Event 2013 by the
Rapid Response Group
Overview
The goal of the Public Health and Safety program is to protect and enhance the health and safety
of the Brisbane community.
Council provides health services and a proactive approach to promoting the safety and amenity
of all residents and visitors. In 2012-13, Council continued to protect the health of residents by
delivering free community immunisation clinics and enforcing food safety standards through the
Eat Safe Brisbane program.
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By providing animal shelters and rapid responses to animal attack complaints, Council helped
maintain community safety and protect domestic animals. We also protected the community from
disease through the delivery of mosquito and rodent-control programs. The personal security of
our residents and their property remained a priority, as did maintaining the fight against graffiti
through graffiti removal and mitigation.
Council’s Rapid Response Group provided frontline response across a range of safety and
amenity issues, enhancing safety and accessibility for our residents and visitors.
Performance
6.1
Public health
Protect and enhance the health of Brisbane’s residents.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Delivered 570 free community clinics with approximately 14,000 vaccinations
administered.
•
Provided 62,413 free vaccinations for students through the School-based Vaccination
program and 3050 free flu vaccinations for employees.
•
Monitored 946 rodent baiting stations across Brisbane.
•
Monitored and treated more than 3000 land-based mosquito breeding sites and treated
15,780 ha of land through the aerial treatment program.
•
Recorded a lower incidence rate of Ross River virus and Barmah Forest virus in Brisbane
than in other areas of South East Queensland.
•
Facilitated high standards of food safety by delivering 5245 audits within the Eat Safe
Brisbane program, with 91.4% of premises meeting food hygiene standards.
•
Registered 95,715 dogs.
•
Reunited 1633 lost dogs with owners.
•
Delivered eight low cost microchipping events across Brisbane in partnership with the
National Pet Register.
•
Delivered 46 PetPEP sessions in partnership with the Australian Veterinary Association to
2738 students at 32 Brisbane schools. These sessions promote responsible pet
ownership.
•
Delivered animal shelter services in partnership with the Lost Dogs Home.
•
Amended the Health and Safety Local Law 2008 to maintain visual building amenity in
Fortitude Valley.
•
Council’s Rapid Response Group provided frontline response to more than 200 jobs
within the first 36 hours of the Australia Day Storm Event 2013, and more than 100
business-as-usual responses in the same time period. The average response time per
request was 19 minutes.
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6.2
Citizens’ security
Council addresses the security of citizens and their property, security of the city and community
safety services.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Provided more than $3 million for graffiti removal and mitigation.
•
Removed 128,916 m² of graffiti vandalism.
•
Enhanced the safety and visual amenity of Brisbane through the delivery of two murals in
the Walls and Colour project.
•
Delivered the ‘Don’t be a Fool Tags Aren’t Cool’ anti-graffiti school based education
program in partnership with Warner Education to 12,794 students across 108 Brisbane
schools.
•
Continued to operate the Taskforce Against Graffiti (TAG) in partnership with the
Queensland Police Service (QPS).
•
Expanded the TAG Them Back community education campaign as an initiative between
Council, Crime Stoppers and Queensland Rail (QR).
•
Commenced the GraffitiSTOP project in partnership with the Queensland Government.
•
Expanded the partnership with Queensland Rail, removing more than 20,800 m² of graffiti
from rail corridors.
•
Implemented a graffiti removal program for youth in partnership with Youth Justice
Services.
•
Maintained the CitySafe CCTV monitoring room and CCTV cameras throughout Queen
Street and Fortitude Valley malls 24 hours a day, seven days a week with 12,380
incidents logged. Amplification speakers were activated 2004 times and there were 804
instances of CCTV footage being provided to QPS in reference to potential criminal
offences.
•
Identified eight hot-spot locations across Brisbane through safety audits, and actioned key
recommendations to improve community safety and amenity including improved lighting
and sightlines, toilet upgrades, and vegetation and barrier planting.
•
Completed the Sunnybank Safer Suburbs project which delivered multilingual safety
brochures, multilingual signs, mobile police bikes, CCTV cameras and improved lighting
and sightlines.
•
Commenced construction of a new SES depot at Anstead.
•
93 Brisbane City SES Unit members were awarded the National Emergency Medal for
their sustained service.
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6.3
Cemeteries
Provide cemetery and crematoria services, non-denominational chapels and ash memorials.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Managed and maintained 12 cemeteries offering a range of services.
•
Completed improvements and refurbishments at the Mount Gravatt Cemetery. This
included the construction of a second private chapel to support an additional 270 services
per annum.
•
Completed refurbishment of the rotunda at Nundah Cemetery.
Challenges
Providing responsive services to a changing city
The Public Health and Safety program continually strives to ensure a high standard of services to
our city across a diverse range of issues and needs – 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
The growing population and higher urban density increases customer demand for services. It also
creates challenges in balancing the needs of different groups. For example, it can be difficult to
meet the expectations of both pet owners and non-pet owners for safety, amenity and liveability.
More people are using Brisbane’s public spaces and this requires heightened attention to safety,
shared use and amenity. The Public Health and Safety program applies a strong customer focus
to the management of our public spaces.
Council responds to our city’s needs and delivers premium services to a diverse community in
challenging fiscal times through innovation, education, industry partnerships and digital
technology.
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Council’s focus on safety and amenity
The visual attractiveness of a city and the standard of public facilities have a role to play in public
health and safety.
One of the most influential crime prevention theories in recent years, the Broken Window Theory,
suggests littering, graffiti or broken windows can – if unaddressed – lead to more serious crime.
The Public Health and Safety program adopts this approach and focuses on issues of amenity to
ensure Brisbane is an accessible, connected, friendly, safe, vibrant and creative city.
In 2012-13, more than 128,000 m² of graffiti was removed from across the city and a number of
complementary graffiti mitigation initiatives were delivered. These included the installation of
murals at Keperra and Bald Hills and a successful partnership between Council, Queensland Rail
and Southbank Corporation to create a mural on the Queensland Rail walkway at Southbank.
The mural enhances the safety and amenity of a key thoroughfare and access route to
Southbank and the surrounding area.
In an Australian first, Council installed the Graffiti Security Solution Stormwall system on The Gap
Historical Society building. The system discourages tagging by using sensors to trigger a fall of
water when areas are targeted.
Council also worked in partnership with Youth Justice Services to deliver a program in which
youth graffiti offenders remove litter and graffiti in the community areas where their offence
occurred.
Council continued to work closely with the Queensland Police Service (QPS) to undertake safety
audits across the city, providing advice and recommendations on safety and amenity
improvement projects. Often initiated by the community, the audits focus on public spaces and
result in the delivery of safety enhancements.
Among the enhancements delivered in 2012-13 were lighting upgrades to the City Botanic
Gardens’ bus stop, paths and gardens, increased QPS patrols at Bedford Park, Spring Hill and
repairs to park gates, and new signs at Gibson Park, Stafford.
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Program 7: Economic Development
Drive economic development by capturing our city’s unique window of opportunity.
What we do
•
Promote the city as a place to do business
•
Attract investment and jobs
•
Build infrastructure capacity to support future growth
•
Support productive precincts
•
Support workforce availability and capability
•
Export market development
Highlights
Released the Brisbane Community Profiles
4 Lord Mayor’s Brisbane Economic Snapshots published
6 Lord Mayor’s Business Forums delivered attracting more than 430 attendees
2 Lord Mayor’s Business Excellence workshops hosted
Launched Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE and delivered key improvements to businessrelated services
Commenced implementation of the Digital Brisbane Strategy
Launched the Guide to the Hotel Investment
Launched the global Choose Brisbane marketing campaign
Launched 2012 Brisbane Innovation Scorecard
Overview
The Economic Development program drives economic development and secures Brisbane’s
future prosperity by:
•
implementing the Brisbane Economic Development Plan 2012-2031
•
driving business investment, attracting new businesses, growing exports, establishing
strong economic precincts, increasing digital uptake by business, attracting and retaining
skilled workers, and expanding Brisbane’s global reputation as an attractive and
economically successful city
•
driving a business-focused organisation through regular engagement with Brisbane
businesses, Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE, a dedicated business section on
Council’s corporate website, and online business forms with electronic payment options
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•
showcasing Brisbane’s economic strengths and lifestyle benefits through initiatives such
as the Choose Brisbane international marketing campaign
•
actively targeting, promoting and enhancing key industry sectors including professional
services, education, mining services and tourism through targeted marketing and
investment attraction campaigns
•
encouraging investment and development of four and five-star hotels in Brisbane in order
to secure future visitor revenue
•
providing high quality economic advice to the city’s decision makers
•
continually updating economic data which drives business decisions and tracks
Brisbane’s economic performance.
Performance
7.1
Growing Brisbane’s economy
Facilitating strategies and activities to attract new business investment and generate employment
growth for Brisbane.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Created a business section on Council’s corporate website to make business related
information easier to access and enable online lodgement and payments.
•
Hosted six Lord Mayor’s Business Forums across Brisbane with more than 430
attendees, with a90% satisfaction rate.
•
Held two Lord Mayor’s Business Excellence Workshops.
•
Delivered four editions of the Lord Mayor’s Brisbane Economic Snapshot business
newsletter.
•
Delivered foreign language signage at more than 30 inner city locations.
•
Supported the Lord Mayor’s Multicultural Round Table and the Lord Mayor’s Multicultural
Entrepreneur Awards.
•
Sponsored the Quest Business Achiever Awards.
7.2
Removing barriers to growth
Ensure infrastructure projects are identified and sequenced to support projected employment and
population growth, exports and investment.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Supported the Brisbane Infrastructure Council, comprised of business leaders who advise
Council on meeting the city’s infrastructure needs.
•
Continued to implement the Brisbane Long Term Infrastructure Plan 2012-2031.
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•
7.3
Supported the alignment of infrastructure deliverables across agencies.
A city of many skills
Ensure Brisbane enterprises have ready access to a workforce with the necessary capabilities to
support business demand.
Key results for 2012-13
•
•
7.4
Continued to deliver a program of Council internships and secondments:
o
provided work experience opportunities for 30 university students
o
established a mentoring program for university students in partnership with the
Queensland University of Technology.
Advised the Australian Government on the future skill requirements of the Brisbane
region.
Delivering world class economic precincts
Support Brisbane’s key economic growth locations by facilitating the strategic planning and
activation of these key precincts to maximise their potential for economic success.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Coordinated, integrated and facilitated the delivery of Council services, initiatives and
major projects in the CBD and Fortitude Valley.
•
Collaborated with the Fortitude Valley business community to develop a concept design
for the Brunswick Street Mall upgrade.
•
Activated the Valley Malls, CBD and Queen Street precincts through a program of
festivals, events and markets.
•
Continued to work with local Chambers of Commerce to deliver the Living Villages
Development levy and to implement a precinct development plan for Manly.
•
Worked with Brisbane Marketing to deliver a series of campaigns including:
o
Christmas 2012 campaign – 400 events over six weeks
o
Autumn/Winter tourism campaign
o
City Sounds, a live music and artist support program
o
Show Your Colours city campaign to support football in Brisbane
o
Spring/Summer fashion campaign.
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7.5
Capturing Brisbane’s unique window of opportunity
Capture Brisbane’s unique window of opportunity for economic growth by promoting Brisbane
locally, nationally and internationally as a place for business, investment and tourism.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Continued delivery of the Window of Opportunity Report:
o
implementing the Brisbane Digital Strategy
o
launched the Guide to Hotel Investment in Brisbane
o
held the Lord Mayor’s Business Awards, which attracted 95 nominations and was
attended by 580 people from 139 businesses.
•
Hosted the Enable 2012 innovation awards and released the third Brisbane Innovation
Scorecard.
•
Continued to roll out the Brisbane – Australia’s New World City positioning campaign and
launched the Choose Brisbane campaign in China and Europe.
•
Attracted conventions to Brisbane generating an economic value of $266 million for the
city across 439,920 delegate days, and won the bid to host the 19th International
Congress on Tropical Medicine and Malaria 2016, forecast to attract 3000 delegates and
generate $10 million in economic value.
Supported leisure tourism:
•
attracted 63,949 unique visitors per month to visitbrisbane.com.au
•
launched a Hot Deals page on visitbrisbane.com.au
•
provided services to an average of 1426 visitors per day at the Visitor Information Centre
•
delivered campaigns including the New Zealand Summer and Winter campaigns
•
conducted regional weekend activation programs throughout June
•
delivered a targeted travel trade program including 18 industry development workshops
and coaching programs, which attracted more than 670 operators
•
delivered the Brisbane Greeters program
•
delivered a China Partnership strategy including content development, a domestic
campaign, inbound tour operators family program and agent functions.
•
Brisbane hosted major events including:
o
Brisbane Festival
o
Cirque du Soleil
o
Bolshoi Ballet
o
Bledisloe Cup
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7.6
o
British and Irish Lions
o
Brisbane International Tennis Tournament.
Export market development
Grow Brisbane’s out-of-region exports to maintain living standards, incomes and employment
growth.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Undertook research, analysis and industry engagement to enhance Council’s
understanding of Brisbane industries’ priorities and strengths.
•
Facilitated the growth of Brisbane’s international student market by:
o
delivering the Study Brisbane campaign
o
hosting the annual Brisbane Welcomes International Students event
o
holding six Lord Mayor’s International Student Friendship Ceremonies
o
appointing international student ambassadors.
Challenges
Brisbane city recorded a faster rate of growth than the state and nation between 2001 and 2011.
The 2011 Census confirmed that Brisbane’s growth has continued to exceed expectations, with
gross regional product estimated at $135 billion in 2012.
A key driver of this growth continues to be the resource sector, which is estimated to account for
almost one quarter of the local economy. There are more than 180 mining and resource
businesses located in Brisbane. These are being serviced by thousands of local businesses
providing goods, professional services, technologies, transport and logistics to the global
resource industry.
Brisbane’s long-term economic prosperity requires continued development of the knowledge
businesses which provide creativity, design, professional and scientific services to global
industries. Recent trends confirm the three fastest growing industries in Brisbane are financial
services; professional, scientific and technical services and manufacturing. These three industry
sectors contribute almost 30% of Brisbane’s economic output.
Brisbane is well positioned to capture the opportunities of a rapidly expanding Asian region. To
successfully grow the city’s share of the Asian market, Brisbane businesses will need to lift their
competitiveness through innovation, particularly through capturing the benefits of the digital
economy. Brisbane must also continue to build its brand as a world class destination for skilled
workers, students and visitors in order to attract and retain the skills necessary to grow
knowledge-intensive exports and build long-term prosperity.
More than 96% of Brisbane’s businesses are small, employing fewer than 20 employees. They
are key drivers of innovation, creativity and employment. A challenge for these businesses is to
ensure they remain competitive and sustainable. A further challenge is to ensure their potential is
recognised and leveraged so they can become globally significant businesses in the future.
Increased collaboration, innovation and digital engagement will be keys to achieving their future
success.
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Making it easier to do business in Brisbane
Brisbane City Council’s Economic Development program is charged with delivering the city’s
prosperity. A key goal is also to make Brisbane City Council the most business-friendly local
government in Australia.
Over recent years significant strides have been made to achieve this goal by incorporating the
needs of business and the economy into the way Council operates. This includes the way landuse plans are developed, infrastructure is prioritised and delivered, and development applications
are assessed.
Council has also focused on improving service delivery to business customers by rolling out a
series of innovative business initiatives. In addition to launching Council’s Business Hotline 133
BNE program, Council introduced a Doing Business in Brisbane page on its website. The
webpage attracts approximately 2500 unique page views per month, providing access to
information on establishing and expanding a business in Brisbane. It also houses a subsection on
business opportunities and selling business ideas to Council, which attracts approximately 1500
page views each month.
Other online innovations include forms that allow electronic payments, upgrades to the Planning
and Building section of the website, and a new Key Facts about a Property webpage which
allows customers to self-serve and draws approximately 3500 page views monthly.
The Economic Development program has delivered a number of initiatives to empower, inform
and assist local businesses.
A series of Lord Mayor’s Business Forums and Business Excellence Workshops have been held
across Brisbane. At these forums, some of Brisbane’s most successful business leaders pass on
their knowledge and insights. The workshops give businesses an opportunity to meet face-to-face
with officers from across Council so questions can be answered on the spot and areas for service
improvement identified.
The Economic Development program has also produced a range of publications including the
quarterly Lord Mayor’s Brisbane Economic Snapshot and online Community Profiles. These are
designed to assist individuals and companies to make better informed business and investment
decisions.
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Program 8: Customer Focus
What we do
•
Listen to and understand customers’ needs
•
Meet commitments made in the Customer Charter
•
Deliver on customer expectations
•
Set and deliver on customer service standards
•
Guide community engagement
Highlights
6,932,234 customer contacts with Council
15 second average pickup time for customer calls
2192 customer requests responded to via social media
92% of business customers satisfied with the overall service received from Council
86% of residents satisfied with the overall service received from Council
36,418 calls handled by Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE
338 film, festival and event permits issued
Overview
The Customer Focus program delivers on Council’s Customer Service Strategy, encouraging and
supporting all Council employees to provide responsive, accessible and convenient service to
customers. The program has a corporate responsibility for driving a customer- focused culture,
setting customer service standards and guiding community engagement.
The program also contributes to delivering Council’s Customer Focus Vision 2016, under which
the needs of businesses and residents are key considerations in strategy design and
implementation, product and service development and delivery.
The Customer Focus program aims to:
•
provide seamless service to our customers
•
recognise customers have strong voices and are key partners in planning, decision
making and the work we do
•
ensure employees in every role and at every level of the organisation are energised and
proud to serve customers
•
value customers equally and take their individual circumstances and preferences into
account
•
provide a transparent service, resolve requests promptly and deliver on our promises
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•
drive improved services and stronger customer confidence.
The program will continue to monitor and better understand customer satisfaction and actively
address customer dissatisfaction by identifying persistent service problems and helping work
units throughout Council to address these.
Performance
8.1
Engagement
Council engages with its customers to better understand their needs. Council recognises the
importance of engaging with both customers and the community to understand who they are,
what they want and how they value Council’s products and services.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Presented Brisbane City Council’s engagement framework to six South East Queensland
regional councils at Community Engagement Showcases.
•
Developed Community Engagement Guidelines for engaging people with a disability.
•
Increased Your City Your Say membership from 13,390 to 14,089.
•
Delivered community engagement on the Norman Creek 2012-2031 project, contributing
to a master plan for the area.
•
Coordinated consultation on Council strategies including the development of Brisbane
Vision 2031.
8.2
Service delivery
Provide multiple points of contact for Council to meet customer requirements. Manage these
contact points for the benefit of business and residential customers as well as Council.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Maintained Contact Centre channels including mail, face-to-face, telephone and social
media, through both the Contact Centre and online at www.brisbane.qld.gov.au
•
Handled 1,444,418 customer enquiries through the Contact Centre.
•
92% of businesses and 89% of residents agreed it was easy to contact Council through
the channels provided.
•
87% of businesses and 82% of residents were satisfied with Council’s ability to respond to
requests for service.
•
91% of businesses and 89% of residents surveyed gave a positive rating to the
competence of Council employees.
•
Implemented Stage 1 of Council’s new customer relationship management tool to provide
a higher level of services to residents and business customers.
•
Council’s dedicated client management Business Hotline 133 BNE achieved a 92%
satisfaction rating from business customers.
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•
Managed 2192 social media service requests from business and resident customers.
•
Issued more than 338 film, festival and event permits through Council’s Filming and
Events Approvals Liaison Office.
•
74,119 incidents were reported through the ‘Eyes in the Suburbs’ initiative. This initiative
rewards residents for being proactive in reporting issues require addressing by Council.
8.3
A Council easy to do business with
To achieve our Customer Focus Vision we developed customer-focused processes and a
customer focus culture within the organisation aligned to customer needs and expectations.
Key results for 2012-13
•
84% of businesses and 87% of residents say Council is dedicated to its customers.
•
Refreshed customer focus training to ensure the organisation remained customer
focused, delivering training to 2000 Council officers.
•
Improved business customer online information for food licensing, advertising signs,
planning and building, and strategic procurement.
•
Developed Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE quick reference business card to support
business customers.
•
93% of business and 90% of residents are satisfied Council understands their needs.
Challenges
Rising expectations
Technology advances present a constant challenge to keep up-to-date and meet customers’
expectations regarding their contacts with Council.
Council continues to meet this challenge through the Customer Experience Transformation (CET)
project, which implements new customer relationship management systems to update current
applications.
This technology provides staff with better tools to carry out their work and provides a higher level
of service to the residents of Brisbane. The alignment and consistency of service across our
channels remains a key focus for Council. The CET project will also assist in ensuring customers
receive the same experience from Council, regardless of the contact channel they use.
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Supporting business
Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE has assisted thousands of businesses since it was launched
in October 2012.
Emerging out of Brisbane’s Window of Opportunity Report, the hotline’s goal is to make doing
business with Council easier.
Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE gives business customers access to relevant information
24 hours a day, seven days a week. Like Council’s award winning Contact Centre, 80% of calls to
the hotline are answered within 20 seconds.
Staffed by knowledgeable business advisors, the hotline assists with enquires and provides
information on a range of topics such as upcoming business events, development applications,
waste services and business opportunities.
To date, the hotline has managed 36,418 queries from local, state, interstate and international
business customers.
Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE has attracted rave reviews from business customers.
“It’s wonderful to be able to deal directly with someone who can help me work out everything I
need to open my café without having to go to many different areas.” (Renata)
“I am really impressed with the quality of information I have received. It is exactly the information I
needed.” (Priths)
Of business customers surveyed, 82% have stated the Business Hotline made it easier for them
to do business in Brisbane, with a further 72% crediting the initiative with saving them time.
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Program 9: City Governance
City Governance is open, transparent and delivers value for money community outcomes through
strategic planning, risk management, information services and sound financial management. The
community is engaged in, and all of Council’s plans are directed at achieving our Vision.
What we do
•
Councillor, committee and executive support
•
Listen to the community
•
Intergovernmental relations
•
International activities and multicultural affairs
•
Disaster response and recovery
•
Financial management and planning
•
Property management
•
Procurement
•
Risk management
•
Support services
•
Strategic planning
•
Legal services
•
Human resources
•
Corporate communication and advertising
•
Information and communications technology
•
Internal audit services, ethical standards and corporate security
•
Complaints/disputes resolution
•
Right to Information
Highlights
‘Strong’ with ‘neutral outlook’ credit rating from Queensland Treasury Corporation
8 million page views of Council’s social media channels per month
78,000 subscribers to the early warning alert service
6850 pieces of Lord Mayor correspondence actioned
48% reduction in lost time injuries since 2005-06
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Overview
The City Governance program aims to ensure Council is an accountable, effective and
transparent local government that practises strong financial management to deliver outcomes
that serve Brisbane’s community.
The program provides effective city governance by developing an organisation that is flexible,
adaptive and future-focused, in which employees have the commitment and capability to deliver
cost-effective community and customer services.
Performance
9.1
Civic administration and support
Council delivers effective and open government through legislation, support for elected
representatives and community participation in transparent, fair and accessible elections.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Provided administrative support to 30 Council and 161 committee meetings, and ongoing
administrative support to 26 ward offices.
•
Managed the return of Council meetings from 157 Ann Street to City Hall.
•
Provided 31 business scholarships through the Lord Mayor’s Multicultural Round Table to
assist residents from a migrant background obtain business qualifications.
•
Adopted a new Information Privacy Policy to support the implementation of Information
Privacy Act 2009 requirements, and applied privacy procedures and guidelines to support
the policy.
•
Processed 348 applications to access Council-held information under the Right to
Information Act 2009 and Information Privacy Act 2009.
•
Responded to more than 6850 pieces of correspondence for the Lord Mayor’s Office.
•
Implemented an ePetitions system to enable the community to electronically submit
petitions to Council. Since its inception in September 2012, Council has received 61
ePetitions.
•
The Office of the Disputes Commissioner processed 1455 complaints.
•
Hosted 126 civic functions including:
o
Australia Day Citizen of the Year Awards
o
National Sorry Day Ceremony
o
Refugee Welcome ceremonies
o
Citizenship ceremonies
o
Australian National Flag Day Ceremony
o
NAIDOC Week
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9.2
o
Tickertape parades to celebrate 2012 Olympians and Paralympians
o
Keys to the City presentations
o
Lord Mayor Youth Advisory Council meetings.
Regional and international activities
Advance the community’s interests by developing and maintaining strong regional and
international relationships that offer economic development opportunities.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Provided support to councillors attending the:
o
Local Government Association Queensland conference
o
Australian Local Government Association conference
o
Council of Mayors (South East Queensland) board and committee meetings
o
Council of Capital City Lord Mayors.
•
Strengthened Brisbane’s international relationships and economic returns.
•
Developed and delivered the Doing Business in Asia series of business forums.
•
Delivered the 2012 Lord Mayoral Business Mission to Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Hong
Kong.
•
Coordinated visits by international government leaders including Sister City mayors and
deputy mayors.
•
Attracted, hosted and leveraged international delegations to Brisbane from many parts of
the world including Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, China, UAE, Indonesia,
Bangladesh and India.
•
Delivered the 2013 Lord Mayor’s Multicultural Round Table Business Dinner and 2013
Multicultural Entrepreneur of the Year Awards.
•
Coordinated the Lord Mayor’s Multicultural Business Scholarship program.
9.3
Strong and responsible financial management
Provide sound financial management and planning to deliver community services, infrastructure
and leadership.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Retained our ‘strong’ Queensland Treasury Corporation (QTC) credit rating with an
improved ‘neutral outlook’.
•
Delivered a balanced budget for 2013-14 annual budget development and budget reviews
in 2012-13 and improved budget development processes.
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•
Delivered the 2011-12 Annual Financial Statements in a leading practice time frame with
an ‘unqualified’ audit opinion from the Queensland Audit Office.
•
Implemented changes required by the City of Brisbane Regulation 2012 across Council’s
Annual Plan and Budget and Annual Report.
•
Delivered enhanced capabilities to Council’s security operations by migrating all security
systems to an integrated and standardised security technology platform.
•
Provided financial advice regarding the transition of South Bank and Roma Street
parklands to Council.
•
Managed the delivery of security technology solutions for:
9.4
o
City Hall
o
Carindale Library
o
Mitchelton Library
o
Sherwood Bus Depot
o
Council’s Security Operations Centre.
Value for money
Council responsibly manages ratepayers’ money expended in its businesses, and in the delivery
of its services, through a centre-led, value for money procurement process.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Negotiated 58 new contracts for goods and services including traffic signal controllers,
shelf-ready library materials, towing services, blasting and drilling services, passenger
and light commercial vehicles, and the Asia Pacific Cities Summit.
•
Reviewed and re-negotiated 148 contracts to ensure continued value for money.
•
Managed the operation of the Stores Board with more than 90% first-time acceptance.
9.5
Risk management
Service delivery is assured through management of risk.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Reviewed and updated the Corporate Pandemic Plan.
•
Completed the annual Assurance Services Plan of 40 reviews.
•
Trained 38 managers and human resource staff in investigative techniques to improve
capability to address misconduct issues.
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•
Renewed Council’s insurance broking contract as well as the corporate commercial
insurance and liability programs for 2013-14 below forecast costs.
•
Provided legal guidance to the development of the draft new City Plan.
•
Developed a Council-wide integrated security solution.
9.6
Managing Council’s business
Council is efficient and is transparently managed.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Achieved a record high response rate for Council’s Your Voice 2012 employee survey.
•
Led the transition process implementing Council’s operational management of South
Bank and Roma Street parklands.
•
The Support Services Centre:
•
9.7
o
met efficiency targets
o
achieved high levels of customer satisfaction
o
delivered business improvements
o
reduced cost-per-bill
o
maintained debtor levels below industry benchmarks.
Progressed the Business and Systems Efficiency project (BaSE) to deliver an integrated
Council system for core business processes – asset and works management, finance,
payroll and procurement.
Employer of choice
Council’s workforce will be affordable and effective. The workforce will be adaptable to
organisational needs and constraints, and fully capable of delivering Council’s agenda. We will:
•
attract, develop and retain skilled, motivated employees
•
plan and manage human resources cost effectively
•
develop industrial frameworks to deliver a scalable, affordable and agile workforce.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Established change programs to support and guide employees, team leaders and
managers through restructures and work redesigns.
•
Developed 385 team leaders/managers as performance leaders.
•
Provided job assistance to 360 migrants and refugees.
•
Renewed Council’s Zero Harm strategy.
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•
Continued to train 106 full-time apprentices working towards trade qualifications in metals
and engineering, automotive, electrical, horticulture/ arboriculture, building and
construction.
•
Continued to deliver the Graduate Development program with 45 full-time graduates
working across Council in civil engineering and town planning.
9.8
Corporate communication
Council’s communication is strategically aligned with its organisational goals, objectives and
priorities, and delivers maximum impact and value for both the community and Council.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Achieved more than $800,000 in savings through in-house provision of communication
services and ongoing use of online tools.
•
Achieved more than eight million page views of Council’s social media channels per
month, an increase of more than 31% on the previous year.
•
Developed new online crisis communication tools for severe weather events.
•
Corrected more than 40% of identified accessibility issues for Council’s website.
•
Expanded Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD) outreach to 50% of all Council
campaigns.
9.9
Information and communications technology
Utilise information and communications technology (ICT) effectively to improve business
functions and deliver benefits to the community and Council.
Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Developed an ICT Strategic Plan and Roadmap 2012-16 for disaster management.
•
Developed a new SharePoint-based disaster and emergency management solution for
use in Council’s Local Disaster Coordination Centre (LDCC) operations.
•
Developed new maps in Council’s Geographic Information System to integrate real-time
information during flood events.
•
Installed free Wi-Fi at regional business centres, bus depots, Brisbane Square, Green
Square and City Hall.
•
Enhanced the free Wi-Fi service in libraries and upgraded the Library Management
System.
•
Relocated Council’s physical active file storage to its new Eagle Farm site, moving 1.6
million files.
9.10 Disaster response and recovery
Council plans, organises, coordinates and implements measures to respond to and assist the city
to recover from disasters.
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Disaster management in Council is taking an ‘all hazards’ approach, which allows Council to
prepare, plan and respond to the consequences of different types of disasters.
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Key achievements for 2012-13
•
Completed 151 of 177 recommendations under the Flood Action Plan, with all remaining
work on track to meet agreed timeframes.
•
Refurbished the LDCC.
•
Implemented the Disaster Management Workforce Capability Plan.
•
Delivered near real-time damage assessment collection capability.
•
Conducted disaster management training exercises in partnership with internal and
external agencies, including Emergency Management Queensland.
•
Reviewed and tested the Brisbane CBD Emergency Plan involving all key agencies and
stakeholders.
•
Continued to deliver SMS Early Warning Alerts, with almost 78,000 residents now
registered.
•
Expanded the Creek Flood Alert service to include properties in Windsor, Northgate and
Deagon.
•
Delivered the most successful Brisbane Ready for Summer campaign on record with:
o
15,106 new Severe Weather Early Warning Alert Service registrations during the
2012/13 campaign, a 24.5% increase
o
91.8% positive community engagement on social media channels
o
218,308 Flood Flag Map downloads, an 81% increase.
Challenges
A sustainable city and Council
South East Queensland is one of the fastest growing regions in Australia and, with Brisbane at
the centre of the region, Council faces an ongoing demand for asset creation and maintenance
together with the delivery of community services. These demands put pressure on Council’s
budget. Council is addressing this through transformational productivity improvements such as
the BaSE solution, as well as by supporting the growth of Brisbane’s economy through its Unique
Window of Opportunity initiatives.
BaSE: changing the way we do business
The BaSE initiative is a key Council response to the challenge of improving the way we do
business. BaSE will improve productivity and efficiency by replacing more than 60 existing ICT
systems with a single, integrated cross-Council system for the core business processes of asset
and works management, finance, payroll and procurement. The multi-year project involves:
•
developing improved business frameworks
•
detailing new cross-Council business processes
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•
configuring the system to deliver these
•
linking the system to key Council systems not being replaced including rates and
customer service systems
•
cleansing and loading existing data to the new system
•
supporting users through change.
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Putting response plans into action
The disaster response lessons Council learned from the January 2011 Flood were put into action
over the 2013 Australia Day long weekend, when Brisbane experienced severe weather as a
result of ex-tropical cyclone Oswald.
While the destruction caused was not on the same scale as the January 2011 Flood, significant
damage was experienced across the city with thousands of residents affected. Brisbane
experienced foreshore damage, and substantial tree damage in parklands and streets across the
city. High levels of sediment caused the temporary closure of a water treatment plant requiring
residents to conserve water while the available supply was directed to essential services.
Council’s disaster management planning delivered a prompt response to the heavy rain,
damaging winds and storm surge that struck the region between 27 and 29 January 2013.
Council managed the response by activating the Local Disaster Management Group and Local
Disaster Coordination Centre.
Council was able to keep its response phase relatively short by implementing pre-planned
disaster management arrangements and priorities, including sandbagging. As part of Council’s
response, sandbags were initially made available to residents at four locations with additional
sandbagging locations activated as demand grew.
Approximately 120,000 m³ of green waste was collected in the clean-up phase.
While damage caused by the Australia Day Storm Event 2013 was significant, Council was able
to keep the clean-up time to a minimum using efficiencies and lessons learnt from the January
2011 Flood.
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Progress and performance – businesses
In this section
Brisbane Transport
Field Services Group
City Parking
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Brisbane Transport
Brisbane Transport is one of the largest bus operators in Australia and Brisbane’s major provider
of public transport.
The purpose of Brisbane Transport is to meet customer needs through the provision of frequent,
reliable and safe public transport services.
What we do
Brisbane Transport’s modern, well-maintained, clean and carbon-neutral bus fleet, strategically
positioned depots and operational management systems ensure services are delivered reliably,
efficiently and safely.
Bus services include:
•
public transport network bus services
•
school services
•
charter and special event services
•
City Sights tours.
Highlights
78.78 million passengers carried
3.31 million passenger service trips
1255 buses in the fleet
90 new rigid equivalent buses added to the fleet
1136 buses are wheelchair accessible
60% of buses are enhanced, environmentally friendly vehicles
Overview
Brisbane Transport provides frequent, reliable and safe transport for residents and visitors
through scheduled network passenger bus services, free loop services, school services, charter
services, special event services and City Sights tours.
The demand from people choosing Council bus services as their preferred mode of travel,
especially during peak periods, continues to be strong. This contrasts with the overall public
transport patronage trend for South East Queensland. Improved connections between places of
work, residences and recreation venues have helped grow demand.
Brisbane Transport’s bus services help Council meet social and environmental objectives and
facilitate economic growth. More people catching buses
and leaving their cars at home means less traffic congestion and less impact on the environment
from private vehicle emissions. Brisbane residents and visitors are encouraged to ‘think public
transport first’.
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We continue to meet the demand for public transport with new, environmentally friendly buses,
strategically located depots, effective operational management systems and new and better
integrated services.
Brisbane Transport works with Council’s Moving Brisbane, Customer Focus, Sustainable, Green
and Clean City, and City Governance programs to support achievement of their outcomes.
Annual performance plan report
In 2012-13, Brisbane Transport’s after tax result was a deficit of $222,000. This is an improved
result on the deficit budgeted for. Customer satisfaction with bus services was maintained over
the year as reported by Translink in its customer satisfaction survey data. Patronage of 78.78
million was achieved, which in absolute terms is a slight decline on the previous year’s results.
However, when allowance is made for the previous year being a 53-week period, patronage
shows a modest increase.
To enable better service to Brisbane ratepayers, Brisbane Transport receives partial funding from
Council for the services it operates. Community Service Obligation funding by Council is reported
in Brisbane Transport’s Budgeted Income Statement.
Performance
Improvements in the bus fleet
•
Added 90 rigid equivalent, low-floor, low-emission, air-conditioned buses to the fleet.
These new buses have increased capacity, comfort and accessibility for passengers.
•
Increased the proportion of wheelchair accessible buses in the fleet to 90.5%.
•
Reduced the average age of the buses in Council’s fleet to 6.94 years – one of the lowest
fleet ages in Australia.
•
Introduced 15 additional, high-capacity 14.5 m buses, which have 25% more passenger
capacity than the standard 12.5 metre buses, bringing the total number of these vehicles
to 142.
•
Contributed to a more sustainable bus fleet by replacing retired vehicles with buses that
meet Enhanced Environmentally-friendly Vehicle (EEV) standards. These EEV buses
produce 85% less nitrogen oxide and 90% less particulate matter pollutants than the
retiring buses.
•
Removed an average of 21 cars from Brisbane’s roads for each bus trip, an approximate
saving of 136,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide per year, reducing Brisbane’s carbon footprint.
Bus services
•
Delivered 3.31 million bus trips. Additional scheduled trips provided in 2012-13 led to
further decreases in the number of full buses, ensuring passengers have more reliable
and comfortable services.
•
Commenced construction of a new depot at Eagle Farm.
•
Introduced a new Maroon CityGlider service from Ashgrove to Stones Corner.
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Patronage
•
Carried 78.78 million passengers. This record patronage contributed to 68% growth over
the past decade.
Improved network scheduling and efficiency
•
Completed the Bus Network Review taking into consideration community feedback and
data from a variety of sources.
•
During the morning peak period carried more than 20,000 passengers daily to the city via
the Captain Cook and Victoria bridges. To achieve the same result using private cars, the
Captain Cook Bridge would need an extra 7.5 inbound lanes.
•
Carried more than 30,000 passengers per day to the University of Queensland.
Passenger numbers have increased from 3600 per day prior to the opening of the Eleanor
Schonell Bridge, significantly easing traffic congestion to the university.
Safety and security
•
Installed CCTV security systems in 539 buses.
•
Reduced the risk of passenger injuries through continued implementation of Council’s
Zero Harm policies. This is demonstrated by continuing decreases in passenger injury
claims per kilometre travelled as well as public accident and injury claims per bus.
Employees
•
Obtained the highest level of job satisfaction and engagement on record for Council’s
annual Your Voice 2012 employee survey. The response rate on this survey by Brisbane
Transport employees was 75%.
•
Conducted 85 Bus Operator Safety Refresher training programs, which were attended by
1284 bus operators. This program updates bus operators on workplace health and safety,
driving skills, operational practice, and organisational performance, and supports
Council’s Zero Harm Strategy. Feedback from bus operators was strongly positive.
Challenges
Affordability and standard of public transport
Increased demand for service enhancements and the affordability of public transport continue to
be the key issues for public transport users.
The current environment means the cost of maintaining and improving bus services continues to
be a challenge.
Bus Network Review
In March 2013, responsibility for completion of the Bus Network Review initiated by Translink was
handed over to Brisbane Transport. The review was delivered to the Queensland Government by
1 June 2013 in accordance with the set time frame. A plan to implement the Bus Network Review
has been established and implementation is being progressed.
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Safer bus travel
Brisbane Transport is the premier public transport provider in Brisbane and South East
Queensland.
Over the past decade bus patronage has increased by more than 68%, with related rises in the
number of buses in Council’s fleet and the kilometres travelled annually.
As an organisation dedicated to passenger, bus operator and road safety, this growth was
aligned with a concerted commitment to Zero Harm.
Zero Harm means no injuries to anyone, at any time, and over the past year Brisbane Transport
has continued to focus on delivering initiatives to improve safety and enhance the experience for
bus patrons, other road users and the general community.
This includes innovative operational procedures, a modern bus fleet and embedding safety as a
core element of our organisational leadership and culture. In the 2012-13 financial year, more
than 1200 bus operators received Operator Safety Refresher training.
Together these initiatives have contributed to a one-third reduction in passenger injury claims
over the past 10 years, with the frequency of accident and injury claims per bus halved. In the
same period the employee lost time injury rate has decreased by more than two thirds.
Aside from the obvious benefits of fewer injuries, improved safety means delays to passenger
journey times can be avoided and costs incurred by unscheduled repairs averted.
Council’s pursuit of Zero Harm is by no means at an end and Brisbane Transport will continue to
eliminate safety-related incidents wherever possible. This remains an essential feature of how we
work and deliver services.
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Field Services Group
Field Services Group provides a civil construction and maintenance service to Council in
conjunction with high-level management of service contracts.
Field Services Group’s role is to be a competitive provider of quality and value for money services
to Brisbane ratepayers.
What we do
Field Services Group delivers a broad range of products and services.
•
Civil construction
•
Quarry products
•
Asphalt manufacture and laying
•
Waste management
•
Park maintenance
•
City cleansing
The group has six branches.
•
Asphalt and Aggregates
•
Construction
•
Urban Amenities
•
Operational Services
•
Asset Services
•
Waste Services
Highlights
42,673 street trees trimmed
>13,000 trees planted
8455 unsafe trees removed due to damage sustained in the Australia Day Storm Event 2013
1330 mosquito sites treated per month
163 park equipment upgrades
40.36 km of concrete kerb and channel works completed
25,000 park inspections
112,124 km of road swept
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27.46 million wheelie bins services
Overview
Field Services Group is a competitive provider of quality, value for money civil construction,
maintenance and waste services for Brisbane City Council. Since formation in July 2011, Field
Services Group has pursued initiatives to deliver savings to Council and productivity and value to
customers.
Field Services Group works across Council’s programs: Sustainable, Green and Clean City;
WaterSmart City; Moving Brisbane; Your Brisbane; and Public Health and Safety.
Performance
Quality civil construction and maintenance services to Council
As a quality endorsed business, Field Services Group’s role is to provide civil construction and
maintenance services that meet customer expectations in productivity, availability and value for
money.
Key results for 2012-13
•
Installed, replaced or straightened 40,265 street signs.
•
Continued to deliver flood recovery works through the road resurfacing program and
carried out repairs to more than 180 parks and natural areas affected by the January 2011
Flood and Australia Day Storm Event 2013.
•
Delivered parks servicing across more than 2000 parks:
o
cleaned 800 public barbeques
o
cleaned 203 public toilets
o
cut 82,314 ha of grass in parks
o
responded to 136 requests for service.
•
Produced more than one million tonnes of quarry aggregate road bases and other
construction material from Council’s quarries at Mount Coot-tha and Bracalba for internal
use and external sale.
•
Delivered a record $60 million capital works program, laying 280,500 tonnes of asphalt as
part of the road resurfacing capital program, and recycling more than 62,000 tonnes of
asphalt pavement from road resurfacing projects.
•
Delivered more than 200 new footpaths covering more than 44 km, and spent $18.6
million to reconstruct and maintain existing footpaths, improve accessibility and remove
cracks.
•
Undertook 12 hazard reduction burns across 200 ha of natural areas.
•
Emptied 27.46 million wheelie bins.
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•
Collected 4021 tonnes from the multi-unit dwelling recycling service.
•
Repaired or replaced 70,184 wheelie bins across the city.
•
Collected 2606 tonnes of waste from parks and footpath collections.
•
Contributed to the Australia Day Storm Event 2013 clean-up with approximately 120,000
m³ of green waste collected.
•
Commenced the production of recycled glass, converting waste glass material into natural
fine sand replacement for use in asphalt production.
•
Installed line and pavement markings at 1662 locations.
•
Swept 112,124 km of road.
•
Installed energy-saving LED lights on the Story Bridge reducing maintenance costs and
resulting in a 30% reduction in energy consumption, improved safety for workers and a
wider range of colour and dynamic lighting options.
•
Conducted approximately 2000 serviceability inspections of bridges, culverts and other
structures.
•
Conducted 84,000 gully inspections.
•
Completed the heritage restoration of the Howard Smith Wharves.
Challenges
ICT functionality
Continuing to deliver improved efficiency and productivity remains a key challenge for Field
Services Group.
The new Business and Systems Efficiency (BaSE) solution will provide Field Services Group with
an extended level of ICT functionality to measure, manage and improve the services it provides.
This streamlined solution is designed to remove repetitive finance and procurement tasks and
provide simplified analysis of activity and performance. Employees will use mobile devices to
capture data and managers will use this data to source operating results from a suite of
dashboard tools.
This will be a significant advance in capability for Field Services Group and will provide benefits in
service delivery for both employees and customers.
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Restoring Brisbane’s wharf history
The history of the Howard Smith Wharves has been preserved through a $5.6 million restoration
of the site.
Howard Smith Wharves is one of the last remaining wharf sites in Brisbane’s city centre. The 170
m timber wharf and heritage buildings are located on the northern end of the Story Bridge.
After standing derelict and vacant for more than 20 years, the structural integrity of the old
buildings surrounding the wharf has been restored and safeguarded against further damage. This
protects some of the last remaining features of the pre-World War Two Port of Brisbane.
As part of the project, the nearby cliffs were stabilised to improve safety and protect five wartime
air raid shelters.
The City Projects Office and Field Services Group began the wharf refurbishment in April 2012.
Repairs to the wharf involved 15 Council employees. Revitalising the area required 120
timber girders, 1315 m² of timber decking and 460 timber headstocks. Parts of the original
girders were salvaged and hand shaped into seating.
The Howard Smith Wharf precinct will remain closed until the completion of the Riverwalk
reconstruction project.
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City Parking
City Parking provides management services for large undercover car parks, on-street metered
parking, temporary and event parking.
What we do
•
Management of on-street metered parking
•
Temporary and event parking
•
Management of King George Square and Wickham Terrace car parks
•
Implementation of advanced parking management systems
Highlights
175 parking meters upgraded to solar power
Launched Brisbane’s first public car park electric vehicle recharging station in King George
Square Car Park
1124 undercover off-street spaces in Brisbane managed
Overview
City Parking:
•
provides competitive car parking services to all customers
•
ensures customer focused service
•
acts to ensure the security of Council monies and assets
•
maintains best practice infrastructure.
The effective management of parking bays within the CBD and inner city suburbs helps to
achieve Council’s vision of providing an accessible, connected city for all users. The provision of
paid parking spaces supports the economic viability of the city by managing equitable access to
surrounding land uses.
Performance
Key activities for 2012-13
•
To encourage the use of electric cars, installed Brisbane’s first public car park recharge
station at King George Square car park. The recharge is free and casual parking of
electric vehicles is discounted by 50%.
•
Upgraded the solar power generation capability of 175 of Council’s most frequently used
parking meters. This reduces battery recharges and associated maintenance and
management.
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Challenges
Changing industry requirements
New credit card industry requirements have been established and Council will deliver an upgrade
of equipment as necessary to support safe use of this payment method.
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iPark Cashless Parking
iPark Cashless Parking, Council’s mobile and web- based parking service, provides a range of
options for residents and visitors when parking in metered areas in and around the CBD.
To use cashless parking, customers register their Visa, MasterCard or American Express card
details and mobile phone number with iPark. To pay for parking, customers use their mobile
phone (via a mobile application or SMS) to nominate their vehicle license plate number and meter
zone number.
Customers clock on and off, paying only for the time spent in the parking space, and a tax invoice
is emailed to the customer as confirmation and proof of payment.
All details are then transferred to a secure Council database allowing parking officers to easily
identify vehicles for which payment has been made.
The web-based application also allows customers with mobile devices to use their current
location to identify nearby parking zones, and information on parking rates.
iPark provides the community with an interactive, reliable and customer-focused system to easily
and effectively maximise available parking.
The mobile service is accessed via www.cashlessparking.com.au
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Community financial report
In this section
Financial summary
Revenue
Expenses
Assets
Liabilities
Community equity
Measures of financial sustainability
Rates: Fair and equitable rates and rates concessions
133
This report summarises Council’s financial position at 30 June 2013 in plain English.
Council maintains best value for money for ratepayers and customers. We maximise resources
available for essential initiatives such as roads, public transport, parks and libraries.
Financial Summary
$1.87 billion
revenue
$2.9 billion
expenditure
$20.9 billion
assets
$2.72 billion
liabilities
Strong
credit rating
$18.2 billion
community equity
Revenue: Where did the money come from?
Council received $1.87 billion in revenue and other income. The largest contribution was due to
rates and utility charges, which totalled $812 million (after discount and pensioner remissions).
Total revenue decreased by $57 million (2.9%) on the previous year. Principal movements
included:
•
rates and utility charges increasing by $43 million mainly due to an increase in the number
of rateable properties and increases in general rates
•
donations, contributions, subsidies and grants decreasing by $105 million due to a change
in infrastructure charges policy and a reduction in the value of assets contributed to
Council
•
fees and charges revenue decreasing by $4.5 million due to the sale of SAS Laboratories
to Queensland Urban Utilities (QUU) and the cessation of SAS Laboratories’ and other
services to QUU
•
public transport revenue increasing due to growth in network services and special events.
Expenses: Where was the money spent?
Council spent more than $2.9 billion during the year between operations ($1.8 billion) and capital
projects ($1.1 billion).
Spending on major projects included:
•
Flood recovery works: $24 million
•
Major infrastructure:
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•
•
o
Legacy Way $468 million
o
City Hall restoration $58 million.
Moving Brisbane program projects:
o
railway level crossings $54 million
o
bus build $43 million
o
constructing key bikeway links $23 million.
Other:
o
corporate systems $101 million
o
land (including Bushland Levy funded) acquisition $13 million
o
parks infrastructure $20 million.
The primary expense components of each program include:
•
employee costs
•
materials
•
services
•
depreciation
•
finance costs
•
other expenses
•
loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment.
Note 2 of Council’s Annual Financial Statements reports each program’s expenditure.
135
136
Assets: What do we own?
At 30 June 2013, Council’s assets were valued at $20.9 billion.
The value of property, plant and equipment assets increased due to the completion of the
restoration of City Hall and progress on projects such as Legacy Way.
Liabilities: What do we owe?
Council borrows to fund future long-term infrastructure assets to provide ongoing benefits to the
community. The most recent credit review issued by Queensland Treasury Corporation in
September 2012 provided Council with a ‘strong’ rating and ‘neutral outlook’.
At 30 June 2013, Council’s liabilities totalled $2.72 billion. This was made up principally of:
•
•
loans owing to the Queensland Treasury Corporation
amounts owed to suppliers, and
•
employee leave entitlements.
A significant part of Council’s total liabilities are borrowings associated with funding the
construction of the Legacy Way project. On completion of the project, which is expected to occur
in 2015, a $400 million grant will be provided by the Australian Government.
Community equity
Council’s community equity is defined as its net worth – what we own, less what we owe. At 30
June 2013, Council’s community equity as was $18.2 billion.
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Measures of financial sustainability
The City of Brisbane Regulation 2012 requires that Council report its results for the financial year
against selected financial sustainability ratios. These ratios, their definitions and Council’s results
at 30 June 2013 are stated below.
How the measure is calculated
Operating surplus
ratio
Asset sustainability
ratio
Net financial liabilities
ratio
Net result (excluding capital items)
divided by total operating revenue
(excluding capital items).
Capital expenditure on the
replacement of assets (renewals)
divided by depreciation expense.
Total liabilities less current assets
divided by total operating revenue
(excluding capital items).
Actual –
Consolidated*
-3%
Actual –
Council
0%
76%
76%
141%
137%
Council’s current year financial sustainability statement, the Auditor-General’s report on it and
Council’s long term financial sustainability statement are located following Council’s Annual
Financial Statements in this report.
Queensland Urban Utilities: Water distribution retailer
Council’s Annual Financial Statements show transactions between Queensland Urban Utilities
(QUU) and Council.
Rates: Fair and equitable rates and rates concessions
Council ensures fair and equitable rates to all Brisbane ratepayers. This is achieved by:
•
complying with the requirements of Australian and state legislation when making and
levying rates including National Competition Policy legislation where applicable
•
applying the principle of ‘user pays’ where appropriate when making charges so as to
minimise the impact of these charges on the efficiency of the local economy
•
equity by reference to the value or quality of land
•
being transparent in the making and levying of rates and charges
•
clearly communicating the responsibilities of Council and ratepayers in regard to rates and
charges
•
timing the levy of rates to take into account the financial cycle of local economic activity, in
order to assist smooth running of the local economy
•
having a rating regime that is efficient to administer.
In 2012/13 the average rates price increase for owner-occupied residential properties was 4.49%.
Council offers a range of rates concessions in support of a fair and equitable rates system. We
are guided by the following principles when applying rates concessions:
•
equity by reference to the value or quality of land
138
•
the same treatment for ratepayers with similar circumstances
•
transparency by making clear the requirements necessary to receive concessions
•
flexibility to allow Council to respond to local economic issues
•
responsiveness to community expectations of what activities should attract assistance
from Council.
In 2012-13, Council offered the following rates concessions:
•
a $60 per year discount where the full payment of all rates and charges, including arrears
and interest, was made within 30 days of issue of rates notices
•
remissions on pensioner-owned land (in addition to the Queensland Government’s 20%
subsidy). On application to Council:
o
pensioners receiving the maximum pension were eligible to receive 40% remission
on rates and charges up to $836 per year
o
pensioners receiving a partial pension were eligible to receive 20% remission on
rates and charges up to $388 per year.
•
remissions for environmentally sensitive land – owners of properties who have signed
either a Voluntary Conservation Agreement or Land for Wildlife Agreement with Council
were remitted the Bushland Preservation Levy in full
•
owner-occupied remissions, or ‘rate capping’, was granted on general rates for owner
occupiers of residential properties. Any increase on general rates was limited to a
maximum of 7.5% on the previous year’s general rates. Where an increase in general
rates would otherwise have exceeded 7.5%, Council granted the amount greater than
7.5% as a remission
•
general rates exemptions – granted to properties used for public, religious, charitable or
educational purposes that conformed to the criteria set out in the annual resolution of
rates and charges
•
Council also provided remissions on pensioner water and waste water utility charges
through QUU. Pensioners receiving the maximum pension were eligible for a remission of
$472 per year. Pensioners receiving a part pension were eligible for a remission of $236
per year.
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Corporate governance
In this section
Risk management
Assurance, security and ethical standards
Brisbane City Council Audit Committee
The Queensland Audit Office
Complaints management
Right to Information and Information Privacy access requests
National Competition Policy
Code of Conduct
140
Effective corporate governance helps ensure Brisbane’s sustainability and liveability.
For Council, governance involves open and transparent adherence to legislation, policies,
processes and practices that ensure effective direction setting, decision making, management
and control to achieve organisational objectives.
Brisbane City Council demonstrates good governance through its:
•
support for elected representatives
•
compliance with legislation
•
engagement with the community
•
planning and reporting
•
financial management
•
management of risk
•
procurement practices
•
internal controls
•
human resource management practices.
Council recognises transparent, accessible and timely reporting as a key element of good
governance. The City of Brisbane Act 2010 and the City of Brisbane Regulation 2012 also place
obligations on Council to disclose particular matters and to report on Council’s performance.
This Annual Report includes:
•
an assessment of Council’s performance in implementing its Corporate Plan (see
Corporate Plan scorecard)
•
an overview of Council’s strategic planning framework
•
Council’s annual financial, current year and long- term financial sustainability statements
and associated Auditor General’s reports
•
reporting on Council’s performance in implementing its Annual Plan (in Progress and
performance sections)
•
a community financial report including a summary of concessions for rates and charges
granted (in Community financial report)
•
information about Council’s risk management practices (in this section)
•
Council’s expenditure on grants to community organisations (in Disclosures)
•
detail regarding application of councillors’ discretionary funds (in Disclosures)
•
a summary of Council’s internal audit report (in this section)
•
information about Council’s management of complaints (in this section)
•
information regarding:
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o
councillors’ remuneration, expenses and attendance at meetings (in Disclosures)
o
overseas travel by councillors or Council officers (in Disclosures)
o
the remuneration of senior contract employees (in Disclosures)
•
information regarding competitive neutrality complaints, investigation notices and any
related decisions by Council (in this section)
•
a list of registers maintained by Council (in Disclosures)
•
a statement of actions taken to implement the Public Sector Ethics Act 1994 (in this
section).
Risk management
Council’s risk management practices contribute to the city’s liveability and sustainability by
avoiding, minimising and managing risks that may affect the community and visitors. Effective risk
management practices also contribute to the city’s economic growth by aiding the successful
delivery of major infrastructure projects.
Council has developed a set of risk management tools to assess business risks as well as the
risks associated with particular activities such as community events or environmentally sensitive
works.
Council’s risk management framework is based on International Standard ISO 31000:2009.
Council continually updates its risk management plans. These include plans for operations and
new business ventures and for major initiatives such as infrastructure and ICT projects.
Each Council division has a business risk profile with strategies to minimise and manage
identified issues. These profiles inform twice-yearly reviews of Council’s corporate risk profile.
The corporate risk profile provides the foundation for effective risk management.
In high risk matters, Council maintains programs with measures in place to ensure compliance
with Queensland and Australian Government legislation and standards, as well as with internal
policies, procedures and guidelines. These compliance programs are measured against the
elements of the Australian Standard for Compliance AS3806 and results are reported to the
Corporate Risk Management Committee.
Council’s Corporate Risk Management Committee consists of the CEO, senior Council
executives and an independent member. The committee regularly reviews strategic risks,
compliance programs and internal processes, and provides high-level advice to ensure Council
achieves its risk management goals.
Assurance, security and ethical standards
The Chief Internal Auditor heads the Assurance Security and Ethical Standards branch, which
brings together the Assurance Services, Ethical Standards and Corporate Security units to
optimise Council’s internal audit and control functions, helping to ensure Council continues to
maintain the highest standards of transparency, openness and accountability. The Chief Internal
Auditor is directly responsible to the Chief Executive Officer and Council’s Audit Committee, and
is professionally independent of any other officers or divisions of Council.
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Assurance Services
The Assurance Services unit delivers Council’s internal audit function. It provides independent
assurance that Council’s policies, operations, systems and procedures meet appropriate
standards of effectiveness, efficiency, propriety, regulatory requirements and good business
practice, while adequately recognising and managing risk, and complying with internal policies.
Assurance Services operates in accordance with the Brisbane City Council Assurance Services
Charter, which is reviewed and endorsed by the Audit Committee each year. The Charter
authorises appropriate access to all functions, records, property and personnel within Council, as
well as direct access to the Chair and independent members of the Audit Committee.
Assurance Services provides a broad range of functions in line with International Standards for
the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing and best practice, including:
•
operational reviews
•
financial reviews
•
compliance reviews
•
change management reviews
•
information systems and security reviews
•
data analysis
•
a comprehensive program of continuous assurance.
Assurance Services applies a risk management approach to strategic planning, assignment
planning, fieldwork and reporting and works closely with the corporate risk management function
to ensure appropriate coverage across Council.
During 2012-13, Assurance Services completed 40 reviews across all divisions and provided ad
hoc advice to managers on a range of issues.
For 2012-13, the Chief Internal Auditor provided the CEO with an opinion on the effectiveness of
Council’s system of internal control stating:
“The reviews undertaken by Assurance Services in
2012-13 did not indicate any systemic breakdown of internal controls that would preclude
management or the Audit Committee from relying on Council’s key internal controls.
Of the 40 reviews undertaken by Assurance Services, four reviews resulted in unsatisfactory
overall ratings. In addition, the Queensland Audit Office has not raised any significant control
issues.
Accordingly, based on the work performed by Assurance Services and other information available
to me, I conclude that there is an effective system of internal control across Council’s operations.”
In accordance with International Standards for the Professional Practice of Internal Auditing, a
Quality Assessment Review of Assurance Services is carried out on a five-yearly basis by the
Institute of Internal Auditors Australia. The most recent review, reported in June 2013, found that:
“Assurance Services at Brisbane City Council is operating effectively. There was general
conformance to the Standards and the IIA Code of Ethics. This is the top rating that can be
143
given.” Assurance Services achieved the highest available rating against each of the quality
assessment objectives.
Ethical Standards
The Ethical Standards unit provides advice and assistance to Council management on the control
of fraud and corruption via Council’s Fraud and Corruption Control Plan. The unit investigates
reported or suspected instances of fraud and other serious crime and misconduct in Council and
maintains a focus on raising awareness of Council values and encouraging ethical behaviour.
Ethical Standards received a total of 166 individual complaints during 2012-13. Following
assessment, 87 complaints – which included a total of 131 individual allegations – were deemed
to be Crime and Misconduct Commission (CMC) related, requiring formal investigation. Ethical
Standards assessed 79 matters as not coming under their jurisdiction because they did not raise
a suspicion of official misconduct or otherwise did not warrant further action by the unit. These
matters were generally referred to management for consideration.
Ethical Standards also provided investigative assistance to several regional councils as well as to
the Queensland Police Service and the CMC.
The Ethical Standards Unit continued to deliver organisation wide training in Council’s Code of
Conduct, as well as other ethics related and investigation training programs. In 2012/13, the unit
conducted 23 employee training/awareness sessions.
Corporate Security
The Corporate Security unit is Council’s centre-led security office. It provides security risk
management advice and support to all areas of Council, covering security strategies, planning
and staff security awareness.
Corporate Security is responsible for advising management on Council’s preparedness to meet
changes in technology and to manage local and global threats related to security of the
organisation’s physical assets and personnel. Among other agencies, Corporate Security works
closely with the QPS and Queensland and Australian Government departments.
Corporate Security is also responsible for the security design and implementation for new
facilities and significant facility refits, and for managing Council’s security-related contracts and
physical security inspections.
Corporate Security completed 29 security risk reviews in the 2012-13 financial year. The unit also
contributed to major projects including City Hall’s restoration. Council’s service provider won the
Security Industries Annual Awards for Excellence for the delivery of innovative solutions
sympathetic to the heritage
nature of City Hall.
Corporate Security continues to implement strategies defined in Council’s Corporate Security
Master Plan, including the consolidation of asset ownership for our security portfolio. Corporate
Security also developed a citywide CCTV utilisation strategy involving the public and private
sectors. The CCTV strategy will benefit event and disaster management for the city including the
upcoming G20 Summit.
Brisbane City Council Audit Committee
Council’s Audit Committee oversees the organisation’s audit, control and risk management
functions. The main responsibilities of the Audit Committee are to help the organisation to ensure:
144
•
management maintains adequate internal controls to achieve operational and strategic
goals and to ensure compliance with laws, regulations, internal policies and financial
reporting obligations
•
Council entities, business systems and processes are operating with economy, efficiency
and effectiveness
•
key business risks are effectively managed
•
the annual Assurance Services Plan is sufficiently comprehensive to assess major risks
and internal controls
•
internal and external audit processes are effective.
The Chairman of the Audit Committee is independent of Council. As at 30 June 2013, Audit
Committee membership comprised:
•
Len Scanlan, independent chairman
•
Mitchell Petrie, independent member
•
Carolyn Barker, representative of Brisbane Transport Advisory Board
•
Neil Hatherly, representative of Field Services Group Advisory Board
•
Colin Jensen, CEO, observing member
•
Peter Rule, Executive Manager, Office of the Lord Mayor and CEO, observing member
•
Vicki Pethybridge, Divisional Manager, City Planning and Sustainability, observing
member
•
Greg Evans, Divisional Manager, Organisational Services, observing member
•
Paul Oberle, Chief Financial Officer, observing member.
Andrew MacLeod, Chief Internal Auditor, and representatives of the Queensland Audit Office
(QAO) also attend committee meetings as observers.
Ordinary meetings of the Audit Committee are held quarterly and additional meetings are
convened at appropriate times each year to focus on risk management and draft Annual Financial
Statements. The committee maintains close communication with the audit committees of
Council’s subsidiary entities, including the City of Brisbane Investment Corporation and Brisbane
Marketing.
The Brisbane City Council Audit Committee undergoes an annual structured self-assessment as
part of its strategy for maintaining the highest standards of professional practice.
The Queensland Audit Office
The QAO continued to provide independent audit services to Council during 2012-13. The QAO
supports Queensland Government’s Auditor-General in providing parliament with an independent
assessment of the financial management of public sector entities. The Auditor-General certifies
Council’s Annual Financial Statements and, in order to do so, continuously
reviews and assesses the internal control environment surrounding Council’s financial practices.
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The QAO liaises closely with Council’s Assurance Services unit and provides advice to the
Brisbane City Council Audit Committee.
QAO testing for the 2012-13 Brisbane City Council annual financial statements did not identify
any high risk issues or exposures and confirmed that reliance on key controls over the revenue,
expenditure and payroll cycles was appropriate.
Complaints management
Administrative action complaints
Council is committed to managing customer feedback and dealing with all complaints in a fair and
timely manner and at the local level where possible.
Council’s performance in resolving administrative action complaints has been significant. A total
of 1,536,649 contacts were made with Council over 2012-13. Of these, only 1.3% were
administrative action complaints and 96.3% of the administrative action complaints received in
the financial year were resolved. Of the administrative action complaints not resolved, none were
made in a previous financial year.
Section 179 of the City of Brisbane Regulation 2012 requires Council to report on the following:
Action
Administrative action complaints made to Council
Administrative action complaints resolved by Council under the
complaints management process
Administrative action complaints not resolved by Council under the
complaints management process
Number of administrative action complaints not resolved that were
made in a previous financial year
Number
19,893
*19,904
358
0
* Note: Complaints carried forward from 2011-12 were recorded as resolved this financial year,
resulting in the figures reflecting that more complaints were resolved than were received in the
financial year
Office of Disputes Commissioner
Council’s Office of the Disputes Commissioner is an independent office within Council that
reviews complaints about infringement notices issued by Council. The Office ensures fair
outcomes are delivered without the need for complainants to resort to the court system.
The Office of the Disputes Commissioner also contributes to the improvement of Council services
by identifying systemic issues and making recommendations to the relevant areas of the
organisation.
The Office of the Disputes Commissioner has the ability to waive or uphold infringement notices
and address complaints related to infringement notices regarding:
•
parking
•
malls
•
animals
•
pools
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•
signage
•
environment
•
vegetation
•
water.
During 2012-13, 1282 complaints were raised with the Office of the Disputes Commissioner.
A total of 1455 complaints were processed within the 2012-13 year. This figure includes
complaints carried over from the 2011-12 year, and 196 complaints to be carried forward to 201314.
Right to Information and Information Privacy access
requests
The total number of Right to Information (RTI) and Information Privacy (IP) access applications
received during 2012-13 was 348.
The estimated salary cost for processing these applications was $206,787. This includes
$195,253 in labour costs for RTI unit employees plus $11,534 (estimated) for other officers
throughout Council who have searched for and provided documents.
National Competition Policy
In April 1995, the Australian Government and all States and Territories agreed to the
implementation of a National Competition Policy (NCP). The policy represents a commitment
from governments to reduce restrictions to competition to enhance the overall efficiency of
Australia’s economic performance. At the local government level, the underlying philosophy is to
improve service delivery efficiency and reduce costs to both government and the community
through competitive neutrality.
Council’s initial NCP nominated significant business activities were waste management, water
and transport. The commercialisation reform option was applied to City Parking from 1 July 2001
and continued to be applied to Brisbane Transport. Council resolved to apply full cost pricing to
City Waste Services and to Field Services Group.
Business activities to which the code of competitive conduct applied in
2012-13
During 2012-13, the Code of Competitive Conduct continued to be applied to smaller business
activities in accordance with Council’s 2012 review. A list of these business activities is presented
in the Annual Financial Statements.
Competitive neutrality complaints
Complaints may be made only about business activities to which competitive neutrality reforms
apply, such as where business activities have been subjected to corporatisation,
commercialisation, full cost pricing or the Code of Competitive Conduct. Only competitors or
prospective competitors may make complaints.
147
Under the City of Brisbane Regulation 2012, complaints may be made in writing to Council or to
the Queensland Competition Authority (QCA). If Council receives a complaint it must pass the
complaint on to the QCA. The QCA must investigate and report on the complaint. The report
must be given to Council which must decide by resolution whether to implement the
recommendations in the QCA report.
Council is not aware of any competitive neutrality complaints received in 2012-13.
Annual review of business activities
Each year, Council is required to identify significant activities which may be subject to NCP,
undertake public benefit assessments and consider the application of reform options.
As required under the City of Brisbane Act 2010, an annual review of Council’s larger business
activities was conducted. No new business activities were identified.
Annual resolution
After its review, Council resolved to continue to apply: Commercialisation to:
•
Brisbane Transport
•
City Parking.
Full cost pricing to:
•
City Waste Services
•
Field Services Group.
Code of Competitive Conduct to:
•
Brisbane City Cemeteries
•
City Projects Office
•
Golf courses
•
Spatial Information Services
•
Sports and aquatic centres
•
Urban Amenities
•
Asset Portfolio Management (City Property)
•
Civil Construction and Maintenance Operations.
Significant business activities and application of competitive neutrality
principle
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Brisbane City Council’s Annual Financial Statements for 2012-13 contain details in relation to
Council’s significant business activities and the application of the competitive neutrality principle
as follows:
•
•
Note 25 (a) (b) (c) lists all the business activities that Council conducted during the
financial year
o
Brisbane Transport
o
City Waste Services
o
Field Services Group
o
City Parking
o
City Projects Office
o
Asset Portfolio Management (City Property)
o
Spatial Information Services
o
Civil Construction and Maintenance Operations
o
Brisbane City Cemeteries
o
Urban Amenities
o
Golf Courses
o
Sports and Aquatic Centres.
Note 25 (a) and (b) identifies the business activities that are significant business activities:
o
Brisbane Transport
o
City Waste Services
o
Field Services Group
o
City Parking.
•
The competitive neutrality principle was applied to all significant business activities.
•
There were no significant business activities in financial year ending 30 June 2013 that
were not conducted in the preceding financial year.
•
City Fleet Maintenance (Fleet Services) no longer provides NCP related activities.
•
Council did not conduct any beneficial enterprises in 2012-13.
Tax equivalents
Brisbane Transport and City Parking completed returns under the State Tax Equivalents
regime as commercialised business activities of Council.
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Code of Conduct
In accordance with the Public Sector Ethics Act 1994 (Qld) a Code of Conduct has been
prepared for Council.
The Code of Conduct includes the Queensland Public Sector ethics principles and values for
public sector entities and public officials. It is available to all employees on Council’s intranet and
in hardcopy, on request.
Council employees are supplied with a copy of the Code of Conduct with their letter of offer and
terms and conditions of employment. As part of the induction process, employees receive initial
training and education in the ethics principles and values for public officials, as well as their
obligations under the Code of Conduct. Ongoing training is provided via an online Code of
Conduct training module and face-to- face sessions are provided on request by work areas or in
response to an identified need.
Council’s Code of Conduct is available for inspection and printing by members of the public on
Council’s public website www.brisbane.qld.gov.au
Council’s administration procedures and management practices are prepared by officers having
proper regard to the Public Sector Ethics Act 1994 (Qld), the ethics obligations of public officials,
and the Code of Conduct.
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Disclosures
In this section
Councillor remuneration
Councillor expenses reimbursement
Councillor attendance
Councillor suspensions
Councillor conduct
Complaints regarding councillor conduct
Executive remuneration
Overseas travel
Registers kept by Council
Grants to community organisations
Councillors’ discretionary funds
Registers kept by Council
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Council is committed to transparency, openness and accessibility.
The City of Brisbane Act 2010 and City of Brisbane Regulation 2012 reinforce Council’s
commitment requiring disclosure of matters regarding councillors, remuneration of councillors and
executives, overseas travel, grants to community organisations and application of councillors’
discretionary funds.
Councillor remuneration
as at 30 June 2013
Position
Councillor
Leader of the
Opposition
Chairman of
Council
Committee
Chairman
Deputy
Mayor
Lord Mayor
Relativity to
base rate
Salary
17
1
100%
110%
$136,649
$150,314
Other benefits
Total fixed
(includes
remuneration
superannuation) (salary plus
superannuation)
$27,329
$163,978
$30,062
$180,376
1
125%
$170,811
$34,162
$204,973
6
125%
$170,811
$34,162
$204,973
1
130%
$177,644
$35,528
$213,172
1
= Cabinet
Minister
$222,026
$44,405
$266,431
•
The Lord Mayor and councillors are paid in accordance with an approved policy
framework.
•
In the 2012-13 financial year the salary of a councillor was $500 less than the salary of a
member of the Queensland Legislative Assembly.
•
The councillor salary is used as the ‘base rate’ against which the salaries of the Leader of
the Opposition, chairmen and Deputy Mayor are calculated.
•
The salary of the Lord Mayor is equal to the salary of a Queensland cabinet minister.
•
Superannuation contributions for Councillors must at least meet prevailing federal
superannuation guarantee legislation, currently set at 9%.
•
Councillors currently receive an additional 11% superannuation.
•
The Lord Mayor receives an allowance of $47,964, grossed up to take taxation
implications into account.
•
The Leader of the Opposition and chairmen receive an expense of office allowance of
$18,268.16.
•
•Councillors are entitled to the use of a Council vehicle with a recommended retail price of
up to and including $40,000.
•
The Leader of the Opposition and chairmen are entitled to the use of a Council vehicle
with a recommended retail price of up to and including $46,000.
152
•
The Lord Mayor is entitled to the use of a Council vehicle with a recommended retail price
of up to and including $72,000.
Information on Council’s committees, including committee membership and key responsibilities,
is available by visiting www.brisbane.qld.gov.au
Councillor expenses reimbursement
Section 178 of the City of Brisbane Regulation 2012 requires that the Annual Report contain
information concerning Councillors’ expenses and facilities. Council’s Councillor Expenses
Reimbursement Policy below describes these.
AP032 Councillor Expenses
Reimbursement Policy
Overview
This document outlines Council’s policy concerning:
(a) payment of reasonable expenses incurred, or to be incurred, by councillors for discharging
their duties and responsibilities as councillors; and
(b) provision of facilities to the councillors for that purpose.
Applicability
This policy applies to all Brisbane City Council councillors.
This policy is supported by Authorised Ward Budget Guidelines.
Principles
This policy is consistent with the local government principles of:
•
Transparent and effective processes and decision making in the public interest.
•
Good governance of, and by, local government.
•
Ethical and legal behaviour of councillors and local government employees.
Policy
General
Councillors should be equipped with adequate and appropriate facilities to enable them to
represent their ward and the City of Brisbane.
Additionally, councillors should not be financially disadvantaged when carrying out the
requirements of their role, and should be fairly and reasonably reimbursed in accordance with
statutory requirements and community expectations.
Any party political activities undertaken by councillors or their staff will not be reimbursed. AP176
153
Councillors Publicity Material Policy and MC026 Marketing, Communication and Advertising
Policy provide definitions and guidance on this topic.
Failure to comply with this policy, and with the policies, guidelines, and procedures referred to in
this policy, may constitute inappropriate conduct, misconduct or official misconduct.
Payment of expenses
The payment and/or reimbursement of expenses shall be for the actual cost of items or services
required for legitimate Council business use only.
Spouses, partners and family members of councillors are not entitled to reimbursement of
expenses, or to the use of facilities, allocated to councillors.
Responsibility and accountability for all Council business-related expenditure rests with the
councillor who incurred the expense. It is the responsibility of councillors to ensure that all
proposed expenditure meets the following Council policies, guidelines, and procedures:
•
AP061 Travel
•
•
AP181 Entertainment and
Hospitality Policy
•
•
AP176 Councillors Publicity
Material Policy
•
•
AP043 Councillors Business
Card Procedure
•
MC026 Marketing, Communication and Advertising Policy.
Councillors shall immediately provide information on their expenditure upon request from:
(a) The Lord Mayor, or
(b) Chairperson of Finance, Economic Development & Administration Committee, or
(c) Councillor Support.
Facilities
Councillors will be provided with an appropriately equipped ward office distinct from their
residence, in which to conduct their work on behalf of Council and their constituents. Standard
equipment will be provided for each office.
All councillors will be provided with a fully maintained Council vehicle. Additionally, the Lord
Mayor will be provided with a chauffeur driven vehicle.
Office facilities – Councillors
(a) Council will provide a ward office in every Council ward.
(b) Council will provide an area or areas external to, and close to, the Council Chamber for use
by all councillors.
Office facilities – committee chairpersons
154
In addition to a ward office, Council will provide a committee chairperson’s office.
Office facilities – Leader of the Opposition
In addition to a ward office, Council will provide a Leader of the Opposition’s Office.
Office facilities – Deputy
Mayor
If the Deputy Mayor is not a committee chairperson, then, in addition to a ward office, Council will
provide a Deputy Mayor’s Office.
If the Deputy Mayor is a committee chairperson, then he or she will occupy the committee
chairperson’s Office.
Office facilities – Lord Mayor
Council will provide an appropriate suite of rooms for the Lord Mayor.
A committee chairperson’s office, the Leader of the Opposition’s Office, the Deputy Mayor’s
Office (in the case where the Deputy Mayor is not a committee chairperson), and rooms for the
Lord Mayor will be located either in the public office of Council, or in City Hall, or in such other
building as may be occupied by the Council Chamber.
155
Councillor attendance at 2012-13 Council meetings
Ward
Councillor
Lord Mayor
Bracken Ridge
Central
Chandler
Deagon
Doboy
Enoggera
Hamilton
Holland Park
Jamboree
Karawatha
MacGregor
Marchant
McDowall
Moorooka
Morningside
Northgate
Parkinson
Pullenvale
Richlands
Tennyson
The Gabba
The Gap
Toowong
Walter Taylor
Wishart
Wynnum Manly
Cr Graham Quirk
Cr Amanda Cooper
Cr Vicki Howard
Cr Adrian Schrinner
Cr Victoria Newton
Cr Ryan Murphy
Cr Andrew Wines
Cr David McLachlan
Cr Ian McKenzie
Cr Matthew Bourke
Cr Kim Marx
Cr Steven Huang
Cr Fiona King
Cr Norm Wyndham
Cr Steve Griffiths
Cr Shayne Sutton
Cr Kim Flesser
Cr Angela Owen-Taylor
Cr Margaret de Wit
Cr Milton Dick
Cr Nicole Johnston
Cr Helen Abrahams
Cr Geraldine Knapp
Cr Peter Matic
Cr Julian Simmonds
Cr Krista Adams
Cr Peter Cumming
Number of meetings attended
out of the number of meetings
held
30/30
30/30
30/30
30/30
30/30
30/30
30/30
30/30
28/30
30/30
30/30
30/30
28/30
30/30
29/30
29/30
30/30
28/30
28/30
30/30
29/30
29/30
27/30
30/30
28/30
30/30
30/30
Councillor suspensions from Council or Committee
meetings Council maintains the following registers.
Councillor
Cr Steve
Griffiths
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Shayne
Sutton
Date
23 November
2012
28 August
2012
11 September
2012
30 October
2012
20 November
2012
26 February
2013
7 August 2012
Suspension period
8 days
Reason
Repeatedly disrupting the meeting
8 days
Repeatedly debating the Chairman’s
ruling
Repeatedly not following Chairman’s
rulings then debating the ruling
Repeatedly disrupting the meeting and
debating the Chairman’s rulings
Repeatedly not following Chairman’s
rulings and disrupting the meeting
Repeatedly not following Chairman’s
rulings then debating the ruling
Repeatedly not following Chairman’s
rulings then debating the ruling
Remainder of the
meeting
Remainder of the
meeting
Remainder of the
meeting
Remainder of the
meeting
Remainder of the
meeting
156
Councillor conduct
The City of Brisbane Act 2010 sets out the process to be followed if Council receives a complaint
about the conduct or performance of a councillor in carrying out their official duties. This process
assists in providing transparency and accountability through good governance. It holds
councillors accountable for upholding standards of behaviour.
Section 178 of the City of Brisbane Regulation 2012 requires Council to report on the following
each financial year:
Number of orders and recommendations made under section 183(2) or (4) of the CoBA
2010
Number of orders made under section 185 of the CoBA 2010
Number of orders made under section 186A of the CoBA 2010
5
6
4
Complaints relating to councillor conduct
Number of complaints where no further action was taken as the complaint was
assessed by the CEO
as being frivolous or vexatious or lacking in substance under section 180 (2) of the
CoBA 2010
Number of complaints assessed by the CEO as being about misconduct or
inappropriate conduct and referred to the Brisbane City Council Councillor Conduct
Review Panel under section 180 (3) of the CoBA 2010
Number of complaints assessed by the CEO as being about possible official
misconduct
Number of complaints heard by the Brisbane City Council Councillor Conduct Review
Panel which attracted action
30
15
0
11
2
Councillors for whom an order or recommendation was made under section 183, section 185 or
section 186A of the CoBA 2010 were:
157
Councillor
Cr Amanda
Cooper
Cr Peter
Cumming
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Nicole
Johnston
Cr Nicole
Description of the misconduct or inappropriate
conduct or disorderly conduct
Made statements about Councillor Johnston
that were false
Improperly used Council resources in the
production of letters for political purposes
Called another councillor a derogatory term
during a Council meeting
Disorderly conduct – failure to comply with
direction
Disorderly conduct – failure to comply with
direction
Disorderly conduct – failure to comply with
direction
Disorderly conduct – failure to comply with
direction and debating rulings
Inappropriate conduct – continued to debate
rulings
Inappropriate conduct – failure to comply with
a direction
Inappropriate conduct – failure to comply with
a direction and threatening the Chairman of
Council
Inappropriate conduct – failure to comply with
direction and debating rulings
Applied the powers of the Chairman of a
Council meeting in an inconsistent manner in
that some councillors were ‘cautioned’ and
others were ‘warned’
Inappropriate conduct – failure to comply with
a direction
Summary of the order or
recommendation
Apology
Order to make an admission of
error
Apology and a
recommendation that the Chief
Executive of the Department of
Local Government monitor
Councillor Johnston for
compliance with local
government related laws
Noted in minutes
Noted in minutes
Noted in minutes
Ordered to leave the meeting
Ordered to leave the meeting
Ordered to leave the meeting
Noted in minutes
Ordered to leave the meeting
Counselled
Ordered to leave the meeting
Executive remuneration
as at 30 June 2013
The associated data indicates the total fixed remuneration being paid to senior officer and
executive service employees as at 30 June 2013.
Total Fixed Remuneration
Range ($)
100,000-199,999
200,000-299,999
300,000-499,999
500,000+
•
129
39
8
1
Total fixed remuneration for these employees represents the sum of salary and
superannuation.
158
Overseas travel
In 2012-13, the overseas travel below was made by councillors or Council employees.
Name
Joe Bannan
Position
Manager
Destination
Dubai
Greg Bowden
Greg Bowden
Director
Director
Jason Cameron
Manager
Auckland, NZ
Taipei,
Koahsiung,
Kobe, Daejeon,
Hong Kong
Guam
Keith Foster
Arboriculture
Coordinator
New Zealand
Barry Hancock
Manager
Garth Henderson
Patsy Hsiao
Project Leader
Project Leader
Miriam Kent
Manager
Taipei,
Koahsiung,
Kobe, Daejeon,
Hong Kong
Auckland, NZ
Taipei,
Koahsiung,
Kobe, Daejeon,
Hong Kong
New Zealand
Trish Levey
Head of
International
Projects
Head of
International
Projects
Chief Internal
Auditor
Koahsiung,
Taipei
Andrew MacLeod
Chief Internal
Auditor
USA
Cr Angela Owen-
Councillor
Singapore
Trish Levey
Andrew MacLeod
Taiwan
USA
Purpose
Government
Asset
Management
Congress
Business Mission
Business Mission
Cost
$1595.63
Emergency
Management
Accreditation
Program
New Zealand
Arboriculture
Association
Conference
Business Mission
$718.89
Business Mission
Business Mission
$3481.76
$17,193.09
New Zealand
Association of
Local
Government
Information
Management
2012 Customer
Service
Symposium
2013 Asia Pacific
Cities Summit
$189.18
Asia Pacific
Cities Summit
Plenary
Institute of
Internal Auditors
International
Conference
Institute of
Internal Auditors
Professional
Issues
Committee
Meeting
World Cities
$8168.05
$2481.87
$10,069.88
$446.90
$9944.14
$4677.33
$1948.66
$4752.84
$1471.04
159
Taylor
Cr Graham Quirk
Cr Graham Quirk
Lord Mayor
Lord Mayor
Jeff Sangster
Manager
Alan Warren
Divisional
Manager
Craig Whiteman
Manager
Auckland, NZ
Taipei,
Koahsiung,
Kobe, Daejeon,
Hong Kong
USA
Las Vegas, Los
Angeles,
Washington,
Toronto
USA
Summit 2012,
WCS Forum &
Lee Kuan Yew
World City Prize
Awards
Ceremony
Business Mission
Business Mission
$2605.38
$9686.65
2011 ERSI
International
User
Conference
Study of Bus
Rapid Transit
Systems
$1392.10
Local
Government
Managers
Exchange
Scholarship &
Supplier
Inspection
$1013.86
$12,807.75
160
Registers kept by Council
Council maintains the following registers.
Legislative requirement
Animal Management (Cats and Dogs) Act 2008
•
Register of regulated dogs
•
Register of cats and dogs
Building Act 1975
•
Register of buildings for which development approval has been given and a random
inspection conducted every three years
•
Register of exemptions granted from fencing outdoor swimming pools
•
Register of enforcement notices given
City of Brisbane Act 2010 and City of Brisbane Regulation 2012
•
Register of cost-recovery fees
•
Asset register
•
Local laws register
•
Roads map and register
•
Delegations register
•
Register of business activities to which the competitive neutrality principle applies
•
Register of interests (maintained by the CEO) of (a) councillors, (b) senior contract
employees, and (c) a person who is related to a councillor or senior contract employee
•
Register of interests (maintained by the Lord Mayor) of the (a) the chief executive officer,
and (b) a person who is related to the CEO
Commercial Character Building Register Planning Scheme Policy (City Plan 2000)
•
Register of commercial character buildings
Environmental Protection Act 1994
•
S540 Register
•
Register of environmental authorities
•
Register of registration certificates
161
•
Register of environmental reports
•
Register of monitoring program results
•
Register of environmental protection orders
•
Register of authorised persons
•
Register of transitional environmental programs
Environmental Protection (Waste Management) Regulation 2003
•
Register of approvals and refusals of resource
•
Register of exemptions granted under section 39 or section 64
•
Register of information notified under section 61
Heritage Register Planning Scheme Policy (City Plan 2000)
•
Register of heritage places and heritage precincts of cultural heritage significance
Land Protection (Pest and Stock Route Management) Act 2002
•
Register of pest control and entry control notices issued
Plumbing and Drainage Act 2002
•
Register of installed on-site sewerage and greywater use facilities
Queensland Heritage Act 1992
•
Register of local heritage
Standard Plumbing and Drainage Regulation 2003
•
Register of testable backflow prevention devices
Statutory Bodies Financial Arrangements Act
•
Register of treasurer approvals
Sustainable Planning Act 2009
•
Register of development applications made to Council
•
Register of show cause and enforcement notices issued for offences under the
Sustainable Planning Act 2009 and the Building Act 1975
Local Laws
Meetings (Rules of Procedure) Subordinate Local Law
•
Register of attendance at Council meetings
162
Natural Assets Local Law 2003
•
Register of protected vegetation
To view any of the above listed registers, contact Council on (07) 3403 8888.
Land, reserves and controlled roads
Reserve land
During 2012-13 Council held in trust the following land:
•
State owned land – 50,196,541 square metres
•
Land under Deed of Grant – 1,243,220 square metres
Roads
Council’s Road Surface Inventory System reported the following details as at 30 June 2013:
•
Length of constructed and formed roads in the Brisbane City Council area – 5690.48 km.
This includes 16.88 km of private constructed roads.
•
Unconstructed and unformed roads – 18.4 km.
Total length – 5708.88 km
Council has agreements with Queensland
Department of Transport and Main Roads to maintain some footpath areas along state controlled
roads.
There are roads that Council does not ‘own’ but does control – private roads and the footpaths as
described above. Typically, the non-Council roads are maintained by their respective owner(s).
163
Grants to community organisations
Council’s grants program supports a range of community organisations and activities. Included
are:
•
grants to citywide, multicultural, community and signature festivals
•
sports and recreation grants
•
artist and history grants
•
access and inclusion grants
•
community development grants
•
housing support grants
•
grants directed at particular community groups including seniors and youth.
In 2012-13 community grants totalled more than $6.5 million.
The Lord Mayor’s Suburban Initiative Fund is an allocation of funding for each Councillor to apply
to eligible activities.
Councillors’ discretionary funds
Lord Mayor
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Anywhere Theatre Festival Ltd
1066: The Bayeux Brought to Life
$1000.00
Asperger Services Australia Ltd
International Asperger Day bridge banners
$1512.50
Bicycle Queensland
Film night as part of Bicycle Week
$1000.00
Brisbane Hardcourt Bicycle Polo
Court refurbishment/national tournament 2012
$500.00
Brisbane Multiple Birth Association
Northside Inc.
Family Fun Day
$700.00
Brisbane Pride Festival
Association
Brisbane Pride Festival
$2200.00
Brisbane Seniors Online
Minimising social isolation of seniors in the
greater Brisbane area
$3000.00
Chilarity ATF Chilarity Public Trust
D3 – Dream Dance Donate
$500.00
Corinda State School P&C
Fathers, Footy and Fun Day
$419.00
Drug Arm
Matter of Substance ‘Drug Awareness Manual’
$1250.00
164
Ferny Grove State School P&C
Entertainment stage at the Ferny Grove
Festival
$1500.00
Girl Guides Queensland – John
Oxley Region
World Thinking Day celebrations
$1000.00
Hemmant Scout Group
Opening of Paul Conti Park
$836.00
Hendra Pony Club
Replacement fencing
$500.00
International Adoptive Families of
Queensland
Purchase of laptop
$497.00
Iranian Society of Queensland Inc.
Iranian Film Festival – Brisbane
$2000.00
Latin Alliance Inc.
Colombian National Day Festival
$1000.00
Mental Illness Fellowship
Queensland
Annual Art Exhibition
$1000.00
Our Lady of the Assumption
Enoggera P&F
OLA Community Festival
$1500.00
Parkrun Inc.
Brisbane parkrun
$2000.00
Probus Association of Queensland
Inc.
20th Anniversary celebration
$1000.00
Queensland African Communities
Council
Africa Day Festival 2013
$2000.00
Queensland Association of the
Deaf Inc.
Queensland Deaf Festival 2013
$1500.00
Queensland Fiji Football
Association Inc.
Girmit Carnival
$3300.00
QVITI
Fiji Flood Appeal fundraiser
$1000.00
Robertson State School P&C
Robertson State School Fete 2013
$1331.00
Rotary Club of Sunnybank Hills,
Rotary Club of Salisbury, Rotary
Club Wishart
Charity Fun Run
$2000.00
Runcorn Park Physical Culture
Club
IT for Physie
$500.00
Sinhala Association of Queensland
Inc.
Saralanga Cultural Performance
$1650.00
Sri Lanka Society of Queensland
Inc.
Sinhala and Tamil New Year Cultural Festival
$1100.00
Sunfish Queensland Inc.
Kid’s Fishing Days
$1500.00
165
Tarragindi War Memorial
Kindergarten
Installation of new shade sails
$1000.00
The Compassionate Friends
Queensland Inc.
Improvement of kitchen facilities
$369.41
The Gap Pastime Club Inc.
Field 2 viewing area
$1500.00
The Gap Pioneer & History Group
Book to Commemorate 140th Anniversary of
The Gap Pioneer Cemetery
$1100.00
The General Douglas MacArthur
Brisbane Memorial Foundation
70th Anniversary of General MacArthur’s
arrival in Brisbane commemorative activities
$2000.00
The yLead Association Inc.
Altitude Day – Brisbane
$500.00
Toowong Primary P&C
Toowong Hands and Hearts Fair
$500.00
World Arts & Multi-Culture Inc.
Citizenship Ceremony
$800.00
Zillmere Festival
Zillmere Festival – One Place, Many Cultures
$1818.18
Project summary
Amount
Bracken Ridge Ward
Organisation
Approved
Aspley Memorial Bowls Club Inc.
Ladies President’s Day
$385.00
Aspley Memorial Bowls Club Inc.
Purchase of new greens mower
$8900.00
Aspley Rugby League Football
Club Inc.
Contribution towards main field irrigation
upgrades
$5650.00
Bald Hills Neighbourhood Watch
Safer Streets project
$687.50
Bald Hills State School P&C
Carols and movie night
$2425.00
Bracken Ridge Baptist Church
Bracken Ridge Carols by Candlelight
$3000.00
Bracken Ridge Baptist Church
Movies in the Park
$3000.00
Bracken Ridge Central Lions Inc.
Backyard Bonanza
$6900.00
Bracken Ridge Central Lions Inc.
Backyard Bonanza entertainment event permit
$1409.10
Bracken Ridge Kindergarten
Association Inc.
Sports and fete day
$662.00
Carseldine 4 Area Neighbourhood
Watch
Neighbour Day Picnic
$1804.00
Golden Downs Sports and Social
Club
Computer classes
$3789.50
166
Guide Dogs Queensland
Electronic security gates for Breeding and
Training Centre
$3414.55
Jabiru Community Youth and
Children’s Service Association
Zillmere Festival – One Place, Many Cultures
$329.88
Lions Club of Bracken Ridge
Central Inc.
Citizenship Ceremony 2013
$1336.50
Ridge Hills United Football Club
Bin security
$1025.20
Ridge Hills United Football Club
Community seating
$2071.52
Ridge Hills United Football Club
Trophy Day Extravaganza
$1650.00
St Paul’s School Supporters’
Association
Community Fair
$2900.00
Zillmere State School P&C
Community Fair
$3245.00
Project summary
Amount
Central
Organisation
Approved
139 Club Inc.
New waiting area chairs
$990.00
139 Club Inc.
Rekeying personal storage lockers
$938.30
Anywhere Theatre Festival
Lost & Found Anywhere Theatre Festival
$250.00
Asthma Foundation Queensland
Marquee for National Asthma Week 2012
$1000.00
Australian Taiwanese Chamber of
Commerce Queensland
Brisbane – our city, our home!
$1000.00
Bicycle Queensland
Bike Week 2013 postcard promotion
$500.00
Bicycle Queensland
Bike Week 2013 transport seminar
$500.00
Brisbane Lesbian Gay Bisexual
and Transgender Pride Collective
Brisbane Pride Festival
$1000.00
Brisbane Pride Festival
Association
Brisbane Pride Fair Day
$4000.00
Brisbane Seniors Online
Assist seniors to become computer and
internet confident
$550.00
Communify Qld Inc.
Spring planting
$800.00
Down Syndrome Association of
Qld
Community Festival
$500.00
167
Haemophilia Foundation Australia
Red Run Classic
$2500.00
Holy Spirit School New Farm P&C
2012 Fete
$4400.00
Kelvin Grove Business Association
Kelvin Grove Creative Festival
$4000.00
Kelvin Grove Business Association
Kelvin Grove Creative Festival
$1000.00
Kelvin Grove State College P&C
(JPAG)
Active School Travel Program ongoing
incentives
$600.00
Kidsafe Queensland Inc.
Keep Your Driveway Kidsafe! – Demonstration
display of a vehicle’s ‘blind space’
$1000.00
Multicultural Community Centre Ltd Multicultural Mothers Group: Integration and
Life Skills
$700.00
National Seniors Australia – New
Farm Branch
Purchase of data projection equipment
$618.20
National Trust of Queensland
50th Anniversary Gala Dinner
$2371.51
New Farm and Districts Historical
Society
Teneriffe diorama
$3300.00
New Farm State School P&C
Fete
$3500.00
Open Minds
Alford Street gazebo
$700.00
Queensland Catholic Netball
Association Inc.
New marquee
$1498.20
Queensland Philatelic Council Inc.
Queensland Stamp Show 2013
$500.00
Redsox Softball Club
A1 Women’s team
$500.00
Rostrum Queensland
Rostrum Voice of Youth
$250.00
Rotary Club of New Farm
Citizenship Ceremony
$2000.00
St John Ambulance (Qld) – History
and Heritage Committee
Council Helps Save St John history
$580.90
St Thomas Jacobite Syrian
Orthodox Church Brisbane Inc.
Gloria 2013
$1000.00
Submarines Association Australia
Queensland Inc.
Submariners Walk Heritage Trail – VIP
function
$1320.00
The Brisbane Excelsior Band Inc.
A Centenary in Community Sound
$1000.00
The Corporation of the Order of
the Canossian Sisters
Permanent shade structure over the sandpit
$1000.00
The Creche & Kindergarten
Association Ltd
Children’s educational resources
$1000.00
168
The Metropolitan Senior Citizens’
Centre
Day Club
$1110.00
The Royal Historical Society of
Queensland
Heritage events equipment
$985.50
Tibetan Community Queensland
Inc.
Tibetan New Year Dinner
$300.00
Vegas Spray Inc.
Brisbane Emerging Art Festival
$500.00
Wilston State School P&C
Fete
$1237.39
Windsor State School P&C
Digital arts through interactive whiteboards
$2000.00
World Harmony Society
Unity in Diversity BBQ
$500.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Balmoral Little Athletics Centre Inc.
Scissor mats for high jump
$1848.00
Belmont Scout Group
Stairs renovation
$3000.00
Belmont State School P&C
2013 Belmont Showtime Carnival
$1000.00
Belmont State School P&C
Carols on the oval/fireworks display
$1363.64
Brisbane Seniors Online
Assist seniors and over 50s to become
computer and internet confident
$880.00
Camp Hill Carina Welfare
Association
2013 Crackerjack Carnival
$2500.00
Cancer Council Queensland
Carindale Relay for Life
$2000.00
Chandler Swim Club
Presentation of medals
$500.00
Christian Outreach Centre
Christmas hampers 2012
$5000.00
Citipointe Christian College Parent
Connect
Citipointe Goes Country
$1650.00
Eastern Districts Junior Cricket
Association
Fence to direct people around cricket practice
nets safely
$2200.00
Eastern Group State Emergency
Service Support Unit Inc.
Assist with the purchase of storm operation
trailers
$1000.00
Gumdale State School P&C
Gumdale Country Fair
$917.00
Chandler Ward
169
Hoopstars Inc.
Annual breakup function – 2012
$500.00
Jewish Educational Institute –
Chabad House Brisbane Inc.
Chanukah at Westfield Carindale
$500.00
Mater Foundation ‘Chicks in Pink’
Breast Cancer Fundraising Group
Carina Curves ‘Chicks in Pink’ breast cancer
fundraiser
$250.00
Neighbourhood Watch
Gainsborough Park (Upper Mt.
Gravatt #24)
Australia Day community function
$586.00
Queensland Rifle Association Inc.
Belmont Shooting Complex noise treatment
project
$4555.00
Queensland Rifle Association Inc.
Carols on the Range
$4545.45
Quota International of Carindale
Inc.
Craft and Gift Fair
$2000.00
Redeemer P&F
Fair 2012
$1027.00
Rochedale Community Garden
Inc.
Environmentally friendly composting toilet
$3995.00
Scout Association Queensland
Branch – Rochedale Scout Group
Kitchen refurbishment
$3800.00
Scripture Union Camp Hill State
School Local Chaplaincy
Committee
Camp Hill State School Chaplaincy Christmas
Carols
$1000.00
Scripture Union Camp Hill State
School Local Chaplaincy
Committee
Camp Hill State School Chaplaincy Christmas
Carols
$681.82
Seton College P&F
Seton College community UV quick shade
marquee
$3300.98
SpecialCare Central Inc.
Disability Awareness and Opportunity Expo
$600.00
The Corporation of the Synod of
the Diocese of Brisbane
St Gabriel’s Parish history
$1500.00
The Creche and Kindergarten
Association Ltd (C&K) – Gumdale
Community Kindergarten
Shopping night fundraiser
$300.00
Whites Hill State College P&C
Fete 2013
$1000.00
170
Deagon Ward
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Asperger Services Australia Ltd
AspLan Connect
$2099.79
Banyo RSL Sub Branch
Aging Expo
$2000.00
Boondall Primary P&C
2013 Fete
$1181.00
Boondall Primary P&C
Active School Travel
$500.00
Boondall Synchronized Ice
Skating Club
Nova Spring Gala
$374.00
Brighton District Soccer Club Inc.
Fireworks for Annual Gala Day
$1000.00
Brighton State School P&C
Camel Cup Carnival
$1650.00
Brisbane Seniors Online
Address the low connectivity of the internet to
residential homes
$1100.00
Deagon Ward Office
Rainbow Street mural renewal
$5000.00
Jabiru Community Youth &
Children’s Service Association
Community engagement – ‘Pass It On’
$7000.00
Military Cadets Inc.
Hiring of Sacred Heart Parish Hall
$2700.00
North East Community Support
Group Inc.
Community Christmas celebration
$1500.00
Rotary Club of Sandgate Inc.
Carols in the Park
$1650.00
Sacred Heart P&F
Spring Festival
$1500.00
Sailability Shorncliffe Inc.
Dinghy trailer covers and radios
$962.28
Sandgate and Bracken Ridge
Action Group Inc.
Community Wellness Expo & Fun Run
$900.00
Sandgate and District Chamber
of Commerce
2012 Sandgate Xmas in the Park
$3650.00
Sandgate and District Chamber
of Commerce
Bluewater Festival 2013: Easter Movie Night in
the Park
$4000.00
Sandgate Art Society
Expressions 2013
$2860.00
Sandgate Hawks AFC
Movie Night
$3300.00
Sandgate Home Assist Secure
Health safety and security in the community
$429.94
171
Sandgate Primary P&C
Carnival
$1650.00
Sandgate State School P&C
Active Travel Program
$500.00
Sandgate Swimming Club Inc.
Grey medallion program
$1100.00
Shorncliffe State School P&C
Country Fair sponsorship
$1500.00
Society of Women Writers
Queensland Inc.
Sandgate/Shorncliffe Writers Festival
$2200.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
All Gauge Model Railway Club
Inc.
Annual All Gauge Model Train Show 2012
$1100.00
Anglican Parish of CarindaleCarina-Belmont, St Gabriel’s
Anglican Church
St Gabriel’s Parish history
$3185.00
Ardoch Youth Foundation
Chicken Coop project
$3000.00
Balmoral Cycling Club
Watt bike
$2200.00
Balmoral Little Athletics Centre
Inc.
Scissor mats for high jump
$1848.00
Bravehearts Inc.
Christmas Lights up for Kids
$3379.52
Camp Hill Carina Welfare
Association
2013 Crackerjack Carnival
$2500.00
Cancer Council Queensland
Carindale Relay For Life
$1980.00
Damini Women’s Association of
Qld Inc.
Ladies Day Celebration 2012
$1000.00
Eastern Group State Emergency
Service Support Unit Inc.
Assist with the purchase of storm operation
trailers
$1000.00
Forum Communicators
Association Inc. – Carindale
Forum
Carindale exhibition banner and workshop
$350.00
Friends of Tingalpa Cemetery
Heritage Group Inc.
Pioneers’ Chapel termite damage repairs and
barrier treatment
$4150.00
Friends of Tingalpa Cemetery
Heritage Group Inc.
Stabilise and restore dangerous headstones
$1952.50
Doboy Ward
172
Hemmant Scout Group
Opening of Paul Conti Park
$1118.70
Mater Foundation ‘Chicks in Pink’ Carina Curves ‘Chicks in Pink’ breast cancer
Breast Cancer Fundraising Group fundraiser
$250.00
Mayfield Marlins Swimming Club
Mobile scoreboard and community sign
$2500.00
Mayfield Marlins Swimming Club
and Cannon Hill Dolphins
Doboy Cup
$287.27
Meadowlands Church of the
Nazarene
Meadowlands Men’s Shed
$2727.27
Murarrie Progress Association
Inc.
Support tool for secretary
$348.00
Murarrie State School P&C
Promotional banners
$550.00
Quota International of Carindale
Inc.
Quota Craft and Gift Fair
$2000.00
Rotary Club of Port of Brisbane
Inc.
Murarrie Neighbour Day
$2750.00
St Martin’s P&F
Protective floor covering
$6045.60
Tingalpa Model Aero Club Inc.
Model expo
$3350.00
Waterloo Bay Lapidary Club Inc.
Creative resources
$1854.03
WorshipCentre Ltd
Nestle Inn People’s Day
$2307.16
Wynnum & District Horse & Pony
Club Inc.
Bobby Bayard Memorial Gymkhana 2013
$300.00
Enoggera Ward
Organisation
Project summary
Amount Approved
Enoggera District Stamp Club
Northside Stamp Fair
$275.00
Ferny Grove and Districts
Junior Australian Football Club
Inc.
20th Anniversary
$3663.00
Gaythorne Bowls Sports and
Community Club Inc.
Shades for bowling greens
$4150.00
Hills & Districts Chamber of
Commerce
Big Breakfast
$4400.00
Keperra Baptist Church
Christmas in Keperra
$5000.00
Mitchelton Pre-Schooling
Street signage
$383.00
173
Centre Inc.
Mitchelton State School P&C
Mitchie Fest 2012 – Medieval
Madness
$6515.00
Newmarket State School
Movie night
$2991.50
Phoenix Northside Netball
Club
Equipment and court planning
$9422.64
St Andrews Catholic School
Ferny Grove
Create the Joy at the Fair
2013
$4000.00
The Brisbane Tramway
Museum Society
Roof repairs and air
conditioner
$8496.36
The Grove Baptist Community
Church
Christmas Party in The Grove
$5000.00
Hamilton Ward
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
City Sports Association Ltd
Fusion games at Newstead
$10,000.00
Dragons Rowing Club
Safety project
$3000.00
Intersection
Intersection video art project
$2500.00
Mercy Disability Services,
Cookery Nook – Catering and
Conference Centre
Business development opportunities
$2000.00
Neighbourhood Watch Hendra 1
Division/Ascot
Street numbering
$2750.00
New Farm and Districts Historical
Society
Teneriffe diorama
$2000.00
Queensland Women’s Historical
Association Inc.
Replacement of airconditioner in archival area
$1500.00
Racecourse Road Hamilton
Events Inc.
Racecourse Road Christmas Festival
$2500.00
Racecourse Road Hamilton
Events Inc.
Racecourse Road turns Pink to support Breast
Cancer Awareness Month
$2000.00
174
Rotary Club of Hamilton Inc.
Queen’s Plinth Pinkenba monument
$2410.21
Rotary Club of Hamilton Inc.
Australia Day Citizenship Ceremony
$2804.00
The Community Place Inc.
The Community Place WAND Program
$5000.00
The Danish Association Heimdal
Inc.
The Scandinavian Festival
$10,000.00
Thoroughbred Racing History
Association Inc.
Horses and History
$2000.00
Windsor Croquet Club Inc.
Replacement of unsafe club furniture
$2500.00
Wooloowin State School P&C
Creative Arts Spectacular 2012
$500.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Bulimba Creek Catchment
Coordinating Committee
Mt Gravatt State High School – pollinator link
$460.00
Eating Disorders Association
Essential assets
$799.00
Eating Disorders Association
Messages of Hope and Recovery Arts
Workshop
$2626.82
Fiji Senior Citizens Satsang
Association of Qld Inc.
Seniors’ Dinner Night and Annual Multicultural
Soccer Tournament
$550.00
Greenslopes Bowls Club
Community facility improvements
$2200.00
Greenslopes Bowls Club
Upgrade automatic doors and sensors
$880.00
Greenslopes State School P&C
Logan Road Time Line mural
$5940.00
Harty Street Community
Kindergarten & Preschool
Association Inc.
Upgrade educational resources and equipment
$4900.00
Holland Park and District Meals
on Wheels
Annual volunteer and client afternoon tea
$2000.00
Holland Park Girl Guides
Replace entry ramp
$5000.00
Langri Tangpa Centre
Recording equipment for developing teaching
and meditation resources
$1850.00
Lynndon Bowls Club Inc.
Purchase new gas stove
$1493.60
Majestic Park Scout Group
Tree removal
$1150.00
Holland Park Ward
175
Marshall Road State School
Cinema Under the Stars
$4000.00
Mott Park Kindergarten
Association Inc.
Sandpit garden
$2750.00
Norman Creek Catchment
Coordinating Committee (N4C)
Inc.
Family Fun Day – Peaks To Points Festival
$566.00
Our Lady of Mt Carmel P&F
Traffic safety brochure
$493.00
SKATTLE Ltd
TUNE IN – Supporting teenagers experiencing
grief and loss
$3000.00
Somali Women’s Association of
Queensland Inc.
Family Fun Day
$1650.00
Southside Philatelic Society
Open Day 2012
$770.00
St Joachim’s P&F
St Joachim’s School 75th Anniversary
$2000.90
St Stephen’s Anglican Church
Coorparoo – Anglican Parish of
Coorparoo
Community Christmas party
$2840.00
Stones Corner Community
Kindergarten Inc.
New gardening equipment for working bees
$2045.00
The Brisbane Orchid Society Inc.
40th Anniversary Charity Orchid Show
$440.00
Woodturners Society of
Queensland Inc.
Design and certification of rear stairs
$2475.00
ZigZag Young Women’s
Resource Centre Inc.
Mental Health Awareness Week Pamper Day
$1110.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Brisbane Jindalee Lions Club Inc.
Work shirts
$577.50
Centenary and District
Environment Action Inc.
Purchase of public address system
$1265.00
Centenary Baptist Church
Mainly Music
$909.09
Centenary Christian Kindergarten
Open Day
$2000.00
Centenary Christian Kindergarten
Open Day and Mini Fete
$2550.00
Centenary Community
Centenary Rocks! Festival
$8846.88
Jamboree Ward
176
Connections
Good News Lutheran Primary
School P&F
Billy the Book Bug Book Fair
$2518.59
Good News Lutheran Primary
School P&F
Movie Night
$1379.40
Inner Wheel Club of Brisbane
West Inc.
Projector and laptop equipment
$1250.00
Jamboree Heights State School
P&C
Winter Fete 2013
$2000.00
Jindalee State School P&C
Christmas carols event
$1500.00
Jindalee Swimming Club
New equipment purchase
$1271.82
Kiwanis Club of Brisbane
Jindalee Pool Open Day
$1499.99
Kiwanis Club of Brisbane
Trailer refurbishment
$1796.85
Kiwanis Club of Brisbane
Movies in the Park
$6145.57
Kiwanis Club of Brisbane
MS 24hr Jindalee Swimathon
$2000.00
Men’s Shed 100 Inc.
Bird boxes for Brisbane City Council parks
$2750.00
MontroseAccess
Walk With Me
$1000.00
Rotary Club of Jindalee
Jindalee boat ramp garden renovation
$4637.00
Salvation Army
2012 Centenary Community Christmas carols
$3000.00
South West United Hockey Club
BBQ
$488.95
St Aidan’s Anglican Girls’ School
Active School Travel Program
$990.00
St John Ambulance (Qld) –
Western Suburbs Combined
Division
Breathing Easy with St John
$838.55
Westside Church of Christ
Kiah Occasional Child Care 25th Anniversary
$1650.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Acacia Ridge 1 Neighbourhood
Watch
Marquee
$992.00
Brisbane Kuraby District Lions
Inc.
Sophie Oudney Community Family Fun Day
$895.00
Karawatha Ward
177
Brisbane Multicultural Arts Centre
(BEMAC)
Her Hands Brisbane City libraries tour
$1500.00
Bulimba Creek Catchment
Coordinating Committee
National Tree Day native corridor
$720.00
Calamvale 9 Stretton Gardens
Neighbourhood Watch
Community marquee
$1304.00
College Parents’ Advisory
Committee – Islamic College of
Brisbane
Annual fete
$4062.25
Griffith University Lions Club
BBQ – Kyabra Springfest
$273.00
Griffith University Lions Club
Karawatha Family Fun Day
$5000.00
Indian Senior Citizens
Association Inc.
Seniors Week Celebration
$1382.00
Indian Senior Citizens
Association Inc.
Indian Seniors Christmas function
$1065.00
Indian Senior Citizens
Association Inc.
Holi celebration
$1019.00
Karawatha Ward Office
Karawatha Family Fun Day
$3647.15
Karawatha Ward Office
Karawatha Family Fun Day
$610.91
Karawatha Forest Protection
Society
Marquee for community events
$1472.00
Kuraby Special School P&C
Fundraising evening
$3000.00
Kuraby Special School P&C
Trivia Night
$1300.00
Kyabra Community Association
Inc.
Kyabra Street Community Gardens expansion
$1322.73
Kyabra Community Association
Inc.
Christmas lunch with the kids
$690.00
Kyabra Community Association
Inc.
Kyabra St Community Gardens Springfest
2012
$520.91
Kyabra Community Association
Inc.
Supply of marquee
$901.82
Lower Sunnybank Hills Acacia
Ridge 6 Neighbourhood Watch
Neighbourhood Watch
$1900.00
Ozcare Dementia Support and
Advisory Service
National Dementia Week expo
$600.00
178
Rotary Clubs of Sunnybank Hills,
Wishart and Salisbury
Fun Run
$500.00
Runcorn Heights State School
P&C
Trivia Night
$1935.07
Runcorn Heights State School
P&C
Trivia Night 2013
$1800.00
Southside Community Craft
Circle
Supporting disadvantaged families
$550.00
St John Ambulance (Qld) –
Algester Division
St John to Breathe a Sigh of Relief
$375.00
Sunnybank District Baptist
Church
Carols Under The Stars
$2136.46
Sunnybank Hills State School
Movie Night
$4370.82
Sunnybank Lions Club
50th Anniversary of Lions
$2000.00
Sunnybank RSL Sub Branch Inc.
ANZAC Day March and Commemorative
Service
$2730.02
Taiwan Womens League of Qld
Christmas party
$4000.00
The Lower Sunnybank Hills
Neighbourhood Watch 6 Inc.
Christmas celebrations
$631.00
World Arts & Multi-culture Inc.
Citizenship Ceremony
$300.00
Project summary
Amount
Mac Gregor
Organisation
Approved
Australian Taiwanese Chamber
of Commerce
Taiwan Film Festival
$1000.00
Chinese Precinct Chamber of
Commerce
2013 Brisbane Chinese New Year Festival
(Sunnybank)
$2500.00
Hakka Association of
Queensland, Australia Inc.
Lantern Festival and Hakka Day
$1500.00
Happy Seniors Club of Brisbane
Inc.
Golden Jubilee Wedding Celebration
$1000.00
Kuraby State School P&C
End of year concert
$695.27
MacGregor State School P&C
Active School Travel
$750.00
179
MacGregor State School P&C
Mayfest 2013
$4000.00
Multicap
Carols @ Multicap 2012
$3000.00
Multicap
Multicap Festival 2012
$2350.00
Our Lady of Lourdes P&F
60th Anniversary School Fete 2012
$1000.00
Queensland Baptist Care
Southside Education Harmony Day
celebrations
$1200.00
Queensland Chinese United
Council
Chinese Festival
$2500.00
Queensland Chinese United
Council
Multicultural community fun sports
$1000.00
Robertson State School P&C
Fete Fiesta 2012
$4050.00
Runcorn Horse and Pony Club
Sustainable field and turf management
$2000.00
Runcorn State School Amateur
Swimming Club
Presentation day awards
$1498.00
Runcorn State School P&C
Runcorn Family FunFest 2013
$3300.00
Sunnybank Arthritis Support
Group
Arthritis seminar
$455.00
Sunnybank RSL Sub Branch
PA system
$2300.00
Sunnybank State School P&C
Fireworks Fiesta
$2150.00
Sunnybank State School P&C
P&C Harmony Day
$2123.00
Sunnybank/Acacia Ridge Parish
Friendship Group
Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea – Cancer
Council
$385.00
Sunnybank/Salisbury Meals on
Wheels Inc.
Volunteers/clients luncheon
$1500.00
Taiwan Friendship Association of
Queensland Inc.
2012 Kao Hsiung Park Family Fun Day
$2500.00
Taiwan Friendship Association of
Queensland Inc.
Brisbane Lunar New Year Multicultural Festival
2013
$1000.00
United Muslims of Brisbane
Eid at the park
$1500.00
United Muslims of Brisbane
Eid at the park
$1500.00
WAMCI World Arts and
Multiculture Inc.
Citizenship Ceremony
$1500.00
Warrigal Road State School P&C
Active School Travel Program
$500.00
180
Warrigal Road State School P&C
Active School Travel Program
$650.00
Warrigal Road State School P&C
Information booklet printing
$1060.00
Warrigal Road State School P&C
Parent information evening
$249.80
World Harmony Society
2012 Children’s Day festival
$1000.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
9th Battalion War Memorial
Museum Collection and Property
Trust
Morning Tea – 70th Anniversary Battle of Milne
Bay Memorial Service
$900.00
9th Battalion War Memorial
Museum Collection and Property
Trust
Official opening – 7th Brigade Park shelter
$360.00
Brisbane City Church
Carols on the Green
$1000.00
Brisbane Inner North Sporting
Community Inc.
Inaugural Brook Run 2013
$5500.00
Brisbane Malayalee Association
Talent evening
$600.00
Brisbane North Girl Guides
Fete Fantastic
$500.00
Brothers Junior Rugby League
Football Club
Removable sporting dugout
$8000.00
Emily Foord Memorial
Kindergarten
Open Day
$252.80
Geebung State School P&C
Movie in the Park
$3175.90
Grange Thistle Soccer Club
Field maintenance
$4083.00
Grange Thistle Soccer Club
Tractor repairs
$3000.00
Kedron-Wavell Sub Branch RSL
War Animals dedication
$2200.00
LifeTec (Independent Living
Centre of Qld)
2013 Positive Ageing Journey event and
exhibition
$909.09
Lutwyche Windsor C&K
Kindergarten & Preschool
Movie in the Park
$2800.00
Lutwyche Windsor Kindergarten
& Preschool
Photocopier
$1000.00
Marchant Ward
181
Marchant Park Kindergarten
Association Inc.
Family Fun Day
$786.05
Nexus Care
Fresh Start Breakfast Program, Somerset Hills
State School
$962.00
Padua College P&F
Artscape
$2500.00
Queensland Justices Association
– Brisbane North Branch
JP Refresher training workshop
$400.00
Rotary Club of Stafford Inc.
Marchant Ward Christmas Carols
$4555.02
Somerset Hills State School P&C
Movies in the Park
$3200.00
Stafford Crime Prevention
Kerbside numbering
$1100.00
Stafford Six Neighbourhood
Watch
Neighbour Day BBQ
$275.00
Te Kohanga ote whenua hou
Association Inc.
Nga taonga to tatou tipuna (Treasures of our
ancestors) event
$2500.00
Wesley Mission Brisbane
Purchase a lightbox for children
$264.00
Wilston-Grange Australian
Football Club
History of Wilston-Grange AFC and Junior
AFC
$2000.00
Wilston-Grange Kindergarten &
Preschool Association Inc.
Replacement fridge and dishwasher
$1000.00
McDowall Ward
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Aspley State School Active
School Travel Committee
Active School Travel upgrade project
$1000.00
Australian Karen Organisation
(Qld)
Karen New Year Celebration event
$3000.00
Bridgeman Baptist Community
Church
Christmas Festival and Carols
$5000.00
Bridgeman Baptist Community
Church
SHIFT 2012
$5000.00
Bridgeman Baptist Community
Church
SHIFT 2013
$5000.00
Brisbane Bunya Lions Club
Walk for an Aussie Kid
$544.50
182
Brothers Junior Rugby League
Football Club
Removable sporting dugout
$4200.00
Everton Park Bowls and
Community Club Inc.
‘On the Edge’ Junior Classic
$250.00
Everton Park Bowls and
Community Club Inc.
Kitchen refrigeration
$2045.46
Everton Park Kindergarten
Association
Improvement of display areas
$962.00
Everton Park State School P&C
Active travel launch
$300.00
Everton Park State School P&C
Fun Day @ EP
$2090.00
Everton Park State School P&C
Markets @ EP
$1800.00
Hope Community Care
Christmas celebration at Alpha
Accommodation Centre
$275.00
LifeTec
2013 Positive Ageing Journey Event and
Exhibition
$909.09
Mitchelton Sports Club Inc.
Safety fence for field 3
$3000.00
Neighbourhood Watch Albany
Creek 6 Bridgeman Downs
Movie in the Park
$3270.00
Neighbourhood Watch Everton
Park
Promotion and sausage sizzle
$330.00
Nexus Care
Fresh Start Breakfast Program
$740.90
Queensland Justices Association
– Brisbane North Branch
JP Refresher training workshop
$300.00
St Gerard Majella Catholic
Church
St Gerard’s Christmas Festival
$5000.00
Stafford Heights Baptist Church
2012 Christmas Lights Festival
$4000.00
Stafford Heights Baptist Church
Movie in the Park
$3135.00
Stafford Heights Kindergarten
Association Inc.
Office computer replacement
$1263.80
Stafford Heights State School
P&C
Active School Travel 2013
$468.27
Moorooka Ward
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Aboriginal and Islander
Independent Community School
Murrischool Spring Fair
$1000.00
183
P&F
Acacia Ridge AEDI Response
Group
Acacia Ridge Early Years Expo 2012
$990.00
Acacia Ridge Community
Support Inc.
Movie in the Park
$2570.00
Acacia Ridge Community
Support Inc.
What’s On
$909.09
Acacia Ridge Presbyterian
Church
ARPC Kids Holiday Club
$550.00
Acacia Ridge Presbyterian
Church
Community Christmas carols
$430.00
Acacia Ridge Presbyterian
Church
Community morning tea and Easter egg
hunt in the park
$500.00
Acacia Ridge State School P&C
Harmony Community Fete
$1000.00
ARTIC Community Library
New release purchases
$500.00
Brothers St Brendan’s Rugby
League Football Club Inc.
Purchase of training equipment
$1800.00
Coopers Plains Local History
Group Inc.
History of Rocklea and celebration of the
naming of a park
$2500.00
Coopers Plains State School
P&C
Coopers Carnival
$1100.00
Coopers Plains State School
P&C
Visual Art Competition
$275.00
Ertirean Australian Women and
Families Support Network Inc.
10 Year anniversary
$500.00
Gundoo Mirra C&K Community
Kindergarten
Murri Kids in the Park
$500.00
Liberian Association of
Queensland Inc.
Liberian National Independence Day
Celebration
$1100.00
Lions Club of Brisbane Moorooka Movie flyer
Inc.
$2607.00
Moorooka Business Network Inc.
Moorooka billiard competition
$330.00
Moorooka Lions Club
Australian Day Family Fun Fair flyer
$2530.00
Moorooka Lions Club
Moorooka Community Christmas Festival
2012
$3900.00
184
Moorooka State School P&C
Harmony Day 2013
$900.00
Moorooka State School P&C
Moorooka Community Christmas Carnivale
$3500.00
Moorooka Ward
Community movie eEvent
$2386.44
Nyanda State High School P&C
Re-establishment of Rocky Waterholes
Creek Bush
$1100.00
Tucker Trail
Omega International Church
Acacia Ridge Community Christmas Carols
in the Carpark
$2500.00
Our Lady Of Fatima Primary
School P&F
Our Community Garden
$1100.00
Pine Lodge Home for the Aged
Ekka week celebrations
$1500.00
Probus Association of
Queensland Inc.
2012 Friendship Day Picnic
$550.00
Queensland African Football
Association Inc.
Queensland African Football Association Cup
2013
$990.00
Rotary Club of Salisbury
QEII Hospital gazebo aluminium seating
$1000.00
Rotary Club of Salisbury
Russ Hall Park Annual Community
Celebration
$1818.18
Salisbury State School
Purchase of community noticeboard
$1100.00
St Brendan’s Catholic Primary
School P&F
School Fete
$1100.00
St David’s Neighbourhood
Centre
Harmony program activity
$440.05
St Elizabeth’s School P&F
Fete
$1100.00
St John Ambulance (Qld) –
Moorooka Division
New emergency kits
$935.60
St Pius X Catholic Primary School
P&F
Hire of rides for fete
$1100.00
The Creche & Kindergarten
Association Ltd
Under-8’s Week
$500.00
Village Avenue Community
Church
Kids Blitz
$550.00
YMCA of Brisbane
Swim 100
$4000.00
185
Morningside Ward
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Balmoral and District Local
Ambulance Committee
CPR courses 2013
$2500.00
Brisbane Sailing Squadron Inc.
Princesses and Pirates Day
$798.00
Bulimba Child Care Centre
Community Family Fun Day
$388.18
Bulimba Cricket Club
Equipment season 2012-13
$500.00
Bulimba Memorial Bowls and
Community Club Inc.
Community Bowls Day
$250.00
Bulimba Preschool and
Kindergarten Association
Early childhood development equipment
$964.20
Bulimba State School P&C
Fete 2012
$909.09
Bulimba Uniting Church
Annual Christmas Lights and Community
BBQ
$909.09
Bulimba Valleys Rugby League
Football Club Inc.
Equipment
$640.00
Camp Hill Community and
Sporting Club Inc.
Children’s Christmas Tree
$250.00
Camp Hill Kindergarten &
Preschool Association Inc.
Replace doors to kindergarten foyer
$893.64
Cannon Hill C&K Community
Kindergarten
End of year celebration
$300.00
Cannon Hill Catholic Parish
Jingle Belles in July
$909.09
Cannon Hill Community Sports
Club Inc.
Brekky Bowls – Cannon Hill Bowls Club
$272.73
Cannon Hill Stars Netball Club
Trophy presentation day
$1000.00
Cannon Hill Stars Rugby League
Club Inc.
First aid supplies/kit
$443.31
Carina Kindergarten & Preschool
Refurbish kindy
$812.67
Centacare Cannon Hill Family
Support Centre
Celebrating community with Christmas
Cakes
$636.15
Church of the Ascension
Morningside Anglican
Community Centre interior fittings
$909.09
Eastern Group State Emergency
Purchase of storm operation trailers
$1000.00
186
Service Support Unit Inc.
Easts Rugby Union Inc.
Junior Trophy Presentation Day
$1000.00
Friends of Balmoral Cemetery
Inc.
Purchase of laptop
$1186.00
Gateway Trefoil Guild – Girl
Guides Queensland
Cards, gifts and morning tea for Meals on
Wheels recipients – Bulimba Meals on
Wheels
$300.00
Morningside 3 Neighbourhood
Watch
Picnic in the Park
$965.00
Morningside Australian Football
Club Ltd
Australia Day Big Aussie BBQ
$1977.69
Morningside Development
Association
Welcoming the Babies
$2869.65
Morningside Junior AFC
Terrace picnic sets
$1000.00
Morningside Scout Group
Movies in the Park
$3250.00
Morningside State School P&C
Active School Travel – Walk and Talk
$250.00
Morningside State School P&C
Christmas Movies in the Park
$5530.86
Morningside Ward Office
Wynnum Road Shared Pathway Safety
Campaign
$385.45
National Servicemen’s RSL Sub
Branch Inc.
Protective cover
$450.00
Norman Park C&K
Pam Cooper farewell Trivia Night
$730.00
Norman Park Playgroup
Christmas activity
$435.60
Norman Park Preschool &
Kindergarten
Movies in the Park
$2699.55
Norman Park State School P&C
School Fete
$909.09
Parish of St Peter and Paul
Community Christmas Carols
$1818.18
Playgroup Association of
Queensland Inc.
Purchase of new equipment
$474.40
Playgroup Association of
Queensland Inc.
Sts Peter and Paul playgroup new toy fund
and Christmas party
$454.55
Rotary Club of Balmoral Inc.
Princesses and Pirates Day
$1955.00
RSL (Queensland Branch)
2012 Bulimba Festival
$2272.73
Scripture Union Camp Hill State
Chaplaincy Christmas Carols
$1000.00
187
School
Scripture Union Camp Hill State
School
Christmas carols
$681.82
Seven Hills State School P&C
2012 Bush Dance
$900.00
Southside Eagles Football Club
Inc.
Trophy presentation day
$1000.00
Southside Pony Club
Facility maintenance
$500.00
St Oliver Plunkett P&F
Gala dinner
$800.00
St Thomas P&F
Events equipment
$900.00
Sts Peter and Paul’s P&F
Gala Dinner Dance 2013
$1000.00
Tugulawa District Girl Guides
Support Group
Honour board
$1000.00
Unit Committee Training Ship
Gayundah
Banner
$275.00
Wesley Mission Brisbane –
Balmoral Uniting Community
Centre
Mad Hatter’s Ball for Seniors
$681.82
Northgate Ward
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Banyo Bowls Club Inc.
75th Anniversary
$250.00
Banyo Kindergarten
Association Inc.
Sandpit cover upgrade
$1000.00
Banyo Kindergarten
Association Inc.
Sandpit cover upgrade
$1000.00
Brisbane Seniors Online
Prepare and support seniors and over 50s on
the uptake of the National Broadband Network
$550.00
Burnie Brae Centre
Project Pantry
$1500.00
Community Friendship Centre
Community bus trip
$1650.00
Community Friendship Centre
Concert group entertainment
$1100.00
Community Living Association
All In Community Musical 2012
$500.00
Community Living Association
Putting the Bite on Homelessness and Social
Disadvantage project
$2000.00
188
Community Living Association
Sleep Rough fundraising night
$500.00
Earnshaw State College P&C
10th Anniversary Earnshaw State College
Festival
$1746.36
Girl Guides Queensland,
Nundah Wavell District
Jumping castle for Family Fun Day
$500.00
Hendra Pony Club
Replacement fencing
$500.00
Kedron Football Club
75th Anniversary
$1000.00
Kedron Scout Group
50th birthday – Local Community Family Fun
Day
$750.00
Kedron State School P&C
Kedron Carnival 2013
$500.00
Northern Districts Horticultural
Society Inc.
Replacement of damaged tables in community
hall
$308.00
Northern Suburbs Bowls Club
Inc.
Foundation Day bowls event
$250.00
Northern Suburbs Bowls Club
Inc.
May Day Bowls Carnival
$500.00
Northgate East
Neighbourhood Watch
Family Fun Day
$825.00
Norths St Joseph’s Junior
Rugby League and Netball
Club
Electrical switchboard upgrade
$2200.00
Norths St Joseph’s Junior
Rugby League and Netball
Club
Wayne Swan’s Christmas Carols
$1750.00
Northside Low Vision Support
Local bus trips
$275.00
Nundah Activity Centre
Metal craft
$1200.00
Nundah Community
Enterprises Cooperative
Catering for the community
$4280.00
Nundah Community Support
Group Inc.
Community cooking classes and lunch
$600.00
Nundah Community Support
Group Inc.
Nundah Festival
$500.00
Nundah District Development
Association Inc.
Christmas in Nundah Village
$1000.00
Nundah District Development
Association Inc.
Loving Nundah magazine
$1000.00
189
Nundah Northgate RSL Inc.
World War 1 memorial wall
$2000.00
Nundah Northgate Scout
Group
Movie in the Park
$6022.50
Nundah State School
Amateur Swimming Club
Swimming Club
$995.00
Our Lady of the Angels
OLA Carnival – Country Meets City
$1000.00
RSL (Queensland Branch)
Banyo Sub Branch Inc.
ANZAC Day Commemoration 2013
$500.00
RSL (Queensland Branch)
Banyo Sub Branch Inc.
Banyo Bandstand Grand Opening and
Harmony Day
$4780.00
RSL (Queensland Branch)
Banyo Sub Branch Inc.
Banyo Diwali Celebration
$1000.00
Scouts Australia Qld Branch
Wonargo Revue
Toilet block with disabled facilities
$1100.00
St John Ambulance (Qld) –
Nundah Division
St John to Hit the Airwaves
$1000.00
St Oswald’s Anglican Church,
Banyo
Jumping castle for annual fete
$350.00
St Paschal’s Parish Wavell
Heights
St Paschal’s Twilight Craft Market
$500.00
St Paul’s Lutheran Church –
Nundah
150 years anniversary project
$1000.00
St Pius School P&F Banyo
Active Travel – enhancement project
$550.00
The Rotary Club of Nundah
Inc.
Naming Jack Murray Place
$300.00
Toombul Bowls Club Inc.
Australia Day Get Together 2013
$1000.00
Virginia State School
Family Fun Day 2013
$1000.00
Virginia United Football Club
Inc.
Replace toilets and vanities and install hand
rails for people with disabilities
$825.00
Wavell Heights Kindergarten
Replace a heritage tree
$750.00
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Parkinson Ward
Organisation
190
100 Plus Club
Christmas celebration
$836.36
Algester State School P&C
Multifest
$2273.00
Australian Breastfeeding
Association Algester/
Drewvale Group
Baby’s First Christmas 2012 – Parkinson and
Forest Lake
$5583.70
Australian Taiwanese
Chamber of Commerce (Qld)
Marquee for community events
$1003.00
Forest Lake Baptist Church
Forest Lake Community Carols
$3942.00
Forest Lake State School
P&C
School Fete
$1980.00
Grand Avenue State School
P&C
Community seminar
$766.67
Hope Church Brisbane
Christmas 4 Kids The Musical
$2484.54
Hosanna Lighthouse Pty Ltd
Sports Connexions 2013
$370.90
Lakers Netball Club Inc.
Promoting Lakers Netball Club and providing
training equipment
$875.00
National Seniors Australia
Healthy Hearts
$1750.00
Rotary Club of Archerfield
Photography services for Citizenship
Ceremony
$374.55
Rotary Club of Forest Lake
Inc.
Parkinson Ward Citizenship Ceremony
$2216.50
Rotary Club of Forest Lake
Inc.
Parkinson Ward Citizenship Ceremony and
Multicultural and Dragonboat Festival
$1215.00
Rotary Club of Sunnybank
Hills Inc.
Parkinson Ward Citizenship Ceremony
$300.00
Rotary Club of Sunnybank
Hills Inc.
Parkinson Ward Citizenship Ceremony
$800.00
Rotary Club of Sunnybank
Hills Inc.
Parkinson Ward Neighbourhood Festival
$5298.66
SES South Western Group
BBQ trailer and portable lights
$7276.36
SES South Western Group
Parkinson Christmas carols and stalls
$9262.52
Sinhala Association of
Queensland Inc.
Saralanga Cultural Performance
$1000.00
St Stephen’s School P&F
Community Breakfast and Active School Travel
$1347.50
191
St Stephen’s School P&F
Spring Fair
$1565.00
Sunnybank District History
Group
Parkinson Ward History Project
$1300.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Anglican Parish of Moggill –
Mount Crosby
Moggill Living Nativity
$3000.00
Australian Peacekeepers and
Peacemakers Veterans
Association in conjunction
with Brookfield United Cricket
Club
ANZAC Day Cricket Match 2013
$1850.00
Brookfield Show Society Inc.
2012 Bush Christmas
$3000.00
Brookfield State School P&C
Active School Travel
$600.00
Kenmore Brookfield Anglican
Church
120 Year Community BBQ
$2500.00
Kenmore District Churches
Together
Kenmore Combined Churches Community
Carols
$3000.00
Kenmore District Girl Guides
50th birthday celebrations – BBQ and camp fire
$400.00
Kenmore Junior Cricket Club
Movie in the Park
$500.00
Kenmore Junior Cricket Club
Purchase of cricket balls
$3000.00
Kenmore Park Preschool &
Kindergarten
Parenting information sessions
$3000.00
Kenmore State High School
P&C
40th anniversary commemorative sculpture
$5000.00
Moggill Creek Catchment
Group
Kids’ Day at the Cottage
$3481.50
Rotary Club of Karana Downs
Community movie night
$2500.00
Rotary Club of Karana Downs
Karana Carols
$3000.00
Rotary Club of Kenmore
Australia Day Citizenship Ceremony
$698.50
The Creche & Kindergarten
Association Ltd
Art supplies
$725.80
Pullenvale Ward
192
Richlands Ward
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Acacia Ridge Community
Support Inc.
Brisbane garden recovery
$500.00
Brisbane Oxley-Sherwood
Lions Club Inc.
Children of Courage project
$275.00
Cementco Bowls Club
Beginning Bowls program
$250.00
Community Action in Carole
Park Inc.
Multicultural Festival
$1818.18
Community Action in Carole
Park Inc.
The Social Spot
$909.09
Corinda State School P&C
Father’s Footy and Fun Day
$400.00
Darra Community Group Inc.
Something Fishy in Darra
$800.00
Doolandella Neighbourhood
Watch Inala 10
10th Anniversary
$275.00
Forest Lake 50+ Club
20th Anniversary celebration
$275.00
Forest Lake Junior Rugby
League Football Club Inc.
Trophy presentation day 2012
$1500.00
Forest Lake Lions Club
Catering for tree planting
$275.00
Forest Lake Neighbourhood
Watch Inala 7
Wheelie bin stickers
$476.00
Forest Lake Uniting Church
Blessing ceremony
$1000.00
Forest Place Durack Gem
Club Inc.
Gem cutting equipment
$1000.00
Forest Place Residents’
Association
Winter concert
$500.00
Hub Neighbourhood Centre
Inc.
Community marquee
$1197.74
Hub Neighbourhood Centre
Inc.
Hoy catering
$250.00
Hub Neighbourhood Centre
Inc.
International Women’s Day breakfast
$909.09
Inala and District Darts
Association
Sunshine Classic Darts Championship
$205.00
193
Inala Community House
Musical Morning Tea
$454.54
Inala Kindergarten &
Community Preschool
Association Inc.
Movie in the Park
$4383.72
Inala Kindergarten &
Community Preschool
Association Inc.
Play area landscaping upgrade stage 2
$2727.27
Inala Neighbourhood Watch
4
Membership drive 2012
$275.00
Inala PCYC
Multicultural Youth Day
$454.54
Inala Salvation Army
Prayer Breakfast
$820.00
Inala Wangarra Inc.
Inala Mixed Oztag competition
$250.00
Inala Youth Service Inc.
Men of Honour
$500.00
Lakers Netball Club Inc.
Presentation Day 2012
$500.00
Neighbourhood Watch
Durack
Clean up Durack Common parkland
$302.50
Neighbourhood Watch
Durack
Community Safety Expo
$1650.00
New Life Christian Church
Family Christmas in Inala
$1818.19
Our Lady of the Sacred Heart
P&F
Annual Fete
$500.00
Oxley Bowls Club Inc.
Celebrate Australia Day
$1829.09
Oxley Bowls Club Inc.
Club tee-shirts
$350.00
Oxley Bowls Club Inc.
Mayhem in May
$1015.72
Oxley Neighbourhood Watch
Sherwood 7
Band in the Park
$2300.00
Oxley Ridge Neighbourhood
Watch
Band in the Park
$880.00
Oxley Ridge Neighbourhood
Watch
PA and microphone equipment
$500.00
Oxley Ridge Neighbourhood
Watch
Wheelie bin stickers
$800.00
Oxley State School P&C
Amateur Swimming Club
Refurbishment of storage area
$1500.00
194
Richlands East Community
Playgroup
New resources
$275.00
Richlands Scout Group
Stall at Moon Festival
$600.00
Rotary Club of Rocks
Riverside
Membership drive
$1000.00
RSL Darra and District Sub
Branch
Portable marquee
$1452.27
South West Progress
Association Inc.
Christmas Card Competition
$577.27
South West Progress
Association Inc.
Christmas Lights Up
$250.00
South West Progress
Association Inc.
Queensland Day Community Awards
$1363.64
South West Progress
Association Inc.
Welcoming the Babies 2012
$6000.00
St John’s Oxley Community
Men’s Shed
Garden and Market Fair
$275.00
Uniting Church Oxley Darra
Parish
Community Carols 2012
$1818.18
Uniting Church Oxley Darra
Parish
Equipment for community program
$300.00
Vietnamese Community in
Australia – Queensland
Chapter Inc.
Memorial plaque
$720.00
Vietnamese Community in
Australia – Queensland
Children’s Moon Festival
$909.09
Vietnamese Community in
Australia – Queensland
Chapter Inc.
Vietnamese Tet Festival 2013
$909.09
Vietnamese Senior Citizens’
Association
Catering for monthly community lunch
$2000.00
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Chapter Inc.
Tennyson Ward
Organisation
195
Annerley 2 Yeronga
Neighbourhood Watch
Marketing and awareness
$495.00
Annerley Church of Christ
Pantry assist
$500.00
Annerley Community
Bookshop and
Neighbourhood Centre Inc.
Junction Fair
$250.00
Brisbane Moorooka Lions
Club Inc.
Fairfield Family Picnic
$2200.00
C&K Arnwood Place
Community Childcare Centre
Community Childcare Centre BBQ and disco
$270.00
Centenary Theatre Group
Foyer improvements
$1100.00
Christ the King P&C
Walking Wheeling breakfast
$550.00
Christ the King P&F
School Fete
$1000.00
Corinda Bowls Club Inc.
Refurbishment of flagpole
$500.00
Corinda Bowls Club Inc.
Western triples
$250.00
Corinda State High School
P&C
Moo Baa Munch – BBQ stall
$500.00
Corinda State School P&C
Community flyer drop in Corinda, Sherwood
and
$500.00
Graceville
Corinda State School P&C
Movies on the Oval
$2997.50
Ekibin Lions Club
Purchase of electronic equipment
$495.00
Fairfield Christian Family
Fairfield Community Fair/Christmas Carols
$2241.10
Filipino Community Council of
Queensland Inc.
Barrio Fiesta
$500.00
Graceville Croquet Club Inc.
Replacement of equipment
$1100.00
Graceville State School P&C
Active School Travel – community launch and
celebration
$600.00
Graceville State School P&C
Active School Travel Term 2 Breakfast
$700.00
Graceville State School P&C
Fete 2012
$1350.00
Junction Park State School
125th Anniversary Fete 2013
$1100.00
Junction Park State School
P&C
Movies at the Junction
$2997.50
196
Latin Alliance Inc.
Colombian National Day Festival
$550.00
Liberian Association of
Queensland Inc.
Liberian National Day Celebrations 2012
$550.00
Neighbourhood Watch
Annerley 2
Fehlberg Park RSPCA cupcake fundraiser
$550.00
Oxley Creek Catchment
Association
CreekWATCH Business Breakfast in
conjunction with Peaks to Points Festival 2012
$900.00
PAWES – Providing
Awarness With Education and
Sport
Basketball training and competition
$1100.00
PAWES – Providing
Awarness With Education and
Sport
Junior Hoop Dreamz
$1100.00
Qld Country Womens
Association Annerley Yeronga
Branch
CWA Improvement Project
$300.00
Queensland African Football
Association Inc.
African Nations Cup Tournament 2012
$550.00
Queensland African Football
Association Inc.
African Talent Show
$550.00
Riverside Christian Church
Riverside Community Carols
$2350.00
Sherwood 1 Neighbourhood
Watch
Community BBQs
$550.00
Sherwood Australian Football
Club Ltd
Repair scoreboard
$1000.00
Sherwood Community
Festival Inc.
Community Festival
$1200.00
Sherwood Indooroopilly RSL
Sub Branch Inc.
Watersaver irrigation pump
$1000.00
Sherwood Neighbourhood
Centre Inc.
Movable tables
$2132.00
Sherwood Respite Service
Inc.
Cushion seating for garden rotunda
$1000.00
Sherwood State School
Fete
$1000.00
Sherwood/Indooroopilly RSL
Ladies Auxiliary
Christmas luncheon
$330.00
197
Souths Rugby Union Club
Equipment upgrade
$500.00
St David’s Anglican Church
Christmas Pageant
$2000.00
St Joseph’s School
Fete
$1100.00
St Sebastians Primary School
Yeronga
Spring Art Exhibition
$500.00
St Vincent de Paul (Qld) St
Fabian’s Conference Yeronga
Vinnies Brisbane South Community Sleepout
$380.00
Staverton Kindergarten
Association
Outdoor umbrella
$500.00
Stephens Croquet Club Inc.
Extend concrete slab of mower shed
$1000.00
Stephens Sub Branch RSL
Anzac Day service
$330.00
Wesley Mission Brisbane
Family Day Care
Purchase car seats and portacots
$600.00
Western Districts Netball
Association Inc.
Purchase equipment and mark courts
$935.27
Western Suburbs District
Cricket Club Inc.
Service machinery used to maintain turf
wickets and ovals
$1000.00
Yeronga Anglican Church
Christmas luncheon for senior citizens
$400.00
Yeronga Bowls Club
75th Anniversary – Armistice Cup Bowls
Tournament
$500.00
Yeronga Community Centre
Yeronga Community Centre
$1000.00
Yeronga Dutton Park RSL Inc.
Anzac Day banners
$500.00
Yeronga Football Club Inc.
Signage restoration
$1000.00
Yeronga Meals on Wheels
Volunteers Christmas lunch
$750.00
Yeronga State High School
P&C
Multicultural Day Festival
$500.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Anywhere Theatre Festival
Ltd
The Wind in B Minor 2013 – Anywhere Theatre
Festival
$1000.00
Asia Minor Greek Historical
Commemorative Asia Minor history book
$3300.00
The Gabba Ward
198
Society Inc.
Australian Pensioners and
Superannuants League Qld
Les and Mavis Dutton Memorial
$3000.00
Brisbane Bicycle Film Festival
Brisbane Bicycle Film Festival
$1100.00
Brisbane Hardcourt Bicycle
Polo
Court refurbishment
$1050.00
Brisbane Multicultural Art
Centre
Nowrus Fest
$2000.00
Brisbane Skate Cartel
King of Coops 2012
$750.00
City Sports Association Ltd
Brisbane Blast Cycling and Running Festival
$3000.00
Dutton Park Primary P&C
Community eco-project
$1045.00
East Brisbane Primary P&C
Bike/scooter skills program
$1370.00
Holland Park and District
Meals on Wheels
Volunteer recognition
$1500.00
iSEE Church Brisbane
Christmas on the Green
$1000.00
Jane Street community
garden
Remove activity from under fig tree
$1787.50
Kangaroo Point Rovers
Football Club
Website
$1269.00
Liberian Association of
Queensland Inc.
Liberian National Day Celebrations
$550.00
Multicultural Development
Association
Lantern Parade Walk for Refugees 2013
$1000.00
Nazareth Community
Kindergarten
Market Day
$768.00
Queensland Storytelling Guild
The Story Lounge – West End Block Party
$550.00
Serbian Orthodox Church
Community
Brisbane Serbian Festival
$1500.00
Southern Suburbs Rugby
League Football Club
(Brisbane) Ltd
Purchase shade marquees
$3000.00
SPIRAL Community Hub CoOp Ltd
Community Arts and Sustainability Workshop
series
$2500.00
St Mary’s Naval Centenary
Memorial Committee
Navy Centenary memorial
$2000.00
199
Sunshine Welfare and
Remedial Association Inc.
SWARA Goes Latin – phase 2
$3181.82
The Creche & Kindergarten
Association Ltd
100th Birthday commemorative plaque
$900.00
The Gabba Village
Association Inc.
Shake The Village
$2000.00
The Gabba Ward
Active School Travel – Skateboards
$270.00
Turnstyle Community Hub
Laura Street Music and Arts Festival 2012
$550.00
West End Community
Association Inc.
Kurilpa Derby 2012
$3500.00
West End Community
Association Inc.
West End Community Arts archives
$2000.00
West End Family Care
Services Inc.
Playabout productions in libraries
$3636.36
West End Film Festival Ltd
West End Film Festival
$500.00
Women’s Community Aid
Association (Qld) Ltd
Women’s House community space kitchen
improvement
$2000.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Ashgrove Baptist Church
Christmas @ Ashgrove
$2000.00
Ashgrove Historical Society
Inc.
Ashgrove 150 plaques project
$1375.00
Ashgrove Men’s Shed Inc.
Upgrade of computers and peripherals
$1206.68
Bardon Anglican Church
Bardon Community Carols
$6000.00
Bardon Community
Kindergarten
Bardon community fair
$500.00
Bardon State School P&C
Bardon MayFair
$550.00
Brisbane Concert Orchestra
Build storage for instruments
$1160.50
C&K Community Kindergarten
The Gap
40th Birthday party and markets
$480.00
C&K Oakleigh Community
Kindergarten
Playground drainage improvement
$1818.18
The Gap Ward
200
C&K Red Hill Kindergarten
Red Hill Fair
$500.00
Communify Qld Inc.
Ashgrove Mahjong group
$1000.00
Hands On Art
Pillars of the Gap – Community art project
$2200.00
Hilder Road State School
P&C
Fete
$500.00
Ithaca Creek State School
P&C
Creeky Community Christmas
$500.00
Mater Dei School P&F
Music in the Moonlight
$550.00
Mitchelton and District Gem
Club Inc.
Workshop equipment upgrade
$2500.00
Northern Suburbs Hockey
Club Inc.
Internal rendering of Norths Hockey clubhouse
$2000.00
Oakleigh State School
Spring Fair
$500.00
Payne Road State School
P&C
Payne Fully Arty – Payne Road Art Show
$500.00
Payne Road State School
P&C
Fancy Fashions and Tasty Tea
$500.00
Rotary Club of Ashgrove/The
Gap
Ashgrove Carols by Candlelight
$7000.00
Rotary Club of Ashgrove/The
Gap
Australia Day Citizenship Ceremony
$1100.00
Save Our Waterways Now
Arthur Gorrie Correctional Centre plant
propagation
$3500.00
St Ambrose’s Primary School
P&F
2013 Gala Bush Dance
$550.00
St Finbarr’s School Ashgrove
P&F
Fashions on Parade
$550.00
St Joseph’s Catholic Primary
School P&F
School Fair
$550.00
St Mark’s Anglican Church
The Gap
Men’s Shed
$400.00
St Peter Chanel Primary
School P&F
Family, Food and Fun Festival
$550.00
The Gap Garden Club Inc.
Data projector and filing cabinet
$1100.00
The Gap Netball Club
Spectator mounds
$2300.00
201
The Gap Pastime Club Inc.
Tiered seating for field 2
$3500.00
The Gap Pioneer and History
Group Inc.
140th Anniversary of The Gap Pioneer
Cemetery
$869.55
The Gap Pioneer and History
Group Inc.
The Gap Cemetery, burial information and
walking tour guide
$990.00
The Gap State School
2012 Centenary Fete
$590.00
The Jubilee Singers Society
Inc.
40th Anniversary Concert
$1047.98
Walton Bridge The Gap Girl
Guides
Update honour boards
$1000.00
Westside Orchestra
Sheet music library
$1499.98
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Bardon Scout Group
Panel trailer modifications
$1650.00
Brisbane Bardon Lions Club
Inc.
Christmas Extravaganza
$7472.00
Brisbane Bardon Lions Club
Inc.
Christmas in July
$1100.00
Brisbane Bardon Lions Club
Inc.
Movies in the Park
$610.00
Brisbane Bardon Lions Club
Inc.
Movies in the Park
$873.70
Brisbane Bardon Lions Club
Inc.
Movies in the Park
$4333.45
Brisbane West Senior
Citizens Club
Seniors activities
$600.00
Communify Qld Inc.
Christmas Market/Hamper Day
$861.00
Hands on Art
Substation Artgarden
$4000.00
Milton State School P&C
Fair On The Green
$10,000.00
Queensland Spinners
Weavers and Fibre Artists
Fibre Fest 2013
$550.00
Rainworth State School P&C
2013 Rainbow Carnival
$3300.00
Toowong Ward
202
Rotary Club of Brisbane
Planetarium
Citizenship Ceremony Australia Day 2013
$990.00
Rotary of Toowong Inc.
10th Underprivileged Childrens’ Movie Day
$600.00
St Ignatius Toowong P&F
Sunset Serenade
$2035.00
St Thomas Anglican Church
Installation of memorial gates
$5000.00
The Queensland Rose
Society Inc.
October Rose Show
$872.30
Toowong and District
Historical Society Inc.
Book launch
$1100.00
Toowong and District
Historical Society Inc.
Celebration of the launch of Cradle to Grave –
Toowong Council
$431.52
Toowong State School P&C
Movie Night
$1650.00
Wesley Mission Brisbane –
Toowong Childcare Centre
and Jahjumbeen Occasional
Care Centre
Nature studies for children
$867.00
Wests Juniors AFC Inc.
Computer equipment and PA system for club
$4745.46
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Anglican Parish of
Indooroopilly
Kids Fun Fest
$2000.00
Anglican Parish of
Indooroopilly
Kids Fun Fest
$2500.00
Brizwest Community Music
Ensembles Inc.
Music in the Park
$400.00
Chapel Hill State School P&C
Spring Fete 2012
$2000.00
Crime Stoppers Queensland
Community Festival
$1000.00
Cubberla-Witton Catchments
Network Inc.
Opening of Inner West Catchments Centre
$1378.30
Fig Tree Pocket State School
P&C
Fan-Fair Fete
$2000.00
Fig Tree Pocket State School
Working bee
$422.73
Walter Taylor Ward
203
P&C
Hillsdon Kindergarten
Management Committee
Fete 2013
$3000.00
Indooroopilly Districts Cricket
Club
Cricket pitch renovation
$2000.00
Indooroopilly Districts Cricket
Club
Equipment season 2012-13
$2500.00
Indooroopilly Senior Citizens
Signage for hall parking
$431.00
Indooroopilly State School
P&C
Indigo Fair 2012
$2000.00
Indooroopilly State School
P&C
Indigo Fair 2013
$4000.00
Ironside State School P&C
International Community Festival
$2000.00
Kenmore Junior Cricket Club
Cricket bags with wheels and storage boxes
$2000.00
Kenmore Junior Cricket Club
Movie in the Park
$4085.00
Lions Club of Brisbane InnerWest
Australia Day Citizenship Ceremony 2013
$1674.27
Lions Club of Brisbane InnerWest
Music In The Park Sausage Sizzle
$400.00
Lions Club of Brisbane-Inner
West
Walter Taylor Ward Dogs Breakfast 2012
$1610.00
Mandalay Progress
Association
Jacaranda Festival
$972.73
Rotary Club of Brisbane
Centenary Inc.
Rotary Fun Run 2013
$5000.00
Salvation Army – The Cairns
Aged Care Centre
Residents’ Christmas Lights tours
$1050.00
St John Ambulance (Qld) – St
Lucia Division
Get Carried Away with St John Ambulance
$2255.85
St Lucia Bowling Club Inc.
Direction sign to St Lucia Bowls Club
$281.00
St Lucia C&K Kindergarten
Replacement of floor in class room
$2000.00
St Lucia Kindergarten
Association
Artist-in-Residence fence mural
$1950.00
St Thomas’ Riverview
Kindergarten
Community Fun Day
$845.00
204
The Creche & Kindergarten
Association Ltd
New shelving in outdoor shed and sign-in
bench for parents
$1000.00
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
Access Street Vans
Adopt-a-Pensioner
$5000.00
Anglican Parish of Wishart
Winterfest 2013
$6256.36
Broadwater Road Uniting
Church
2013 Light Party
$3000.00
Bulimba Creek Catchment
Coordinating Committee
Community gardens project
$909.09
Christian Outreach Centre
Christmas hampers 2012
$2727.27
Fiji Senior Citizens Satsang
Association of Qld Inc.
Seniors Dinner Night and Annual Multicultural
$1550.00
Holmead Outlook
Neighbourhood Watch
Christmas Carols
$1500.00
Mainland Chinese Society of
Queensland
Beauty of Yunnan performance
$1363.64
Mount Gravatt Australian
Football Club Inc.
Ground maintenance equipment
$598.00
Mount Gravatt Community
Centre Inc.
Christmas in July
$272.73
Mount Gravatt Community
Centre Inc.
Christmas in July
$675.00
Mount Gravatt Community
Centre Inc.
Sanity Fair – Mental Health Week community
event
$1250.00
Mount Gravatt East State
School P&C
Community Nursing Home and Retirement
Village
$454.55
Wishart Ward
Soccer Tournament
– Musical Christmas tour
Mount Gravatt East State
School P&C
Community Nursing Home and Retirement
Village
$550.00
– Anzac Day Remembrance
205
Mount Gravatt Kindergarten &
Preschool Association
Hire of band for Bush Dance
$672.73
Mount Gravatt Men’s Shed
Inc.
Fit out of the recreation room of the new
clubhouse
$1954.53
Mt Gravatt AH&I Society
The Mount Gravatt Show
$909.10
Mt Gravatt Bowls Club Inc.
Annual Christmas Tree
$454.55
Mt Gravatt Meals on Wheels
Service Inc.
Upgrade equipment for Mt Gravatt Meals on
Wheels
$350.00
Old Yarranlea State School
P&C
25th Anniversary
$2195.00
Queensland Police-Citizens
Youth Welfare Association
2012 Underprivileged Children’s Circus
Spectacular
$1090.91
Rotary Club of Wishart
Australia Day Citizenship Ceremony
$1221.00
SpecialCare Central Inc.
Disability Awareness and Opportunity Expo
$1001.00
St Bernard’s Catholic Primary
School P&F
Fathers’ Day celebration
$550.00
St Bernard’s Catholic Primary
School P&F
Mothers’ Day celebration
$1100.00
St Bernard’s Catholic Primary
School P&F
Spring Fair 2012 – Carnival of Light
$1500.00
St Catherine’s P&F
Fathers’ Day Breakfast
$1400.00
St Catherine’s Wishart P&F
‘Celebrating 40 years’ St Catherine’s Big
Birthday Fete, 1973-2013
$1564.75
St Marks Lutheran Church
Kids Celebration Day
$1034.55
Swara Mohini Inc.
Naada Ranjani 2013
$1400.00
The Rotary Club of Mt Gravatt
Inc.
Mt Gravatt Mountain Challenge
$3000.00
Upper Mt Gravatt Community
Kindergarten Association Inc.
Kindy 50 year celebration
$2000.00
Variety Queensland
2013 Childrens Circus Spectacular
$1800.00
Wishart Neighbourhood
Watch
Community event
$275.00
Wishart Neighbourhood
Watch
Community event
$275.00
206
Wishart State School P&C
Active School Travel Breakfast
$620.00
Wishart Ward Office
Wheelie bin stickers – neighbourhood watch
$1313.19
Organisation
Project summary
Amount
Approved
BABI Youth and Family
Service
Bay Wave Youth and Community Festival 2013
$4600.00
Eastern Group State
Emergency Service Support
Unit Inc.
Storm operation trailers
$2000.00
Manly Chamber of Commerce
Inc.
Manly Harbour Village Halloween Street Party
2012
$4717.11
Moreton Bay Weight
Reduction Club
Get Healthy Project
$990.00
Probus Club of Waterloo Bay
Defibrillator
$1870.00
Rotary Club of Port of
Brisbane Inc.
Wynnum Australia Day – breakfast concert
$754.70
Rotary Club of Port of
Brisbane Inc.
Wynnum Australia Day – breakfast concert set
up
$2749.50
Scout Association of Australia
Queensland Branch –
Bayside Sea Scout Group
New leader training
$1900.00
St John Ambulance (Qld) –
Wynnum Combined Division
St John Set to be Seen in Wynnum
$2696.98
Waterloo Bay Leisure Centre
Repair and maintenance to centre
$4811.40
Wynnum and Districts
Chamber of Commerce
Santa Claus in Wynnum CBD
$1200.00
Wynnum and Districts
Chamber of Commerce
Twilight Bay Run
$5000.00
Wynnum and Districts Men’s
Shed
Wynnum Central State School
$4001.83
Wynnum Baptist Church
Sun protection for community playground
$5705.00
Wynnum Croquet Club Inc.
Provide and erect equipment shed
$2500.00
Wynnum Manly Community
Gardens Group
Bethania St community garden enhancement
$1890.71
Wynnum-Manly Ward
207
Wynnum Manly Community
Kindergarten
Installation of windows overlooking Wynnum
Wynnum North Safety House
Committee
Bayside Community 2012 flyer delivery
$1504.20
Wynnum Softball Association
Inc.
Softball clinic to the junior members of the
$2581.82
Wynnum Vikings AFC
Linemarking machine
Total
$531.00
Creek
Wynnum community
$1995.00
$1,425,046.6
3
208
Annual Financial Statements
The Annual Financial Statements are available in accessible PDF and Microsoft Excel Format
http://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/about-council/council-information-and-rates/news-andpublications/annual-report-and-financial-statements/index.htm
209
Glossary
A
Access and Inclusion Plan 2012-2017: places priority on achieving inclusion and equitable
access to Council services for everyone including people with a disability, chronic illness or
temporary impairment; parents with young children; and seniors.
Active school travel program: educates students, parents and teachers to leave the car at
home and travel by walking, cycling or using public transport.
Adopted Infrastructure Charges Resolution: this resolution was made pursuant to the
Sustainable Planning Act 2009 and provides the mechanism for Council to levy and collect
charges for both Council and Queensland Urban Utilities infrastructure as identified in the Priority
Infrastructure Plan.
Annual Plan (and Budget): each year the Lord Mayor presents and Council adopts an Annual
Plan and Budget. The Annual Plan specifies the outcomes Council seeks to achieve, the services
Council provides to the community, and the projects that Council will undertake. The budget
provides authorisation for Council’s expenditures and revenue collection.
Annual Report: Council’s report on its annual performance. The report includes statements
about annual performance, financial statements and disclosures required under legislation.
Asia Pacific Cities Summit (APCS): the Asia Pacific Cities Summit is a leading regional forum
for civic and business leaders, supported by Brisbane City Council.
Audit Committee: the Brisbane City Council Audit Committee oversees the organisation’s audit,
control and risk management functions.
Australia Day Storm Event 2013: in January 2013, ex-tropical cyclone Oswald passed over
parts of Queensland causing severe rains and flooding. In Brisbane, the greatest impact was felt
over the Australia Day weekend.
B
Backflow prevention device: a device designed to allow water to flow in only one direction
through piped stormwater systems.
Biodiversity: a healthy diversity of native plants and wildlife.
Bluetooth monitoring: allows the monitoring of traffic flow using bluetooth detectors located
along major road corridors. The detectors record the presence of mobile devices, enabling the
determination of travel times between specific points.
Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre: the Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre opened
in 1996. It is located at 31 Paperbark Drive, Boondall. Visitors can view environmental and
cultural displays, discover facts about wetlands flora and fauna, and learn about the importance
of preserving natural areas.
Brisbane Economic Development Plan 2012-2031: sets out the priorities and actions required
to support Brisbane’s economic development to 2031.
Brisbane Greeter Program: a voluntary service in which friendly and well-informed local people
show visitors the city.
210
Brisbane Innovation Scorecard: Council collaborates with business, government and higher
education to produce this annual innovation benchmark.
Brisbane Local Government Area (LGA): a defined portion of the metropolitan area of
Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Unlike LGAs in the other mainland state capitals (Sydney,
Melbourne, Perth and Adelaide), which generally encompass only central business districts and
close neighbourhoods, the Brisbane LGA covers a large portion of the metropolitan area. As a
result it has a larger population than any other LGA in Australia.
Brisbane Long Term Infrastructure Plan 2012-2031: this plan guides the prioritisation and
alignment of Brisbane’s infrastructure as the city grows, and provides a reference for other levels
of government and the private sector.
Brisbane Marketing: a partner in delivering Council’s economic development plan for the city.
Brisbane Marketing is also the Convention Bureau for Brisbane and the Regional Tourism
Organisation for the local governments of the greater Brisbane area.
Brisbane Metropolitan Transport Management Centre (BMTMC): the principal transport
management centre for the greater Brisbane metropolitan area. The BMTMC provides real-time
traffic management updates, safe and secure busway facilities, and public transport continuity
that contribute to the optimal operation of South East Queensland’s road and public transport
network.
Brisbane Transport: Council commercialised its transport services arm in the 1990s to form
Brisbane Transport, a council-owned commercialised business.
Brisbane’s Unique Window of Opportunity Report: based on consultation with Brisbane’s
business community, the report recommends strategies to benefit the city’s economic
development.
Brisbane Vision 2031: is Brisbane City Council’s long-term community plan for the city. It details
the aspirations for our city’s future and outlines ideas for achieving this vision.
Budget (and Annual Plan): see Annual Plan.
Bushland Acquisition program: this program uses funds raised from the Bushland
Preservation Levy to acquire and maintain property that supports significant ecosystems, plants
and animals.
Bushland Preservation Levy: Brisbane residents and businesses pay a Bushland Preservation
Levy as part of their rates account. The levy goes to the protection and enhancement of the
natural environment and creation of a world class natural area network for Brisbane.
Business and Systems Efficiency project (BaSE): Council’s key business transformation
initiative. The project will replace more than 60 ICT systems with a single integrated system for
core business processes including finance, procurement, asset management and payroll.
Bus Network Review: Council has undertaken a review of its bus network to help deliver an
improved and more efficient service.
Business units: organisational units responsible for best practice delivery of outputs within the
commercial framework set by Council. Council’s Annual Plan and Budget lists business units and
their goals and activities. The Annual Report states their financial and non-financial performance.
211
C
Carbon (offsets): Brisbane City Council is committed to being carbon-neutral. Purchases offset
the impact of Council’s fleet and stationary uses of fuel.
CEO: the Chief Executive Officer is Council’s highest ranking executive.
Chairman: each standing committee of Council is chaired by councillor.
Changing places toilet: is different to standard accessible toilets. It has extra features and more
space to meet the needs of people with disabilities who cannot independently transfer onto a
toilet or change themselves. A changing places toilet provides a height adjustable adult-sized
changing table, a ceiling tracking hoist system and adequate space for the person with the
disability and up to two carers.
CityCats: Council’s fleet of catamaran ferries operating along the Brisbane River from the
University of Queensland, St Lucia to Northshore Hamilton.
City Centre Master Plan Ideas Fiesta: a three week program of events conducted in 2013
aimed at generating new ideas and showcasing design concepts for Brisbane’s city centre.
CityCycle: a bicyle hire service with stations located at key inner-city destinations between the
University of Queensland, St Lucia and Newstead.
CityGlider: buses which provide high frequency transport from West End to Teneriffe and
Ashgrove to Stones Corner.
City Hall: turned 80 years of age in April 2010. City Hall has been the backdrop to many of
Brisbane’s cultural, social, and civic events. To conserve and restore this iconic building for future
generations, City Hall closed in January 2010 for three years of repair work and upgrades. With
the project completed, it was rededicated to the people of Brisbane in April 2013.
CityHopper service: free cross river ferries serving the inner city.
City of Brisbane Act 2010: provides for the way in which Council is constituted and its
responsibilities and powers. It is supported by the City of Brisbane Regulation 2012.
City Plan, draft new: Council’s plan for the future development of Brisbane. It guides land use
and development and plans for infrastructure to support growth.
City Plan 2000: The City Plan is a comprehensive statement of Council’s intentions for the future
development of Brisbane. The plan provides guidance for builders, developers, solicitors and
others.
Civic Cabinet (also known as the Establishment & Coordination Committee): Civic Cabinet
makes decisions on a range of matters delegated to it by Council. Civic Cabinet is chaired by the
Lord Mayor and includes the chairmen of Council’s seven other standing committees.
Clem Jones Tunnel (CLEM7): formerly known as the North-South Bypass Tunnel, the Clem
Jones Tunnel (CLEM7) connects Woolloongabba in the south with Bowen Hills in the north. At
6.8 km in length, it is Brisbane’s first major road tunnel.
Community engagement: is the term Council uses for involving residents in Brisbane City
Council’s decision making process. Community engagement has benefits to both the resident
and Council because it allows access to wider sources of information, points of view and potential
solutions. It also gives residents a better understanding of the issues influencing Council’s
decision making and related constraints and opportunities.
212
Congestion Reduction unit: aims to reduce traffic congestion and improve travel times and trip
reliability. Its key target is to improve average travel speeds on the top 20-25 roads in Brisbane.
Conservation Reserves Management program: manages infrastructure and equipment for
Council’s natural areas network including lands purchased through the Bushland Preservation
Levy. Includes preventing illegal access and stabilising and rehabilitating degraded areas.
Corporate Plan: Council’s Corporate Plan specifies the medium term (five year) strategic
objectives that Council seeks to achieve. The Annual Plan and Budget delivers to these
objectives. Achievement of Corporate Plan objectives over a series of Corporate Plans delivers to
the long-term community plan.
Councillor: a councillor is an elected member of Brisbane City Council. The role requires a
councillor to provide community leadership and guidance, and to facilitate communication
between the community and Council.
Councillor discretionary funding: see Lord Mayor’s Suburban Initiative Fund.
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD): refers to the wide range of cultural groups
represented in the community. Acknowledges differences in religion and spirituality, racial
backgrounds and ethnicity as well as language.
Customer Focus Vision 2016: expresses a vision for Council that is dedicated to customers –
everyone, everywhere, anytime.
D
Development approval (DA): Council’s development approval process regulates development in
a manner consistent with the City Plan 2000.
Digital Brisbane Strategy: sets a five-year target to ensure the city capitalises on the rapidly
growing digital economy.
Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA): provides specific time frames for infrastructure to
comply with standards for disabled access.
Disaster management: Council plays a major role in managing the impacts of disasters within its
boundaries.
Disputes Commissioner, Office of: an independent office within Council that investigates
complaints about infringement notices and makes recommendations to either waive or uphold
them.
Don’t Be A Fool Tags Aren’t Cool: the catchphrase for Council’s anti-graffiti school education
program, which is delivered to school students across Brisbane.
Draft Strategy for Young People 2013-2018: ensures Council values and includes young
people in the life of Brisbane.
213
E
Early Warning Network: the Brisbane Early Warning Service provides residents in the Brisbane
City Council LGA with weather alerts via email, SMS and/or home phone.
Eat Safe Brisbane: a food safety rating scheme, developed in consultation with industry bodies,
to help maintain and improve food safety standards in Brisbane.
Election: Brisbane City Council elections are held every four years. The most recent election
was held on 28 April 2012. Voting is compulsory for all residents who are Australian citizens over
18 years of age.
ePetitions: petitions allow the community to bring matters of concern to Council’s attention.
ePetitions are completed and lodged electronically. Council can be petitioned on any matter that
comes under its jurisdiction.
Establishment & Coordination Committee: see Civic Cabinet.
e-waste: includes electronic waste items such as desktop computers, monitors, mobile phones,
printers, televisions, scanners and video game consoles.
Executive Management Team (EMT): consists of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO), divisional
managers and executive managers from across the organisation.
F
Financial Sustainability Statements, current year and long-term: contain measures of
financial sustainability specified in the City of Brisbane Regulation 2012. Council is required to
report its performance and forecasts. These are located in the Annual Report with Council’s
annual financial statements.
Flood: see January 2011 Flood.
Flood Action Plan: Council’s response to the January 2011 Flood and to Council’s and the
State’s subsequent reports.
Flood Flag Map: Brisbane City Council has developed the Flood Flag Map to provide residents
with information on flooding in Brisbane. The map shows overland flow paths and where flooding
from creeks, rivers and storm tides may occur.
FloodSMART Future Strategy 2012-2031: outlines Council’s approach to flood risk
management. The strategy is based on national and international best practice.
FloodWise Property Report: this free report states the risk of various types of flooding at a
specific property. It is available to download from Council’s website. The information is sourced
from Council flood studies and models developed for the river and our major creeks and
waterways.
Full-time equivalent employees (FTE): the statistic stated in this report is calculated as at 30
June 2013. The FTE statistic states the number of equivalent employees working full-time. For
example, two part-time or job share employees, both working half the standard number of fulltime hours, will together be counted as one FTE employee. The number cited in this report
includes all FTEs paid through the Council payroll system. Excluded is overtime, staff on unpaid
leave, workers paid by a third party and supplementary workers not on the payroll system.
214
G
GraffitiSTOP: a project aimed at delivering graffiti mitigation and prevention activities, in
partnership with Queensland Corrective Services and Youth Justice.
Green Heart: through this program, Council encourages Brisbane residents to make changes to
their everyday lives to help achieve the goal of Brisbane becoming Australia’s most sustainable
city. The program includes special events and workshops as well as initiatives for residents,
business and schools.
GreenPower: accredited, renewable energy generated from sources like wind power, solar farms
and biomass, which do not produce any net greenhouse gas emissions.
H
Healthy Waterways: Healthy Waterways is a not-for-profit organisation working to protect and
improve waterway health in South East Queensland.
Homeless Connect: brings together business and community groups twice a year to provide
free services to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Brisbane held the first
Homeless Connect in Australia in November 2006. Similar events are now held in Perth, Hobart,
Adelaide and on the Gold Coast.
I
Immunisation: Council provides free vaccinations. All children, including international and
interstate visitors, can use Council’s free immunisation service.
J
January 2011 Flood: in January 2011, the Brisbane River peaked at 4.46 metres above sea
level, flooding 94 suburbs, approximately 3700 businesses and 20,000 homes. The flood caused
significant damage to the city’s infrastructure, assets, transport, waterways, parks and community
areas.
L
Legacy Way: Legacy Way (formerly Northern Link) is a major road tunnel project connecting the
Western Freeway at Toowong with the Inner City Bypass (ICB) at Kelvin Grove. Legacy Way is
the fourth project in Council’s TransApex plan, designed to reduce congestion and increase
connectivity on Brisbane’s road network.
Lord Mayor’s Brisbane Economic Snapshots: a quarterly newsletter that informs local and
international businesses of Brisbane’s economic performance.
Lord Mayor’s Business Awards: recognises companies and businesses which have
significantly contributed to Brisbane’s economy and profile.
Lord Mayor’s Business Excellence Workshops: a series of free workshops held to give
businesses an opportunity to meet Council officers so questions can be answered and areas for
service improvements identified.
Lord Mayor’s Business Forums: a series of free workshops held across Brisbane for
businesses. Successful local business entrepreneurs provide valuable insights from their own
experience and offer practical tips to help local businesses grow.
Lord Mayor’s Community Sustainability and Environmental Grants: provide funding to
groups and individuals across Brisbane to carry out projects that improve the city’s environment.
215
Lord Mayor’s Multicultural Round Table: aims to identify and facilitate opportunities for
business and economic development in Brisbane’s multicultural community.
Lord Mayor’s Suburban Initiative Fund: the Annual Plan and Budget allocates this fund for
councillors to employ at their discretion to support local projects and help build stronger
communities in Brisbane. Detail on how to apply is available at www.brisbane.qld.gov.au
Lord Mayor’s Writers in Residence program: Council libraries host literary events and writing
workshops featuring high-profile authors.
Low Income Energy Efficiency Program: an Australian Government grant program for
government, business and community organisations which trials approaches to improve energy
efficiency in low-income households.
N
NAIDOC: National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee. Council’s Indigenous
team provides assistance to community organisations to run events which celebrate the
achievements and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.
National Competition Policy: Brisbane City Council’s organisational arrangements are aligned
with Council’s obligations under National Competition Policy.
Neighbourhood plans: locally specific statutory plans which guide future development, urban
design and land uses.
P
PetPEP: a school based education program delivered in partnership with the Australian
Veterinary Association that teaches primary school students responsible pet ownership.
Priority Infrastructure Plan (PIP): aims to ensure coordinated infrastructure delivery across the
city.
Programs: the outcomes that Council plans for are grouped together in programs. In 2012-13
Council’s programs were:
1. Sustainable Green and Clean City
2. WaterSmart City
3. Moving Brisbane
4. Future Brisbane
5. Your Brisbane
6. Public Health and Safety
7. Economic Development
8. Customer Focus
9. City Governance
Council’s Annual Plan and Budget lists programs, their outcomes, associated services and
projects and the budgets allocated to them.
Q
Queensland Police Service (QPS): QPS is the primary law enforcement agency for the State of
Queensland. Council liaises with the QPS on issues including traffic accidents, street closures,
special event management, disaster management and graffiti management
216
R
Rapid Response Group (RRG): the response team that provides Council’s frontline key safety
and amenity response across Brisbane 24 hours a day.
River’s Edge Strategy, draft: a non-statutory guide to decision making and a plan of action for
enhancing recreational, tourism and economic development opportunities for the inner-city
Brisbane River over the next 10 years.
S
Safe School Travel (SafeST): construction of pedestrian and bicycle facilities (footpaths,
refuges, crossings, etc.), bus and car facilities (indented bus zones and two minute passenger
loading zones) which improve the safety of school students travelling to and from school.
Safer Routes to School (SRTS): supports Council’s Active School Travel program. One of the
major barriers for students walking to school is safe street crossings. This program constructs
infrastructure including children’s crossings, minor intersection improvements and specific safety
improvements identified by school communities.
SealSMART: a process aimed at improving plan-sealing (approval) times through the use of
accredited consultants who liaise with Council engineers to provide self-certification.
Sister Cities: Council builds mutually beneficial relationships with other cities around the world in
particular Asia, to develop economic and cultural ties and promote Brisbane as Australia’s New
World City. Council has nine sister cities. They are:
Kobe
Auckland
Shenzhen
Semarang
Kaohsiung
Daejeon
Chongqing
Abu Dhabi
Hyderabad
In 2012, Brisbane celebrated its 20th anniversary for the formal relationship with Shenzen and
10th anniversary with Daejeon. The city commemorated this by receiving Mayoral lead business
delegations from each city.
Social media: Council uses 12 social media channels including Facebook, Twitter, YouTube,
Instagram, Pinterest and Flickr to provide information to and interact with residents on community
service announcements and information about events, services, initiatives, community
engagement opportunities and disaster/crisis management. Residents must ‘opt in’ to these
communication channels. As at 30 June 2013, Council reached between more than eight million
impressions via social media monthly.
Standing Committees: Council has seven standing committees made up of and chaired by
elected representatives. The committees are:Brisbane LifestyleEnvironment, Parks and
SustainabilityField ServicesFinance, Economic Development and
AdministrationInfrastructureNeighbourhood Planning and Development AssessmentPublic and
Active Transport.
State Emergency Service (SES): a volunteer organisation which provides practical support to
Queensland communities during emergencies. Council supports Brisbane’s SES with resources,
training and facilities.
Stores Board: Council’s governance mechanism for authorising procurement. Proposals to
procure goods and services are subject to Stores Board’s review and approval.
217
Sustainable Planning Act 2009: is Queensland’s principal planning legislation. It coordinates
planning at local, regional and state level.
Sydney Coordinated Adaptive Traffic System (SCATS): a traffic signal management system
which adjusts signals automatically according to traffic demand. Every intersection with a traffic
signal operated by Brisbane City Council is controlled by SCATS.
T
Tactile street signs: directional signage enhanced for people with visual impairments.
TAG Them Back: delivered in partnership with Crimestoppers, this initiative provides information
on graffiti and an avenue to report offenders.
Talent Management Strategy: an integrated approach to acquiring and managing Council’s
workforce throughout the employment lifecycle.
Taskforce Against Graffiti (TAG): a joint initiative of Council and QPS to combat graffiti and
associated crime.
Temporary Local Planning Instrument: Council’s response to give confidence to residents
wanting to rebuild or build in flood affected suburbs after the January 2011 Flood.
Tip Shop: Council’s two Tip Shops are operated by the Endeavour Foundation and sell good
quality second-hand products which have been salvaged before going to landfill. The Tip Shops
are at Acacia Ridge and Geebung.
Towards Zero Waste strategy: Council’s Waste Minimisation and Management Strategy 20092026.
Transport Plan for Brisbane 2008-2026: provides a strategic framework to address the
challenges and issues facing Brisbane. The plan outlines objectives and actions to achieve an
efficient integrated transport system.
TRIM: Council’s electronic document management system. TRIM ensures Council’s compliance
with public records management and reliable searching of Council’s records.
U
Urban Renewal Brisbane: a program to revitalise Brisbane’s inner urban areas.
V
Vaccination: see Immunisation.
Vibrant Laneways: a program that rejuvenates ‘forgotten’ city centre spaces and reintroduces
them to our community in an imaginative, fun and engaging way.
Vision: Council’s long-term community plan.
218
W
Ward: Brisbane City Council has 26 wards. Eligible residents in each ward elect a councillor. All
elect the Lord Mayor.
Wayfinding devices: Council is trialling Step Hear signs and wrist activators in the Queen Street
Mall. These provide audio messages to inform pedestrians with a vision impairment where they
are.
Wi-Fi: allows an electronic device to exchange data wirelessly over a computer network.
Council’s Wi-Fi service is available 24 hours a day in selected locations. Anyone can access it
with a Wi-Fi enabled device
Walls and Colours: a graffiti mitigation project which installs murals in ‘hot spots’ that have been
the focus of previous graffiti vandalism. It is delivered in partnership with local communities.
Workforce Equity and Diversity Framework (2011-2015): provides a focus on building equity
and diversity in Council’s workforce and aims to ensure all employees value and consider others
at work.
Y
Your City Your Say: Council’s community reference group is made up of approximately 14,000
Brisbane residents who are interested in having a say about Brisbane’s future. Members receive
information about citywide and local projects and can contribute to important decisions affecting
our city. Your Voice: Council’s employee survey conducted once each two years.
Z
Zero Harm: Council is committed to being a Zero Harm organisation. Council’s goal is to create a
workplace that is injury, illness and incident free.
219
Index
A
Description
Access and inclusion
Access and Inclusion Plan 2012-2017
Accessibility
Anti-discrimination and equal employment
opportunity
Active and healthy
Active transport
Active School Travel program
Annual Financial Statements
Annual Plan and Budget
Audit Committee, Brisbane City Council
Audit Office, The Queensland
Auditor-General
Asphalt
Assurance Security and Ethical Standards
(branch)
Australia Day Storm Event 2013
Australian Government’s Low Income Energy
Efficiency Program
Awards
Page
27, 48, 54, 80,84, 164, 210
27, 48, 210
15, 27, 29, 59, 67, 69, 72, 79, 84, 88, 90, 113,
120, 126, 152
46
5, 12, 39, 47, 67, 80, 81, 82
11, 14, 40, 61, 67, 68, 217,
69, 74, 168, 177, 180, 181, 210, 217
4, 111, 135, 138, 145, 146, 147, 149, 209, 214
24, 38, 111, 210, 211, 213, 216
3, 140, 142, 143, 144, 145, 146, 210
3, 111, 140, 143, 145
138, 145
40, 125, 126, 127
3, 140, 142
26, 28, 51, 53, 54, 60, 64, 83, 89, 90, 117, 125,
127, 126, 210
216
3, 25, 42, 45, 48-49,96, 98, 109, 110, 144,
160, 180, 195, 215
B
Description
Backflow prevention/device
Bikeway(s)
Bins
Biodiversity
Black spot(s)
Bluetooth monitoring
Boondall Wetlands Environment Centre
Brisbane, about
Sir Thomas Brisbane
Brisbane River
History
Local Government Area (LGA)
Brisbane – Australia’s New World City
Brisbane Community Profiles
Brisbane Economic Development Plan
Brisbane flood recovery (see Flood)
Brisbane Greeters
Brisbane Innovation Scorecard
Brisbane Long Term Infrastructure Plan 20122031
Brisbane Marketing
Brisbane Metropolitan Transport Management
Page
63, 162, 210
6, 11, 26, 27, 29, 67, 68, 135,
51, 55, 126, 127
39, 52, 61, 210
27, 68, 70
71, 210
53, 210
6, 7-9
7, 49, 85, 88
6, 7, 8, 39, 53, 60, 63, 64, 212, 215, 217
7-9, 59, 76, 82, 84, 129, 164, 166, 168, 170,
172, 175, 182, 184, 192, 198, 202
6, 211, 214
7, 12, 14, 75, 79, 98, 217
95, 101
95, 210
98
95,98, 211
96, 211
78, 95, 97, 145, 211
71, 211
220
Centre (BMTMC)
• Brisbane Powerhouse
Brisbane Transport (business)
Brisbane Vision 2031
Brisbane’s Unique Window of Opportunity
Report
Budget (and Annual Plan) – see Annual Plan
and Budget
Bus (es)
Bushland acquisition
Business and Systems Efficiency project
(BaSE)
Bus Network Review
12, 82
3, 15, 43, 49, 118, 119, 120, 121, 124, 145,
147, 148, 149, 211
2, 29, 103, 211
98, 211
6, 11, 27, 29, 43, 49, 52, 67, 69, 94, 111, 113,
119, 120, 121, 124, 135, 160, 188, 189, 211,
212, 217
51, 53, 211
28, 43, 112, 115, 127, 211
121, 211
C
Description
Campaign (s)
Page
27, 47, 91, 95, 96, 97, 98, 99, 113,115, 187
CCTV
Carbon
Emissions
Neutral
Offsets
Cemeteries
Chief Executive Officer (CEO)
Chief Executive Officer’s Report
Citizenship Ceremony/ceremonies
69, 70, 71, 91, 121, 144,
10, 51, 52, 74, 119, 120, 212
52, 74
51, 52, 119, 212
52
6, 13, 91, 92, 148, 149
44, 46, 47, 142, 143, 145, 157, 161, 212, 214
28-29
38, 109, 116, 166, 167, 168, 175, 179,180,191,
192, 201, 202, 203, 204, 206
6, 8, 69, 72, 212
68, 212
27, 69, 120, 212
29, 75, 77, 78, 212
108-117, 216
9, 13, 27, 29, 80, 84, 85, 86, 88, 135, 137,
212,
67, 69, 212
141, 148, 152, 157, 161, 212
111, 138, 141, 146, 152, 153, 157
130-132, 147, 149
26, 61, 63, 76, 78, 79, 161, 162, 212, 213
26, 61, 63, 76, 79
76, 78, 161, 162, 212, 213
129, 15, 16
15, 109
3, 25, 29, 38, 39, 40, 41, 212, 214
6, 212
3, 140, 150
15, 40, 47, 48, 49, 108, 113, 145, 154, 213,
217
15, 48, 49, 108, 113
113
26, 29, 77
CityCat
CityCycle
CityGlider
City Centre Master Plan
City Governance (program)
City Hall
CityHopper
City of Brisbane Act 2010
City of Brisbane Regulation 2012
City Parking (business)
City Plan
draft new City Plan
City Plan 2000
City Projects Office
Civic administration
Civic Cabinet
CLEM7
Code of Conduct
Communication
Corporate Communication
Crisis communication
Community consultation
221
Talk to a Planner sessions
Engagement
Attendance
Conduct
Complaints concerning
Contact information
Discretionary funding
Expenses reimbursement policy
Remuneration
Suspensions
Council’s Business Hotline 133 BNE
Credit rating
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD)
Customer Charter
Customer Experience Transformation (CET)
Customer focus
Customer Focus (program)
79
13, 14, 53, 79, 99, 102, 103, 115, 121, 141,
171, 212, 217
13, 26, 27, 84, 85
3, 133-139, 141,
6, 80, 85
11, 15, 38, 67, 68, 69, 71, 72, 74, 119, 121,
213, 215
71, 213
28, 103, 107
28
3, 15, 140-150
24, 28
3, 10-16, 28, 141
108, 142, 144
3, 4, 29, 30, 38-40 , 88,108, 110, 141, 142,
151-160, 164-208, 212, 213, 216, 219
3, 151, 156
151, 157
157
30-37
164-208
153
3, 142, 151, 152, 158
3, 151, 156
29, 95, 101, 104, 107
108, 110, 134
9, 27, 47, 113, 213
14, 102
104
3, 14, 50, 92, 102, 104, 120, 130, 213, 216
102-107
Customer service
5, 39, 42, 102, 109, 116, 159
Community facilities
Community financial report
Community halls
Congestion, traffic
Congestion Reduction Unit
Contact Centre
Corporate Culture Change Plan
Corporate governance
Corporate Plan 2012/13-2016/17
Corporate Plan scorecard
Corporate security
Councilor
D
Description
Development approval
Development assessment
Digital
Chief Digital Officer
Digital Brisbane Strategy
Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA)
Disaster management
Disclosures
Disputes Commissioner, Office of
Draft Strategy for Young People
Page
63, 161, 213
11, 39, 78
26, 48, 49, 82, 92, 95, 98, 99, 169, 213
26
95, 213
69, 72, 84, 213
15, 40, 63, 113, 114, 115, 117, 144, 213, 216
2, 3, 24, 141, 142, 151, 210
109, 146, 147, 213
29, 84, 213
F
Description
Facebook
Ferry
Field Services Group (business)
Filming and Events Approvals Liaison Office
Financial forecast (s)
Page
75, 217
11, 27, 29, 49, 52, 67, 69,72
40, 118, 125-129, 145
104
17
222
Financial management
Financial policies
Financial statements (see Annual Financial
Statements)
Flood (see January 2011 Flood)
Flood Action Plan
Flood Flag Map
FloodSMART Future Strategy 2012-2031
Flood recovery
Flood management
Flood overlay code
FloodWise Property Report
Footpath
Future Brisbane (program)
Future Council Organisational Strategy (Future
Council)
18, 40, 108, 109, 110, 141, 145
17
63, 115, 214
63, 115, 214
27, 28, 63, 64, 66, 214
26, 62, 126, 134
11, 60, 63, 66
61, 63
60, 63, 214
29, 55, 68, 126, 127, 163, 217
50, 75-79
28
G
Description
Garden (s)
Go Between Bridge
Growing Older and Living Dangerously (GOLD)
Graffiti
Graduate (s)
Grants
Green Heart
GreenPower
Green waste
Page
10, 27, 51, 53, 54, 85, 94, 176, 177, 178, 185,
193, 195, 197, 205, 207
70
83
89, 90, 91, 94, 213, 215, 216, 218, 219
43, 44, 45, 46, 48, 113, 113
4, 53, 78, 80, 81, 82, 84, 86, 134, 141, 151,
152, 164, 215
49, 53, 215
10, 52, 215
28, 51, 55, 117, 127
H
Description
Health and safety
Health and Safety and Local Law 2008
Healthy waterways
Heritage
History (see Brisbane in profile)
Hotels Subsidy Administrative Policy
Homeless Connect
Howard Smith Wharfs
Page
3, 13, 50, 89, 90, 92, 94, 121, 126, 216
90
60, 63, 215
9, 12, 39, 48, 49, 53, 75, 76, 78, 79, 85, 88,
127, 129, 144, 162, 168, 169, 190
76
85, 215
129
I
Description
Immunisation
Inclusion (see Access and Inclusion)
Information and communications technology
(ICT)
Information Privacy Act 2009
Infrastructure
Page
89, 215, 218
15, 113, 115, 127
109
6, 9, 12, 14, 15, 17, 22, 23, 24, 26, 38, 39, 42,
43, 44, 47, 55, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 75, 76,
77, 78, 83, 95, 96, 97, 101, 110, 130, 134, 135,
137, 142, 210, 211, 212, 213, 215, 216, 217
223
Charges
Transport including bicycle/cycling and
pedestrian
International standards
International students
Invasive species
iPark
23, 76, 78, 134, 210
6, 9, 12, 24, 26, 38, 43, 67, 68, 69, 70, 72, 217
143
6, 14, 26, 99
56
132
J
Description
January 2011 Flood
Page
26, 28, 60, 62, 63, 66, 72, 117, 126, 214, 215,
218
K
Description
Ken Fletcher Park
Page
53, 59
L
Description
Landfill
Legacy Way
Libraries
Litter
Local Disaster Coordination Centre (LDCC)
Long-Term Asset Management Plan
Lord Mayor’s
Brisbane Economic Snapshots
Business Awards
Business Excellence Workshops
Business Forums
Multicultural Entrepreneur Awards
Multicultural Round Table
Report
Suburban Initiative Fund
Youth Advisory Council
Writers in Residence program
Page
10, 51, 54, 55, 56, 218
27, 29, 67, 70, 135, 137, 215,
6, 12, 39, 80, 81, 82, 85, 113, 134, 178, 200,
216,
10,11, 52, 55, 63, 94
113, 115, 117
24
3, 25, 26, 53, 82, 84, 85, 95, 96, 98, 99, 101,
109, 110, 164, 213, 215, 216
95, 215
98, 215
95, 96, 101, 215
95, 96, 101, 110, 215
96
96,109, 110, 216
3, 25, 26-27
164, 213, 216
84, 110
82, 216
M
Description
Management, Executive
Mobility Centre, City Hall
Moreton Bay
Moving Brisbane
Multicultural
Museum of Brisbane
Page
25, 29, 42-44, 145, 214
27, 84
7, 60, 64, 207
3, 11, 50, 67-74, 120, 126, 135, 216
8, 13, 47, 79, 80, 81, 85, 96, 108, 109, 110,
164, 168, 175, 180, 191, 193, 194, 198, 205,
216
49, 81, 88
N
Description
NAIDOC
Page
84, 109, 216
224
National Competition Policy
Neighbourhood planning
New World City (see Brisbane – Australia’s
New World City)
Norman Creek 2012-2031 Master Plan
3, 138, 140, 147, 216
39, 76, 78, 217
91, 103
O
Description
Open level crossing(s)
Organisational structure
Our Values, Council
Overseas travel
Page
27, 29, 70
3, 25, 41
3, 5, 213, 144, 213
3,142, 151, 152, 159-160
P
Description
Parks
Parking
Patronage
Buses
Ferries
Pedestrian countdown timers
PetPEP
Planetarium, Sir Thomas Brisbane
Playgrounds
Pollution
Pools
Population
Powerhouse (see Brisbane Powerhouse)
Priority Infrastructure Plan (PIP)
Public Health and Safety (program)
Public Sector Ethics Act 1994
Public transport
Page
6, 10, 24, 26, 39, 40, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 59,
61, 62, 63, 76, 80, 82, 83, 94, 111, 112, 117,
125, 126, 127, 1341 135, 165, 166, 171, 173,
177, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184, 187, 190, 192,
194, 197, 202, 203, 204, 215, 217
3, 71, 84, 85, 118, 130-132, 146, 147, 148,
149, 204
11, 12, 13, 69, 70, 119, 120, 121, 124
11, 69, 119, 120, 124
11, 120
29, 71
90, 216
13, 49, 80, 85, 88
54, 85, 200, 207
10, 51, 52, 54, 55
6, 13, 46, 47, 54, 69, 80, 85, 89, 146, 161, 177
6,8, 9, 12, 14, 26, 29, 60, 76, 92, 96, 211,
12, 75, 76, 210, 216
3, 13, 50, 89-94, 126, 216
142, 150
11, 14, 26, 38, 40, 67, 68, 69, 72, 74, 84, 119,
120, 121, 124, 134, 210, 211,
Q
Description
Queensland Government
Queen Street Mall
Queensland Urban Utilities (QUU)
Queensland Police Service (QPS)
Queensland Rail (QR)
Queensland Treasury Corporation (QTC)
Page
42, 56, 63, 70, 71, 77, 78, 91, 121, 139, 145,
27, 29, 84, 219
61, 76, 134, 138, 139, 210
91, 94, 144, 216, 218
91, 94
108, 110, 137,
R
Description
Rates and charges
Rapid Response Group (RRG)
Recreation
Page
138, 139, 141
90, 217
10, 13, 48, 52, 53, 54, 59, 61, 80, 81, 82, 83,
85, 119, 164, 206, 217
225
Recycling
Registers
Remuneration (see Councillor remuneration
and, or executive remuneration)
Right to Information (RTI)
Right to Information Act 2009
Risk management
Riverstage
Riverwalk
River’s Edge Strategy, draft
Roads
11, 51, 55, 126, 127
4, 142, 151, 156, 161, 163
3, 109, 140, 147
109
3, 15, 40, 60, 63, 66, 108, 111, 140, 141, 142,
143, 144, 145, 210, 214
13, 80, 85
28, 72, 129,
29, 77, 217
4, 6, 10, 26, 29, 33, 63, 67, 70, 120, 134, 161,
163, 213,
S
Description
Safe School Travel (SafeST)
Sister cities
Social inclusion
Social media
Standing committee
State Emergency Service (SES)
Stormwater
Strategic planning
Support Services
Sustainability
Sustainable, Green and Clean City (program)
Sustainable Planning Act 2009
Page
70, 217
110, 217
13, 83
78, 82, 102, 103, 104, 108, 113, 115, 217,
38, 212, 217,
39, 48, 89, 91,169, 172, 186-187, 191, 207,
217
24, 26, 60, 61, 62, 64, 210
3, 17, 39, 48, 97, 108, 141, 143,
45, 108, 112
3, 10, 18, 22, 23, 39, 42, 49, 51, 52, 53, 83, 86,
88, 133, 138, 141, 142, 145, 199, 214, 215,
217
3, 10, 50, 51-59, 120, 126
79, 162, 210, 218
T
Description
Tactile street signs
Talent Management Strategy
Talk to a Planner sessions
Temporary Local Planning Instrument
Tip Shop (s)
Towards Zero Waste strategy
Transport Plan for Brisbane 2008-2026
TRIM
Twitter
Page
27, 84, 218
46, 218
79
78, 218
55, 58, 218
55, 218
67, 218
28, 218
75, 217
U
Description
Urban renewal
Page
39, 49, 75, 76, 78, 218,
V
Description
Values (see Our Values, Council)
Vibrant Laneways
Voluntary Home Purchase Scheme
Page
75, 218
28, 60, 63
226
W
Description
Ward (s)
Waste
Management
Disposal
Water
Water quality
Water Sensitive Urban Design
WaterSmart City (program)
Waterways
Wayfinding devices
Wi-Fi
Workforce
Workforce Equity and Diversity Framework
2011-2015
Workplace Health and Safety (see Zero Harm)
Wetlands
Page
30-37, 109, 153, 154, 155, 164-208, 219
10, 11, 26, 28, 40, 51, 52, 55, 61, 107, 117,
125, 126, 127, 139, 147, 148, 149, 162, 214,
218
26, 40, 52, 125, 147, 162
10
3, 11, 24, 26, 39, 50, 54, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 68,
84, 89, 94, 117, 126, 138, 139, 147, 162, 185,
197, 210, 214, 215, 216
62, 64
64
50, 60-66
11, 26, 39, 54, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 214, 215
84, 219
4, 14, 80, 82, 113, 219
15, 16, 45, 46, 47, 95, 97, 112, 115, 218, 219
46, 219
53, 77, 210
Y
Description
Your Brisbane (program)
Your City Your Say
Your Voice employee survey
Page
3, 12, 50, 80-88, 126, 216
14, 103, 219
28, 45, 46, 47, 112, 121, 219
Z
Description
Zero Harm
Page
47, 121, 124, 219
227
Contact details
Council Administration Offices
Brisbane Square
266 George Street, Brisbane Qld 4000
Green Square
505 St Paul’s Terrace, Fortitude Valley Qld 4006
General information
Phone: (07) 3403 8888
Website: www.brisbane.qld.gov.au
For deaf, hearing impaired or speech impaired:
National Relay Service: www.relayservice.com.au
TTY: 133 677 then ask for (07) 3403 8888
Speak and Listen: 1300 555 727 then ask for (07) 3403 8888
Internet relay: www.iprelay.com.au/call then enter (07) 3403 8888 as the phone number you
wish to call
Video Relay Service: www.relayservice.com.au Skype name ‘ace.vrs’ then ask for (07) 3403
8888
Additional copies
You can download a copy of this report at www.brisbane.qld.gov.au or contact us on (07) 3403
8888 for more information.
Feedback
Feedback on this document is welcome.You can write to us at:Brisbane City Council GPO Box
1434 Brisbane Qld 4001orwww.brisbane.qld.gov.au
Acknowledgements
Council thanks all those who contributed to the development of the Annual Report 2012-13.
Translation or interpretation
Please contact Council on (07) 3403 8888 if you need to access information in the Brisbane City
Council 2012-13 Annual Report in alternative formats, or if you need help with translating and/or
interpreting parts of the report.
228
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