University of Nevada, Reno
Counseling and Educational Psychology
CEP 756: Sexual Issues in Counseling
Summer Mini-term: M-R 4:00pm-8:00pm
WRB Room 2006
Instructor: Dr. Tory Clark, MPH, DHS
Office: I will be available in the classroom before & after each class. My mailbox is in
WRB room 3007
Phone: 775-843-9593
Office Hours: By appointment only
E-Mail: [email protected]
Course Web Site: http://CEP756.weebly.com
Textbooks:
1) Kelinplatz, P. J. (Ed.). (2012). New directions in sex therapy: Innovations and
alternatives (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group.
2) Morin, J. (1996). The erotic mind: Unlocking the inner sources of sexual passion and
fulfillment. New York, NY: Harper Perennial.
Course Description:
This course is designed to increase our personal and professional awareness about the
topic of human sexuality. This course provides information and perspective to future
therapists regarding biological, developmental, behavioral, emotional, and cultural
aspects of human sexuality. Appropriate clinical interventions from a systemic
perspective will be addressed.
Reading materials, classroom experiences and discussions are used to augment student’s
knowledge of human sexual functioning, both potential and problematic, and to expand
student’s comfort with their future role as therapists to couples and individuals. Students
will be encouraged to explore their own sexual history and how it affects their ability to
form therapeutic relationships. In addition, there will be many opportunities for students
to confront and share their attitudes, thoughts and values as related to human sexuality.
The content of this course is, of course, provocative. We will need to conduct ourselves
with poise and respectful confidence as we research and investigate the nuances of sexual
interaction.
 Please note: there will be sexually explicit material/film shown in this class!
Goals and Objectives:
Personal and Professional Growth:
 Develop an awareness of the impact of sexual issues on clients and their
relationships.
 Develop an awareness of personal narratives about sexual issues.
 Develop a personal style of counseling families with sexual issues.
 Integrate personal and professional knowledge base of counseling families with
sexual issues to become a more effective family counselor, who can understand
and address families and family members’ sexual issues across differing ages,
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gender, personal characteristics, traits, capabilities, and life circumstances.
Professional Knowledge, Skills, and Strategies:
 Enhance conceptualization skills of sexual issues operating in families.
 Enhance skills in the application of concept to therapeutic situations and
interventions.
 Enhance your understanding of the role of sex in emotionally committed
relationships.
Course Content Areas and 2001 CACREP MCFC/T Program Standard Addressed
Sexual issues as they relate to various dimensions of the following Standards:
 The role of racial, ethnic, and cultural heritage, nationality, socioeconomic status,
family structure, age, gender, sexual orientation, religious and spiritual beliefs,
occupation, physical and mental status, and equity issues in marital, couple, and
family counseling/therapy; Standard A.6
 Marital, couple, and family life cycle dynamics, healthy family functioning,
family structures, and development in a multicultural society; Standard B.1
 Human sexuality issues and their impact on family and couple functioning, and
strategies for their resolution; Standard B.2
 Societal trends and treatment issues related to working with diverse family
systems (e.g., families in transition, dual-career couples, blended families, and
gay and lesbian families); Standard B.3
 Interviewing, assessment, and case management skills for working with
individuals, couples, families; Standard C.2
 Specific problems that impede family functioning, discrimination and bias,
addictive behaviors, person abuse, and interventions for their resolution;
Standard C.4
To address these standards, the course will address:
Philosophical Dimension relating to:
 The ethics of gender (the matter of bodies)
 The solitude of “being”
 Marriage and fidelity
 Sex and spiritual transformation
 Erotic love
Theoretical Dimension relating to:
 Intergenerational emotional transmission processes
 Object relations and attachment theory
 Structural, strategic, and narrative contexts
 Differentiation
 Intimacy
 Desire
Personal/Professional Practice Skill Dimension:
 Conceptualizing cases
 Diversity issues and paradigms of inclusion: dialectical thinking; solution-
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

focused; and hopefulness
Assessment of issues and inclusion of sexual issues in counseling
Sexual minorities
Student Responsibilities:
Your job is to attend class ON TIME and be prepared. There will be discussion groups
and in a small way, your grade depends upon you having a dialogue with the rest of your
group. There is absolutely no substitute for the classroom experience. When you miss
class, you miss class material, which cannot be had except by being in class. Therefore,
your final grade may be affected by your absences.
 Please do not use your cell phone in class. If you need to use it, please step
outside of the classroom.
UNR’s Policy on Academic Dishonesty:
Anyone caught cheating, in any way, as defined by the University code – whether
confronted during the act, through comparative analysis or acquired evidence, will be
automatically dismissed from the course and given a course letter grade of an “F”. If the
infraction is considered severe, action may also be taken at the university level.
A Note on Plagiarism: Plagiarism (copying all or part of someone else's work and
passing it off as your own) is a serious form of academic misconduct and will not be
tolerated in this class. The following definitions and possible courses of action are taken
from the Academic Standards section of the university catalog:
Academic dishonesty is defined as: cheating, plagiarism or otherwise obtaining grades
under false pretenses. Plagiarism is defined as submitting the language, ideas, thoughts or
work of another as one's own; or assisting in the act of plagiarism by allowing one's work
to be used in this fashion. Disciplinary procedures for incidents of academic dishonesty
may involve both academic action and administrative action for behavior against the
campus regulations of student conduct.
"The work of another" does not just mean whole papers or articles copied from another
source. It includes any information, ideas, sentences, or phrases that came from
somewhere other than your own head (i.e. books, articles, internet sites, videos,
documents, lecture notes or handouts from other courses, and any other sources used in
your paper). These must be properly acknowledged by providing references either in the
text or in a footnote, along with a bibliography giving the complete publication
information for all sources used in your paper. Even if you paraphrase someone else's
ideas and do not quote them directly, you still must acknowledge your source. Citations
should also be given for little known facts and statistics. Ignorance is not an excuse for
plagiarism. If you are not sure whether you need to provide a source for a piece of
information or how to cite a source, ask me.
Audio/Video Recording Classes:
Surreptitious or covert videotaping of class or unauthorized audio recording of class is
prohibited by law and by Board of Regents policy. This class may be videotaped or
audio recorded only with the written permission of the instructor. In order to
accommodate students with disabilities, some students may have been given permission
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to record class lectures and discussions. Therefore, students should understand that their
comments during class may be recorded.
Academic Success Services:
Your student fees cover usage of the Math Center (784-4433 or
www.unr.edu/mathcenter/), Tutoring Center (784-6801 or www.unr.edu/tutoring/) and
University Writing Center (784-6030 or www.unr.edu/writing_center/. These centers
support your classroom learning; it is your responsibility to take advantage of their
services. Keep in mind that seeking help outside of class is the sign of a responsible and
successful student. If I ask you to seek help at the writing center, I expect you to do so.
Accommodations for Student Disabilities:
If you have a special need due to a disability (physical, learning, psychological), please
be sure to let me know as soon as possible. Please coordinate with the Disability
Resource Center and/or Counseling Services to get the assistance and documentation you
need.
 Disability Resource Center:
Thompson Building, Suite 101
Phone: (775) 784-6000
TTY: (775) 327-5131
8 am – 5 pm, Monday-Friday
 Counseling Services:
202 Thompson Building775.784.4648 (tel) After hours, Crisis Call Line:
775.784.8090 (or toll free: 1.800.992.5757) 8am - 5pm, Monday – Friday
Sanctioned Student Activities/Athletics or Work that interfere with class:
If you are an athlete and /or student involved in competition or other activities that take
you away from class this semester you will need to provide us with official
documentation from your coach, the athletic department, or other party of your schedule
and any class sessions that you may miss. We need to know which classes you are
missing. Again, you are responsible for any materials, information, or assignments that
you miss. There will be no late assignments or make-up tests. This means you will
need to turn in assignments ahead of time if necessary.
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Assignments
If your paper is full of grammar, spelling syntax, and APA errors it will not be
graded. Your paper will be handed back to you with the option of re-doing it and
making the suggested the corrections. You will not lose points for re-doing the
paper; you will lose points for not making the corrections. I am also more than
happy to meet before class to answer any questions that you may have!!!
Participation: 100 points:
A total of 100 points are possible for participation in class sessions. At the end of each
class, you will turn in a 3 x 5 index card (which I supply) with your name, date, and you
may be asked what you took away from the class or 2 questions you had based upon what
you heard in class. Sometimes, you will be asked to rate each of your group member’s
participation. These will be counted and used for class attendance. They will be reviewed
and you will get either a “+” or a “-“.
Class Material Reaction Papers 10 @ 10 points each = 100 points total
At the beginning of every class, you will need to turn in a 1-2 page typed and doublespaced reaction paper on the material we covered in the class the day before. Please DO
NOT summarize what we covered in class. I am looking for how the material affected
you on an emotional level and how or why you believe it is important in our profession. I
HIGHLY suggest that you look at page 16 “processing questions” at the end of this
syllabus to help you write these papers.
On June 5th you have the opportunity to earn 10 extra credit points through handing in a
1-2 page paper that discusses your overall thoughts about the course.
**If you cite any of the readings or other materials, follow APA guidelines.
Chapter Presentation: 50 points
Each student in this course will be responsible for giving a power point presentation on
his/her assigned chapter from the textbook Kelinplatz, P. J. (Ed.). (2012). New directions
in sex therapy: Innovations and alternatives (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge Taylor
& Francis Group. Please see the attached schedule for your presentation date and the
grading rubric for further details. Hint: make sure that you meet the criteria listed under
each category on the rubric while preparing your presentation!!
Shame Assignment: 100 points due June 2
1) On May 29th, Dr. Kitty Unthank will be joining us. Her lecture will cover one of the
most common emotions associated with sex: shame.
2) We will then watch the movie "Shame" for the rest of the class
period. http://www.foxsearchlight.com/trailer/148/trailer/
"Brandon (Michael Fassbender) is a New Yorker who shuns intimacy with women but
feeds his desires with a compulsive addiction to sex. When his wayward younger sister
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(Carey Mulligan) moves into his apartment stirring memories of their shared painful past,
Brandon's insular life spirals out of control."
3) Be sure to do the readings listed for May 28/29. You will analyze the main character
of the movie, "Shame" through the readings. We will discuss this assignment in more
detail on May 28, where you will be given detailed instructions and a grading rubric.
4) Follow the APA guidelines for this assignment.
The Sexual Genogram: 100 points due June 4
First, read the following journal articles, which are listed under the May 20 readings:
Bowen Family Systems Therapy and Revisiting the Sexual Genogram
Completing a sexual genogram (Hof & Berman, 1986; Berman & Hof, 1987) is useful in
exploring intergenerational themes, patterns, and events that may have affected a
person’s sexuality. The basic structure of the genogram remains the same (McGoldrick,
Gerson, & Shellenberger, 1999), but the focus of the information is on identifying the
following information: people who were either sex-positive or sex-negative; people who
talked to you about sex; who in your family is heterosexual, homosexual, or bisexual;
sexual secrets that have been kept in the past or are currently being kept; miscarriages or
abortions; and any other critical events related to sexuality (e.g., rape, sexual abuse,
trauma, addiction). Once this information is collected, careful reflection on how this has
affected your thoughts and feelings about sexuality helps to understand where your
strengths and challenges may be.
1.Construct a skeletal structure of your Sexual Genogram including the basic components
of your family and relational system (refer to above readings).
2.Answer the reflection questions in appendix B listed in Revisiting the Sexual Genogram
(you do not have to turn these in). Add the sexuality information to your genogram.
3.Process your resulting diagram; it’s meaning, and its impact on your life thus far.
Additionally, answer the following questions:
4.Would you consider your family to be "sex positive," "sex negative," or "sex neutral?"
How does your answer affect your sexuality today?
5a. Differentiation: read about it here
http://www.thebowencenter.org/pages/conceptds.htmland we will discuss this question in
class more.
5b.Are there any members of your extended family whom you are cut off, and if so, is
this situation part of a triangle?
6. If you cite any of the readings or other materials, follow APA guidelines.
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Erotic Mind Journal 100 points due June 5
“Knowing your own darkness is the best method for dealing with the darknesses of other
people.” ~ Carl Jung
As future therapists, you will be expected to be comfortable speaking with your clients
about their sexuality. Awareness of your own sexuality is vital - what are your biases,
judgments, and values? If you are not comfortable discussing your own sexuality, is it
possible to have a comfortable conversation with your client about theirs? Jack Morin
wrote The Erotic Mind in order for people to explore these very issues.
Jack Morin compassionately invites you readers to explore your erotic side, and offers
non-judgmental support page after page. In order to fully experience what this book has
to offer, Morin asks you to keep an erotic journal (please refer to page 25 in the book to
get started on the journal). He poses questions throughout the book that will challenge
you to delve deep inside your mind; to remember your own peak erotic experiences.
Please answer his questions in your journal every time that you read one. A Sexual
Excitement Survey, developed by Morin himself, asks numerous questions regarding
these experiences. The survey sets the stage, as you can look back at their answers and
recognize recurring themes or patterns in your erotic mind.
I am NOT collecting your journals. I would like you to bring your journal to class on
June 6th and just show me that you actually did it. Remember, you will only get out as
much as you put in to this.
Grading Scale: 550 points possible
Total
Points
495-550
479-494
462-478
440-461
424-439
407-423
385-406
369-384
352-368
330-351
314-329
<314
Percent
90-100
87-89
84-86
80-83
77-79
74-76
70-73
67-69
64-66
60-63
57-59
<57
Grade
A
AB+
B
BC+
C
CD+
D
DF
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Course Schedule
Topics will be covered in approximately the order listed on this syllabus. I will make
every effort to cover the topics on the specified dates. However, it is my experience that
some topics stimulate a great deal of discussion. Therefore, we may have to adjust the
syllabus as the course progresses. You will be informed of any changes on the syllabus in
class.
Week 1: May 19 - 22
May 19 (Mon):
Introductions
Attitudes and Perspectives on Sexuality: “Am I Normal?”
Overview of The Erotic Mind
Lectures:
1) Sex and Culture
2) Chapt 1: On the Need for a New Direction in Sex Therapy
HW:
Reaction paper #1
Refer to class website for reading assignments
May 20 (Tues):
Reaction paper #1 due
Presentations:
Kathryn Carr: Chapt 6: Ethics and Sex Therapy: A Neglected Dimension
Colleen Shaver: Chapt 7: Is That All There Is? A New Critique of the Goals of Sex
Therapy
Speed Questions Exercise
Lectures:
1) Sexology: A Brief History
2) A Sexological Approach
Assignment overview: The Sexual Genogram (due June 4)
HW:
Reaction paper #2
Refer to class website for reading assignments
May 21 (Wed):
Reaction paper #2 due
Presentation:
Roy Bettencourt: Chapt 8: Sexual Medicine, Sex Therapy, and Sexual Health Care
Lecture:
1) Female, Male, and Intersex Sexual Anatomy
2) Sexual Pleasure
Guest Speakers:
Jenni Limoges: Pelvic Floor Health
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Jo Arascada: Sex & Disability
HW:
Reaction paper #3
Refer to class website for reading assignments
May 22 (Thurs):
Reaction paper #3 due
Presentation:
Robyn Davis: Chapt 10: Cultural Diversity and Sensitivity in Sex Therapy
Lecture:
1) Chapt 19: Understanding Gender Nonconformity and Transgender Identity: A SexPositive Approach
6:45 – 8:00pm: Guest Speakers: Kyle & Loren on coming out as transgender & therapy
experiences
HW:
Reaction paper #4
Refer to class website for reading assignments
Week 2: May 26 – 29
May 26 (Mon):
HOLIDAY - NO CLASS
Catch up on reading!!!
May 27 (Tues):
Reaction paper #4 due
Presentations:
Ana De La Maza: Chapt 17: The Honeymoon Is Over: Narrative Sex Therapy for LongTerm Lesbian Partners
Keith Olsen: Chapt 18: HIV Serodiscordant Male Couples: Special Considerations For
Sex Therapy
Lecture:
1) Sexual Orientation
6:45 – 8:00pm: Guest Panel on the spectrum of sexual orientation & their therapy
experiences
HW:
Reaction paper #5
Refer to class website for reading assignments
May 28 (Wed):
Reaction paper #5 due
Christopher Dietrich: Chapt 5: The Challenging Landscape of Problematic Sexual
Behaviors, Including “Sexual Addiction” and “Hypersexuality”
Lecture:
1) Sex Addiction & Overview of Shame assignment
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2) Alternative Sexuality
Film: BDSM: It’s Not What You Think
7:00 – 8:00pm Guest Speaker: Michelle McHardy on BDSM
HW:
Reaction paper #6
Refer to class website for reading assignments
May 29 (Thurs)
Reaction paper #6 due
4:00 – 6:00pm: Guest Speaker: Kitty Unthank, Ph.D on shame & rage
Film: Shame
HW:
Shame assignment
Reaction paper #7
Refer to class website for reading assignments
Week 3: June 2 – 5
June 2 (Mon)
Shame assignment & reaction paper #7 due
Sabrina Lupo: Chapt 11: Approaching Your Highest Sexual Function in Relationship: A
Reward of Age and Maturity
Kristina Muscutt: Chapt 13: The Good Enough Sex (GES) Model: Perspective and
Clinical Applications
Lecture:
1) Open Relationships & guest poly family TBA
Film: Esther Perel: "The secret to desire in a long-term relationship"
Guest Speaker: Chuck Holt, Ph.D. on Infidelity
HW:
Reaction paper #8
Refer to class website for reading assignments
June 3 (Tues)
Reaction paper #8 due
James Studer: Chapt 16: Healing the Sexual Repercussions of Sexual Abuse
Film: Boyhood Shadows
Guest Speaker: Ben Felix, President of Sexual Assault Support Services, Reno Crisis Call
Center
HW:
Sexual Genogram
Reaction paper #9
Refer to class website for reading assignments
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June 4 (Wed)
Sexual Genogram & reaction paper #9 due
4:00 – 5:15pm: Guest Speaker: Steven Ing on Intimacy Skills Deficit and Sex Offenders
Group Discussion on readings
Presentations:
Kimberly Newman: Chapt 3: Sex Therapy for Men: Resolving False Dichotomies
Melissa Petersen: Chapt 9: Sexual Choreography: “Am I Enjoying This Right Now?” Not
“How Am I Doing?”
6:45 – 8:00pm: Guest Speaker: Sue Harris from the UNR Sanford Center for Aging on
sex & aging
HW:
Erotic Mind Journal
Reaction paper #10 & optional extra credit
Refer to class website for reading assignments
June 5 (Thurs)
Erotic mind journal, reaction paper #10 & optional extra credit due
Presentation:
Michelle Sahagun: Chapt 20: Keys to the Sexual Mysteries: An Integrative Model for
Exploring Clients’ Stories
Guest Speaker: Misha Allen Scheinberg, President of People Builders on prostitution &
sex trafficking
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Readings
Readings will be covered in approximately the order listed on this syllabus. I may send
you additional reading via email or post it to the class website. I will make every effort
to cover the readings on the specified dates. However, it is my experience that some
readings stimulate a great deal of discussion. Therefore, we may have to adjust the
syllabus as the course progresses. You will be informed of any changes on the syllabus in
class.
Readings for May 19 (Mon):
1) Are You Sexually Normal -- and Does That Matter? by Dr. Marty Klein
http://bit.ly/w3PZ0p
Be prepared to discuss this question in class: So far in your life, what has "normal"
sexuality meant to you?
2) Chapt 1 in your text book: On the Need for a New Direction in Sex Therapy
3) Read chapters 1 & 2 of The Erotic Mind by Jack Morin. Follow this
link: http://www.jackmorin.com/userfiles/673622/file/SexualExcitementSurvey.pdf
Download, print and begin filling it out.
Readings for May 20 (Tues)
1) Chapt 6: Ethics and Sex Therapy: A Neglected Dimension
Chapt 7: Is That All There Is? A New Critique of the Goals of Sex Therapy
2) The Ethical Slut: Chapter 08: Enjoying Sex
by Easton: https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
Bring 2-3 talking points with you to class that you found interesting about the above 2
readings and complete the Yes, No, Maybe Check-List.
3) Sexological Interviewing Techniques by Dr. Janice Epp
http://ejhs.org/volume1/epp.htm
Access the below readings here: https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
4) American Journal of Family: Therapy Revisiting the Sexual Genogram
5) Essentials of Family Therapy: Chapter 05: Bowen Family Systems Therapy
6) Systemic Sex Therapy: Chapter 02: The Profession of Sex
Therapy https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
Readings for May 21 (Wed)
1) Chapt 8: Sexual Medicine, Sex Therapy, and Sexual Health Care
2) Sexuality for Women With Spinal Cord Injury http://bit.ly/10eSCSN and Sexuality
for Men With Spinal Cord Injury http://bit.ly/12Fl8g7
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This link will take you to the main site where the two above readings came from. This is
an excellent resource on sexuality and spinal cord injuries:
http://www.uab.edu/medicine/sci/daily-living/sexuality-a-sexual-function
3) Systemic Sex Therapy: Chapter 05: The Treatment of Hypoactive Sexual Desire
Disorder, Chapter 06: The Treatment of Erectile Dysfuntion, Chapter 07: Premature
Ejaculation: An Integrative, Intersystems Approach for Couples, Chapter 10: Anorgasmia
in Women, and Chapter 15: A Systemic Approach to Sensate
Focus https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
Readings for May 22 (Thurs)
1) Chapt 10: Cultural Diversity and Sensitivity in Sex Therapy
Chapt 19: Understanding Gender Nonconformity and Transgender Identity: A SexPositive Approach
2) Transgender people no longer considered "mentally ill" to American Psychiatric
Association By Kelly Craig http://dot429.com/articles/1119
3) Watch: "Becoming Me": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxzKlPVceWg
4) Is It A Boy or A Girl? by Milton Diamond http://bit.ly/M5tf9S
5) What Not to Say to a Transgender Person
http://www.cnn.com/2014/01/15/living/transgender-identity/index.html?hpt=hp_c3
6) My Son Wears Dresses; Get Over It by Matt Duron http://bit.ly/1n9k4Kq
Readings for May 26 (Mon)
No Class! Holiday! Catch up on reading!
Readings for May 27 (Tues)
1) Chapt 17: The Honeymoon Is Over: Narrative Sex Therapy for Long-Term Lesbian
Partners
Chapt 18: HIV Serodiscordant Male Couples: Special Considerations For Sex Therapy
2) American Psychological Association: Resolution on Appropriate Affirmative
Responses to Sexual Orientation Distress and Change
Efforts http://www.apa.org/about/policy/sexual-orientation.aspx
3) Human Sexuality Chapter 14: Sexual Orientation https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
4) Read & watch the video: 'Julea Ward' Bill Passed In Michigan House Allows
Religious Counseling Students To Deny Gay Clients by David Sands
http://huff.to/1sXKKBn
Readings for May 28 (Wed) & May 29 (thurs)
1) Chapt 5: The Challenging Landscape of Problematic Sexual Behaviors, Including
“Sexual Addiction” and “Hypersexuality”
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2) Out of the Shadows: Understanding Sexual Addiction: Chapter 01: The Addiction
Cycle (Excerpt) and Chapter 03: The Family and the Addict's
World https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
3) Depathologizing Porn by Joe Kort https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
4) The Emperor Has No Clothes: A Review of the ‘Pornography Addiction’ Model Ley,
David, Prause, Nicole & Finn, Peter https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
5) Sex Addiction: Rejected Yet Again by APA by David Ley http://bit.ly/SHdwpC
and The Profit in Sex Addiction by David Ley http://bit.ly/tsIwLo
6) You’re Addicted to What? Challenging the Myth of Sex Addiction by: Marty Klein
http://thehumanist.com/magazine/july-august-2012/features/youre-addicted-to-what
7) Take the SAST: http://www.sexhelp.com/am-i-a-sex-addict/sex-addiction-test
8) Human Sexuality Chapter 15: Atypical Sexuality (Excerpt)
https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
9) SSSS Western Region Conference April 14, 2011 BDSM & Empowerment Guidelines
For Clinicians, Educators, and Health Care Providers Working With Kinky People by
Olga Perez-Stable Cox https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
Readings for June 2 (Mon)
1) Chapt 11: Approaching Your Highest Sexual Function in Relationship: A Reward of
Age and Maturity
Chapt 13: The Good Enough Sex (GES) Model: Perspective and Clinical Applications
2) Opening Up: A Guide to Creating and Sustaining Open Relationships: Chapter 01:
Pilots, Parties, and Polyamory: A Brief History, Chapter 07: Polyamory, and chapter 17:
Raising Children https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
3) Systemic Sex Therapy: Chapter 13: An Integrative Approach to Infidelity
Treatment https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
Readings for June 3 (Tues)
1) Chapt 16: Healing the Sexual Repercussions of Sexual Abuse
2) Watch: "Let’s Talk About Sex" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6TsEBgyanb0
3) Sexualized Children: Assessment and Treatment of Sexualized Children and Children
Who Molest: Chapter 01: Childhood Sexuality, Chapter 02: Age Appropriate Sex Play
Versus Problematic Sexual Behaviors, Chapter 03: Sexual Behaviors: A Continuum
https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
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Readings for June 4th (Wed)
1) Chapt 3: Sex Therapy for Men: Resolving False Dichotomies
Chapt 9: Sexual Choreography: “Am I Enjoying This Right Now?” Not “How Am I
Doing?”
2) The Bitter Legacy of Adam Walsh by Steven Ing (Steven and his wife started the
website SexualFuturist.com) http://www.sexualfuturist.com/2014/01/05/the-bitter-legacyof-adam-walsh/
3) Officials push to amend Nevada’s controversial sex offender law
http://bit.ly/1lrL2vq
4) Scroll down and read: 2009 Summary of the Annual Report for 2008 Published by
ING Counseling http://www.sexoffenderhelp.com/publications.php
5) How Can We Stop Pedophiles? By Jennifer Bleyer http://slate.me/ULMWLV
6) Born This Way: Sympathy and Science for Those Who Want to Have Sex with
Children http://bit.ly/Tr33j1
Readings for June 5th (Thurs)
1) Chapt 20: Keys to the Sexual Mysteries: An Integrative Model for Exploring Clients’
Stories
2) Sex and the Single Senior http://nyti.ms/1jnHkp6
3) Consensual Sex In Elderly Care Homes - Ageism And Safety
Concerns http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/247036.php
4) Human Sexuality Chapter 13: Sexuality Across the Life Span (Excerpt)
http://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
5) Trade Secrets by Emi Koyama http://bitchmagazine.org/article/trade-secrets
6) Human Sexuality Chapter 19: Sex as a Commodity (Excerpt)
https://ares.library.unr.edu/ares/
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Processing Questions
Activity – Reflection – Analysis – Application
1) Reflection/What?
 What Happened?
 What did you observe when…?
 What did you notice about…?
 What were you aware of…?
 Were there any surprises…?
 How did you feel when…?
 What were you thinking or feeling when…?
2) Analysis/So What?
 What did you learn about…?
 What does this tell you about…?
 How does this relate to…?
 What does that mean to you…?
 How was that significant…?
 What does that suggest to you about yourself?
 What do you understand better about yourself?
 What else does this remind you of?
 What might you take away from that?
 What does that help explain?
3) Application/Now What?
 How can you use this learning?
 How can this learning help you to….?
 What will you do differently the next time you…?
 How can this help you in a similar situation?
 How could you hold on to that?
 How might you use what you learned here in other areas of your life?
 What do you need to implement what you learned in other areas of your life?
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File - CEP 756: Sexual Issues