BSc (Honours) in Business Information Systems
Course Handbook 2010/11
Definitive January 2011
Contents
Welcome to the Course
The induction programme
Key dates
PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION
Course Record Information
 Name and level of final and intermediate awards
 Awarding Body
 Location of Delivery
 Mode of Study
 UoW Course Code
 JACS Code
 UCAS Code
 QAA Subject Benchmark
 Professional Body Accreditation
 Date of Initial Course approval/last review
 Date of the programme specification
Admission Requirements
 Accreditation of Prior Learning
Aims of the Course
Employment and Further Study Opportunities
Course Learning Outcomes
Teaching, Learning and Assessment Methods
Course Structure
 Progression requirements
Support for Students
Key Reference Points for the course
Quality Management and Enhancement
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SECTION COURSE HANDBOOK
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1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
1.6
1.7
1.8
How to contact us
Contact details for the Course Leader
Personal Tutor arrangements
Who to contact about module queries
School Registry role, location and opening hours
Information about where course information/news/events is posted
Support for students with disabilities
Support for international students
WIUT Students’ Union
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2.1
2.2
How you are taught
The Teaching and Learning Strategy for the course
The course skills strategy
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2.3
2.4
WIUT Intranet
Study abroad and Exchange opportunities
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3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
How you learn
Guided Independent Study
Study Guidance
The Library and IT Services
Personal Development Planning
Feedback on assessed work
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4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
How you will be assessed
The assessment strategy for the course
Cheating and Plagiarism
Assessment Offence and Point System at WIUT
Guidance on the project/dissertation
Assessment Boards and the release of results
External Examiners
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5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
Make your voice heard
The Course Committee
How course representatives will be selected
Feedback from the Course Committee
Module Feedback Questionnaires – why complete them?
Student Experience Survey
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6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
6.7
What to do if things go wrong
Mitigating Circumstances
Penalties for late submission of coursework
What to do if you fail
Suspending from the course
Withdrawing from the course
Changing Course
Complaints procedure
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7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
Course Regulations
How your degree is classified
Intermediate Awards
Maximum periods of registration
Exclusion from the course on academic grounds
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Your rights and responsibilities as a student
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Module Pro formas
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Section 10 Westminster International University in Tashkent
Appendix 1. Glossary of commonly used regulatory terms (Undergraduate courses)
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Every effort is made to ensure that the information given in this Course Handbook is correct at
the time of publication and that the course information given accurately describes the courses
offered by the University.
The University reserves the right to cancel, without prior notice, a course, modules or
specialisms within a course.
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Welcome to the Course
Welcome to Westminster International University in Tashkent (WIUT) and to the Bachelor of
Science (Honours) in Business Information Systems, a validated course of the University of
Westminster, London.
The purpose of this handbook is to explain to you the main details of the course. Some of the
information may appear complex and daunting at first sight, but as you become used to the
University and the course you will find it will become more useful. We want you to feel confident on
the course and hope this handbook will help you understand how the course is structured, the
assessment procedures, the course management and other vital aspects of your programme.
It is important that you retain this handbook throughout your time at the University. The Course
Handbook should be read in conjunction with the general WIUT booklet ‘Essential Information
Undergraduate Student Guide ’ which contains vital information on University regulations,
procedures and facilities. Copies of this booklet are available in the library and on the University
intranet.
Being a student can be an enjoyable experience - despite all the pressures, it is a unique
opportunity for you to discover your own strengths and to capitalise on them. This time will remain
in your memories with warm thoughts and many friends you make here will stay with you for a long
time.
You will find that your colleagues on the course have varied backgrounds, abilities, hopes and
aspirations. We hope you will gain useful life experiences and knowledge from the interaction with
your fellow students as you progress in the course.
For some of you, your aim at the end of the course will be to gain an interesting and worthwhile job.
For others it will be to continue your studies to degree, masters or research level. The University
provides many opportunities to help you both in your studies and in your personal development, but
the final responsibility for learning rests with you.
We strive to create an academic environment in which you are continually challenged and
inspired to do your best possible work. We can only do that with your effort and ambition. It is a
partnership between all of us - you, the lecturers and the University. So let us work together to
achieve our aim and to make your time here an enjoyable and valuable experience.
Lobar Mukhamedova
Course Leader, WIUT
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And Welcome to the University of Westminster
You are a student of both the Westminster International University and the University of
Westminster. I would like to welcome you as a student of both Universities but in particular as an
employee of the University of Westminster. WIUT and the University of Westminster are partners,
WIUT is not a campus or branch of the University of Westminster, it is an independent Uzbekistan
public university, the Rector being appointed by the President of the Republic of Uzbekistan. I am
appointed by the Vice Chancellor of the University of Westminster to work in WIUT as the 1st
Deputy Rector (Academic). I have many colleagues in the University of Westminster who are
responsible for ensuring you are able to progress your studies. In particular each course has a
Liaison Tutor who you may meet at WIUT, they make regular visits to Tashkent, to ensure you are
being treated fairly and to ensure WIUT is able to deliver to the standards expected.
The University of Westminster is a public National University of the United Kingdom and its main
campus is situated in London. The University of Westminster like all other UK Universities, has the
power to validate its awards in other countries such as Uzbekistan. You have been enrolled on
such an award and will be allocated a student record number, a unique number, on the University
of Westminster Student Record system. All your assessment results will be stored on this system
and if you successfully pass all the requirements you will be able to graduate with a University of
Westminster Award, at the appropriate level. This will be the same award as students who study in
London.
Staff employed by WIUT will teach you and you will be subject to the disciplinary rules and
regulations of WIUT. For your academic studies the rules and regulations are those of the
University of Westminster. In practice you should not notice any difference, all my colleagues at
WIUT understand this relationship and give you advice if you are confused. You are however
responsible for your own performance and learning, for your own discipline and behaviour, we are
here to help and will do so if needed.
I was appointed to work with my WIUT colleagues to help develop and build a unique and strong
university. WIUT is still a young university but it has been able to offer high quality courses, built on
a high standard of integrity and honesty that you will be expected to observe. It provides a unique
experience in Uzbekistan and Central Asia, an Uzbekistan University offering International
standards of education, built on the traditions, values and standards of UK education, and the
particular expertise of the University of Westminster. I hope you will be proud to be a student of the
University of Westminster as well as WIUT. I am proud to work at WIUT for the University of
Westminster.
Alan P. France
1st Deputy Rector (Academic)
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The induction programme
The induction programme is seen as an integral part of the learning process and will operate
during the week prior to commencement of lectures in Semester 1. The main aim of induction
programme is to introduce students to the University, to the Course, to the facilities that they will
immediately make use of, and to the course structure.
Responsibility for organising the
Induction programme rests with the course leaders and the course team. The primary objective
of the induction is to ‘ice-break’ within the students groups and between the students and tutors.
It will also help them to overcome language barrier students may have.
Games, simulations and other exercises will be used to break the ice and help to build a team
spirit. This programme is very important as some of the students will be entering direct into the
degree programmes, whereas others will come from the foundation programme (Certificate of
International Foundation Studies, level 3) and will therefore have a better understanding of the
system and principles of WIUT.
The induction programme gives you the opportunity to get settled in and familiarize yourself with
the University and your course. Once lectures have started all of you will have busy time
attending lectures and seminars as well as meeting the deadlines of various assignments. So
induction is a good chance for you to get to know each other and make initial contact with your
classmates.
Key dates
The normal duration of study for full-time bachelor students is three academic years. Each
academic year lasts about 34 weeks and is divided into two semesters, the first running from
September to February and the second running from February to June. Each semester normally
consists of 13 teaching weeks followed by assessment weeks.
In-course-work assignments are given to students normally in the beginning of modules. Each
student should be aware of the deadlines for assignments. For this purpose students are
advised to regularly visit the University Intranet and check their University emails.
To provide a broader support in learning, during academic year students are offered series of
Personal Development Planning workshops organised by Faculty staff. Students are highly
recommended attending these workshops in order to acquire necessary transferable skills. The
dates of the trainings will be announced by your Personal Tutor.
Academic year structure and calendar
The normal duration of study for full-time bachelors students is three years. Each academic
year lasts 34 weeks and is divided into two semesters as follows:
Semester Dates 2010/2011
Semester 1:
Enrolment/Induction week
Monday, 20/09/2010 – Friday, 24/09/2010
Teaching Weeks 1 – 13
Monday, 27/09/2010 – Friday, 24/12/2010
New Year Holiday
Monday, 27/12/2010 – Friday, 31/12/2010
Assessment Week
Monday, 03/01/2011 – Friday, 07/01/ 2011
Semester 2:
Teaching Weeks 1 – 13
Monday, 24/01/2011 - Friday, 22/04/2011
(13 weeks)
Assessment Weeks
Monday, 25/04/2011 – Friday, 06/05/2011
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Assessment Board Weeks
Monday, 23/05/2011 – Friday, 03/06/2011
Publication of Results
Week commencing on 06 June 2011
Semester 9:
GIS Weeks
Monday, 13/06/2011 – Friday, 01/07/2011
Referral Exam weeks
Referral CW deadlines
Monday, 04/07/2011 – Friday, 15/07/2011
Within this structure, a more detailed breakdown is issued every academic year, which contains
dates for teaching weeks, GIS weeks and formal holiday breaks.
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PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION
Course Record Information
Name and level of final & intermediate BSc (Hons)
Awards
BSc
DipHE
CertHE
Awarding Body
University of Westminster
Location of Delivery
WIUT, Tashkent, Uzbekistan
Mode of Study
Full-time
UW Course Code
BFDNWIT
JACS Code
UCAS Code
QAA Subject Benchmarking Group
Computing,
General
Management - 2007
Professional Body Accreditation
University of Westminster
Date of initial course approval/last review
Sept 2003/ January 2007
Date of Programme Specification
April 2010
Business
and
Admission Requirements
Entry requirements for the BSc Business Information Systems have been set in order to select
potential students who have proven academic ability and are able to demonstrate a solid
foundation of skills in both Mathematics and English.
The admissions policy aims to attract and recruit motivated applicants across the full range of
possible access routes.
Students may have a background in any academic discipline. We encourage applications from
students with disabilities. The admissions policy follows, where ever possible the equal
opportunities policies of the University of Westminster.
The over-riding principle upon which admission decisions are based is that applicants should be
likely to benefit from, and succeed on, the course.
Intending students will have to meet age, English language, Mathematics and general
requirements:
Age Requirement
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Normally applicants will have to reach the age of at least 18 years old at the date of enrolment.
For the purpose of this regulation the academic year runs from 1st October to 30th September.
English Language and Mathematics Requirement
Applicants must:
 Have had their secondary educations through the medium of English and gained grade C or
above in the equivalent of GCSE English; or
 Have an IELTS score of 6 with a minimum of 6 in the writing component or the equivalent
score at TOEFL or other University of Westminster recognised English Test according to the
WIUT/UoW conversion table; or
 Have successfully completed an appropriate International Foundation course and passed an
Academic English Language module.
Applicants must have an acceptable level of competence in Mathematics.
demonstrated by one of the following:

A pass in an maths test approved by the University of Westminster; or

Grade C or above in GCSE/’O’ Level Mathematics (or its equivalent); or

A pass in Quantitative Methods on an appropriate Foundation course.
This could be
General Requirements
Applicants must have studied a broad range of subjects and have a school leaving certificate
equivalent to GCSE/’O’ Level e.g the Uzbek Certificate of Secondary Education (Attestat)
normally with an average of 70%.
In addition applicants should satisfy at a minimum one of the following requirements, namely:
 Successfully completion of an appropriate International Foundation course which includes a
pass on an English for Academic purposes module or equivalent; or
 Successful completion of the WIUT Lyceum’s Attestat, and the WIUT International
Foundation, course including the module English for Academic Purpose;
 Successful completion (an minimum of an average mark of 70%) of the first year of an
appropriate degree course in a recognised Uzbek or similar university; or
 Two GCE A level passes (in any subject excluding mother tongue), plus three GCSE passes
at grade C or above including English Language and Mathematics; or NC/ND or HNC/HND.
(The range of academic disciplines studied is not hereby restricted, but certain vocational
courses such as City and Guilds would not satisfy the admissions requirements.); or
 An Advanced General National Vocational Qualification (GNVQ); or
 Any other equivalent qualification normally accepted as entry requirements (e.g. International
Baccalaureate, etc).
Accreditation of Prior Certified Learning (APCL)
If an applicant has certificate(s) or credits from previous undergraduate courses of internationally
recognised universities they may refer to Accreditation of Prior Certified Learning (APCL)
process approved by the University of Westminster and qualify for exemption from modules.
Making a claim for APCL is an applicant’s responsibility and s/he is recommended to contact the
Course Leader or the Dean’s Office for further advice.
The overall programme aims are to produce technologically skilled professionals who can
understand the business challenges of an enterprise and conceive and manage solutions, which
are ICT dependent. This course is designed to produce graduates who will be able to integrate
their ICT skills with their knowledge of business operations and environments to support an
enterprise to achieve competitive advantage.
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Course Aims
The course also aims to:

Develop student’s critical thinking, analytical reasoning and modelling skills for problem
solving;

Enable students to recognise the professional, legal and ethical issues in developing or
employing information systems and technology;

Produce graduates with a range of key skills such as team working and independent
learning;

Provide educational foundation for further study.
The detailed objectives are that students completing the course will be able to:

Comprehend and illustrate key information and business systems and their
interrelationships;

Analyse business environment issues that influence information systems development;

Interpret and apply proven management paradigms to a specific problem;

Evaluate critically contending information systems development strategies and practices;

Select and apply appropriate technology to design and deliver ICT related applications
for an enterprise;

Demonstrate awareness, knowledge and skills required to operate effectively in a
commercial or public sector environment;

Recognise the potential benefits of employing Information Systems and ICT within
organisations;

Evaluate situations and solutions and make appropriate choices in relation to the use of
information systems to solve business problems in a changing environment.
Employment and Further Study Opportunities
The study of Business Information Systems involves applying knowledge and problem solving to
practical business situations, and in an academic environment successful students must also be
able to discuss and communicate these ideas effectively. The combination of knowledge and
skills gained in each of the areas as stipulated by the learning outcomes ensures that students
have many of the attributes required by the graduate employers. For a number of years there
has been a consistent demand for graduates with hybrid knowledge and skills in ICT and
business.
With the current explosion in the availability of information, businesses are becoming more and
more reliant on information systems to support innovation, decision-making and day-to-day
operations. Working in the advancing world of information systems can be exciting and
rewarding, as companies throughout the world are keen to recruit staff that can maximise
business potential. Graduates of the BIS course typically go on to careers in the business and/or
IT sectors. They have open to them a wide spectrum of career options. British Computer Society
(BCS) recognises some of the career routes available to BIS practitioners as Systems Analyst,
Web Designer, Sales Executive, and End User Support Analyst. The University’s First
Destination Statistics of the precursor degrees show how proudly our graduates demonstrated
their skills and knowledge to qualify for positions in these categories. In addition to these as
career entry opportunities, BCS lists Business Analyst, Consultant, Project Manager and
Director positions as opportunities open to experienced BIS graduates in their career
progression.
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Graduates who wish to continue to masters can confidently pursue their education in a variety of
advanced courses in information systems, information technology, business management or
similar disciplines.
According to the latest survey 93 % of the BC graduates are working and 7% are studying. It is
very pleasing to see that 30% of BC graduates are working in the IT sector and 30% in
education on the related courses. This means that at least 60% of the students are employed in
their field of study. The positions students’ held in different organisations are very varied:
Business analysts, Software and web developers, Service development specialists, Financial
managers, teaching assistants and lecturers.
Course Learning Outcomes
Learning outcomes are statements on what successful students have achieved as the result of
learning. They threshold statements of achievement and are linked to the knowledge,
understanding and skills that a student will have gained on successfully completing a course.
Knowledge and Understanding
On completion of the BSc Business Information Systems course, students should have detailed
knowledge and understanding of:
1. The structures of business organizations, their functions and challenges, and the
environment in which they operate.
2. The application of information systems and their impact on the business operations and on
an organization as a whole.
3. The information systems life cycle including the major development processes/models,
phases, activities, and issues relating to the development, management and maintenance
of information systems.
4. The principles, methodologies, criteria and tools that can be employed in analysis,
specification, development, evaluation, and management of information systems
Information and Data Modeling.
5. The wider issues of quality, security, ethical principles, legislative compliance and the
social and economic implication in relation to the computer industry.
6. The issues and implications surrounding the management of information systems projects.
7. The history and theoretical foundations of information systems and trends in application of
information systems.
8. The components of ICT e.g. hardware, software, servers, and networks.
9. Security and risks relating to computer systems and the implications of security breaches.
Specific Skills
BSc (Hos) in Business Information Systems graduates should possess subject-specific, but
highly transferable, rigorous skills. High transferability of these skills into a wide range of areas
should allow high mobility of the graduates to wide range of careers. These subject skills can be
summarized as follows:

Conduct critical analysis of a business problem/situation, formulate criteria to identify and
employ an appropriate strategy to solve it;

Identify, analyse and specify user requirements to develop or to select an appropriate
information system solution;

Specify, design, develop and test information systems to address business problems;
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
Evaluate the quality of an information systems solution and the effects of possible tradeoffs in a particular business context;

Critically evaluate, select and apply appropriate principles, methodologies, techniques,
tools and packages in the analysis, specification, development and evaluation of
information systems;

Produce models of business processes, business data, and information systems using a
industry standard modeling language;

Select and use appropriate methods and tools to plan and manage the development of
an information system.
Key Transferable skills
While the development of generic skills and abilities must be an integral aspect of Higher
Education courses it must remain highly visible to the students and it must be assessed.
Key transferable skills and abilities encompass the general intellectual development of the
individual. Use of a wide range of assessment formats enhances the visibility of these
characteristics. BSc (Honours) in Business Information Systems graduates acquire a high level
of transferable skills such as:

Gather and assess information;

Organise and manipulate data;

Think critically and evaluate their own performance;

Work collaboratively;

Self-manage;

Use numbers accurately and effectively;

Communicate effectively orally and in writing;

Use IT;

Conceptualise and problem solve.
Students’ employability should be enhanced by their increased awareness of their transferable
skills and abilities.
Transferable skills enable the students to perform a range of business related skills with
awareness of the necessary techniques, their potential uses and hazards.
Key transferable skills/other attributes developed during the course are:
Cognitive

Critically analyse theories, concepts and problems

Formulate a complex argument within a theoretical and contextual framework

Challenge received opinion and use own criteria and judgment
Numeracy

Use quantitative information to verify and extend existing theory
Use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Select and use most appropriate ICT tools for self-determined task
Research

Develop and implement own research strategy, working with a minimum of guidance
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
Critically review those aspects of current research relevant to self-determined research
topic
Decision-making

Evaluate options within the limitation of imperfect and incomplete information
Communication

Engage in debate in a professional manner, using communication to persuade and
convince
Teamwork

Work effectively as a member of a team, negotiating in a professional manner and
managing conflict

Continually reflect on the group process to improve group effectiveness
Leadership

To provide motivation and leadership skills, relevant to an economy in transition
Personal Awareness and Career Management

Initiate own activity, plan and manage own time effectively over a project

Reflect on outcomes, processes, the experience of others and personal experience to
improve performance
Students’ employability should be enhanced by their increased awareness of their transferable
skills and abilities.
Learning, Teaching and Assessment
Teaching, Learning and Assessment Strategy of the BSc (Hons) in Business Information
Systems course fits to the Learning, Teaching and Assessment Strategy of the University of
Westminster and is set up so that to be aligned with the stated aims and learning outcomes
within each module.
Learning and Teaching
Most modules include a formal taught component with lectures provided on a weekly basis.
Tutorial seminar classes are also provided each week to provide a stimulating environment for
students to work through examples and case studies, experiment with hands-on solutions in the
labs, engage in group discussions or on-line discussions, and gain immediate feedback and
support from tutors.
In addition, students are provided with a range of additional resources including online
discussion forums to encourage student-centred learning. The resources can be accessed
through the University Intranet, textbooks, academic journals and other materials available in the
University’s Library, and software systems. Teaching staff are often engaged in research or
commercial activities, and this ensures that the students gain an understanding of contemporary
business issues.
Working with industry in a real-life situation is invaluable in developing professional skills but
also in raising confidence. Interacting with the workplace while studying help students prepare
for a future career but also help them reflect on your knowledge and be more aware of how this
fits with the developing needs of industry.
The course is designed to offer opportunities to engage with industry before graduation, so that
the students can develop skills alongside the ones you get from the rest of your course. These
opportunities can be a formal part of your course, such as doing an internment within your
course or attending talks giving by guest speakers from industry. You will also, however, be able
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to engage with industry by interacting with the professional community, working on assessments
drawn from real-life examples, and engaging with your area’s professional bodies.
Students are encouraged to learn independently throughout their studies. This may be in the
form of literature review or research to support their assignments and projects. There are also
guided Independent study periods when are encouraged to interact with their tutors and
lecturers for advise and guidance and take responsibility for their on learning.
Assessment
The Assessment Strategy of the Course is based on the criterion-referenced assessment
concept, which is designed to assess changes in performance as a result of learning, for the
purpose of seeing what and how well material has been learned. The course strives to develop
effective approaches to assessment, both formative and summative, taking into consideration
the variety of modules within the course such as level, length and type of the module. The
assessment strategy is based on principles of best practice such as validity in purpose (to
measure the learning outcomes), reliability and free of bias (by the use of carefully designed
marking scheme), as well as constructive and timely feedback to students
Course Structure
This section shows the core and option modules available as part of the course and their credit
value. Full-time Undergraduate students normally study 120 credits per year.
BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems consists of three types of the modules: core,
optional and free choice. All students must take core modules and full-time students study from
6 to 8 modules worth in total 120 credits per year.
Types of the modules:
Core. These are modules that must be undertaken by all students on the course. They provide
the fundamental skills and knowledge on which to base your future careers and must be taken
for the award of the degree.
Option. These are modules that can be chosen from the course specific list of modules. These
modules allow you to pick modules that best fit your own aspirations while still providing a
cognate business information systems oriented curriculum.
Free choice. A free choice module, of which you may take one at level 4, 5, and 6, may be
chosen from other courses offered by WIUT. A free choice can be one of the listed option
modules, but it usually is a module from one of the other course offered at the University. Free
choices are subject to availability and the approval by the relevant module leader and your
Course Leader.
All modules on the course are worth 15 credits and some of them 30 credits. 15-credit modules
should normally be completed in a single semester of study, while 30-credit modules should be
completed within one academic year of study.
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Code
Module Title
Status
Semester Credits
Credit Level 4
EUZC405
Data Analysis and Information Management in Core
Business
1+2
EUZC400
Fundamentals of Programming
Core
1+2
30
2UZB404
Business Communications
Core
1
15
2UZB409
Introduction to Web Publishing
Core
2
15
2UZB401
Organisational Behaviour
Core
1
15
30
15 credit option / free choice modules to be chosen in semester 2
2UZB412
Writing for Professional Success
Option
2
15
2UZB403
Fundamentals of Finance and Accounting
Option
2
15
EUZC407
Fundamentals of Information Technology
Option
2
15
BUZB413
Role of Manager
Free
choice
2
15
Award of Certificate of Higher Education available
Credit Level 5
EUZC500
System Analysis and Design
Core
1+2
30
EUZC507
Database Systems Development
Core
1+2
30
EUZC508
Information Systems Management
Core
1
15
EUZC509
Web Design
Core
1
15
15 credit option + 15 option / free choice modules to be chosen in semester 2
EUZC510
Software Design Patterns
Option
2
15
2UZC505
Network Operations
Option
2
15
2UZB503
Management Research Methods
Option
2
15
BUZB524
Professional Practice Learning from Work
Option
2
15
4UZE507
Money and Banking
Free
choice
2
15
BUZB523
Retail Management
Free
choice
1
15
Award of
available
Diploma of
Higher
Education
Credit Level 6
2UZC699
Business Information Systems Project
Core
1+2
30
EUZC600
Web Application Development
Core
1+2
30
15 credit option + 15 option / free choice modules to be chosen in semester 1
15 credit option + 15 option / free choice modules to be chosen in semester 2
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Code
Module Title
Status
Semester Credits
2UZC604
Decision Support and Data Mining
Option
1
15
2UZB610
Project Management
Option
1
15
2UZC603
Database Management
Option
2
15
2UZC605
Strategic Management of Information systems
Option
2
15
EUZC606
Marketing Communications
Free
choice
2
15
EUZC607
Strategic Management Accounting and PM
Free
choice
2
15
2UZB609
Cultural Differences and People Management
Free
choice
1
15
4UZE611
Investment and Risk Management
Free
choice
2
15
2UZB607
Marketing Research
Free
choice
1
15
2UZB612
Developing Small Business
Free
choice
1
15
2UZB606
International Accounting Standards
Free
choice
2
15
Award of BSc/ BSc (Hons) available
NB: Not all option modules will necessarily be offered in any one year.
Students will have to attempt and achieve a qualifying mark of 30% in the specified assessment
element in addition to achieving an overall module pass mark of 40% or above. When a mark
for a component is below 30%, then the module is not deemed to be passed even when the
average between the components is over 40%.
Progression requirements
The BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems and its intermediate awards operate in
accordance with the Academic Regulations of the University Westminster and the Framework for
Higher Education Qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland published by the Quality
Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA).
All students should make sure that they have and keep for reference a copy of the current
edition of the general University handbook called Essential Information for Undergraduate
students 2010/11. The following course specific requirements should be read in conjunction
with the Modular Framework for Undergraduate Courses and relevant sections of the current
Handbook of Academic Regulations.
A Pass in a module is achieved when the overall mark is at least 40% and the marks for
aggregated components (e.g. coursework and exam) are individually at least 30%.
Condoned Credit at Level 4
A student may be awarded condoned credit at Level 4 four only, on the condition:
That the failed element(s) of assessment has been attempted at both the first and
referred opportunity, and where he/she has achieved:
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a) An overall module mark of greater than or equal to 30% but less than 40%;
b) An overall mark of 40% or greater for the module but not reached the required
qualifying mark(s) and/or qualifying set(s) as detailed in the module handbook.
Where a student is awarded condoned credit, the recorded module mark will be capped at 40%.
Condoned credit will count towards any credit limits for specified awards. Where a student is
awarded condoned credit in a module but subsequently achieves an overall pass at a re-take,
credit may contribute only once to an award.
Progression
To progress from Level 4 to Level 5 in full time study, a student must achieve an average of 40%
across 120 credits and pass 75 credits with the remaining 45 as condoned credits.
To progress from Level 5 to Level 6 full-time study, a student must pass at least 165 credits,
including 75 credits at Level 5.
To qualify for the award of BSc (Hons) BIS, a student must:
a)
Obtained at least 360 credits including:
- passed 75 credits at Level Four or higher and achieved at least a condoned credit in
each of the remaining modules worth 45 credits at Level 4; and
- a minimum of 120 Credits at Level 5 or higher; and
- a minimum of 120 credits at Level 6 or higher.
b)
Attempted modules with a maximum value of 330 credits at Levels 5 and 6
c)
Satisfied the requirements contained within any course specific regulations for the
relevant course Scheme.
The class of the Honours degree awarded is decided by two criteria: the average of the best 105
credits passed at Level 6 being in the range of the class to be awarded, and the average of the
next best 105 credits passed at Levels 5 and 6 provided the next best 105 credits passed are no
more than one classification below this.
Support for Students
On arrival, an induction programme will introduce students to the staff responsible for the
course, the campus on which they will be studying, the Library and IT facilities and to the
Campus Administration. Students will be provided with the Course Handbook, which provides
detailed information about the course.
Learning support includes the Library, which holds printed collections of books and journal
subscriptions. Access to electronic resources such as WestLaw, SpringerLink, JSTOR, EBSCO,
and BLACKWELL is also available.
There are over 100 computers spread over four computer labs available for students use. The
University uses a Virtual Learning Environment where students can access course materials and
communicate with staff and other students via message boards.
At University level, student services provide advice and guidance on accommodation, financial
and legal matters, personal counselling, health and disability issues, and careers. The Social
Development Department provides particular support for international students. The WIUT’s
Student Union also provides a range of facilities to support all students during their time at the
University.
Tutorial and Student Support
All undergraduate students at the Westminster International University in Tashkent, in common
with every student of the University of Westminster, have access to the University's student
academic and personal support system for students. All students are allocated to a named
individual who is their Personal Tutor.
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There are the following University wide support services:
Counselling and Advisory Service
Students are allocated an individual Personal Tutor at the start of semester one of the
programme. Personal tutors are selected from amongst the course teaching team. Personal
Tutors’ aim is to provide his/her tutees a quality counselling and advisory service whenever there
is a need for this.
Social Development team also provides counselling and advisory services for students.,
including, the career services, that give students a chance to look at a variety of opportunities,
starting from an advice and assistance on building plans for the future career, and ending with
getting a part-time employment to cover their own living expenses. Plus for those who are
required to undertake military service the Social Development Team can also help. In addition,
this department provides assistance for students coming from other regions of Uzbekistan as
well as other countries with their passport and other related procedures.
Student Housing Services
Because of the vast diversity of students in terms of where they come from, the University offers
accommodation for regional and international students. In addition to all the necessary
conditions, the dormitory has Gym, where any student can spend his/her leisure time.
Moreover, computer labs with an access to Internet offer the students a chance to continue their
academic assignments off-campus.
Student Health Service
A Health Department is available on the University and provides the students an immediate point
of help should there be a need for this. Professional staff of this department also offers students
counselling of a medical type.
Students’ Union
The aim of the Union is to provide a range of essential services as well as assisting students in
their sporting and social life. The Union gives help and advice on academic and personal
matters and represents students on all University Committees, to organise sport, societies and
entertainment.
Support through office hours
Given the favourable ratio of teacher to student, an advantage of studying at WIUT is that
students have ample opportunity to work with the academic staff of university in one to one basis
during office hours of Faculty staff. Office hours of each faculty staff involved in the academic
delivery process are normally announced on the module web-site in the WIUT intranet and
information boards as well as within in-course assessment instructions.
Key Reference Points for the course
Internally
The BSc (Honours) in Business Information Systems programme draws upon the Mission
Statement of the University of Westminster and its international remit. It seeks to establish the
quality and good practice in teaching and learning that is articulated throughout the University's
policies and to promulgate those practices abroad.
Since the initial validation, the scholarly activities of the WIUT staff have built on and influenced
the breadth of the curriculum on offer and have affected the teaching and learning
methodologies which are shared across the two participating countries (UK and Uzbekistan).
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Externally
The external reference points for the programme are the QAA subject benchmarks particularly
the QAA Subject Benchmark Statement for General Business & Management and
Computing.
This document sets out the nature and characteristics of the programme and represents ‘general
expectations about the standards for the award of qualifications at a given level and articulates
the attributes and capabilities that those possessing such qualifications should be able to
demonstrate’
Attention has also been given to Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Degree
Programs in Information Systems, done by Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
and Association for Information Systems (AIS). IS 2009 is the latest in a series of model
curricula for undergraduate degrees in Information Systems. It builds on the foundation formed
by this earlier work, but it is a major revision of the curriculum and incorporates several
significant new characteristics. IS 2009 is the third collaborative effort by ACM and AIS. Both
organizations have worldwide membership, and therefore, IS 2009 includes elements that make
it more universally adaptable than its predecessors. IS 2009 is not directly linked to a degree
structure in any specific environment but it provides guidance regarding the core content of the
curriculum that should be present everywhere and suggestions regarding possible electives and
career tracks based on those. Copies of the report are available from ACM and AIS:
http://info.acm.org/education/, http://www.aisnet.org.
Quality Management and Enhancement
Course Management
The Course Leader is responsible for the overall academic management and organisation of the
course.
Course approval, monitoring and review
A University Validation Panel approved the course in April 2010. The Panel included internal
peers from the University and external subject specialists from academia and industry to ensure
the comparability of the course to those offered in other Universities and the relevance to
employers. Periodic Course Review helps to ensure that the curriculum is up-to-date and that
the skills gained on the course continue to be relevant to employers.
The course is monitored each year by the Faculty to ensure that it is running effectively and that
issues that might affect the student experience have been appropriately addressed. Staff will
consider the outcomes from each Course Committee, evidence of student progression and
achievement and the reports from External Examiners to evaluate the effectiveness of the
course. The Academic Standards Group of WIUT audits this process and the outcomes are
reported to the Academic Council of WIUT and to the UoW, London.
The Liaison tutor
A Liaison tutor is appointed by the University of Westminster to provide support to both staff and
students at WIUT.
The liaison tutor’s role is to ensure that students studying at WIUT receive the same information,
standard of teaching as those students studying in London, including having similar standards of
assignments and examinations.
The liaison tutor will usually visit WIUT twice a year and during their visit will hold meetings with
WIUT students to discuss their views on their programme and any other issues of concern.
The liaison tutor will attend the assessment Boards held at WIUT and also moderate the work of
students prior to the work being presented to the external examiner.
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Student involvement in Quality Assurance and Enhancement
Student feedback is important to the University and student comment is taken seriously.
Student feedback is gathered in a variety of ways. The most formal mechanism for feedback on
the course is the course committee. Student representatives will be elected to sit on the
committee to represent the views of their peer group in the discussions held at the committee.
The University and the Students’ Union work together to provide a full induction to the role of the
Course Committee.
Course Committee Meetings are held normally 4 times a year - 2 meetings in each Semester
according to the following schedule:
Semester 1
Semester 2
CCM # 1
CCM # 2
CCM # 3
CCM # 4
TW 4
TW 11
TW 4
TW 11
Students are asked to complete a Module Feedback questionnaire at the end of each module.
The feedback from this will inform the Module Leader on the effectiveness of the module and
highlight areas that could be enhanced. The University also administers an annual Course
Evaluation Questionnaire, which provides valuable feedback about a range of University
services.
Students meet with Review Panels when the periodic review of the course is conducted to
provide oral feedback on their experience on the course. Student feedback from course
Committees and the University’s internal surveys are part of the Faculty quality assurance
evidence base.
For more information about this course:
University web site: www.wiut.uz
General queries: [email protected]
Admission queries: [email protected]
Please note – This programme specification provides a concise summary of the main features
of the course and the learning outcomes that a student might reasonably be expected to achieve
and demonstrate if s/he takes full advantage of the learning opportunities that are provided. This
specification should be read in conjunction with the Course Handbook provided to students and
Module Handbooks which provide more detailed information on the specific learning outcomes,
content, teaching, learning and assessment methods for each module.
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SECTION COURSE HANDBOOK
1 How to contact us
Course Leader
The Course Leader is responsible for the overall academic management and organisation of the
course. Typically, a module team delivers each module. Each module has a Module Leader who
is responsible for the delivery, resourcing, assessment and smooth running of the module and
for co-ordinating the module team.
The Course Leader for BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems course is:
Dr Lobar Mukhamedova.
1.1 Contact details of the Course Leader
Course leader can be contacted at the following address:
Westminster International University in Tashkent
12, Istiqbol str., Tashkent 100047
Room 117
Tel: (+998 71) 2387409, ext. 431
Fax: (+998 71) 2363599
Email: [email protected]
The Executive Dean of the School of Electronics and Computer Science
The BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems programme is similar to the BSc (Hons) in
Business Information Systems course within the School of Electronics and Computer Science of the
University of Westminster. The Executive Dean of the School of Electronics and Computer
Science, Prof. Graham Megson has ultimate responsibility for this course. You will be undertaking
your studies within the Westminster International University in Tashkent.
The address of the School of Electronics and Computer Science is:
School of Electronics and Computer Science
115 New Cavendish Street, London, W1W 6UW
Tel: +44 (0)20 7911 5000
University of Westminster, London
Telephone:
00 44 0207 911 5000
Fax
00 44 0207 911 5089 (School Office)
The School of Electronics and Computer Science provides Computing education at both
undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The majority of its courses have been designed in close
collaboration with the local business community.
Liaison tutor
A liaison tutor is appointed by the University of Westminster to provide support to both staff and
students at WIUT.
The liaison tutor’s role is to ensure that students studying at WIUT receive the same information,
standard of teaching as those students studying in London, including having similar standards of
assignments and examinations.
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The liaison tutor will usually visit WIUT twice a year and during their visit will hold meetings with
WIUT students to discuss their views on their programme and any other issues of concern.
The liaison tutor will attend the assessment Boards held at WIUT and also moderate the
assessment of students prior to the work being presented to the external examiner.
For the liaison tutor of the School of Electronics and Computer Science for the course BSc
(Hons) in Business Information Systems is Dr. Elia El-Darzi. Elia normally sees students and
the course representatives on his visits to WIUT, which is normally 2 times per year and often
more frequent.
If you have any major concerns you can e-mail him on
[email protected]
1.2 Personal Tutor arrangements
Personal Tutors (PT) are the first point of contact for a student seeking academic advice about
their studies. Your tutor can help you to develop your full academic potential and give advice on
academic and personal matters, which may affect your studies at WIUT.
Each student who attended the Course of International Foundation Studies [CIFS] became
accustomed to the role of a personal tutor [PT]. In Levels 4, 5 and 6 you will continue to have a
PT and as far as possible, you will have the same tutor for a period of 3 years. In Level 6, you
will also have a Project Supervisor and this also will give you an opportunity to discuss personal
issues related to your academic programme. You will have an opportunity to get to know your
PT during the Induction Week when various activities will be held to familiarize students with
their new academic year. Each PT should arrange a meeting at least once per semester where
students have an opportunity to ask questions and to have an open forum for discussion. PT’s
may also meet individually with students. You should not wait until a meeting is called before
bringing any concerns to the attention of your PT. Just contact them by email and arrange a
meeting or visit their room during office hours, which should be posted on the door. You should
also refer to the PT grid for each Level which sets out the PT and PDP [Personal Development
Plan] programme for the whole academic year.
A PT may not know the answer to all your questions! However, they will be able to direct you to
the person who can provide the answer – perhaps the module leader, course leader or the
Dean for example. If the question is related to a non-academic issue, you may be directed to
the Social Department.
WIUT presents you with an opportunity to receive advice on academic matters from a Student
Academic Advisor. Academic Advisor is a member of the course team, who has in-depth
knowledge of all regulations and policies of WIUT. Academic Advisors are the first point of
contact for students seeking advice about studies, academic and personal matters, which may
affect your study at WIUT. Academic Advisors provide confidential support service for all
students. Usually there are more than one Academic Advisors you may consult with. Please
contact your Course Leader or Student Academic Support (SAS) Coordinator to find out who
your Academic Advisor is. For more information, please visit http://intranet.wiut.uz/module/mypersonal-development-programme.
What can I expect from my PT?
A Personal Tutor will:

Monitor and support a student’s progress through the course and keep a record of
meetings held and action taken;

Advise a student on a course of study;

Assist with the development of study skills;

Provide advice and support on personal matters which may affect a student’s academic
performance;
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students

Highlight problems in a timely manner and, jointly with the student, determine any
necessary remedial action;

Direct a student to the relevant internal and external support services where necessary;

Prepare references when appropriate.
What can I not expect from my PT?
A personal tutor will not:

Solve all student problems;

Be able to give financial advice or advice relating to a student’s contract but may direct a
student to another support agency;

Be able to give advice on personal matters that do not relate to academic performance;

Give advice on health issues but will direct a student to a support agency;

Be constantly available. Students should make appointments by email and refer to a
PT’s office hours posted on the office door. If the situation is urgent, students should
telephone the PT’s office or seek assistance from one of the other agencies outlined in
the diagram above.
For further information, please refer to the PT/PDP booklet.
1.3 Who to contact about module queries
Module Leaders
You are registered on a course and a set of modules. You will have a Course Leader who is
responsible for the general management of the course and your programme of study. You will
also study a range of modules, as approved by your Course Leader; each module has a Module
Leader.
If you have a query about a module you should contact the relevant Module Leader. However
whilst studying on the module you may not be taught by the Module Leader so it may also be
appropriate to contact your tutor who teaches you first.
The list of Module Leaders can be founds at the Dean’s office or on the intranet module page.
Module Leaders are responsible for:

The day to day administration of the module;

Liaising with other lecturers on the module and integrating contributions from staff;

The monitoring of students’ progress on the module and liaising with students’ tutors and
the Course Leader as appropriate;

Ensuring that the assessment of the module operates smoothly in collaboration with the
Academic Registrars Office
Dean’s Office
The Dean is responsible for the delivery of the courses and assuring their academic quality and
standards at the University. The Dean’s office deals with the operation of the Faculty functions,
for example: staffing and staff professional development, academic programmes development
and management, research and consultancy, academic quality assurance and enhancement,
timetabling, academic requirements, etc. If you are not sure about an issue you can approach
the Dean’s Office or the Academic Registrar’s office and they will direct you to the most
appropriate office.
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1.4 Academic Registry role, location and opening hours
The Academic Registrar’s Office deals with a range of responsibilities. The main areas for your
studies would be for example, the formal registration of your studies, your student record and the
information on you as a student, enquiries about the academic regulations and information on
what happens if things go wrong plus it is the only office that will publish the results of
assessments, details of deadlines and exam dates, etc.
One of the most important functions of the Academic Registrar’s office is the collection and
registration of your coursework. It is the only and official point of collection for assessments.
You will be given a deadline for each coursework and you must hand the assessment in on time
to the Academic Registrar’s Office.
OPENING HOURS FOR STUDENTS
To help provide a good service to students and for staff to complete all their duties the Academic
Registrar’s Office is open for students Monday to Friday at the following times
MONDAY to FRIDAY
MORNINGS:
10:00 am to 12:30 pm
AFTERNOONS:
2:00 pm to 4:00 pm
EXCEPT WHEN THERE IS AN ASSESSMENT DEADLINE AND THE OFFICE IS OPEN UNTIL
THE DEADLINE.
1.5 Information about where course information/news/events is posted
All course related information/news/events will be posted in official notice board outside room
117 and course intranet http://intranet.wiut.uz/
1.6 Support for students with disabilities
If you have a registered disability and need support you should contact the Social Development
Department.
1.7 Support for International Students
If you are an International Student then you must contact the Social Development Department to
learn about services available for your stay in Uzbekistan.
1.8 WIUT Students’ Union
Students’ Union is a unique WIUT authority, which lies between the students and the university
administration and ensures that the university ‘life conditions’ of students are optimized. The
functioning power and the main rights of SU usually depend on the level of assertiveness,
credibility, and activism shown by its executive. Officially, this is composed of:

President;

General Secretary;

Project Manager;

Events and Entertainment Executive;
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
Information and Communication Executive;

Welfare and Education Executive.
Any WIUT student is eligible to occupy any of the above listed positions. All you have to do is to
pick up an application form from the SU room (312) when the election period gets started
(usually two and a half months before the end of academic year).
Provided that 10 signatures for the person are collected he/she may be registered as a nominee
for the respective position (it should be noted that the Project Manager position is not elected but
appointed by university administration or SU members). The results are calculated by the
independent representatives , Everything is done on fair, ethical, and objective grounds.
After the SU has been formed, complete freedom and independence is in their hands to make
some real changes in WIUT. Each member of the executive has its own program of activities or
clubs but weekly SU meetings help to coordinate those activities and to set further targets.
Some of the activities may include: separate commercial projects, sports events, cultural events,
foreign languages courses, academic support, students’ academic development courses,
relations with other universities, supervising the students’ representatives’ system or any kind of
advices and guidance needed. The list of the activities is very long, and it usually depends on
the creativity of the SU Executive or any of the WIUT students.
You should not forget that every single student of Westminster International University in
Tashkent is a member of Student’ Union and their contribution into its running may also make
significant changes. There is no society that is currently run without the help of WIUT students
who are not official members of the SU Executive but are members of different SU teams. That
is what the SU is striving for: a team of enthusiastic, optimistic, and devoted students who are
sacrificing their time for the sake of improving the students’ learning and leisure environment
here at WIUT. However, in exchange for the time and efforts spent all the active participants of
SU get a priceless set of highly important skills, experiences and memories! Students’ Union run by students for students!
1.9 Sports facilities
The University offers a range of sports facilities to organise your social and free time. In the
University sports club students can play active games such as football, basketball, volleyball,
handball and badminton as well as attend a gym under the guidance of professional instructors.
You should contact the Social Development department to register yourself to the sports club.
To get a weekly schedule of sports activities visit: http://www.wiut.uz/en/students/services/sport
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2.
How you are taught
2.1
Teaching and Learning Strategy for the Course
The teaching and learning strategy adopted on this course derives from that of the School of
Electronics and Computer Science undergraduate programme, which provides the aims,
structure, philosophy and rationale behind the BSc(Hons) in Business Information Systems.
Wide ranges of teaching strategies are being used to best achieve the particular module learning
outcomes.
Students arriving on the course from other institutions in Uzbekistan may be used to a style of
education that is more teacher-led and where there is limited opportunity to get hands-on
experience with modern computing equipment. By adopting a very practical, student-centred
approach, which is characteristic of courses at the University of Westminster, WIUT hopes to
offer a different, more attractive and effective learning experience for students.
The teaching and learning strategy employed by the course Team aims to enable you to
maximise your own individual learning style as well as developing your ability to work in teams.

Businesses increasingly operate with teams of specialists. They require people who can
communicate and interact effectively within a team, recognising and supporting
leadership, being proactive in leadership, negotiating and managing conflict. It is a
fundamental belief at WIUT that students learn by doing, rather than by being told. As a
BSc IS student you will be required to participate in group work in a variety of situations.
By putting students into teams and giving the teams a task to perform or product to
produce it is hoped that you will gain experience upon which you can reflect and from
which you can learn. There are many places in the course where this will happen, for
instance, in Systems Analysis and Design students are required to work in teams on a
requirements gathering exercise. They then have to communicate their findings to
another group. Communication skills are enhanced as well as team-working skills.

Increasingly, businesses will rely on people who can work independently and remotely,
using technology to overcome the traditional constraints of location, time and national
boundaries. The course is designed to provide in its delivery experiences that reflect not
only the current world of work but also anticipate how it will develop. An example of the
way in which the team illustrate this is the use of ICT in teaching, learning and
assessment. For instance, module leaders may provide students with web-based
learning material and provide feedback to their tutorial groups through email and webbased notices. In Introduction to Web-Publishing students learn to use the
technologies that help to facilitate this new way of working and doing business. Again the
assessment has a very practical edge: students design and build their own web-sites.
The experience of doing this allows for real evaluation, which in turn develops your
reflective skills.

As the content of the Level 4 modules is primarily knowledge based, the mixture of
traditional and active learning approaches allows students to assimilate gradually the
demands of UK higher education. Key readings covering major theories and models will
be provided in lectures and you will be expected to participate in seminar exercises to
develop discursive and analytic skills.

Delivery of most modules is supported by learning materials, which will be paper and/or
electronic-based. These provide key input to the module and could include: a teaching
schedule; an outline of the key concepts expanded in the lecture; key readings (from
original authors where possible); exhibits and mini-case studies with solutions to
demonstrate the theory in practice; activities for completion during seminars to reinforce
key concepts. It will also act as a mechanism to enable you to monitor your progress and
achievement of the learning outcomes.
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2.2

Technological learning support will be provided wherever possible. In the core module
Data Analysis and Information Systems in Business, support for the development of
key concepts is provided using interactive spreadsheets. A variety of other methods will
also be used to facilitate learning e.g. computer workshops, simulations and role-play,
case-study analysis, student-led seminars and group work. Lectures might include both
oral and slide presentations, which in some subject areas will include software
demonstrations and video clips or accessing a range of web sites. In particular, in
Introduction to Programming, Database Systems Development, Web Design and Web
Applications Development software will be used to develop and run aspects of
applications.

Learning experience in information systems management profession is required at the
current IT market for the maintenance of IT services in contemporary business
organisations. Core module - Information Systems Management will provide an
understanding of business organisations in terms of their types and structures, and the
information systems needed to enable those business organisations to operate
successfully within their environment.

In summary, the teaching and learning strategy used will develop your intellectual
abilities; your knowledge; your powers of creativity, powers of analysis and your
transferable skills. On any individual module, a combination of teaching approaches will
be used depending on the nature of the subject being taught, and the specified learning
outcomes.
The course skills strategy
In addition to specific business skills you will learn during your programme, you will have the
opportunity to develop a range of skills, which are transferable to other contexts.
Project management skills are covered in a number of modules whilst coursework exercises
often involve submission of a written report, providing you with extensive experience of report
writing and is some cases oral presentations, which help develop your verbal communication
skills.
Transferable skills enable you to perform a range of business related skills with awareness of
the necessary techniques, their potential uses and hazards.
You will develop a degree of self-reflection and begin to recognise your own strengths and
weaknesses. Transferable skills also enable you to work within a relevant ethos and assist you
to access and use a range of learning resources.
Currently the University’s policy is set out in the QAA Handbook as follows:
Students need to develop key transferable skills as an integral part of their study in Higher
Education, to enhance their flexibility, adaptability and autonomy in learning. The acquisition of
generic skills and abilities helps students to learn effectively (promoting lifelong learning) to meet
the demands of the graduate labour market. The Association of Graduate Recruiters has
highlighted the five most recognised skill shortages amongst graduates as:

Communication skills;

Business awareness;

Ability to work as part of a team;

Leadership;

Problem solving.
While the development of generic skills and abilities must be an integral aspect of Higher
Education courses it must remain highly visible to the students and it must be assessed.
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Key transferable skills and abilities encompass the general intellectual development of the
individual. Use of a wide range of assessment formats enhances the visibility of these
characteristics. Typically students are expected to demonstrate through coursework, tests,
portfolio generation and examinations their ability to

Gather and assess information;

Organise and manipulate data;

Think critically and evaluate their own performance;

Work collaboratively;

Self-manage;

Use numbers accurately and effectively;

Communicate effectively orally and in writing;

Use IT;

Conceptualise and problem solve.
Students' employability should be enhanced by their increased awareness of their transferable
skills and abilities.
It is part of the Course Team’s assessment strategy that the assessments of the course should
encourage the development of students’ transferable skills.
The table below shows how the transferable skills map onto the assessments of Level 4,5 and 6
of the course:
Knowledge and Understanding
On completion of the BSc Business Information
Systems course, students should have detailed
knowledge and understanding of:
Core module(s) in, which assessed
1. The application of information systems and their
impact on the business operations and on an
organisation as a whole.
Data Analysis and Information Management
Managing information systems
2. The information systems life cycle including the
major
development
processes/models,
phases,
activities, and issues relating to the development,
management and maintenance of information systems
System Analysis and Design
Data Analysis and Information Management
3. The principles, methodologies, criteria and tools that
can be employed in analysis, specification,
development, evaluation, and management of
information systems Information and Data Modelling:
System Analysis and Design
Managing information systems
4.The wider issues of quality, security, ethical
principles, legislative compliance and the social and
economic implication in relation to the computer
industry
Managing information systems
The issues and implications surrounding
management of information systems projects
Managing information systems
the
The history and theoretical foundations of information
systems and trends in application of information
systems
Data Analysis and Information Management
The components of ICT e.g. hardware, software,
servers, and networks.
Fundamentals of Programming
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Security and risks relating to computer systems and the
implications of security breaches
Web Application Development
Specific / Practical Skills
On completion of the BSc Business Information
Systems course, students should be able to:
Core module(s) in
which assessed
Conduct critical analysis of a business
problem/situation, formulate criteria to identify and
employ an appropriate strategy to solve it.
Business Information Systems Project
Identify, analyse and specify user requirements to
develop or to select an appropriate information
system solution
System Analysis and Design
Specify, design, develop and test information
systems to address business problems.
System Analysis and design
Web Application Development
Database Systems Development
Web Design
Evaluate the quality of an information systems
solution and the effects of possible trade-offs in a
particular business context.
Critically evaluate, select and apply appropriate
principles, methodologies, techniques, tools and
packages
in
the
analysis,
specification,
development and evaluation of information
systems.
Business Information Systems Project
System Analysis and Design
Produce models of business processes, business
data, and information systems using a industry
standard modeling language
Information Systems and Data Management in
Business
Select and use appropriate methods and tools to
plan and manage the development of an
information system.
Business Information Systems Project
Managing information systems
System Analysis and Design
Managing information systems
Key Transferable skills
On completion of the BSc Business Information
Systems course, students should be able to:
Core module(s) in, which assessed
Competently use a range of ICT applications for
communication,
presentation,
research
and
learning purposes.
All core modules.
Confidently use and present data/information
All core modules.
Carry out a comprehensive literature research of a
given topic using a wide range of resources and
justify the inclusion of ideas and techniques to
benefit new custom made solution
Business Information Systems Project
Work independently and manage own time and
workload. Take responsibility for own learning and
become independent learners.
All core modules.
Work effectively as a member of team towards
Managing information systems
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achieving a common goal
System Analysis and Design
Effectively and fluently communicate critically
acquired knowledge by written, oral and visual
means in a clear and concise manner
Business Communications
2.3
WIUT On-line Learning Management System
The university has developed its own version of a student on line support system to reflect the
conditions in Uzbekistan and to provide a resource for students and staff, to interact and provide
additional support for independent learning. The WIUT Intranet has been developed to enable
students to access learning resources independently and remotely. Each module has an on line
box that provides the facility for independent student exchange via a ‘Module Blog’, for the tutor
to provide additional learning materials, lecture material, seminar and assessment material. You
will find that module teams use the module box in different ways, but in most cases you will be
able to get your assignments, receive feedback on assessments, review lecture materials and
obtain additional reference material that you would find useful in you studies. In addition the
Library provides an on-line catalogue and e-journals that you can access.
In addition the WIUT Student Record System is also available via the WIUT Intranet, both within
the university and remotely. This stores all your assessment marks and you can review your
profile. There are developments that are planned to further help you in your studies. The
university has a multi-media studio and there are plans for interactive learning materials to be
used for your learning.
The University of Westminster has a similar on-line support system, that provides similar
learning support to students based in London
2.4
Study abroad and Exchange opportunities
The University may have both outgoing students; those students who are initially enrolled on a
University of Westminster course and who then seek an exchange with an overseas partner and
incoming students; those students from a higher education institution outside of the University
who have agreed their exchange through the Dean’s office and studying normally on reciprocal
basis implemented according to a bi-lateral partnership agreement or within Erasmus Mundus
framework. The student exchanges are normally done with an approved University of
Westminster Overseas Partner Institutions. Student exchange arrangements are governed by
academic regulations stated in the Section 19 of Handbook of Academic Regulations 2009.
3.
How you learn
3.1
Guided Independent Study
The organisation of Guided Independent Study weeks (GIS) is an important aspect of the
learning and teaching strategy of the University. In each module you may have up to 3 weeks of
GIS in each semester. A GIS week is not a period of time when students are left to work on their
own without academic guidance. It is a part of academic delivery process which has a
structured and planned approach to the organisation of the academic support in students
learning, and which is organised as a out-of-class-teaching activities that help to integrate,
reinforce and induce better understanding and deeper learning of students. During GIS weeks
module teams can organise formative or summative assessments such as CW progress reports,
presentations, in-class tests, intermediate revisions etc.
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3.2
Study Guidance
This course is based on student centred approach rather than teacher led: students are
expected to develop as autonomous researchers and critical thinkers, to prepare them for their
careers and lifelong learning. In addition to the taught modules within the course curricula the
University offers the Personal Development Programme (PDP) consisting of academic guidance
and a range of training sessions for students to develop their learning and other professional
skills. To learn more about PDP refer to the Section 1.2 and 3.4.
Attendance
WIUT has an attendance policy, please refer to the Academic Registry office for details. You
highly recommended to attend all lectures and seminars and if you are to be absent for more
than 3 days to seek approval from the Course Leader and Dean.. Moreover the analysis shows
very strong positive relationship between student’s attendance and performance.
3.3
The Library and IT Services
The Westminster International University in Tashkent has a Library that is part of the Learning
Resource Centre (LRC).
When you enrol you will be given a card, which acts as your University ID card and library card.
New students should present their ID cards to a member of library staff at the library counter
who will validate the ID card on the library system. This usually takes only a minute.
The library has three main areas:

Quiet study areas and Main Book Stock on the lower/ground floor

Group study area where you can work with fellow students, use your laptop, etc

A reception, Reservation Desk, PC and enquires
The library has a large collection of books, but it is impossible for the library to provide a lending
copy of every book for every student when they want it; we have neither the funds nor the space
to do this. Therefore students must be prepared to use reference copies in the library and it is
important to allow time to reserve copies already out on loan. Students are advised to purchase
their own copies of recommended core textbooks wherever possible.
Books in heavy demand are purchased in multiple copies, some of which are designated for one
week loan or less or for reference use only. The borrowing allocation is up to 5 books at a time.
Fines and Sanctions
The library operates a policy of charging a fine for the late return of a book. The Fine system is
clearly stated and there are no exceptions. The system was introduced to improve the
circulation of books and not to make money for the library. It is your responsibility to return the
book on the due date. If all students did so then there are enough books for each student to
borrow. And the library would not receive any money from fines.
There are other sanctions for the misuse of the library and you must ensure you understand the
regulations.
The library currently subscribes to local periodicals, magazines and newspapers. The library is
continually growing and actively pursues the addition to the library stock of both British and
Uzbek orientated business publications.
Opening Times
The library is open 6 days a week in term time:
Monday
9:00-20:00
Tuesday
9:00-20:00
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Wednesday
9:00-20:00
Thursday
9:00-20:00
Friday
9:00-20:00
Saturday
9:00-19:00
Sunday
Closed
Guides to the use of the Information Resource Centre are available from the Library lending
desk on the second floor.
IT provision
WIUT has over hundred desktop PCs available for student use. These PCs are to be found on
the second floor of the building.
Most of these machines are located in one of four computer classrooms: rooms 208, 209, 202
and 215. You can use these machines at any time between 09.00 and 21.00 provided that there
is no timetabled class, taking place. Business Computing Students are provided with the
separate laboratory in the room 2.15 with 17 computers with the following hardware
specifications:

CPU Intel Pentium4 2.00 GHZ BOX (L2 512kb /Socket 478) /

Motherboards chipset Intel 845G chipset /Socket 478 /

DDR PC2700 256MB RAM / 40 GB HDD ATA133 /

CD-R(W) / FDD /

GeForce 2 MX400 64 MB

ATX Case DELL-250W / Mouse DELL/ Keyboard DELL.
All PCs have Internet access and office applications. Most area of the University is covered with
Wi-Fi Internet access.
The WIUT Help Desk is the first point of contact for many IT applications and services.
Contacting the Help Desk
There are multiple ways to get technical assistance from the WIUT Help Desk:

By phone: 2387406 or ext: 466

Visit the Help Desk room in 2nd floor for Face-to-Face IT Support Monday - Saturday 9
a.m. - 6 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Submit a Help Request via the [email protected]
Helpdesk Policy

WIUT Help Desk services only university hardware and software.

Every student or staff must present his ID card before we take any action.

WIUT Help Desk does not share University owned software or pirated software with
students or staff.

Any hardware or software upgrade is done under the supervision of the I.T. Manager.

Under heavy and critical situations I.T.
supervises the actions.
Manager sets the priorities and directly
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
University students or staff is not allowed to download or install pirated software.
policy is enforced by applying server side software.

PC labs are open from 9:00 a.m. to 20:00 p.m.
This
Help Desk Services

Maintain PC labs, computer peripherals and other IT teaching facilities including the
equipment of the Copy centre, provide timely and accurate service in distribution and
receipt of notebooks, projectors and other equipment for teaching process, organize first
hand prompt response to enquiries of staff and students re IT facilities (computers,
copiers, computer peripherals, projectors and other equipment).

Being present and visible in the Help Desk and available to users requiring technical
assistance. Primary responsibility is user support and customer service.

Responding to questions from callers; remotely assisting users with technology
problems.

Attending IT training sessions. Becoming familiar with available technology changes or
problems.

Wi-Fi Maintenance and troubleshooting.

Maintaining students’ printing accounts.

University computer maintenance and support.

LRC Workstation Hardware/Copy Centre maintenance.

Assisting and providing trainings to university personnel, Expertise in Office programs
such as Word, Excel, Visio, Project, Outlook, Access.

Set up and configure computers for new users and are typically responsible for any
physical work relating to the computers such as repairing software or hardware issues
and moving workstations to another location.
Available software
University has four PC labs №202, 208, 209, 215(for BC students only) and the library PCs. All
PCs in PC labs have core software installed on them, which includes:
 Operating System Windows XP Professional SP2
 Adobe Reader
 Internet browsers Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Opera
 MS Office Package including
a. Microsoft Access
b. Microsoft Excel
c. Microsoft Frontpage
d. Microsoft Office Proofing Tools
e. Microsoft Photo Editor
f. Microsoft PowerPoint
g. Microsoft Word
 Kaspersky Antivirus
 DeepBurner for write CD
 Windows Media Player
 DjViewer
 Print Manager Plus - Client
 K-Lite Codec Pack
 Macromedia Flash Plugin
 Macromedia Shockwave Plugin
 QuickTime
 Information Law system "PRAVO"
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
Information Law system "Norma"


Room 215 also includes (for BIS students only):
Microsoft Visio
Microsoft Visual Studio 2003 Professional Microsoft Visual Studio 2008 Express Edition

Room 208 also includes:
Microsoft Project
Library PCs have an access to Library Information System OPAC and WebOPAC.
You will also find a number of PCs in the Learning Resources Centre and these can be used
anytime during the opening hours of the centre. In addition the Library Group Area has a
wireless system where you can use a laptop .
In order to use the University’s computing resources you will need to have an account. An
account will be created for you when you first enrol on your course and you will be shown how to
use the computing facilities during Induction Week.
Printing, copying, and computing help and advice is available from the copy centre (Room 204)
and from the technician’s room (Room 203).
Access to the University of Westminster on-line resources
As one of the requirements of the collaborative provision the University students have access to
the University of Westminster, London, on-line resources. The University students are given
personal accounts to use the University of Westminster intranet functions as well as email
services.
3.4
Personal Development Planning (PDP)
During your course of study you can expect to develop a number of personal and transferable
skills, which will help develop yourself, assist you in making the best use of your study and
leisure time. The course team and PDP trainers’ and tutors’ team will help you to develop and
enhance these skills which will benefit you in your future career.
During the period of your course, WIUT will be further developing a programme to support the
development of both your employability skills and your personal development planning.
There is a complex program aimed to help you develop and further enhance your personal and
professional skills both yourself and with the help of our experienced members of staff.
PDP WORKSHOPS
These workshops will help you become a professional graduate and improve your performance
as a student and future employee. Each workshop is aimed to develop a particular skill, as part
of the requirements to meet the University Standards. Information on this will be provided during
first weeks of each Semester.
Skill Being Developed
Learning Resources
Management
Group working
Workshop
/
Information Search engines, libraries, online sources
Reading habits, selecting appropriate material,
critical reading
Group working
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Skill Being Developed
Workshop
Problem Solving
Problem Solving
Self Evaluation
Self evaluation
Autonomy
Motivation, self regulation
Time management
Goal setting
Stress management
Communication
Self Expression
Leadership Skills
Diversity and conflict resolution
PDP tutors
PDP tutor is a member of your course team, who will help you create a year-long plan at the
beginning of the first semester and help you reflect on it at the end of the second one. It is
YOUR RESPONSIABILITY to contact your PDP tutor and arrange the meeting with him/her.
For more information, please visit http://intranet.wiut.uz/module/my-personal-developmentprogramme
PDP WORKBOOK
A workbook for you to use throughout your Degree Course, which includes interesting
articles on the skills, space for you to make year plans and write reflections on the
workshops you attended and tools to track your progress from year to year. The copy of the
workbook
is
available
from
your
SAS
Coordinator
or
online
from
http://intranet.wiut.uz/module/my-personal-development-programme
INFORMATION RESOURCES
More information on the skills, useful resources can be obtained from the My Personal
Development
Programme
module,
available
on
intranet
(please
visit
http://intranet.wiut.uz/module/my-personal-development-programme
3.5 Feedback on assessed work
You will be given feedback on all formative assessments. The feedback which you will receive
will allow you to reflect, revise and improve your skills and approaches for given tasks within
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assessments. You should carefully analyse the feedback given on your piece work, if you do not
understand it, then you should seek clarifications from your tutors who gave you these
comments. Understanding and reflecting on feedback is critical for your development.
4.
How you will be assessed
4.1
The assessment strategy for the course
The general principles governing assessment on the course are that a variety of assessment
methods should be used to supplement formal examinations. The appropriate assessment
method should be selected for the particular learning outcome being assessed. Coursework and
in-module assessments should be considered part of the learning process, with appropriate and
timely feedback being given.
At the start of each module students will be given details, in writing, of the assessment scheme,
the timetable against which each component of assessed work must be submitted, and details of
when marked coursework will be returned to students. Because of the varying size of modules, it
is not possible to specify a uniform period for the return of coursework, but normally this will be
done promptly enough to enable you to make use of the feedback supplied with the assessment.
The assessment strategy has been developed to support the course philosophy to develop
effective, reflective, thinking business managers of the future. The aim is to provide you with the
opportunity to demonstrate your capabilities in an accessible, structured manner within budget
constraints.
Assessment is perceived to be an integral part of the overall learning process. Combined with
the teaching and learning strategy, it aims to promote initiative and creativity, critical thinking,
structure of coherent arguments, evaluation, decision-making, professional communication skills,
effective group work, personal reflection, time-management, the ability to meet deadlines, and
ability to work under pressure.
There can be a various assessment model for course modules but normally - in-module
assessment and end-of-module assessment as per University regulations. The in-module
element will normally entail you working continually on an assignment, but it may also take the
form of a time-constrained test.
In-module assignments will give the opportunity for personal reflection on your current
attainment in order to improve your own performance; for continuous educational feedback from
the module lecturer, seminar tutor or personal tutor; and allow you to chart your progress
through the module.
The end-of-module assessment will normally be an individual submission and will provide a
summative judgement of achievement.
The module leader, in consultation with the module teaching team, sets all assessments for a
module. All assessments are subject to a process of approval known as moderation, through
which the University of Westminster ensures that assessments are appropriate for the level and
learning outcomes of the module.
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Coursework and Exam Weightings for the Course Modules
Level 4
Status
Title
Credit
value
Core
Data
Analysis
and
Management in Business
Core
Fundamentals of Programming
Core
100
-
30
70
30
Business Communications
15
60
40
Core
Introduction to Web Publishing
15
60
40
Core
Organisational Behaviour
15
50
50
Option
Writing for Professional Success
15
100
Option
Fundamentals
Accounting
Option
Fundamentals of information technology
Core
of
Information 30
Coursework% Exam %
Finance
and 15
30
70
15
60
40
Systems analysis and design
30
100
-
Core
Database systems development
30
100
-
Core
Information systems Management
15
40
60
Core
Web design
15
100
-
Option
Network operations
15
40
60
Option
Software Design patterns
15
40
60
Option
Management Research Methods
15
100
-
Option
Professional Practice Learning from 15
Work
100
-
Core
Web application development
30
100
-
Core
Business Information Systems project
30
100
-
Option
Project Management
15
50
50
Option
Database Management
15
40
60
Option
Decision support and data mining
15
50
50
Option
Strategic Management of IS
15
100
-
Level 5
Level 6
Students will have to attempt and achieve at least 30% in the specified assessment component
in addition to achieving an overall module pass mark of 40% or above to pass the module.
When a mark for a component is below 30%, then the module is not deemed to have been
passed even when the average between the components is over 40%.
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Assessment process
At the start of each semester your Module Leader should provide you with an assessment
schedule. The assessment of a module usually consists of a number of components each of
which must be completed to a satisfactory standard. The assessment schedule will describe
each component in the following way:

Brief description of the component

Date set i.e. the date when the Module Leader will provide a detailed description of the
task so that you can start it

Deadline: date by which you must submit the work (or the date and time when you must
attend an exam or test)

Weighting the value of the component as a percentage of the overall module mark

Feedback: the method by which the tutor will provide feedback on your performance
(other than the mark)

Results: date by which the marks for this component will be published
The schedule will also tell you:

How your work should be presented

The rules for reassessment and deferral

Rules concerning late submission of coursework

How to notify us about ‘extenuating circumstances’

How to contact the Module Leader
Please remember that all coursework should be submitted to the University Registrar’s Office
where a record of its submission will be kept. Never submit your coursework directly to the
lecturer.
The Course Leader will be responsible for making sure that assessment schedules have been
produced for each module. The Course Team will work together to make sure that assessment
deadlines are spread across the semester so that you do not find yourself working on too many
different assessments at any one time.
The assessment schedule states a date by which each component must be set. On or before
this date the Module Leader should provide a detailed description of the component. The
component description will add to the information provided in the assessment schedule:

A list of the learning outcomes assessed by the component

A more detailed description of what you will need to do and what you will need to submit
in order to succeed

The assessment criteria that will determine your mark.
The assessment criteria for each in-course assessment will relate to the specific module learning
outcomes and will be provided with the assessment when handed out to help you to determine
what is required and to know which specific learning objectives of the module are being
assessed.
The component description is checked by a second member of the Course Team, under the
supervision of the Dean of Faculty, to ensure that it has been properly defined and is a fair
assessment of appropriate standard, testing the learning outcomes of the module.
Marking and moderation
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All written work will be marked following the marking criteria published with the assessment.
Your work will be marked by members of the Module Team under the co-ordination of the
Module Leader. The work will be marked according to the assessment criteria laid down in the
component description. You will be provided with feedback that justifies your mark and suggests
what you could have done to improve it.
The Registrar’s Office will select a sample of work according to University of Westminster
regulations and this will be marked a second time by a different marker.
The University of Westminster has the right to inspect and second mark any coursework, test or
exam.
Please note that the final approval of marks takes place at the end-of-academic year
assessment board. The board will be attended by an external examiner from the United
Kingdom. The external examiner will see all the marks and will be able to view any piece of
work that you have submitted. This inspection by an independent person is the final guarantee
of the integrity of your results.
General Criteria for the Main Forms of Assessment
The assessment criteria for each in-course assessment will relate to the specific module learning
outcomes and will be provided with the assessment to allow you to determine exactly what is
required and to know which specific learning objectives of the module are being assessed. This
will promote the opportunity for you to achieve the maximum mark your ability allows and help to
ensure consistency when several lecturers are marking work. The criteria are based on an
evaluation of the quality and competence of student work in relation to the module’s published
learning outcomes.
All written work will be marked following the marking criteria published with the assessment.
Marking of all in-course assessment work is usually by one of the lecturers involved in the
teaching for the module. This is sample second-marked at all Levels. The marker’s comments
and corrections will either be directly on the student’s document and/or on a feedback sheet.
The feedback sheets are designed to clearly articulate your performance in relation to the
specific criteria for that assessment and to provide consistency when there is more than one
marker involved in the module assessment. The importance of constructive feedback as part of
learning is recognised and you will receive written feedback including:

a summary of the strengths and weaknesses of your work

a rationale for the mark awarded linked to the module learning outcomes and
assessment criteria

an indication of how you could have improved your work.
It is important to you to find time to reflect on the comments so that you can improve your
performance. Try not to be disheartened by a low mark – just remember that you can always
improve.
In the case of examinations, the Module Leader produces a brief report analysing the main
strengths and weaknesses of students’ responses and common errors. You should ask for a
copy from the last semester so you can use this feedback to help you prepare for your
examination.
The table below is intended only as a general indication. The mark awarded for an individual
piece of work will relate both to these generic criteria and to the specific assessment criteria set
out in the module documentation. Where a mark is changed, either by an internal moderator or
by an external examiner, a brief rationale for this should be given to you.
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LEVEL
Assessment Criteria
4
5
6
No evidence to suggest that any learning has taken place beyond the most basic
principles.
1-9
0
0
Makes no serious attempt to answer the question, and has little or no coherence.
What little evidence exists to show that learning has taken place is interspersed with
nonsense.
10-19
1-9
0
Makes a limited attempt to answer the question but demonstrates a clear lack of
understanding of the issues concerned. Misunderstandings and errors of fact are
likely to outweigh correct or meaningful statements. There is unlikely to be any
referencing. The poor quality of the writing may make it difficult to read.
20-29
10-19
1-9
Attempts to answer the question but is only partly successful in doing so, with much
irrelevant material included and much relevant material left out. Referencing is likely
to be limited. It should show at least an emerging understanding of the issues, but is
likely to include some fundamental misunderstandings and/or errors of fact. It may
well lack structure and be poorly written.
30-39
20-29
10-19
Makes a clear attempt to answer the question, but is likely to include material of
doubtful relevance. It may well be based largely on a single text- book, or on lecture
notes, but shows at least a basic understanding of the issues. There may be some
significant misunderstandings or errors of fact. Structure may be confused and
language clumsy.
40-49
30-39
20-29
Is clearly focused on the question and demonstrates a general understanding of the
major issues without significant misunderstandings or errors of fact. It may well
demonstrate a degree of naivety and is likely to be largely descriptive in nature. It
should be properly referenced, but may be based on a limited number of sources,
principally text-books. It should have a coherent structure, but may have some
clumsy expression.
50-59
40-49
30-39
Demonstrates a detailed understanding of the major issues and at least a general
awareness of problems and conflicting viewpoints. Reading is likely to go beyond
basic textbooks, and should show at least an emerging ability to compare and
contrast the arguments in different sources. It should be well-structured and wellwritten.
60-69
50-59
40-49
Demonstrates a full understanding of the major issues and a full awareness of
problems and conflicting viewpoints. It should include references to secondary as
well as tertiary sources (journal articles, monographs etc.) and should demonstrate at
least an emerging ability to evaluate and criticise sources. The quality of argument
should demonstrate a degree of sophistication and elegance.
70-79
60-69
50-59
Demonstrates a clear ability to evaluate and criticise sources and at least an
emerging ability to apply original insight and thought to the issues under discussion.
There should be at least a limited understanding of theoretical issues. If the analysis
of primary data is included this should be conducted with at least a basic degree of
competence.
80-89
70-79
60-69
Demonstrates a clear ability to apply original insight and critical thought to the issues
under discussion, and a clear understanding of the problems and limitations of the
approaches developed. It should demonstrate a degree of sophistication in the way
in which theory and practice are integrated. If the analysis of primary data is included
this should be conducted with complete competence and with a degree of
sophistication.
90-99
80-89
70-79
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Assessment Criteria
LEVEL
4
5
6
Theoretically informed, with a high degree of originality and an effective integration of
secondary and primary data. It should be capable of adaptation with a limited amount
of effort either for publication (though not necessarily in a peer-reviewed journal) or
for effective professional use (e.g. a marketing strategy that could actually be
presented to the Board).
100
90-99
80-89
Suitable for publication or effective professional use, as above, in its submitted form,
without significant adaptation.
100
100
90-99
Suitable for publication as a significant article in a peer-reviewed journal, or as a
highly innovative professional document.
100
100
100
A ground-breaking piece of research or exemplary professional document.
100
100
100
How and where to hand in work
All written work must be word-processed and printed single-sided on A4 paper. The top sheet
should state your registration number, together with the module title and marker’s name. Where
possible, assessments are marked anonymously (the marker will not know the identity of the
student). Please do not put your name on any piece of assessed work. Some work, like
presentations cannot be marked anonymously of course. Since it is important in business
reports that an efficient and appropriate writing style is adopted, a limited word count will
encourage such style and also serve to guide you on the amount of work expected.
All assignments have deadlines, which must be met if the work is to be graded. All work must be
submitted to the University Registrar’s Office and never directly to your lecturer using the
appropriate assessment submission form.
It is vital that students retain a copy of all course work they hand in. Whilst every care is taken, it
is inevitable, even in the best-regulated organisation that some instances of work being mislaid
will occur. In such cases, you will be required to produce your copy for assessment. It is
unfortunate but it must remain the responsibility of individual students to ensure that they have a
copy of any work submitted.
As an academic community, all students and staff at the University are expected to demonstrate
the highest standards of academic conduct. The University’s expectation is that all grades
obtained by students must result form the student’s own efforts to learn and develop. If carried out
knowingly, cheating and plagiarism have the objectives of deceiving examiners and gaining an
unfair advantage over other students. This is unethical. It also threatens the integrity of the
assessment procedures and the value of the University’s academic awards.
While you are studying here your academic performance will be assessed on the basis of your
own work. Anyone caught cheating in exams/in-class tests or through coursework assignments
will be subject to formal investigation in accordance with Section 10 of the University of
Westminster’s Academic Regulations.
It is your responsibility to ensure that you are not vulnerable to any allegation that you have
breached the assessment regulations. Serious penalties are imposed on those who cheat.
These may include failure in a module or an element of a module, suspension or exclusion from
your course and withdrawal of academic credits awarded previously for modules, which have
been passed.
Typical breaches of assessment regulations are described below.
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4.2
Cheating and plagiarism
As an academic community, all students and staff at the University of Westminster are expected to
demonstrate the highest standards of academic conduct. The University’s expectation is that all
grades obtained by students must result form the student’s own efforts to learn and develop. If
carried out knowingly, cheating and plagiarism have the objectives of deceiving examiners and
gaining an unfair advantage over other students. This is unethical. It also threatens the integrity of
the assessment procedures and the value of the University’s academic awards.
While you are studying here your academic performance will be assessed on the basis of your
own work. Anyone caught cheating in exams/in-class tests or through coursework assignments
will be subject to formal investigation in accordance with Section 10 of the University of
Westminster’s Academic Regulations.
It is your responsibility to ensure that you are not vulnerable to any allegation that you have
breached the assessment regulations. Serious penalties are imposed on those who cheat.
These may include failure in a module or an element of a module, suspension or exclusion from
your course and withdrawal of academic credits awarded previously for modules, which have
been passed.
Typical breaches of assessment regulations are described below.
Plagiarism/Academic Integrity
When you submit work for individual assessment, the work must be your own. If you have
included sections of text from other sources without referencing them correctly, then you may be
accused of plagiarism.
Plagiarism is defined as submission for assessment of material (written, visual or oral) originally
produced by another person or persons, without acknowledgement, in such a way that the work
could be assumed to be the student’s own.
Plagiarism may involve the unattributed use of another person’s work, including: ideas, opinions,
theory, facts, statistics, graphs, models, paintings, performance, computer code, drawings,
quotations of another person’s actual spoken or written words, or paraphrases of another
person’s spoken or written words.
Plagiarism covers both direct copying and copying or paraphrasing with only minor adjustments.
You must keep a careful record of all the sources you use, including all internet material. It is
your responsibility to ensure that you understand correct referencing practices.
If you use text or data or drawings or designs or artefacts without properly acknowledging who
produced the material, then you is likely to be accused of plagiarism.
Here are some simple dos and don’ts, to help you avoid plagiarism:
Do
Include references to all sources at the point
where they appear in your text, either via a
direct reference or foot note
Always use quotation marks to indicate
someone else’s ideas
Do not!
Rely on citing sources in your bibliography
without making clear where they appear in
your text
Take parts of other people’s sentences and
incorporate them into your own writing
without making clear that they are not your
own words
Reference diagrams, tables and other forms Assume that plagiarism only refers to written
of data
words in prose narrative
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Include full website references which make Simply cite the top-level page and expect
clear exactly which page you referenced, e.g. your tutors to search for your source:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/2009/ap
r/18/university-life-academic-cheating
http://www.guardian.co.uk/
Always check with your Module Leader or Course Leader if you are unsure about subjectspecific conventions concerning referencing and attribution (e.g. in design-based and creative
subjects where there may be particular expectations about referencing and/or copyright).
You can access a helpful tutorial about plagiarism in WIUT Intranet. After signing in the tutorial
can be accessed from any page in WIUT Intranet by clicking on the ‘Skills Resources’ tab.
Please consult the relevant Module Leader or your Course Leader if you need any further
advice.
Double-counting
Students are also not permitted to re-present any assessment already submitted for one module
as if for the first time assessment in another module. Double counting of assessed work is not
normally allowed. If submitting work previously included in another assessment the student
should attribute the section of text from the earlier work. This may be taken into account by the
markers.
Working Together
Discussing ideas is part of academic life at University and you are allowed to exchange sources
and references. However, you must recognise the distinction between sharing ideas, and
collusion. This means that you must not work with others to the extent of exchanging written
materials you have prepared, such as notes or drafts of assignments. If these types of materials
are shared this will be regarded as an assessment offence for the person who lends the material
as well as for the person who uses it. Your own work must be regarded as your own property
and you should protect it. If you are working in a shared space, log off from the PC you are
working on whenever you take a break so that others cannot access or copy your work; take
care to destroy printed drafts or copies of work, rather than just discarding them; and, don’t give
your work to others on disk. If you are working on a group assignment make sure you
understand the allocation of responsibilities between yourself and the other members of the
group.
Cheating in exams or in-class tests
You must not communicate with other students during an exam or test. You must not take into
the exam or test room any materials, notes or aids other than those officially authorised in the
examination paper. If an invigilator observes you with any prohibited materials, notes or
equipment, or observes you communicating with another student, your actions will be
investigated in accordance with Section 10 of the University’s Handbook of Academic
Regulations. Students should also remember that the reproduction of material originally
produced by another person, or persons, without acknowledgement, in such a way that the work
could be assumed to be the student’s own is not permitted; this includes work produced in
examination conditions.
Assessment Offence and Point System at WIUT
Nature of offence
Minor offence: Talking during exam/test; minor plagiarism
Minor offence: Failing to comply with the instructions of invigilator,
minor plagiarism - poor referencing, minor collaboration;
Major offence: Continuous talking during exam/test, major
Points awarded
1
2
3
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plagiarism, copying from another students work, close
collaboration, cheat sheets during exam;
Serious offence: obtaining, or attempting to obtain, access to Referred to stage 3
examination papers prior to the start of the examination, being automatically
party to any arrangements whereby a person other than the
candidates fraudulently represents the candidate at an examination
Each point corresponds with a certain penalty. When students accumulate points, a penalty is
imposed accordingly.
Point awarded
1
2
3–5
6–8
9+
Penalty imposed
Official warning reg 4.6.35 (b)
Capped mark at a pass for an assessment – reg 4.6.35 (c)
Zero for assignment any reassessment or re-attempt capped at a bare
pass - reg 4.6.35 (d) and (e)
Zero for module and the mark capped at a bare pass for any
reassessment or re-attempt – reg 4.6.35 (f)
Refer to stage 3 reg under 4.6.39
For students registered on a degree course accumulated points shall remain on the students file
until they have completed the award, which they have been registered for or offered by an
Award Board.
4.3
Guidance on the project/dissertation
In level 6, your final year, you will carry out work on the ‘project’. This is a particularly important
module, not only because it is a ‘double module’ taken over two semesters, but also is probably
the most challenging, and hopefully interesting and rewarding, piece of work you will undertake
at the university. The challenge is that you will have to work mainly on your own, building on the
knowledge and skills you have developed over the previous two levels, and going into one topic
very deeply. What should be interesting is that you get to choose the topic, and what is
rewarding is producing an independent piece of work, which you can then use to impress future
employers (and possibly get published).
However, we don’t leave you completely on your own! One member of staff, who has experience
in the area you have chosen, will be your supervisor for the year – which means they will give
you advice, comment on your work and encourage you through the process, as well as
assessing your work (along with one other colleague). After each of the three assessment
stages you will get feedback and ideas on how to improve the work. Though it starts at level 6,
you should already start thinking about what you want to specialise in, and what you might want
to write your project on.
The detailed information on the module will be provided in the Business Information Systems
Course Project Module handbook.
4.4
Assessment Boards and the release of results
The relevant Assessment Board must formally ratify all assessment marks, suggested referral
opportunities, recommendations for conferment of an award or exclusion from a course. Any
marks or grades released prior to the meeting of the Assessment Board have the status of
provisional marks and are identified with an *.
The University operates a two-tier system of Assessment Boards for undergraduate modular
courses, comprising Subject Boards (for modules) and Conferment Boards (for awards). However,
in some cases a single Assessment Board may combine the roles of Subject and Conferment
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Boards. Details of these Boards are set out in Section 14 of the University’s Handbook of
Academic Regulations.
Each Academic Registry will publish its own calendar for submission of assessment marks and
Assessment Boards. Provisional marks will be released on-line through SRSWeb throughout
each semester and marked with a *. Confirmed results will then be released through SRSWeb
once agreed by a Subject Board, and the * removed, rather than on a single University-wide
date.
Please note that if you have failed a module you need to re-check your results on or after the
University publication of results day (westminster.ac.uk/university-calendar). If a Conferment
Board has subsequently determined that a student should be excluded from their course on
academic grounds, that decision will override any decision of a preceding Subject Board about
reassessment in a module.
4.5
External Examiners
As part of its overall procedures for ensuring the quality of its provision, the University appoints
External Examiners to its courses (or sometimes to groups of related courses or subject areas).
Each Assessment Board as specified in the University of Westminster Academic Regulations will
have at least one External Examiner from another University or Higher Education Institution in the
UK appointed to it. Courses with a particular professional focus or which a Professional Statutory
Body (PSB) accredits may also appoint External Examiners from the relevant PSB or industry, in
order to ensure that assessment within the University meets their expectations.
Results cannot be formally published to students unless the External Examiner(s) for their course
confirm their agreement with the marks, as specified in the Handbook of Academic Regulations.
For the BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems there is one External Examiner and he/she is
appointed to the BIS Subject Board.
The role of Subject Board External Examiners is to judge whether students have been fairly
assessed in relation to the objectives and syllabuses of modules and have reached the required
standard indicated by their final marks. External Examiners also attest that assessment regulations
have been fairly applied ensuring parity of judgement for all students taking a module.
The role of Conferment Board External Examiners is to ensure the fair and equitable application of
the University's regulations on credit accumulation, and the course specific regulations for each
award, in decisions on the award of qualifications and specific classifications of awards to
students. This includes decisions on intermediate awards and decisions to exclude students from
their course of study.
5.
MAKE YOUR VOICE HEARD
The University takes your views about your course and your experience as a student seriously.
This section of the handbook provides information on how you can contribute to the quality
assurance of the course and modules you are studying on.
To help address any concerns you may have with the course and to help the university improve
its services we would like you to ‘make your voice heard’. The following are the formal means
by which you can voice your concerns. They are meant for concerns on the general conditions
and course related issues, personal concerns should be addressed to your Personal Tutor,
Course Leader, etc.
Student feedback is obtained in a number of ways, both formal and informal. Staff/student
relationships are characterised by a relaxed and informal approach. Students are encouraged
(and show no reluctance) to approach Module and Course Leaders directly with comments and
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queries. If you have a general concern on an issue relating to the course you should contact
your Course Representative first.
The senior management is always pleased to see students but you must address any concerns
you have to the appropriate person and please follow the procedures for more formal
complaints.
5.1
The Course Committee
The Course Leader is responsible for organising a Course Committee Meeting in semesters one
and two of each academic year. The Course Committee is the forum for students and staff to
present their views on the operation and development of the course. As a formal Committee within
the University's Committee Structure, the Course Committee provides an important mechanism for
the collection and consideration of student feedback. The Terms of Reference and Composition of
Course Committees are set out below. Any alternative mechanism approved for student-staff
consultation e.g. for part-time students, should accord with these Terms of Reference and
Composition.
Terms of Reference
The Course Committee has responsibility for considering the effective management of the
course, including enhancement of provision. The remit of the Course Committee covers the:

Academic welfare of students, and specifically the course induction and the Personal
Tutor system;

Student feedback comment on course operation, curriculum content, teaching, study
skills, support, assessment, facilities, library and computing support and administrative
support;

Monitoring information/comment on previous year's course audits, operation of course
academic standards, i.e. ‘progress statistics' of students enrolled, progressing,
graduating (and withdrawing); aggregated Module Feedback Questionnaire data; student
survey outcomes (internal and the National Student Survey where appropriate);
summaries of external examiners' reports; reports of University Review Panels and
University Validation Panels or external bodies which accredit the course;

Consultation on proposed changes to module content, assessment and/or course
structure.
The Course Committee minutes provide part of the evidence base for the annual monitoring
exercise conducted each year by the University, and the periodic review of the course conducted
by the University (normally every six years).
Composition

Elected student representatives, forming 40% - 50% of total membership, including
representation from all modes of study and subject areas as far as possible

Course Leader

Dean of Faculty

Full-time staff teaching the course, to include representatives of all major subject areas

One member nominated by Information Systems & Library Services (ISLS)

One member of administrative support staff nominated by the Academic Registry
Manager.
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Total membership should not exceed 30. The quorum shall be 40% of the approved membership.
Where the traditional model of face-to-face meetings is not considered to be the most
appropriate mechanism to gather and respond to student feedback, Course Teams may present
an alternative approach to a University Validation or Review Panel for consideration.
Good practice in committee organisation indicates that:
 The Course Leader should organise a pre-meeting for all student representatives in
advance of the first Course Committee meeting of the session, and provide copies of
the previous year's Course Committee minutes;
5.2

Agendas should be circulated one week ahead and put on course notice boards/
WIUT Intranet site to allow for items to be researched and responded to by inviting
relevant parties to respond;

Meetings should be held at least once each semester but preferably twice;

A Secretary should be appointed from the Academic Registry Office and should be
responsible for posting minutes and the associated actions and outcomes on the
WIUT Intranet site;

Issues raised at the Course Committee should be reasonably representative of the
student and/or staff group and not just of a minority;

Urgent practical problems (e.g. access to IT facilities or teaching rooms) are to be
raised with the Course Leader and/or Head of Department in-between Course
Committee meetings, rather than delayed;

Issues raised at the meeting and decisions taken are recorded on an ‘action list', and
draft minutes or notes should be approved by the Chair and circulated within three
weeks of the meeting and the list of actions reported back to the next meeting as
‘Matters Arising'.
How Course Representatives will be selected
Student representatives are elected by the relevant student groups to ensure that students from
each level, mode and major subject area are represented. Elections take place within
timetabled classes for core modules to encourage maximum participation. Elections will be held
annually early in semester 1.
All students are eligible to be a course representative and it can be a good experience if you are
chosen.
If you are interested in becoming a representative for your course and get elected, then you will
receive an induction and some training. This is done in collaboration with the WIUT Student
Union each year for all course representative. A ‘course rep’ handbook is provided to each new
course representative. In addition the Course Leader, Dean, Student Union executive and the
Academic Registrars office can help with any concerns you may have as a course
representative
5.3
Feedback from the Course Committee
The outcomes of each Course Committee are documented in a set of minutes. The minutes are
a formal record of the meetings they will be held in the Academic Registrar’s office and be
published directly following each meeting in a similar manner to the agendas. There are also
opportunities for Course Representatives to seek informal advice on the outcomes from other
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course representatives and the course team as well as providing feedback of meetings to the
student body either during lectures or electronically.
It will be the responsibility of the Chair of the Committee to ensure that direction is given to the
appropriate person or area for action or consideration on any aspects of the minutes.
The actions noted by the Course Committee are produced as an ‘Action Plan’. These action
plans are then progressed in the following way:
5.4

A Course Leader (CL) is asked to organize a post CCM meeting with the other CLs and
other relevant parties to prepare list of common problems;

After that meeting the CLs prepare draft course action plans, and may raise at this point
any concerns with the appropriate senior manager to resolve any issues;

The CLs prepare a final version of action plan including any resolved issues and pass it
to SU Welfare and Education secretary;

The SU Welfare and Education secretary will pass the final action plan to course reps;

Course reps pass this info to students.
Module Feedback Questionnaires – why complete them?
The University has a standard end-of-module student questionnaire as an additional means by
which students can give feedback on the quality of academic process (teaching, assessment,
etc.). The questionnaire is concerned with the quality of the teaching and learning process on
each module. All modules are surveyed at the end of the semester. All students on the module
are surveyed.
The questionnaire is confidential and anonymous. The questionnaire is filled in on-line and its
results are processed by computer software. Completion takes approximately ten minutes.
The results are used to address any concerns with particular modules, to assess the overall
performance across all modules, they are also made available to the UoW liaison tutor and are
used in the annual review of all courses.
They are important and are used by staff and senior managers to help improve the delivery and
outcomes of modules.
Individual members of staff may also use their own questionnaires or methods of evaluation.
These do not form part of the overall Quality Assurance system of the university and students
are free to participate as they wish.
5.5 Student Experience Survey
The Student Experience Survey is held once a year for all non-final year undergraduate and
postgraduate students and will seek your opinions on:






The teaching on your course
Academic support
Skills development and employability
Learning resources
Welfare resources and facilities
Representation and social opportunities
The results are made widely available within the University and used in the Annual Monitoring to
identify any action they need to take to enhance the student experience as a result of the survey
outcomes.
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6.
What to do if things go wrong
6.1
Mitigating circumstances
If illness or other unforeseen circumstances unavoidably prevent you from completing your
assessed work, or submitting it on time, you can submit an application for Mitigating
Circumstances (MCs) to be taken into consideration. If your MC claim is accepted it will result in
one of the following outcomes:
Your original mark will be reinstated (for late work submitted up to 10 working days after the
published deadlines):
You will be offered an opportunity to sit the assessment without penalty at the next available
opportunity as a Deferral (in cases where you have missed an assessment entirely).
The University operates a fit-to-sit policy for assessment. This means that if you submit a piece
of coursework or attend an exam or other time-limited assessment, you are deemed to have
declared yourself fit to attempt the assessment and must accept the result of the assessment.
If you have missed a significant part of your studies due to ill health or other personal problems,
you must speak to your Course Leader and Personal Tutor, to discuss whether you should
suspend studies or request deferrals either for the individual assessments, or entire modules. If
you do so it is very important that you seek advice from a Student Advisor in the Counselling and
Advice service, as suspension of studies may have a serious impact on your student funding.
If you miss an assessment or submit work late, you should submit an application in writing using
a Mitigating Circumstances claim form to the Academic Registrars Office, supported by original
documentary evidence (e.g. a medical certificate), at the earliest available opportunity.
MC claims will be considered, when submitted, by at least two members of the Mitigating
Circumstances Board. It is in your best interests to submit your claim as quickly as possible,
normally within one month of the circumstances occurring, as you will receive a decision on your
claim much earlier and will be in a better position to plan your studies for the remainder of the
year. A claim of mitigating circumstances should be submitted as close as possible to the
deadline of the piece of assessment in question (see Section 11 of the Handbook of
Academic Regulations). A Mitigating Circumstances Board will meet at least twice a year in
order to review decisions made to ensure consistency. Please note that retrospective claims will
not normally be considered, especially in cases where the claim is being made after the release
of the results for the assessment in question.
If you do submit an MC claim, you should not assume that it is necessarily going to be accepted;
it is your responsibility to make sure that you complete all assessment requirements in a module
as far as possible.
It is very important that you read Section 11 of the Handbook of Academic Regulations, on
Mitigating Circumstances, to find out what to do if you miss the deadline for any piece of work; in
most cases it is crucial that you submit the work or participate in the assessment as soon as you
possibly can. Late work will not normally be accepted if it is received more than ten working days
after the original coursework deadline. If other students have already had their marked work
returned, the same assignment cannot be marked once submitted late.
Your MC claim will be considered and a decision made by at least two members of the Mitigating
Circumstances Board. The Mitigating Circumstances Board’s decision will normally be
communicated to you by email within five working days of the MC claim being submitted (please
note during busy periods a response may be communicated up to ten days from the MC claim
being submitted). It is your responsibility to obtain the outcome of your mitigating circumstances
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claim. This decision is later communicated to the Subject Board, which meets at the end of the
year to formally ratify all of the results for your course.
The University-wide criteria by which claims will be judged are standardised for reasons of
fairness and these are published in detail in Section 11 of the Handbook of Academic
Regulations, which you should read before submitting any claim. The criteria for acceptance or
rejection of an MC claim reflect work-based standards of conduct and performance, and only
those circumstances, which are demonstrably serious and likely to have affected your academic
performance, will be considered.
6.2
Penalties for late submission of coursework
The University operates a two-tier penalty system for late submission of coursework and inmodule assessment. This regulation applies to all students registered for an award irrespective
of their level of study. All University coursework deadlines are scheduled between Monday and
Thursday inclusive. Where possible, the submission day will coincide with the day the module
classes are normally taught. However, the University does not allow submission deadlines to be
set for Fridays.
If you submit your coursework late but within 24 hours or one working day of the specified
deadline, 10% of the overall marks available for that element of assessment (i.e.10%) will be
deducted, as a penalty for late submission, except for work which obtains a mark in the range 40
– 49%, in which case the mark will be capped at the pass mark (40%).
If you submit your coursework more than 24 hours or more than one working day after the
specified deadline you will be given a mark of zero for the work in question.
Late work and any claim of Mitigating Circumstances relating to coursework must be submitted
at the earliest opportunity to ensure as far as possible that the work can still be marked. You will
normally have the right to submit coursework 10 working days after the original deadline. Once
the work of other students has been marked and returned, late submissions of that same piece
of work cannot be assessed.
6.3
What to do if you fail
For details of University regulations and procedures in the case of failure in a module or element of
a module, please refer to the Modular Framework for Undergraduate Courses, Section 17 in the
Handbook of Academic Regulations. You should note that, the University has specific regulations
pertaining to modules results and awards. For example, in order to be eligible for the award of an
Honours Degree, the maximum number of credits that can be attempted at Credit Levels 5 and 6
is 330 credits. Therefore, if a student fails and does not pass any reassessed modules, that will
take their number of credits at Credit Levels 5 and 6 over this limit, they will not be eligible for the
award of BSc (Hons) In Business Information Systems.
6.4
Suspending from the course
The University allows a student to suspend from their course for a period of one academic year.
If you think you need to suspend your studies you are advised to contact the Academic Registry
and speak to a Student Adviser or the Students’ Union before making any final decision. You
need to make yourself aware of any financial implications your decision might have and bear in
mind the maximum periods of registration for the course. It is then your responsibility to:
a.
b.
c.
Discuss the suspension with your Course Leader or Personal Tutor
Inform the Academic Registry of your decision in writing
Contact the Course Leader and Academic Registry Office 6-8 time weeks prior to the
enrolment period.
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Please see contact the Academic Registry for full details of the regulations on suspension, which
gives information on liability for fees and implications for any deferred or referred assessments.
6.5
Withdrawing from the course
If you decide to withdraw from the course please speak to your Course leader or a student
advisor before making a final decision. Once you have decided to leave the course, it is your
responsibility to inform the Academic Registry Office in writing of your decision.
You should be aware that if you withdraw from the course you may be liable for the payment of
the full tuition fee for that semester/academic year.
6.6
Changing course
If you want to change your course for another within the University, you must discuss this
request with both your current Course Leader. It is also recommended that you speak to a
Academic Advisor. It is then your responsibility to ensure that you have obtained the full
agreement from both your current and the new Course Leader and completed the standard form,
which is available from the Academic Registrars office. This process must be completed before
changing course. There is no guarantee that once you have been accepted onto one course at
the University that you will be able to transfer to another.
Please contact the Academic Registrars office for further information.
6.7
Complaints procedure
The University is committed to providing a good quality service to students. However, it is
acknowledged that there may be times when individuals may experience a quality of academic
or service delivery which they feel falls short of the standard reasonable expected by the
University.
In such cases, you may feel that it is necessary to make a written submission setting out your
concerns. You will find information on the procedure for making complaints on the universities
intranet Academic Registrars Office
7
Course regulations
7.1
How your degree is classified
The University normally determines the classification of undergraduate degree in
accordance with the following mark and credit ranges:
First:
An average of 70% or above in the best 105 credits at Credit Level 6,
with an average of 60% or above in the next best 105 credits at Credit
Levels 5 and 6.
Upper Second: An average of 60% or above in the best 105 credits at Credit Level 6,
with an average of 50% or above in the next best 105 credits at Credit
Levels 5 and 6.
Lower Second: An average of 50% or above in the best 105 credits at Credit Level 6,
with an average of 40% or above in the next best 105 credits at Credit
Levels 5 and 6.
Third:
An average of 40% or above in the best 210 credits at Credit Levels 5
and 6.
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The University of Westminster Student Records System automatically calculates the
recommended Degree classification of the report for the Conferment Board’s. However, the final
Degree classification agreed through the assessment process is a matter of academic judgement,
following and consultation with the External Examiners for the course, as appropriate.
7.2
Intermediate Awards
Students who are unable or do not wish to complete the BSc (Hons) Business Information
Systems, may be eligible to claim an intermediate award as described below. If a student plans
(for whatever reason) to leave the course for which they are registered and therefore wants to
claim an intermediate award, they must notify the Academic Registry in writing. The University will
then confer any intermediate award for which they are eligible at the next available opportunity. A
student shall not normally be allowed to claim more than one award within the same
undergraduate course scheme.
BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
To be eligible for the award of an unclassified Degree, a student must have:
a)
Obtained at least 360 credits including:

a minimum of 120 Credits at Level 4 or higher, of which no more than 15 shall
be condoned; and

a minimum of 120 Credits at Level 5 or higher, of which no more than 15 shall
be condoned; and

a minimum of 120 credits at Level 6 or higher, of which no more than 15 credits
shall be condoned.
b)
Attempted modules with a maximum value of 330 credits at Levels 5 and 6 (for the
purpose of this regulation a first attempt of any module shall count as an attempt,
and, a re-attempt of any module shall count as a further, separate attempt.
Reassessment, however, shall not count as an attempt); and
c)
Have passed all core modules at level 5 and 6.
d)
The University may award:

a Non-Honours degree with Merit to a student whose marks average at least
60% across the best 150 credits passed at Credit Levels 5 and 6;

a Non-Honours degree with Distinction to a student whose marks average at
least 70% across the best 150 credits at Credit Levels 5 and 6.
Diploma of Higher Education in Business Information Systems
To be eligible for the award of a Diploma of Higher Education, a student must have:
a)
b)
obtained at least 240 credits including

a minimum of 120 credits at Level 4 or higher, of which no more than 15
shall be condoned; and

a minimum of 120 credits at Level 5 or higher, of which no more than 15
credits may be condoned; and
satisfied the requirements contained within any course specific regulations for the
relevant course scheme.
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c)
The University may award:
-
a Diploma in Higher Education with Merit to a student whose marks average at
least 60% across the best 105 credits at Credit Level 5 or higher.
-
a Diploma of Higher Education with Distinction to a student whose marks average
at least 70% across the best 105 credits at Credit Level 5 or higher.
Certificate of Higher Education in Business Information Systems
To qualify for the award of a Certificate of Higher Education, a student must have:
a)
obtained at least 120 credits at Credit Level 4 or higher including no more
condoned credits; and;
than 15
b)
satisfied the requirements contained within any course specific regulations for the
relevant course scheme
c)
The University may award:
- a Certificate of Higher Education with Merit to a student whose marks average at
least 60% across the best 105 credits;
- a Certificate of Higher Education with Distinction to a student whose marks average
at least 70% across the best 105 credits;
7.3
Maximum periods of registration
The University normally expects a student to complete their award within the following maximum
periods of registration (in years) including any period of suspension of studies.
Full-time Study
Part-time Study
Cert HE
3
5
Dip HE
5
6
Degree
6
8
Honours degree
6
8
including 7
9
Degree/Honours degree
placement / year abroad
If a student is following a mixed mode programme of (part-time and full-time study) the maximum
period of registration will apply as if they were studying part time.
7.4
Exclusion from the course on academic grounds
In certain circumstances, usually where students have failed a significant proportion of modules
attempted, a student may be excluded from their course on academic grounds. Please refer to the
Modular Framework for Undergraduate Courses published in the current Handbook of Academic
Regulations for further details. This is available on the Academic Services Department website
westminster.ac.uk/academic-regulations.
8
Your rights and responsibilities as a student
The University’s Essential information undergraduate student guide is available at
http://intranet/static/academic/templates/Essential%20Information%202009-2010.pdf.
This
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includes information on your rights and responsibilities as a student of the University and it is
important that you make yourself aware of these rights and responsibilities.
The University’s rules and regulations are published in the interests of fairness, consistency and
transparency. Your signature on the enrolment form signifies that you undertake to abide by the
University’s regulations. It is therefore important that you take the time to read and understand
them. The University Handbook of Academic Regulations is available at http://intranet/faq/97.
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9
Module Proformas
Level IV
Data Analysis and Information Management in
Business1
Core
Fundamentals of Programming
Core
Business Communications
Core
Introduction to Web Publishing
Core
Organisational Behaviour
Core
Writing for Professional Success1
Option
Fundamentals of Finance and Accounting
Option
Fundamentals of Information Technology
Option
Role of Manager
Free choice
Level V
Systems Analysis and Design
Core
Database Systems Development
Core
Information Systems Management
Core
Web Design
Core
Software Design Patterns
Option
Network Operations
Option
Management Research Methods
Option
Professional Practice Learning from Work
Option
Money and Banking
Free choice
Retail Management
Free choice
Level VI
Business Information Systems Project
Core
Web Application Development
Core
Decision Support and Data Mining
Option
Project Management
Option
Database Management
Option
Strategic Management of Information Systems
Option
Marketing Communications
Free-choice
Strategic Management Accounting and PM
Free-choice
International Accounting Standards
Free choice
Developing Small Business
Free-choice
Investment and Risk Management
Free-choice
Marketing Research
Free-choice
Cultural Differences and People Management
Free -choice
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Full Module Title:
DATA ANALYSIS AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT IN BUSINESS
Short Module Title: Data Analysis and Information Management
Module Code: EUZC405
Credit Level: 4
Credit Value: 30
Length: 2 Semesters
School and Department: WUIT
Module Leader(s):
Jakhongir Negmatov
Extension:
471
Email:
[email protected]
Host course: BA (Hons) in Business Adminstration / BSc (Hons) in BIS
Status: Core
Subject Board: BA (Hons) in Business Adminstration / BSc (Hons) in BIS
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework/Portfolio – 100%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
In the module students learn how to perform quantitative analysis of business data with
computer applications as well as about basic concepts of information management and
information systems and how they are used in business decision making process.
Key words: Data analysis, descriptive statistics, computer applications, information
systems.
Module Aims:

To foster confidence in students in their ability to harness the power of numerical and other
information in a business context;

To prepare students to understand the role data analysis and information systems play in
the management of organisations;

To develop in students a critical awareness of the limitations of data analysis;

To provide the student with an understanding of the quantitative concepts, and to develop
their competence in the application of mathematical techniques, relevant to the monitoring
of the business environment and the management of the organisation;
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
To develop the competence of the student in the use of relevant computer software to
analyse data and manage information;

To provide the students with an understanding of how businesses can be seen as systems;

To develop an understanding of how information is collected, synthesized and used by
business;

To prepare the students to appreciate the contribution of information systems to functional
areas of business;

To introduce the students to the basic concepts of relational databases;

To provide that the students understand the concepts of information systems development
and communication.
Learning outcomes:
On completion of this module, the student should be able to:
1. Identify and access the main internal and external sources of data and methods of data
collection relevant to the business organisation;
2. Gather, filter and manipulate relevant data for presentation and quantitative analysis
using computer applications;
3. Select and apply appropriate, simple modelling and forecasting methods as well as
mathematical techniques in a range of commonly occurring business situations;
4. Interpret results in a business context ;
5. Communicate results in an appropriate format with regard to audience and desired effect
using computer applications as appropriate;
6. Identify priorities and allocate tasks within a group;
7. Describe the nature and use of information systems in business,
8. Identify basic concepts of information system development
9. Demonstrate practical experience of implementing simple information system application
Indicative syllabus content:

Role of information in management;

Sources of data, desk and field research, cost-benefit analysis of research, collection of
data, survey methods;

Normal Distribution – Basic introduction and calculating normal probabilities

Management statistics (averages and measures of variation);

Modelling (bivariate correlation and regression);

Forecasting (moving average time-series model);

Planning (graphical solution of linear programming problems);

Business mathematics (application of linear equations e.g. break-even, non-linear
equations e.g. profit maximisation based on simple quadratics).

Distinction between data and information and the principal ways in which data is codified;
Sources of data in business
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
How information is collected in business, then synthesised and communicated. Value of
information and protection of data

Definition of an Information System; main hardware and software components of an IS;
networks; security issues

Basic system concepts and definitions including sub-systems, components, boundaries,
networks, hard and soft systems, emergent properties and behaviour.

Business systems as they operate in the main functional areas of business.

Types of information systems.

Practical and applied overview of basic information systems development including
considerations of appropriate technologies such as databases and spreadsheets.

Steps of systems development: the traditional waterfall model

Contribution of modern technologies and networking to business information systems.
Teaching and Learning Methods:
The module will be delivered within two separate but inter-linked subject sections – quantitative
analysis of business data and information management in business environment. This will
provide students an integrated approach to more thorough and in-depth understanding of the
role of business data and information, data analysis and information management for business
decision making.
The first section will teach students on techniques of data analysis in business context and use
of necessary computer applications for this purpose. The section will be taught using a problemsolving approach in order to emphasise how quantitative analysis techniques are relevant in the
business and management environment. A spreadsheet will be used for quantitative analysis
with the emphasis on interpretation but not on calculation. Students work with pre-prepared
spreadsheet material to develop understanding of the underlying concepts, lectures which
provide the underpinning knowledge required, practical tutorials in computer classes where
students develop competence in the application of data analysis techniques to business
problems, and seminars which allow students the opportunity to discuss the interpretation of
their results.
In the second section of the module a teaching focus will move from numerical techniques to
information management concepts. The lectures are used to outline the main concepts of
information systems and information management in business environment. In tutorials students
will be given exercises where they are required to find solution to various information
management problems using systems thinking. They incorporate element of real time
information management, elements of systems design, database applications. MS Access
software will be used to teach the basics of database development.
The module will consist of weekly sessions of a mix lecture and workshops. Within teaching
weeks Guided Independent Study weeks will be organised in order to involve students in
additional activities to strengthen their independent learning and problem solving and group
working skills.
Assessment Rationale:
The module will composed of 100% Portfolio – which students have to produce thought the year
and will be based on a practical case. To assess students’ ability to apply data analysis
techniques in business context using computer applications and understanding of fundamental
concepts of information systems in business environment. Part of the task can be done in
groups which will require students to gather and analyse business data, and present findings in
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a business manner using appropriately computer software applications. Several draft
submissions will be required for the students to get the feedback from the tutors so to
demonstrate progress toward identified outcomes.
Assessment criteria:
Numerical calculations will be judged for accuracy and approach and appropriate
application of computer software.
Presentation skills will be measured for content and effect.
The assessment will assess the students understanding of the nature of IS in Business
and their ability to develop simple applications for data using a simple database and a
spreadsheet application (such as for example Access and Excel).
Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Assessment
Description
Weighting
CW/Portfolio
Collection, analysis and in100%
class presentation of data.
Create a simple IS application
from a supplied data model.
Interpretation of results in
business context.
Reflection of the work done.
Group task 30%
Individual task 50%
Presentation 20%
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Learning
Outcomes
1-9
Essential Reading
1. Business Information Systems: Analysis, Design and Practice (2008), Financial Times/
Prentice Hall; 6 edition
2. Morris, C.
Education
(2003) Quantitative Approaches in Business Studies, 6th edition, Pearson
3. Curwin, J. & Slater, R. (2002) Quantitative Methods for Business Decisions, 5th edition,
Thomson
4. Swift, L. (2001) Quantitative Methods for Business, Management & Finance, Palgrave
5. Burton, G., Carrol, G. & Wall, S. (2002) Quantitative Methods for Business & Economics,
2nd edition Financial Times / Prentice Hall
6. Wisniewski, M. & Stead, R. (1996) Foundation Quantitative Methods for Business, Financial
Times / Prentice Hall.
7. Thomas, R. (1997) Quantitative Methods for Business Studies, Financial Times / Prentice
Hall
8. Bocij, P., Chaffey, D., Greasley, A. and Hickie, S. (2003) Business Information Systems,2nd
edition, Prentice Hall
Further Reading
1.
Bancroft, G. & Fletcher, M. (1998) Improve your Maths, McGraw-Addison-Wesley.
2.
Chapman, M, & Wykes C. (1996) Plain Figures, HMSO
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3.
Parker, D. (1994) Tackling Coursework Assignments, Projects, Reports & Presentations,
Letts Educational
4.
Checkland, P. (1981) Systems thinking: Systems Practice, Wiley
5.
Harry,M. (2001) Business Information: a systems approach, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall
6.
Waring, A. (2001) Practical Systems Thinking, Thomson
7.
Richie, B., Marshall, D., Eardly, A. (1998) Information Systems in Business, Thompson
Business Press.
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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Full Module Title:
FUNDAMENTALS OF PROGRAMMING
Short Module Title: FP
Module Code: EUZC400
Credit Level: 4
Credit Value: 30
Length: 2 Semesters
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Vasiliy Kuznetsov
Extension:
431
Email:
[email protected]
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Status: Core
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Time constraint lab tests 30%, Coursework 40%, Examination 30%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content: The module introduces basics of programming, fundamental
data structures and classical algorithms for searching and sorting, computer architecture and
number systems, and traditional software development methodologies. Emphasis is placed on
practical experience with a suitable programming language.
Module Aims:
The module aims are to provide students with fundamental understanding of computer
architecture, to introduce students to an object based, event driven programming language, to
introduce basic algorithms and data structures and demonstrate how algorithms and data
structures could be applied to solve real world problems using an appropriate language, to
produce simple prototypes, and to raise the awareness of existence of different software
development methodologies.
Learning outcomes:
After completing this module the student should be able to:
1. produce syntactically correct and functional program
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2. identify the various activities involved in translating a given problem into a corresponding
executable program
3. understand and implement fundamental data structures using classes
4. understand and implement the concept of persistence in relation to objects
5. comprehend some of the classical algorithms for sorting and searching
6. understand binary, hexadecimal number system, perform calculations and conversions
between numbering systems.
7. discuss the problems inherent in different software development methodologies
Indicative syllabus content:
The requirements of a prototyping language, and how some current commercial languages fulfil
these requirements.
Key concepts of programming languages incorporating programming structures, data types,
procedures, debugging and testing.
Issues associated with event driven programming.
Creation of a simple relational database, execution of SQL queries from the designed interface,
and concept of persisting objects to databases
Design for a user interface, and coding the functionality required to produce a working
prototype.
Overview of numbering systems including number representations and conversions; binary
variables including logic expressions and simplifications of binary variables; binary arithmetic,
signed numbers; multiple precision arithmetic, floating point representation and manipulation.
Hexadecimal numbering system. Algebra, set theory
General overview of computer organization, processor architecture, memory. Classification of
programming languages, difference between compiled and interpreted programming languages.
Relationship between data structures and algorithms; standard algorithms for searching, sorting.
Perform elementary analysis of algorithm complexity.
Specification and implementation of fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, trees)
Teaching and Learning Methods:
The module will consist of weekly sessions of a mix lecture and tutorials. Within teaching weeks
Guided Independent Study weeks will be organised in order to involve students in additional
activities to strengthen their independent learning and problem solving and group working skills.
Lectures will introduce key concepts while tutorials will have a very practical focus, based on
problem solving. Exercises will be set in the lectures and students will be expected to develop
and present their practical solutions during the tutorial sessions.
Assessment Rationale:
The module will be assessed by means of two PC Lab tests, 1 coursework and an examination.
The tests will be time constrained and will require students to apply knowledge and skills
acquired on the module to solve given problems.
The coursework will enable students to use their understanding of different data structures and
algorithms to solve real life problems.
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The exam will assess some theoretical aspects of the module not covered in the coursework or
tests.
Assessment criteria:
PCLAB test 1 – This will be a time constrained closed book assignment in the PC laboratory.
Students will be expected to produce and test simple code that follows standard conventions. [1]
PCLAB test 2 – This will also be a time constrained closed book assignment in the PC
laboratory. The scenario presented to the students will be more complex and will involve
classes. [1,2]
Coursework 1 – This will be an individual assignment; students will be given a case study and
will be required to develop a solution program in appropriate programming language that will use
suitable algorithms and data structures. [3,4]
Exam – Final exam will cover all the theoretical aspects of the module [2,5,6,7]
Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Component
Unit
Weight
Learning
Description
Outcomes
PC LAB test
Practical
test 1
30%
1, 2
Students will be given some
simple problems that they will
need to solve by producing a
simple computer program and
that involves methods and
classess.
Coursework
Individual
40%
3, 4
Students will be given a
scenario (with solution outline
that should guide students to
the correct solution, e.g. suggest
algorithms/data structures) that
will require students to develop
their own algorithms, implement
and use standard algorithms
and use various data structures
studied on the module sessions.
Students also will be required to
use databases to produce a fully
functioning software.
Exam
Unseen
30%
written
examination
2,5,6,7
Covers theoretical aspects of
the module, assess broader
issues of understanding.
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
Essential Reading
Fred Barwell, Richard Blair, Jonaton Crossland, Professional VB.NET ( Second edition)
Fred Barwell, Richard Blair, Jonaton Crossland Beginning VB.NET (Second edition)
Mc-Millan, M. “Data Structures and Algorithms using VB.NET”, 2005
Pandit M., How Computers Really Work, MCGraw-Hill, 1993
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Further Reading
McConnell, S., (1996) Rapid Development: Taming Wild Software Schedules, Microsoft Press
Beekman G., Computer Confluence (4th Ed), Prentice Hall, 2001
Brookshear J. G., Computer science an overview, Pearson Education, 2003
Callan R., Mathematics for computing, Ashford Colour Press, UK, 1998
Lipschutz S., Essential Computer Mathematics, McGraw-Hill, 198
Schaums Outline of Fundamentals of SQL Programming (Schaum's Outline Series) by Ramon
MataToledo and Pauline K Cushman (Paperback - 1 Sep 2000)
Introduction to Java Programming: Core Version: Fundamentals First by Y Daniel Liang, 2006
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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Full Module Title: INTRODUCTION TO WEB PUBLISHING
Short Module Title: IWP
Module Code: 2UZB409
Credit Level: 4
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Aleksey Semyonov
431
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Core
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
In-module individual assessment 60%, End-of-module exam 40%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content: The Internet and the World Wide Web have become key tools
in the world of commerce and in the community. Web design and publishing have been and
will continue to be fundamental to the success of the Internet. This module aims to give
students an understanding of the technology that underpins the Internet, together with practical
experience of designing and constructing a non-transactional website
Module Aims:


provide students with an understanding of Internet and World Wide Web technologies
develop website design and construction skills through the use of appropriate and current
web languages and tools.

enable students to analyse and evaluate commercial website designs and functions

provide students with an awareness of e-Commerce business models and issues
Learning Outcomes
On completion of this module, the successful student should be able to:
1. discuss the elements of good website design.
2. develop a site plan and design strategy.
3. develop a site design and implementation plan.
4. construct, test and publish a functioning website using both hand coding and appropriate
software tools.
5. select and use a website construction tool.
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6. evaluate the design of commercial websites.
7. discuss the use of the Internet in e-Commerce and its associated issues.
Indicative syllabus content
History of the Internet and the World Wide Web.
Internet infrastructure and environment.
governance. Internet services.
Demographics of usage.
Management and
An overview of HTML and variants such as XHTML, website construction and publishing tools.
Students will also be presented with an introduction to XML and CSS concepts.
Website planning. Goals and objectives. Audience profiling. Design and construction
strategies. Maintenance and monitoring. Navigation and site structures. Management of
design and construction process.
e-Business models.
e-Business issues. Security and privacy. Political and cultural issues.
Teaching and Learning methods
Teaching methods will include lectures, discussions, and interactive tutorials.
Seminars will focus on the development of web page construction and publishing skills. These
will consist of tutorials in the use of more than one Web development tool and will help to
prepare students for the in-module assessment.
Assessment criteria
The in-module assignment has been developed to test some of the learning outcomes of the
module, to provide students with a chance to develop a rigorous and carefully developed piece
of work, and to gain a first hand understanding of the issues involved in planning, designing and
constructing a simple website.
The end-of-module examination is designed to test their ability to retrieve, understand and apply
theory to specific issues and problems, and to be able to conduct this analysis under a time
constraint.
Assessment methods and weighting
The precise learning outcomes assessed are listed below:
Assessment
Description
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
Coursework
Plan,
design
and 60%
construction of nontransactional website
2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Examination
Essay type questions
1, 7
40%
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
SOURCES
Essential Reading
Ozz E. (2002) Foundations of e-Commerce Prentice Hall
Further Reading
Castro, E.(2002) HTML and XHTML Peachpit Press
Cato, J. (2002) User-centred Web Design Addison Wesley
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Rosenfield, L. and Morville, P. (2002) Information Architecture for the World Wide Web
O’Reilly
Other Resources
Students will be provided with online module support.
Students will also use a number of online research and assignment resources.
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Full Module Title: FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Short Module Title: FIT
Module Code: EUZC407
Credit Level: 4
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Olga Yugay
432
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Option
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 40%, Final exam 60%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
This module introduces core information technology concepts and its components.
characteristic of computers, evolution of computers, generations, classification, applications
of computers.
Module aims
To make a student familiar with main information technology concepts and directions as
advanced IT users
Learning outcomes
After completing this course, a student is expected
1. to have strong understanding of information technology concepts and be able to explain
its various components
2. to be able to easily differentiate between computer hardware and software
3. to understands the numerical processes run within computer system
4. to apply acquired knowledge in future workplaces as advanced IT users
Indicative content

Characteristics of Computers

Computer Generations

Types of Computers

Digital Block Diagram and different units
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students

Input, Output, Storage and process Devices
Number Systems

Non Positional Number System

Positional Number System (Binary, Octal, Hexadecimal Number Systems)

Conversion of One Number System to Another

BCD, EBCDIC, ASCII
Memory Managements

Primary Storages

Storage Capacity : Bit, Byte, MB, KB, GB, TB

RAM, ROM, PROM, EPROM

Cache Memory, function of Cache Memory

Secondary Storages: Floppy Disc, CD, DVD, Hard Disk, Pen Drive Punch Card,
Magnetic Tape, Magnetic Disk,
Operating System

Definition and Functions

Evolution of Operating System

Types of Operating System

Difference between Windows and Open source Operating System

Batch Processing, Spooling, Multiprocessing, Multiprogramming, Time-

Sharing, On-Line Processing, Real-Time Processing,
Networking

Introduction, LAN, WAN, MAN, Intranet, Internet

Internet Topologies

OSI Model (Seven layers)

Communication Media
Practical Approach

Computer Assembly

Handling Boot Setup

Installation of Operating System and Server

Connecting your client to server

User and Workgroup Handling
Teaching and Learning Methods:
The contact time for the module comprises lectures and tutorials each of 2 hours duration.
Lectures will introduce key concepts while tutorials will have a very practical focus, based on
problem solving. Exercises will be set in the lectures and students will be expected to develop
and present their practical solutions during the tutorial sessions. Exercises will be set in the
lectures and students will be expected to develop and present their prototypes and certain
algorithms and data structures during the tutorial sessions.
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Assessment Rationale:
The module will be assessed by means of a coursework and an examination.
The coursework will enable students to use their understanding of different aspects of
information technology.
The exam will assess some theoretical aspects of the module not covered in the coursework.
Assessment criteria:
Coursework – Students will be assessed on their ability to produce a comprehensive paper
explaining various concepts of computer science.
Exam – Final exam will assess all the theoretical aspects of the module
Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Component
Description
Weight
Learning
Outcomes
Coursework
Students are required 40%
to produce a paper
explaining
various
concepts of computer
science.
1
Exam
Covers
theoretical 60%
aspects of the module,
assess broader issues
of understanding.
1-4
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
Snyder, Lawrence. 2007. Fluency with information technology: Skills, concepts, and
capabilities.3rd Edition. Boston: Addison-Wesley. ISBN: 0321512391
New Perspectives Computer Concepts 2010 Comprehensive (with BookOnCD), Parsons & Oja,
ISBN 978-0-324-78084-0
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Full Module Title: ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR
Short Module Title: OB
Module Code: 2UZB401
Credit Level: 4
Credit Value: 15
Length: 2 Semesters
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Olesya Smagina
Host course: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Extension:
432
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Core
Subject Board: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 50%/Final exam 50%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
This module will provide an insight into behaviour and interactions of individuals and groups
within organisations and their overriding objectives and goals.
Module Aims:

To introduce the concept of OB (Organisational Behaviour) and its importance in
managing people and organisations.

To explore the theories and models applied to study of organisations and make it
intelligible to students from a wide range of backgrounds.

To stimulate wider interest in human aspect of organisations and its significance.
Learning outcomes:
On completion of this module, the student should be able to:
1. Define what OB is in individual, group and organisational level and how it contributes
to understanding people and their behaviour in organisations.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of theory and research related to current issues and
future trends in organizational behaviour.
3. Define individual needs, aspirations and motivation and the collective purpose of
organisations; define organisational implications of individual differences, different
personality and roles.
4. Explain what attitudes, values, stress, diversity, conflict management, power mean;
Define the impact of new technology; Describe the impact of leadership and power in
organisations.
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5. Explain the role of human factors, organizational structure and organizational process
related to each other.
Indicative syllabus content:
Studying organisations - Students will explore the various ways in which people and
organisations have been studied.
Individuals and social differences - The ways in which individuals differ will be described and
related to social, cultural and demographic differences. Motivation, job satisfaction and
performance will be studied comparatively to needs of individuals and groups.
Groups, teams and leadership in an organisation - The importance of groups to people will
be analysed and the development of groups and group roles will be discussed.
Leadership in organisation - The development of leadership theories will be traced through
trait, behavioural and contingency ideas of leadership and different leadership styles discussed.
Structures in organizations - Formal and informal organizations in relation to the goals and
objectives of each organization. Trends in Organizational behaviour: learning organizations,
diversity.
Context and processes governing organisations - Theories and models of these concepts
will be reviewed. Concepts of conflict and change management described. The impact of
culture examined. Organizational culture and change with specific examples
Teaching and Learning Methods: Lectures, seminars/tutorials, formative tests and quizzes,
end-of-modules test, interactive discussions and simulations. Lectures will introduce key
concepts while tutorials will have a very practical focus, based on problem solving.
Assessment Rationale: The assessments are designed to measure the ability of students to
reproduce and comprehend knowledge on the subject.
Assessment criteria:
Coursework – Students are expected to produce a piece of written work, reflecting on theories
and approaches as well as on their own practice.
Final exam - Final exam will cover all the aspects of the module applied to a given case.
Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Assessment
Description
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
Student
Time
Coursework
A 1500-2000 words
50%
2, 3, 4
15 hours
Examination
Essay questions,
short answer
questions.
50%
1, 2, 3, 4, 5
2 ¼ hours
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
1. Buchanan, D. & Huczynski, A. (2007) Organisational Behaviour: An Introductory Text,
6th edition Longman Higher Education
2. Arnold, J. and Cooper, C.L. (1998) Work Psychology, FT Prentice Hall
3. Buchananan, D. & Huczynski, A. (1997), Organisational Behaviour, Student Workbook,
3rd edition, Harlow: Prentice Hall.
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4. Brooks, I (2003) Organisational Behaviour, Individuals, Groups and Organisation FT
Prentice Hall
5. HNC HND BTEC Business Course Book (2000), Organisations and Behaviour, London:
BPP Publishing Limited
6. Greenberg, J. & Baron, R.A. (2000) Behaviour in Organisations Prentice Hall.
7. Grint, K. (1998) The Sociology of Work: An Introduction, Polity Press/Blackwell.
8. Mullins, L. (2002) Management and Organisational Behaviour, 6th edition, Harlow:
Pearson Education Limited.
9. Preece, D. and Laurila, J. (2003) Technological Change and Organisational Action,
Routledge.
10. Thornhill, Lewis, Millmore and Saunders (2000) Managing Change FT Prentice Hall
11. Robbins, S. (2001) Organizational Behaviour (9th Edition). Englewood Cliffs, NJ:
Prentice-Ha
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
74
B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Full Module Title: BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS
Short Module Title: BC
Module Code: 2UZB404
Credit Level: 4
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Olesya Smagina
Host course: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Extension:
432
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Core
Subject Board: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Component 1 - Written Coursework 30%, Component 2 - Oral Task 30%, Component 3 Endof- module Exam 40%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module introduces students to the way how verbal and non-verbal communication works
between people in an organization.
Module aims

To give students an opportunity to communicate effectively in business.

To give students an opportunity to select and use appropriate information for effective
business communication.

To enable students to reflect on their experience, competencies and attainments in order to
compile a C.V. or other appropriate written tasks/documents.

To give students experience in giving and receiving appropriate and constructive feedback
on interpersonal behaviour
Learning outcomes:
On completion of this module the student should be able to:
1. Identify, analyse and apply relevant methods of communication.
2. Produce a piece of written work relevant to business communications.
3. Become aware of obstacles and barriers to effective communications and strategies in
problem solving.
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
4. Structure and present personal ideas in any format (i.e. via oral presentations, meetings,
debates, etc)
5. Assess personal experiences, learning and transferable skills in order to construct a
personal profile (CV, development plan, etc).
6. Develop necessary skills to be a successful interviewer/interviewee.
Indicative syllabus content

Communication Process in organizations

Identifying and assessing individual skills; describing work and learning
experiences; preparing and presenting a C.V. and a development plan

Conducting a successful interview

Giving a talk

Understanding communication styles

The processes and pitfalls of interpersonal communication.

Nonverbal communication and cultural differences

Communication in groups

Problem Solving

Business Etiquette

Types of written communication
Teaching and learning method
Lectures, seminars/tutorials, formative tests and quizzes, interactive discussions and
simulations. Lectures will introduce key concepts while tutorials will have a very practical focus,
based on problem solving.
Assessment rationale
1. The in-module assessments (a written coursework and an oral task) are designed to
measure students’ ability to communicate orally and in writing
2. The end of module exam evaluates students’ knowledge of the learning outcomes and the
overall concepts covered in the module.
Assessment criteria
Component 1

Ability to communicate a message and be persuasive

Use of appropriate tone and style according to the type of message

Well written, well presented and well structured piece of writing
Component 2

Content

Evidence of research

Consistent line of arguments

Visual Aids

Structure and signposting

Fluency and clarity of delivery
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students

Audience awareness and body language
Component 3
The criteria against which the exam is assessed are the ability of the student to understand and
reproduce the concepts of business communication. Suggested answers are provided during
moderation.
Assessment method and weighting:
Description
CW1
Component 2
Examination
Weighting
Students will prepare a written
piece of work that is relevant to
their career and development.
The task may vary from year to
year. An example would be the
production of a CV plus covering
letter and supporting statement
for a job application and
constructing
some
possible
questions and answers for a job
interview
30%
Students will present their
personal points of view and
ideas on a specific topic in oral
format. They will prepare
necessary documents they will
refer to during their speech.
30%
Questions
based
on
the
concepts of the module and
selected reading material on
verbal
and
nonverbal
communication.
40%
Learning
Outcomes
Student
Time
Principle LO
2,5,6
20 hours
Contributing
LO 1
Principle LO
3,4
20 hours
Contributing
LO 1
Principle LO
1,2,3
2¼ hours
+ revision
time
Contributing
LO,5,6
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
1. Barker, A. (2002), How to Manage Meetings, Kogan Page Ltd.
2. Barker, A. (2004), Improve your Communciation Skills, Kogan Page Ltd.
3. Bradbury, A. (2004), Successful Presentation Skills, Kogan Page Ltd.
4. Cottrell, S. (1999), The Study Skills Handbook, Palgrave
5. Hamilton, C. with Parker, C. (2001), 6th edition, Communicating for Results, a Guide for
Business & the Professions, Wadsworth
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6. Hamilton, C. (2005), 7th edition, Communicating for Results, a Guide for Business & the
Professions, Wadsworth
7. Hartley, P. and Bruckman G. (2002), Business Communication, Routledge
8. Langford-Wood, N. and Salter, B. (2002), Critical Corporate Communications, Wiley
9. Lesikar, R.V. and Flatley, M.E. (2002), 9th edition, Basic Business Communication, Tata
McGraw Hill
10. Madura J., Introduction to Business, (2004), 3rd edition, Mason: South-Western
11. Michelli, D. (2002), Assertiveness in a Week, Hodder and Stoughton
12. Mullins L., Management and Organisational Behaviour, 6th edition (2002), Pearson
Education Ltd.
13. Peel, M. and Lamb, J. (2002), Presentation in a Week, Hodder and Stoughton
14. Ribbens, G. and Thompson, R. (2002), Body Language in a Week, Hodder and
Stoughton
15. Stanton, N. (1999). Mastering Communication, Macmillian
Date of Initial Validation
Date of CASG approved modifications
Date of revalidation/review
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Full Module Title: WRITING FOR PROFESSIONAL SUCCESS
Short Module Title: WPS
Module Code: 2UZB412
Credit Level: 4
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Saodat Akhmedova
Extension:
475
Email:
[email protected]
Host course:
BA (Hons) Business Administration
Status: Option
Subject Board: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 1 40% Coursework 2 60%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module further develops students’ competence in all the main elements needed to produce
clear and competent written English in a style appropriate for undergraduate academic study.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
At the end of the module students will be able to:
1) Express themselves in clear and accurate language appropriate to formal written
academic contexts at undergraduate level.
2) Evaluate and assimilate written information and use it to develop an argument.
3) Use correct referencing and source acknowledgement techniques.
4) Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of their own written work and identify explicit
action points for future improvement.
5) Further develop their language skills independently using appropriate strategies.
INDICATIVE CONTENT

Reading strategies

Analysis of text structures

Reading and note taking

Summary and report writing
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students

Essay writing

Text sequence markers

Academic style and vocabulary

Using sources in written work

Editing and reformulating work

Cohesion and coherence in writing

Function of paraphrase and summary

Evaluating own and others’ writing
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
 Pair and group work; language and text analysis; debate.
 Lecturer input on key skills and language.
 Student research to gather data and find academic sources.
 Peer review
 Self-evaluation
Classes will normally consist of two tutorial sessions per week.
ASSESSMENT RATIONALE
Students will study and be tested in two distinct types of academic writing; the summary and the
essay. Work on each of these will be ongoing both inside and outside tutorials with continual
formative tutor feedback to maximize student engagement and learning.
Coursework 1 Summary
A 1000 word précis of an article from the business subject area. The summary will be written in
class with a time limit. Students will be permitted to have an annotated copy of the original article
as they write the précis.
Coursework 2 An essay
A 1500 word academic essay on a topic chosen by a student from her/his subject area and
approved by the ML. A student will produce an essay plan and first draft and will receive formative
feedback on these from both peers and tutor. The final draft submitted for summative assessment
should take this feedback into account. Students should also submit a short piece of reflective
writing
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
Coursework 1 (40%) The précis will be marked for language and content. Language comprises
range of expression and vocabulary, grammatical accuracy and punctuation, appropriate
academic style, flow and presentation. Content involves the student’s ability to abstract and then
restate the author’s central argument clearly, completely, succinctly, and in her/his own words
Course work 2 (Essay 40% + reflective writing 20%) The criteria for the final draft of the essay are
in three categories: language, content and ability to act on feedback to improve a draft. Language
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
comprises range of expression and vocabulary, grammatical accuracy and punctuation,
appropriate style, flow and presentation. Content is subdivided into introduction and aims,
structure and overall coherence, use of sources and referencing, quality of argumentation,
appropriateness of conclusion. In the third category there should be evidence that the student has
made an effort to act on tutor and peer feedback to improve the language and content of the
essay. The piece of reflective writing will be marked for ability to explain the changes made, how
these changes have improved the essay, which changes were most difficult, etc. It should also
include a brief action plan for further development of the student’s academic writing skills.
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND WEIGHTINGS
Assessment
Description
Component
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
Student
time
Coursework 1
A 1000 word summary of an
article from the business subject
area.
40%
1
10 hours
Coursework 2
The final draft of a 1500 word
academic
essay
and
full
bibliography (40%). A 200-250
word reflection on changes made
in the essay as a result of
feedback and a plan of action for
further improvement in academic
writing (20%).
60%
Essay - 1, 2,
3
25 hours
Reflection
4, 5
–
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
INDICATIVE READING
1. Greetham, B. (2001) How to write better Essay, Palgrave
2. Lewis, M. and Reinders, H. (2003) Study Skills for speakers of English as a second
language Palgrave
3. Oshima, A. and Hogue, A. (1997) Introduction to Academic Writing, Longman
4. Oshima, A. and Hogue, A. (1999) Writing Academic English, 3rd edn, Longman
Date of Initial Validation: March 2007
Date of CASG approved modifications
Date of revalidation/review: April 2010
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Full Module Title: FUNDAMENTALS OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
Short Module Title: FFA
Module Code: 2UZB403
Credit Level: 4
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Alexey Kim
Host course: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Extension:
478
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Option
Subject Board: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 30%; 70% examination
Special features: BSc (Hons) Economics (core)
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module will provide students with an introductory course in the fundamentals of finance
and accounting.
Module aims:
The module aims to:

To introduce students with a concept of the role of finance and financial markets and the
need for financial intermediaries in an economy.

Demonstrate the importance of the information system in financial accounting.

Identify and appreciate the use of the accounting concepts in fundamental financial
accounting.

Develop an awareness and understanding of how financial statements are prepared
through the accounting cycle process

Interpret the link between the accounting standards, accounting concepts, the EU
directives and GAAP.

Explain the significance of the accounting standards, both UK and international in the
preparation of accounting statements.
Learning outcomes:
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
On completion of this module, the successful student should be able to:
1. Understand the role of financial intermediaries and markets, and identify the nature and
operation of financial institutions and markets.
2. Understand financial instruments, allowing for the impact of risk and time.
3. Understand the nature of the financial accounting information system.
4. Appreciate the significance of the accounting cycle process in the preparation of financial
statements.
5. Prepare simple profit and loss accounts and balance sheets and appreciate the
importance of the cash-flow statement.
6. Have the ability to define main terminology used in published annual accounts.
7. Summarize theories of accounting from a UK perspective and understand the importance
of international accounting standards and international harmonization.
Indicative syllabus content:

Financial institutions and markets: functions of financial intermediaries; financial markets and
their efficiency; evolution of financial institutions and markets.

Types of financial assets: types of asset; assets and financial investment ratios; the time
value of money;

Accounting concepts and policies.

Accounting cycle: journals, ledgers, adjustments, trial balance.

The structure of published company accounts, the profit and loss account, the balance sheet
and an initial understanding of the cash flow statement.

Interpretation of the financial statements.

An initial appreciation of the importance of the fundamental accounting standards.
Teaching and learning methods:
There will be twelve weekly lectures and twelve weekly seminars, amounting to thirty six contact
hours.
Lectures will be used to impart knowledge on financial concepts and the financial standards and
how these underpin the preparation of the financial statements and provide students with
sufficient understanding of accounting to stimulate interest in accounting as a career and / or to
aid business planning and control.
Seminars will reinforce accounting and finance theory by demonstrating how they are applied in
preparing sections of the financial statements and how the concepts taught in the lecture are
practically related to accounting by using a series of graded accounting exercises.
Assessment criteria:
There will be an in-class test for one and a quarter hours which will include multiple choice
questions, a number of short questions requiring finance and accounting definitions and the
preparation of the profit and loss account and the balance sheet.. This will demonstrate the
student’s understanding of the nature of financial information and allow them to demonstrate an
awareness of accounting and finance theory and also be able to apply it in relation to financial
accounting concepts and accounting standards.
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The end of module examination for two and quarter hours will include a compulsory question
needing the preparation of a profit and loss account and balance sheet and the answering of a
number of short questions in finance and accounting, and some optional questions.
In the end of module examination students need to illustrate a sound understanding of the
fundamentals of finance and accounting.
Assessment methods and weightings:
Assessment
Description
Component
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
Coursework
Coursework
30%
3, 4, 5, 6
Examination
Examination with set of
questions
70%
1, 2, 4, 6, 7
Student
time
2 ¼ hours
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
Essential reading
Dyson JR “Accounting for Non-Accounting Students” (5th edition) 2003 Prentice Hall
Mishkin, FS & Eakins, SG (2003), Financial Markets and Institutions, International Edition, 4th
edition, Addison Wesley.
Howells, P & Bain, K (2002), The Economics of Money, Banking and Finance, 2nd edition,
Financial Times, Prentice Hall.
Howells, P & Bain, K (2000), Financial Markets and Institutions, 3rd edition, Longman.
Pilbeam, K (1998), Finance and Financial Markets, 2nd edition, Macmillan Business.
Further reading:
Britton A & Waterson C “Financial Accounting” (3rd edtion) 2003 Prentice Hall
F Wood & A Sangster, Business Accounting 1, 9th edition, 2002, FT Prentice Hall.
Madura, J (2001), Financial Markets and Institutions, 5th edition, South Western College
Publishing.
Miller, RL & Van Hoose, D, (2001), Money, Banking and Financial Markets, South Western
College Publishing.
Madura, J (2001), International Financial Management, 6th edition, South Western College
Publishing.
Brealey, R & Myers, S (2003), Principles of Corporate Finance, International Edition, McGraw
Hill Higher Education.
Periodical references:
Journal of Business Finance and Accounting
Journal of Business Finance and Accounting
European Finance Review
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
The Investor’s Chronicle
Journal of Money, Banking and Finance
Web sites:
The Financial Times
www.ft.com
The London Stock Exchange
www.londonstockexchange.com
NYSE
www.nyse.com
Bloomberg
www.bloomberg.com
Datastream and Thompson Financial
www.datastream.com
The London Stock Exchange
www.londonstockexchange.com
ACCA
www.accaglobal.com
CIMA
www.cimaglobal.com
Date of Initial Validation:
Date of CASG approved modifications:
Date of revalidation/review: April 2010
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Full Module Title: DATABASE SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT
Short Module Title: DSD
Module Code: EUZC507
Credit Level: 5
Credit Value: 30
Length: 2 Semesters
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Dmitriy Pochitaev
431
Host course: BSc (Honours) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Core
Subject Board: BSc (Honours) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 1 20%, coursework 2 40%, coursework 3 40%
Special features:
Students will have access and exposure to an appropriate Enterprise level database system
such as SQL Server or Oracle
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content: The module provides a practical introduction to the basic
concepts and terminology used in the design and implementation of data based information
systems.
The module provides a solid approach to Database Theory and its Practical perception,
investigates the fundamental issues related to Conceptual Data Modelling, Logical Data
Models, and Relational Information Retrieval. The module investigates database issues related
to data aggregation, query optimisation, web database connectivity, and multi-source
databases.
Module aims
To provide in the foundations of database technology and in the Integration of Databases and
Information Systems with the emphasis on the separation between Stand-alone and On-line
Systems and related issues like system performance, and data representation.
Learning outcomes
After completing this module the student will be able to:
After completing this module the student will be able to:
1. explain the fundamental concepts of the relational model;
2. relate the conceptual and logical world and vice versa, with the aid of mapping;
3. identify and explain the main components, functions and human roles relating to Database
Management Systems
4. validate and improve a logical data model with the aid of functional dependencies;
5. appreciate the limits of the relational model and its current extensions
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6. write queries for aggregating data and formulate queries with unknown conditional values;
7. optimise queries in achieving maximum execution performance;
8. implement constraints as part of base relations or views;
9. report and formulate data according to users specification;
10. attach a database to the Internet for retrieving and storing data through a web interface;
11. analyse and implement issues related to object relational databases;
12. analyse issues related with data integration.
Indicative syllabus content
Introduction to Information Systems: The nature of data and information, systems theory,
information systems and computerised information systems (definitions, components, types)
Introduction to Databases: File-based systems, redundancy, the database approach, ANSISPARC 3-schema architecture, components and functions of databases management systems.
Data models (e.g. Relational Model, E-R Model). Human roles.
Database Tools: Using application generators to define, store and manipulate data (e.g. use of
Forms, Reports, QBE). Building, testing and evaluating functional prototypes.
Relational Data Model: Relational data structure, Domains, Properties of a relation, Relational
Keys, Entity Integrity, Referential Integrity, Domain Constraints, Operational Constraints
Mapping: Map Entities, Map Binary relationships, Map Ternary relationships, Map
Supertype/Subtype relationships
Functional Dependencies: Functional Dependencies and Keys, Conceptual Models
Construction through Functional Dependencies - database reverse engineering
Relational Algebra: Unary Operators, Binary Operators, Additional Operators
SQL: DML Implementation of Unary and Binary Operators, SQL DDL.
Aggregating Data, Subqueries: Grouping on expressions, Grouping functions, Single row
Subqueries, Multiple row Subqueries, Multiple row & Multiple Column Subqueries
Query Optimisation: Rules for Heuristic Query Optimisation and cost based query optimization
Constraints: Create and maintain Constraints, valid Constraints in SQL DDL
Limits of the RD model: inefficiencies of the Relational Data Model and extensions like Object
Relational Model for overcoming these limitations
Web- Databases: overview of various server side web programming technologies such as CGI
protocol, JSP, ASP, ASP.NET. Development of web interfaces for DB using ASP.NET.
Examination and assessment of different database systems, techniques and languages. This will
include consideration for example of Oracle and SQL3, DML and DDL
Data Integration: Introducing Data Federation, Multidatabases, Data Warehousing
Teaching and learning methods
The module will be taught by a combination of lectures (24 hours) and tutorials (24 hours).
However, the substantial effort of teaching students the basics of modeling using the UML, will
be delivered in tutorials. During these sessions students will work in smaller groups in the form
of supervised workshops. These sessions enable students to develop their practical, technical
and analytical skills and to discuss with the tutors their thoughts, ideas and progress within the
subject matter. Within teaching weeks Guided Independent Study weeks will be organised in
order to involve students in additional activities to strengthen their independent learning and
problem solving and group working skills.
ASSESSMENT RATIONALE
The module will be assessed by a set of courseworks. The courseworks will involve an in class
test (20%) and two practical courseworks 40% each.
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
The CW 1 will assess the student’s ability to satisfy learning outcomes 1,3,4. The practical
courseworks will assess the student’s ability to satisfy learning outcomes 2, 5,8,10 and 12.
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ASSESSMENT METHODS AND WEIGHTING
Component
Unit Weight Learning Outcomes
CW1
1
20%
1, 3, 4
CW2
2
40%
2, 5, 6, 8
CW3
3
40%
7,9,10,11,12
Description
Students are expected to
explain fundamental concepts
of the relational model and
main components and
functions of DBMS, validate
and normalize Logical Data
Model with the aid of
Functional Dependencies
Students will be given a case
study that they will use to
develop a Conceptual Data
Model map it to Logical Data
Model, create relations using
SQL DDL, implement
constraints as part of base
relations or views and retrieve
information relevant to user
requirements using SQL.
Students will be given a case
study that they will use to
develop a Database System,
and retrieve/store data through
a Web-Interface.
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
SOURCES
Recommended Reading
Connolly, Begg & Strachan; Database Systems A Practical Approach to Design, Implementation
and Management, Addison-Wesley, ISBN 0-201-42277-8, August 2001
Further Reading
Elmarsi Ramez, Navathe Shamkant., Fundamentals of Database Systems, Addison-Wesley,
Longman; ISBN 0805317554, August 1999
Abraham Silberschatz, Henry Korth, S. Sudarshan Database Systems Concepts
McGraw Hill, ISBN 0-07-228363-7, October 2001
Kenneth C. Laudon and Jane P. Laudon, (2001) Management Information Systems, ISBN 0-13061960-4, Prentice Hall
Sue Coles and Jenny Rowley, Access 2000: An Advanced Course for Students, Learning
Matters, September, 2000
Other Resources
SQL - any relational DBMS vendor
Date of Initial Validation
Date of CASG approved modifications
Date of revalidation/review
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Full Module Title:
SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN
Short Module Title: SAD
Module Code: EUZC500
Credit Level: 5
Credit Value: 30
Length: 2 Semesters
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Lobar Mukhamedova/Vasiliy Kuznetsov
Extension:
431
Email:
[email protected]
[email protected]
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Status: Core
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites:
EUZC405 Data Analysis and Information Management in Business
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 1 50%, Coursework 2 20%, Coursework 3 30%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module will provide learning experience in information systems methodologies and
frameworks to grasp the knowledge and skills in organisation, development and design and
maintenance of IT services in contemporary business organisations.
Module aims
To enable students to identify information systems requirements in a way that is sensitive to the
needs of the users and to the objectives of the organisation. To allow students to document and
model information systems requirements, including the modelling of the data and processes that
support these. To provide students with practice in object oriented software development. To
identify and document functions within an IS environment. The module explores the concepts of
object oriented programming in the context of a Rapid Applications Development environment,
and the associated software design techniques.
Learning outcomes
After completing this module the student will be able to:
1. Work with others, apply a variety of techniques for requirements elicitation (for welldefined problems of medium complexity and restricted scope)
2. Identify, document, and prioritise functional requirements of medium complexity (with
some tutor guidance on the scope of the problem).
3. Model the main data that are needed to support a given set of functional requirements
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4. Identify and model the activities, tasks, functions, processes of human activity systems
and their supporting information systems (for well-defined problems of medium
complexity and restricted scope)
5. Describe and briefly compare different approaches to systems development (e.g.
structured and rapid)
6. Discuss the desirable properties of an Object Oriented Programming Language.
7. Design and implement classes in a commercial RAD development environment.
8. Create object based programs which address the problem of persistence of data.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT
Context
Information, systems and information systems. Systems development life-cycles, systems
development methods. Decision structure: feasibility study, business systems options.
Techniques for Investigation
Fact-finding techniques, including JRP workshops, business activity modelling; document,
resource and data flow diagrams; requirements definition, requirements analysis and
presentation.
Data Modelling
Data modelling notations: UML and brief introduction to alternative notations (e.g. SSADM,
DSDM).
Data modelling technique: logical data modelling, relational data analysis.
Process Modelling
Data Flow modelling, process specification for current and required system.
IS Analysis and Design
Classes and instances, attributes, operations, and identity. Associations and Multiplicity.
Aggregation and Composite objects. Generalisation and Specialisation. Static and Dynamic
models. Object interaction diagrams. State charts – states, events and transitions.
IS Testing
Different approaches to testing. How to plan, structure and prepare static and dynamic end-user
acceptance testing.
IS Implementation
Rapid Applications Development and Objects from the Programming Perspective
Classes, objects – properties, methods and events. Abstraction, Inheritance, Encapsulation, and
Polymorphism. Data persistence using object serialization and databases.
Teaching and learning methods
The contact time of the module comprises lectures and tutorials.
The module has a major case-study that is introduced and developed across the lecture
program. The case study is used to demonstrate the application of each technique and its use
helps the student to perceive the relationships between the different techniques.
Most of the tutorials will be based around problem-solving exercises that provide students with
practice at the various systems analysis and object-oriented programming techniques. Some
exercises will be set a week in advance and where this happens students will be expected to
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prepare an answer in advance of the tutorial. During the first part of the tutorial students will be
encouraged to present their answers. The tutor will provide a suggested solution and a
discussion of commonly occurring mistakes and other issues that arise. Where time permits
follow-up exercises may be undertaken.
Other use of tutorial time will include: demonstration of CASE tool and UML modelling software
such as Rational Rose, formal in-class assessment, running JRP (joint requirements planning)
workshops, development sample system covering major common information system
requirements.
Tutorial sessions will be held in PC labs and will give students an opportunity to have hands on
experience in programming.
Assessment rationale
The courseworks will present students with a case study and will require them to apply the
techniques that they have learnt in class. There is no element of rote learning in this type of
assessment: students work mainly at the higher cognitive levels of application, analysis and
synthesis.
The softer or social aspects of systems analysis revolve around interaction with others and as
such cannot be assessed effectively under exam conditions. Hence there will be an element of
the assessment that is based around group work undertaken during and between tutorials.
Additionally the coursework component of the assessment will include an individual, formative
element that is intended to give students practice in and feedback on the techniques that will be
covered by the exam.
Assessment criteria
1. Working with others, apply a variety of techniques for requirements elicitation (for welldefined problems of medium complexity and restricted scope)

level of participation/interaction

contribution of ideas

adherence to task (where specified)

adherence to role (where defined)
At this level students are expected to show some initiative and autonomy, but are expected to
work within a framework laid down by the tutor rather than managing and organising the
group entirely independently.
2. Identify, document (at summary level) and prioritise functional requirements of medium
complexity (with some tutor guidance on the scope of the problem)
 distinguish between functional and non-functional requirements
 appropriate level of detail
 relevance to business objectives
 completeness (with reference to the information supplied by the tutor)
3. Model the main data that are needed to support a given set of functional requirements
 entities and relationships are consistent with requirements
 absence of redundancy
 choice of suitable primary keys
 consistency between relationships and associated foreign keys
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4. Identify and model the activities, tasks, functions, processes of human activity systems and
their supporting information systems (for well-defined problems of medium complexity and
restricted scope)
 accurate and unambiguous naming
 appropriate granularity/levelling
 boundary is consistent with information supplied by the tutor
 accuracy of notation and technical correctness
 some degree of consistency with other products
5. Describe and briefly compare different approaches to systems development (e.g. structured
and rapid)
 clear and concise
 acceptable grammar, punctuation and spelling
 addressing the question
 offering a rationale or argument
6. Students will be expected to design and implement medium scope business information
system for a given specification including:

the creation and management of business classes,

handling exceptions

development of user interface, handlingevents

persisting application data using file system and Database Management System.
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND WEIGHTINGS
Component
Unit
Weight
Learning
Outcomes
Description
Coursework 1
Group
30%
Mainly 1, Group work in which students
also 2,4
have to find and document
requirements for a given
scenario
Individual
20%
3, 4, 5
Continuation of the above
where students have to
define
the
data
and
processing that support a
given set of requirements
Coursework 2
Individual
20%
6
Continuation of the above
where students have to
develop business logic for
the given case.
Coursework 3
Individual
30%
7, 8
Continuations of the above
where students have to
finalize
the
solution
developed
and
present
findings in a relevant format.
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
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SOURCES
Essential reading
Fred Barwell, Richard Blair, Jonaton Crossland, Professional VB.NET ( Second edition)
Flynn, D., (1998) Information Systems Requirements: Determination and Analysis, McGrawHill,
London
Hargrave, D., (1996) SSADM 4+ for Rapid Systems Development, McGrawHill, London
Kevin Bowman 2003 Systems Analysis - A beginner's guide Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN : 0-333-98630-X
S.Skidmore and M.Eva 2003 Introducing Systems Development Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN :0-333-97369-0
M. Lejk and D.Deeks 2003 Systems Analysis Techniques 2nd Edition Addison Wesley
2ISBN : 0-201-79713-5
Robertson and Robertson. 1999 Mastering the Requirements Addison-Wesley. ISBN
0201-360462
M. Fowler, K. Scott, UML Distilled Third Edition
Bennett, S., McRobb, S., and Farmer, R.,Object Orientated Systems Analysis and Design using
UML, McGraw Hill, 2002
B. Eckel “Thinking in Java” Third Edition, www.bruceeckel.com
WWW references
www.dsdm.org (DSDM)
http://www.methodsandtools.com
www.uml.org
http://www.extremeprogramming.org
Date of Initial Validation
Date of CASG approved modifications
Date of revalidation/review
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Full Module Title:
INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
Short Module Title: ISM
Module Code: EUZC508
Credit Level: 5
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Abdumalik Djumanov
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Core
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites:
2UZB411 BIS /EUZC405 Data Analysis and Information Management in Business
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 40 %, End-of-module exam 60%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module will provide learning experience in information systems management
profession to grasp the knowledge and skills in organisation and maintenance of IT
services in contemporary business organisations.
Module Aims:

To provide an understanding of business organisations in terms of their types and
structures, and the information systems needed to enable those business organisations
to operate successfully within their environment.
•
To raise awareness of current trends of the information technology and IT-enabled
business applications;
•
To foster an understanding of the key concepts of IT infrastructure and approaches for
providing and managing this infrastructure;
•
An understanding of the basics of business finance to manage IT services.
•
An awareness of fundamental human resource issues arising in different businesses
entities.
Learning outcomes:
Students should be able to:
1. Identify and describe different types of business organisations and information systems
enabling business operations;
2. Understand and evaluate opportunities provided by various IT solutions to businesses;
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
3. Structure and plan the implementation of IT services and IT support to business
enterprises;
4. Provide an understanding of financial accounting, planning and funding practice,
5. Evaluate IT service performance and the way it is supported by information systems;
6. Identify and apply fundamental human resource issues for managing various aspects of
IT services and businesses.
7. Understanding of IT societal issues – ethics and legal framework.
Indicative syllabus content:
The Nature of Business Entities – type of business entities and its environment
Contemporary IT solutions, IT development trends and impact of technological advances on
businesses and markets
The Accounting Process and Interpretation of Financial Statements for effective IT service
management Accounting process and interpretation of operating statements and financial transactions;
Analysis of financial transactions - capital and revenue, management reporting, recording fixed
assets and depreciation;
Analysis of profitability, gross and net profit, and evaluation of the financial performance of
business entity;
Financial planning for the supply of IT services – IT service resourcing, costing and budgeting
approaches;
Capital funding of IT services – time value of money, interest rates and cost of capital;
Inventory management and stock valuation;
Organising sales and marketing in IT services and business – business models for IT services;
Human resource management in IT services – Recruitment, training, reward systems,
motivation, staff performance appraisal and management.
Societal aspects of IS management – ethical and legal issues.
Teaching and Learning Methods:
The contact time of the module comprises at least 10 lectures and 10 tutorials each of 1½ to 2
hours duration. The emphasis is on students’ in-class and independent learning activity. Directed
reading and individual research, using a range of module textbooks, commentary, IT vendor
product information and additional sources. Invitation of guest speakers from the companies who
can bring their practical professional experience in the management of IS services in real life
companies and enterprises.
Student presentations and group discussions on case studies with given tasks in tutorials will
reinforce course material.
Practical exercises to foster skills and personal abilities in IS specification.
During Guided Independent Study weeks students will be provided with additional academic
support in the form of out-of-class-teaching activities that help to integrate, reinforce and induce
better understanding and deeper learning of students.
Assessment Rationale:
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The in-course assessment will require students to make an individual research on a given case
study, write a report individually and make an oral presentation highlighting research findings on
business nature, IT service implications and its management practice in business entity. The
coursework will also consist of accounting and financial planning tasks. Written report and oral
presentation will foster the student transferable skills in communication of their ideas/findings –
an important skill of successful managers - to convince stakeholders of the efficiency of a
proposed IT service models.
In the final assessment, an examination with a seen case, will have to demonstrate their problem
solving and analytical skills in IT service/business resource planning and management
Assessment criteria:
Individual coursework assessment – 40%;
Final examination – 60%.
The coursework will require students to make individual research on a given case study and
perform a set of tasks to demonstrate their knowledge and ability of recognising the nature of
business and role of IT services in it as well as evaluate financial performance of the business
and plan its IT services. Feedback on the coursework will be given in due time after submission,
in order to insure that the students get comprehensive feedback to be guided in their learning.
Also, students will be expected to make a presentation on their findings that illustrates
application of knowledge, research skills, oral communication skills and demonstrate ability to
work with a presentation package. Additionally, students will have to demonstrate an ability to
answer a range of questions on the topic chosen.
The final examination will assess students’ problem solving, research and analytical abilities
relevant to the information systems management profession, in particular resource planning for
adequate IS services and evaluation of financial performance of the given IT service/business.
Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Component
Unit
Weight
Learning
Outcomes
Coursework
Individual
report (80%)
with a
presentation
of results
(20%)
40%
1, 2 ,3
End-ofModuleExamination
Time
constrained
assessment
60%
3, 4, 5, 6
Description
An individual report in which
a student will work on a
given case to describe the
business nature and impact
of IS in business operations,
structure and plan adequate
IS services to the business
case. In addition a student
makes a presentation of
CW findings.
25 hrs
Examination with a preseen case study
examination
2 hrs 15 min
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
1. K Pearlson, C Saunders, Managing and Using Information Systems, 4th edition, Wiley
2. O’Brien, James A., & Marakas, George M. (2008). Management Information Systems,
8th Edition. New York: McGraw-Hill.
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3. Turban, E, McLean, E, & Wetherbe, J (2002), Information Technology for Management –
Transforming the Business in the Digital Economy (3rd Ed.), John Wiley & Sons, ISBN:
0471215333
4. Beynon-Davis, P (2002), Information Systems – An Introduction in Organisations,
Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN: 0333963903
5. R. M. Stair and G. Reynolds, Principles of Information Systems: A Managerial Approach,
Delmar Learning, 2007, ISBN 1423901193
6. J. O'Brien and G. Marakas. Enterprise information Systems , (13th edition). McGraw-Hill,
2006. 007110710X
7. D. Boddy, A. Boonstra, and G. Kennedy. Managing Information Systems: An
Organisational Approach, (2nd Edition). Prentice Hall, 2004. ISBN 0273686356
8. Britton, A. & Waterson, C. (2003) “Financial Accounting” (3rd edition) Prentice Hall
9. Atkinson, Banker, Kaplan & Young (2000) Management Accounting (3rd Edition) Prentice
Hall (Pearson Education
10. Maund, L. (2001) An Introduction to Human Resource Management theory and
11. practice Palgrave
12. Torrington, D., Hall, L. and Taylor, S. (2002) Human Resource Management , (5th edition)
Prentice Hall
13. Laudon, K C & Laudon, J P (2004)
14. Management Information Systems – Managing the Digital Firm (8th Ed.), Pearson
Education ISBN: 0131206818
15. B McNurlin, R.Sprague, T. Bui, Information Systems Management, 8th edition,
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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B.Sc. BIS Handbook Version 2010/11 (V7) Jan 2011 – New UG Students
Full Module Title: WEB DESIGN
Short Module Title: WD
Module Code: EUZC509
Credit Level: 5
Credit Value: 15
Length: Semester 1
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Djakhongir Mahkamov
457
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Core
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 100 %
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content: This course is designed to instruct students in Web site
construction and design. Students will learn HTML coding and then be introduced to popular
Web design and graphics programs including Dreamweaver, Photoshop, and Flash, as well as
the multimedia programs Quicktime and iMovie.
Module Aims:
This course provides an introduction to and overview of the JavaScript and Adobe Flash to
develop dynamic Flash animations that can be integrated with HTML, multimedia, ActionScript,
XML, and data sources to create dynamic Web pages. The course assumes the student has a
basic understanding of programming concepts prior to the taking this course, as well as a basic
understanding of Web design including HTML, and database concepts
Learning outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. create animations and effects;
2. integrate media files with Flash;
3. add interactivity to Flash movies;
4. integrate Flash movies with Web pages;
5. use ActionScript to control movie clips and add interactivity to Flash movies;
6. use Flash components and bind data and events to those components.
Indicative syllabus content:
Overview of HCI and course
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JavaScript Introduction, Variable, If-Else, Switch
Operators, Popups, Functions, Loops
Forms, Events, and Event Handling, Try-Catch
Using Flash’s Drawing and Painting tools
Working with text in flash
Frame-by-Frame animation
Shape-Tweened animation in flash
Motion-Tweened animation in flash
Working with layers in flash
Symbols and Instances
Working with Graphic Symbols
Working with Movie Clip Symbols
Working with Button Symbols
Using basic Actions and ActionScript
Features of ActionScript 2.0
Using Event Handlers In ActionScript
Target Paths in ActionScript
Controlling Information Flow in ActionScript
Controlling Text in ActionScript
Manipulating information in ActionScript
Managing content in ActionScript
Teaching and Learning Methods:
The contact time for the module comprises lectures and tutorials each of 2 hours duration.
Lectures will introduce key concepts while tutorials will have a very practical focus, based on
problem solving. Exercises will be set in the lectures and students will be expected to develop
and present their practical solutions during the tutorial sessions. Exercises will be set in the
lectures and students will be expected to develop and present their prototypes during the tutorial
sessions. During Guided Independed study weeks, students will be submitting draft versions of
the coursework for the feedback from tutors.
Assessment Rationale:
The coursework will enable students to apply on practice their knowledge to solve real life
problems and provide students with a chance to develop a rigorous and carefully designed piece
of work, and to gain a first hand understanding of the issues involved in planning, designing and
constructing a website with multimedia.
Assessment criteria:
The coursework will assess the student’s ability to develop simple to moderate applications
using Flash technology and Action Script programming language. Students will be assessed on
the creation of animation, working with layers and graphics to enable simple functionality.
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Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Component
Unit
Weight
Learning
Description
Outcomes
CW
Individual
100%
1,2,3,4,5,6
Students will implement an
interactive web site of moderate
complexity and present it during
viva session.
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
Required: The Essential Guide to Flash CS4 with ActionScript by Paul Milbourne, Michael
Oliver, and Chris Kaplan (Paperback - Feb 23, 2009),
Optional:
Learning Flash Cs4 Professional (Adobe Developer Library Annotated edition [May 1, 2009]).
Programming the Web Using XHTML and JavaScript by Larry Randles Lagerstrom
http://www.mhhe.com/webdev/lagerstrom
Robin Williams and John Tollett, The Non-Designer's Web Book. 3rd Edition. Berkeley, Calif.:
Peachpit Press, 2005.
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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Full Module Title:
NETWORK OPERATIONS
Short Module Title: NO
Module Code: 2UZC505
Credit Level: 5
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Email:
Vasiliy Kuznetsov
432
[email protected]
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Status: Option
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 40%, Examination 60%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
Study of LAN topologies; Network Components; The architecture of LANS and
WANS.Study of the OSI model and application of standards and protocols;
An introduction to communication principles and techniques.
Module aims
This module begins by considering various network topologies and the components necessary
to build enterprise-wide data networks (bridges, hubs, backbones etc.). The architecture of LANs
and WANs is then covered before introducing the subject of integrated network management.
Standards and standards forming procedures are covered also.
Learning outcomes
After completing this module the student will be able to:
1. state the nature, uses and basic operational principles of typical local area networks in
the private sector and, where applicable, in the public sector;
2. describe the main network devices and their characteristics, state the criteria for their
selection, and evaluate which to use in a given situation;
3. identify the key network standards related to the design, implementation and
management of local and wide area networks;
4. specify and outline an appropriate network design for a basic distributed information
systems environment (with regard to the media used), and justify its suitability;
5. list the layers in the Internet and OSI protocols and describe their function and place
them in the context of an enterprise network;
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6. explain the operations of network and transport layer protocols;
7. develop a client-server application working over an appropriate protocol
Indicative syllabus content
(a) Networking Media
Copper, Optical and Wireless media
(b) OSI Model
7 layer model
(c) LAN Topologies
Bus, ring, star
(d) Enterprise-wide Data Network Components
Bridges, routers, switches, backbones (e.g. hubs, Ethernet switches, FDDI, ATM, LAN
emulation); Network operating system functions
(e) LAN Architectures
Ethernet, Token Ring, emerging high speed architectures (e.g. fast Ethernet)
(f) Public and Private Wide Area Networks
Interconnected enterprise-wide networks; Packet switching, message switching, routers,
gateways (e.g. X.25, Frame Relay, TCP/IP, ISDN, SDH, ATM)
(g) Network and Transport Protocols
The operation of the network and transport layer in a TCP/IP network, including the differences
between TCP and UDP as transport layer protocols, the family of network layer protocols (IP,
IPX)
(h) Integrated Network Management
Configuration, fault, security, performance and accounting management; centralised, distributed
and hierarchical approaches; management protocols, management information base (MIB);
schema for the representation of MIB objects
(i) Standards
Standards and standards forming procedures, standards bodies (e.g. ISO, ITU, Internet, IEEE
etc.); Distributed Applications Standards (e.g. DNS, SMTP, X.400, X.500)
Teaching and learning methods
Lectures are used in the module to outline the main concepts to be explored in the module and
to impart to the student the information required for the achievement of the learning outcomes. It
is anticipated the lecture content will be supplemented by material covered in the seminars and
by additional reading by the students.
The tutorials are designated as workshops covering both theoretical principles and calculations
relating to the covered lectures.
Assessment rationale
Coursework 40% of the module total: reinforce learning and develop ability of students to identify
and analyse the major features of a network system and how they are integrated in a network
system and demonstrate their understanding of major networking concepts.
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Exam 60%: comprehensive assessment of students' ability to grasp and explain the module
material and apply it to simple problems.
Assessment criteria
The student will demonstrate the achievement of the learning outcomes by being able to:

Identify and explain the use of network hardware components in a given brief

Comprehend the underlying concepts in the field

Produce suitable technology plan for a given problem

Document and justify the process and techniques

Demonstrate the knowledge and understanding of operational principles of networks
Assessment methods and weightings
Assessment
Description
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
Coursework
Coursework 1
20%
2, 3, 4
20%
4, 7
Research exercise – network hardware
components and network topologies
Coursework 2
Problem
Solving:
calculations
Examination
Applied
problems/
The examination will test the student’s 60%
knowledge on the theoretical aspect of
Network topology and theoretical aspects
covered in the module.
1, 2, 3, 5, 6
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Essential Reading
Behrouz A Forouzan, Data Communications and Networking. 2003 ISBN 72923547
Behrouz A Forouzan, TCP/IP Protocol Suite. McGraw-Hill. 2003 ISBN 72460601
Further Reading
A.Tanenbaum. Computer Networks. 2003 ISBN 81-7808-785-5
Fitzgerald, Dennis. Business Data Communications and Networking. 1997.
Kurose, Rose. Computer Networking.
White, Curt. Data Communications & Computer networks a business User’s approach. 2004
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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Full Module Title:
SOFTWARE DESIGN PATTERNS
Short Module Title: SDP
Module Code: EUZC510
Credit Level: 5
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Sarvar Abdullaev
432
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Option
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: EUZC400 Fundamentals of Programming
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Individual Coursework 40%, Final Exam 60%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
Software design patterns will equip students with knowledge on a general reusable solution to
a commonly occurring problem in software design. It is a description or template for how to
solve a problem that can be used in many different situations.
Module Aims:
This course provides an understanding of software development patterns, particularly to Design
Patterns (DP) described by Gang of Four. This module describes recurring solutions to common
problems in software design. DP module is for students that are currently pursuing computing
related course, and as a pre-requisite it requires the knowledge of any Object-Oriented
Programming language and UML. Throughout the course, students will be taught on solving
trivial design problems and will have hands-on practice in implementing found design solutions.
Learning outcomes: Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Define, describe and illustrate Design Patterns
2. Understand and apply UML and pseudo-code in designing software
3. Use Computer Aided System Engineering tools
4. Design reusable, scalable and robust software architecture and conceptual framework
5. Convert designed framework to pseudo-code
6. Avoid commonly known anti-patterns
Indicative syllabus content:
1. Introduction to Patterns, Design Patterns and UML
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2. Creational Patterns: Abstract Factory and Builder Patterns
3. Creational Patterns: Factory Method, Prototype and Singleton Patterns
4. Structural Patterns: Adapter and Bridge Patterns
5. Structural Patterns: Composite and Decorator Patterns
6. Structural Patterns: Façade, Flyweight and Proxy Patterns
7. Behavioural Patterns: Chain of Responsibility and Command Patterns
8. Behavioural Patterns: Interpreter and Iterator Patterns
9. Behavioural Patterns: Mediator, Memento and Observer Patterns
10. Behavioural Patterns: State and Strategy Patterns
11. Behavioural Patterns: Template Method and Visitor Patterns
12. Other Patterns: Concurrency Patterns, Architectural Patterns
Teaching and Learning Methods: The contact time for the module comprises 12 lectures and
12 tutorials each of 2 hours duration. Lecturers will introduce key concepts while tutorials will
have a very practical focus, based on how students understand the materials of lecture.
Exercises will be set in the lectures and students will be expected to develop and present their
practical solutions during the tutorial sessions.
Assessment Rationale: The coursework will enable students to apply on practice their
knowledge to solve real-life software design problems. Students will have an individual
assignment to build refined and robust system architecture and design for chosen business
case.
Assessment criteria: There are 2 major components to the course. The practical aspect of this
module will concentrate on individual assignment that will require student to design his/her own
software architecture and conceptual framework for chosen business domain, applying the
knowledge of Design Patterns. Students must attain the skills of identifying software design
problems and finding reusable, scalable and abstract design solutions throughout their
coursework assignment.
Final exam will involve questions from theory asking students to describe particular Design
Pattern in standard template format. Also final exam will include practical case where the
students will be required to draw UML diagrams for given domain.
Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Component
Unit
Weight Learning
Description
Outcomes
CW
Component 1
Individual
40%
3,4,5,6
Students will be given 1.5-2 month long
coursework, in which they need to
produce reusable, scalable, robust and
abstract system design for chosen
business domain.
60%
1,2,5,6
Students will be given theoretical
questions asking them to describe given
Design Pattern in standard template
format. Also students will be required to
draw corresponding UML diagrams and
write explanatory pseudo-code for given
domain applying Design Patterns.
Final Exam
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
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Sources:
1. Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software (ISBN 0-201-633612,), Erich Gamma et al, Gang of Four, Addison-Wesley.
2. UML Distilled – Third Edition by Martine Fowler, Addison Wesley
Optional:
1. Design Patterns Explained: A New Perspective on Object-Oriented Design, Alan
Shalloway et al, Addison-Wesley.
2. Pattern-Oriented Software Architecture: A System of Pattern by Frank Buschmann et al,
John Wiley & Sons, 1996.
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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Full Module Title: MANAGEMENT RESEARCH METHODS
Short Module Title: MRM
Module Code: 2UZB503
Credit Level: 5
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Zokir Nazarov
Host course: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Extension:
450
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Option
Subject Board: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Pre-requisites: Data Analysis and Information Management
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 1: Group work with individual reflection elements 60%, Coursework 2: Individual
work 40%
Special features:
None
Access restrictions:
Any other Research Methods module
Summary of Module content:
This module is designed to introduce the main aspects of business research. It provides an
understanding of the philosophies which drive research, a capability in the main research
methods and develops an analytical approach to research which will support students in all
their studies in addition to providing an insight to prepare them for the Major Project in the
final year. Business research is also an important management tool that exerts a major
influence on policy and decision-making.
MODULE AIMS

provide students with an introduction to management research providing a bridge
between philosophical and practical issues

develop an awareness of the philosophical and political issues influencing research in a
business context

equip students with the quantitative and qualitative techniques used in business
management research
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On completion of this module, the successful student should be able to:
1.
Find, read and use research information to write a literature review using appropriate
referencing.
2. Select a research question and develop a realistic methodology to produce relevant data
addressing issues of reliability, validity and generalisation.
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3. Develop and use research instruments to collect primary data
4. Analyse quantitative and qualitative data to communicate research findings in an
appropriate academic format
5. Reflect on the group research experience, drawing lessons for further individual research
and group projects.
6. Develop an individual research proposal for the level 6 project.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT

The nature of business management research.

Underlying research philosophies and the debate surrounding them.

Ethical considerations in management research.

Research design to address issues of validity, reliability and generalisation.

Accessing and interpreting secondary data.

Sampling methods.

Research methods.

Design of research instruments.

Analysing qualitative data.

Analysing quantitative data.

Developing a research proposal.
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
This module underpins the Major Project. It will be taught using the research process as a
structure so continuously reflecting and supporting the coursework assessment activity. The
module will consist of a weekly lecture which will introduce key concepts and issues related to
the research process. For part of the assessment, students will be working in small learning
groups. To facilitate the effectiveness of this teamwork, the students will work in these learning
groups (task focus) during seminars working on their own project or particular cases applying the
concepts introduced in the lectures. Learning groups will present their work in progress at
regular intervals for peer review. Each student will maintain an individual reflective journal and
will meet as a different group (reflection focus) at regular intervals to reflect on their learning.
Computer workshops will allow individuals to practise the use of relevant software packages for
data analysis.
This range of learning methods will develop their key work skills of research, technology,
communication, teamwork, self-management and reflection. Students will develop an emerging
ability to critically evaluate evidence.
ASSESSMENT RATIONALE
The coursework component 1 is designed to test the students’ ability to develop, plan,
implement and report on a piece of research into a business management issue. As a group
activity, it assesses their ability to interact effectively to achieve team goals. Each group will
work to a learning contract incorporating peer assessment.
Specific aspects of work in progress will be submitted for assessment at regular intervals. This
will be marked, critiqued and feedback given. Groups will be allowed to reflect on the feedback
and to make revisions to their work in progress to improve subsequent performance but the
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initial mark will be recorded. This continuity of assessment and feedback encourages a positive
future learning experience whilst assessing current performance.
The end-of-module components allow the individual to reflect on their learning and on their own
performance and that of others in order to apply this learning and reflection on an individual
basis. Students will also submit an outline research proposal for their Major Project. The
feedback they receive will allow them to reflect, revise and improve their proposal for
implementation in the Major Project module.






Personal & Career
management
Team-work
Communication
Decision-making
Research
Numeracy
CIT
Cognitive
Bus Awareness
This range of assessments tests the key transferable skills of:


ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
Students will be assessed on:
Group project including the following tasks:

development, planning and implementation of a piece of research into a business
management issue making effective use of research methods;

oral presentation skills and
Individual reflective statement:

evidence of progression, reflection on progress;

evidence of conceptualisation of the learning process;

discussion of implications for own learning from the group experience;
Individual outline research proposal requires:

coherence of articulation of nature of overall research;

quality of reflection on links between proposed area of research and personal study
programme;

validity of proposal.
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND WEIGHTINGS
Assessment
Description
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
60%
1-5
CW1: Group work with
individual self-reflective
elements
Plan, design, implement & present
self-determined research into a
business issue; write individual
reflection of the group work
CW2: Individual work
Outline research proposal for Major 40%
Project
6
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
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INDICATIVE READING
Essential Reading
Saunders, M., Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2007) Research Methods for Business
Students. (4th ed) London: Pearson Education and earlier editions
Further Reading
1. Easterby-Smith, M., Thorpe, P., & Lowe, A. (2002) Management Research- an
introduction (2nd edition). London: Sage Publications
2. Zikmund, W.G. (2003) Business Research Methods (7th ed) Ohio: South-Western
3. Grix, Jonathan (2004) The Foundations of Research, Basingstoke: Palgrave McMillan.
4. McQueen, Ron & Knussen, Christina (2002) Research Methods for Social Sciences: An
Introduction, Harlow: Pearson Education
5. Bell, Judith (1999) Doing your research project: a guide for first-time researchers in
education and social science (3rd edition) Maidenhead: OUP
6. Silverman, D (2000) Doing Qualitative Research: A Practical Handbook, Sage, London.
7. Bell, Judith & Opie, Clive (2002) Learning from Research. Getting more from your data,
Buckingham: OUP
8. Denscombe, Martyn (2003) Good Research Guide for small-scale social research
projects (2nd ed), Maidenhead: Open University Press
9. Denscombe, Martyn (2002) Ground Rules for Good Research, Maidenhead: OUP.
10. Murray, Rowena (2002) How to write a thesis (2nd ed) Maidenhead: OUP (Ref)
11. Blaxter, Loraine., Hughes, Christina & Tight, Malcolm (2001) How to Research.
Maidenhead: OUP
12. Oliver, Paul (2003) Students Guide to Research Ethics, Maidenhead: OUP
Academic Journals

Journal of Business Research

Journal of Marketing Management

Journal of Management

Journal of Applied Accounting Research
Date of Initial Validation: July 2004
Date of CASG approved modifications:
Date of revalidation/review: May 2010
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Full Module Title: WEB APPLICATIONS DEVELOPMENT
Short Module Title: WAD
Module Code: EUZC600
Credit Level: 6
Credit Value: 30
Length: 2 Semesters
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Email:
Dmitriy Pochitaev
421
[email protected]
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Status: Core
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: EUZC508 - Information Systems Management
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 1 60%, Coursework 2 40%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module provides an opportunity for students to extend their knowledge of the
criteria for effective and efficient development of information system strategy in and
between organizations and focuses on the need for integrated business and IT
planning and analytics at all levels of the organization
Module aims
The module aims are

To enable students to understand the nature and importance of web applications today
and in the foreseeable future

To practice some of the technologies and applications which underpin e-commerce

To develop an appreciation of some of the current constraints and limitations of ecommerce

To encourage students to develop an understanding of some of the management issues
which relate to effective e-commerce implementation.

To develop common web application using modern client and server side technologies
with the shop card, encrypting password protection and test on usability.
Learning outcomes
After completing this module the student should be able to:
1. Critically discuss the benefits of web applications for organizations, consumers, and
society
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2. Illustrate a number of the business models which organisations which engage in ecommerce apply
3. Critically analyse the impacts of e-commerce on trading and intermediaries
4. Critique the limitations of e-commerce and discuss some major managerial issues
regarding e-commerce.
5. Understand the concepts of developments of common web applications
6. Understand the different standard and emerging technology solutions that exist, their
uses, advantages and limitations
7. Practically apply the concepts, issues and methods with reference to the development of
web applications.
Indicative syllabus content
Economic rules of the digital economy. Impact of e-commerce on traditional enterprises.
Impacts of the digital economy on business processes and functional areas in organizations.
Business models and strategies implied by e-commerce. Disintermediation, reintermediation,
channel conflicts in e-retailing. Electronic Advertising. e-marketplaces and e-auctions. Critical
success factors of direct marketing and e-retailing, along with mistakes to avoid.
Specifics of development of e-commerce applications. Basics of servers-side and client-side
scripting. Modern technologies and platforms for e-commerce application development. Major
e-commerce application development options and the approaches for option selection. Site
usability and management.
Order fulfillment, logistics and supply chain management in e-commerce environment.
Integrating the information systems of the front and back offices. The relationships among
Enterprise Resource Planning, Supply Chain Management, and e-commerce.
E-commerce security. Developing a security risk management system. Technologies for
securing e-commerce. Encrypting passwords. Testing on usability.
Online Publishing & Knowledge Dissemination. On-line stock trading and global exchanges.
Cyberbanking, its drivers, and capabilities. Online knowledge dissemination and distance
learning.
Teaching and learning methods
The teaching and learning strategy is based on a number of methods including lectures,
tutorials, case studies and through practical coursework. Both tutorials and lectures will be coordinated together to build the students knowledge.
Lectures are a central component of the module and will be used to introduce the relevant
theories and concepts.
Tutorials and case studies will be used to allow students to apply the topics covered in the
lectures to practical exercises and explore concepts and ideas further. These sessions will
enable students to develop both their analytical and technical skills and to discuss with the tutors
their thoughts, ideas and progress within the subject matter.
Assessment rationale
The module will be assessed by means of three courseworks.
The courseworks will enable students to show their understanding of the major steps of an ecommerce application development process including business analysis of the need for on-line
presence of an enterprise, options available, development of a typical e-commerce application.
The coursework should give students practical experience of interacting with typical third-parties
involved into e-commerce application development such as advertising and hosting companies.
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Additionally the coursework will test various transferable skills such as business analysis, report
writing and presentation skills.
Assessment criteria
Coursework 1 – This will be an individual assignment. Students are required to choose a real
company and conduct analysis of its e-commerce potential. [1, 2, 3]
Coursework 2 – This will be an individual assignment. Students are required to develop a typical
e-commerce application using modern development platform and database management
system. [6, 7]
Coursework 3 – This will be an individual assignment. Students are required to enhance the
application developed in the previous component and host it on a real ISP’s server. Students are
also required to make a presentation on the outcomes of all three components [5, 6, 7]
Assessment methods and weighting
Component Unit
Weight Learning
Outcomes
CW
CW1
Individual
30%
1, 2, 3
Students are required to choose a real
company and conduct analysis of its ecommerce potential. The report should
include business profile of the company,
e-commerce business models applicable
to its type of business as well as
recommendations
for
e-commerce
application to be developed for the
company
CW2
30%
4, 5
The coursework is based on the
recommendations developed as a part of
CW 1. Students are required to develop a
typical e-commerce application using
modern development platform and
database management system.
40%
6, 7
Students are required to enhance the
application developed during CW 1:
enable better security mechanisms,
provide
search
and
advertising
capabilities. The application should be
hosted on a real ISP’s server. Students
are also required to make a presentation
on the outcomes of all three components
Individual
CW2
Description
Individual
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
SOURCES
Essential Reading
Turban E, Lee J, Warkentin M, Chung HM. (2004) Electronic Commerce: A Managerial
Perspective Prentice Hall
Bill Evjen, Scott Hanselman, Devin Rader (2008) Professional ASP.NET 3.5 In C# and VB Wiley
Publishing
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Further Reading
Christensen CM (1997) The Innovator's Dilemma Harvard Business School Press
Gelber, S. (1998) Data Communications Today Networks,The Internet and the Enterprise
Prentice Hall
Hagel J & Armstrong AG (1997) Net Gain Harvard Business School Press
Laudon and Laudon (2002) Management Information Systems Prentice Hall
Moschella DC (1997) Waves of Power Amacom
Panko, R. (1996) Business Data Communications Prentice Hall
Stallings, W. (1996) Data and Computer Communications Prentice Hall
Stallings, W. & van Slyke, R (1997) Business Data Communications Prentice Hall
Turban, E & Aronson, JE (2001) Decision Support Systems and Intelligent Systems Prentice
Hall
Wysocki, R. & DeMichiell, R. (1997) Managing Information Across the Enterprise Wiley
Other Resources
Students will also be encouraged to use a number of online research and assignment resources.
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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Full Module Title:
STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Short Module Title: SMIS
Module Code: 2UZC605
Credit Level: 6
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Olga Yugay
Extension:
433
Email:
[email protected]
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Status: Optional
Subject Board: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: EZC508 Information Systems Management
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 100%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module provides an opportunity for students to extend their knowledge of the
criteria for effective and efficient development of information system strategy in and
between organizations and focuses on the need for integrated business and IT
planning and analytics at all levels of the organization
Module Aims:
1. To provide an understanding and application of the information as a strategic resource
and that effective information management is a major factor in the performance of the
organization.
2. To focus and analyse on the need for integrated business and information systems
strategy development and planning at all levels.
3. To enable identification of the current and future potential for exploitation of information
systems, both internal and external, in a business context.
4. Evaluation and application of technology and techniques as strategic issues, and how
technology can be used successfully in organization.
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Learning outcomes:
By the end of the module students will be able to:
1. To evaluate the organisational and managerial implications of IS/IT considering factors of
business environment;
2. To validate the role of IS/IT in transforming business processes and competition
3. To analyse how organisations affect IS/IT and how IS/IT affect organisations
4. To explain and analyse how managers and organisations make decisions using IS/IT
5. To prepare the analytics of data, information and knowledge as corporate resources
6. Be able to apply the knowledge of strategic systems management methods to participate
as a key member of a team taking strategic information systems decisions for an
organization;
7. Be able to evaluate the information systems strategy of an organization and to form a
judgment as to the likely adequacy of that strategy.
Indicative syllabus content:
1. Rationale for development of strategies for information systems – determining future
potential, value chain analysis, business reengineering
2. Strategy toolkit and strategies in practice – context of IS true case studies, identifying
how IS/IT could impact the strategy
3. Evaluation of IS, knowledge management – retail manufacturing, RFID, Smartlane,
Information Asset management
4. Critical appraisal of the main constituents of methodologies used in the design and
development of organization’s information systems – Business Process Analysis,
organizational model, gap between current and required IS/IT environments
5. Models of complex systems, of value to the IS industry – management implications,
context of IT/IS, organizational IS capability
6. Strategic management of IT/IS: organizing and resourcing
7. Managing investments in IS – managing investment risks, investment policy
8. Managing the supply of IT services, applications and infrastructure
9. Strategic planning – business change perspective – IT/IS services, CRM, outsourcing,
applications service providers
10. Information security issues – regulatory framework and technical provisions.
Teaching and Learning Methods:
The contact time of the module comprises at least 10 lectures and 10 tutorials each of 1½ to 2
hours duration. The emphasis is on student activity. Directed reading and individual research,
using a course text, commentary and additional sources. Invitation of guest speakers from the
companies who can demonstrate the strategies and IS applied in real life companies and
enterprises.
Presentations to reinforce course material.
Practical group and individual exercises to reinforce skills and personal abilities in IS
specification.
During Guided Independent Study weeks students will be provided with additional academic
support in the form of out-of-class-teaching activities that help to integrate, reinforce and induce
better understanding and deeper learning of students.
Assessment Rationale:
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The in-course assessment will require students to make group and individual research on real
life company case, write reports in a group and individually as well as make an oral presentation
to the group that highlights a strategic framework, tool, model or resource pertinent to
information systems and demonstrates its importance in the development of an organization’s IS
strategy. The presentation requires the student to make case orally, a frequent requirement for
IS managers, and demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the particular topic that includes
evidence of wider reading and sources of information and practical examples of where the topic
has been used effectively. In the individual piece of the assessment students will have to
demonstrate their personal knowledge and skills in the planning of IS strategy management
process and suggest change strategy plan for the given organisation.
Assessment criteria:
In-course assessment:
group coursework 1 - 50 %
individual coursework 2 – 50%.
The module assessment will consist of a set of group and individual courseworks. The both
courseworks will be based on one case, for which students will require to determine IT/IS
strategy implementation, evaluate opportunities, application of the knowledge management
techniques, make decisions using IT/IS, analyse and consider future trends, evaluate the
information systems strategy of an organization and to form a judgement as to the likely
adequacy of that strategy. Feedback on each coursework will be given in 2 weeks after
submission, in order to insure that the students get the feedback at each stage of the
coursework development and get necessary guidance from the Module leader. In the group
coursework 1 students will be expected to evaluate, analyse and plan how IS/IT could impact the
strategy of the basis of the given company case. In this work students also will be required to
evaluate knowledge management opportunities, identify the gap between current and required
IS/IT environments. Also, students will be expected to make a presentation of their findings that
illustrates application of knowledge, research skills, oral communication skills and demonstrate
ability to work with a presentation package. Additionally the students will have to demonstrate an
ability to answer a range of questions on the topic chosen.
Coursework 2, as an individual piece of work, will require students to develop the proposed on
Coursework 1 strategy, apply principles of strategic management of IT/IS: organizing and
resourcing and also change management plan.
Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Component
Unit
Weight
Learning
Outcomes
Description
Coursework
Group work
with
presentation
(50%) and
100%
1-7
A combination of group and
individual works in which
students will work on a
given
case,
develop
strategic
management
decision,
evaluate
opportunities, apply all the
skills learned during the
module, and make a
presentation
of
their
findings.
Individual
work (50%)
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
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1. D. Boddy, A. Boonstra, and G. Kennedy. Managing Information Systems: An
Organizational Perspective (2nd Edition). Prentice Hall, 2004.
2. Strategic Management and Information Systems, 2nd ed. W. Robson (Ed.); Pitman
Publishing, 575 pages, ISBN 0273-61591-2, 1997.
3. Managing and Using Information Systems: A Strategic Approach (Paperback) 4th edition
by Keri E. Pearlson, Carol S. Saunders, John Wiley & Sons 2010 (ISBN 978-0-47034381-4)
4. Ward J, Peppard J, Strategic Planning for information systems, third edition, John
Wiley&Sons, Ltd, 2002.
5. Information technology and the networked economy 2nd , Patrick G. McKeown, 2004
6. Business information systems : analysis, design, and practice 4th ed, Curtis, Graham,
2002
7. Strategic information management : challenges and strategies in managing information
systems 3rd ed., Galliers, Robert, 2003
8. Strategic Management of e-Business by Judy McKay and Peter Marshall, John Wiley
and Sons: 2004
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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Full Module Title: DECISION SUPPORT AND DATA MINING SYSTEMS
Short Module Title: DSDMS
Module Code: 2UZC604
Credit Level: 6
Credit Value: 15
Length: Semester 2
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Olim Bakirov
432
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Option
Subject Board: BSc in Business Computing
Pre-requisites:
2UZC502 Database Theory and Practice/EUZC507 Database Systems Development
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Course Work 50% Final exam 50%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module is dedicated on the development of systems that will help in the analysis of
business information and help the management to make intelligent decisions.
Module Aims: To analyse, investigate and apply the fundamental design aspects related to
decision support and data mining, such as online analytical processing (OLAP), descriptive
analysis, association rule mining, classification, prediction and cluster analysis.
Learning outcomes:
1. build a Data Warehouse with the aid of dimensional schemas;
2. analyse–query a Data Warehouse, through OLAP activity for Decision Support
3. realise the need for data mining and explain the distinction between the various mining
techniques
Indicative syllabus content:
Data Warehousing: Data Marts, Data Models such as relations, Stars & Snowflakes, Cubes,
Metadata
On-Line Analytic Processing: OLAP applications, Multidimensional View of Data, Operations
such as slicing, dicing, ROLAP, MOLAP
Data Mining: Decision Trees, Association Rules, Classification by Distance functions, statistical
approaches, fuzzy theory, mining the Web
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Advanced Issues: Incomplete Data, Decision support and Mining under Uncertainty
Teaching and Learning Methods:
Lectures, seminars/tutorials, formative tests and quizzes, interactive discussions and
simulations. Lectures will introduce key concepts while tutorials will have a very practical focus,
based on problem solving.
During Guided Independent Study weeks students will be provided with additional academic
support in the form of out-of-class-teaching activities that help to integrate, reinforce and induce
better understanding and deeper learning of students.
Assessment Rationale:
The module will be assessed by a combination of coursework and examination. The coursework
will be an independent practical component (50%). The examination (50%) will assess the
student’s ability to explain and apply the concepts involved in the area of Decision Support.
Assessment criteria:
The practical component will assess the student’s ability to satisfy learning outcomes 1,2. The
examination will assess the student’s ability to explain and discuss the techniques in learning
outcomes 3.
Assessment Methods and Weightings:
Component
Coursework
Weight
50%
Learning Outcomes
1,2
Examination
50%
3
Description
Practical case study to develop
students ability in design and
implementation of data
warehouse
2 hours closed book
examination covering the full
module range.
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
Sources:
1. Kimbal R., Ross M, “The Data Warehouse Toolkit” 2nd edition, [Wiley Computer
Publishing], 2002
2. Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber: “Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques” 2nd Edition,
[Morgan Kaufmann], 2006.
Date of Initial Validation:
Dates of approved modifications:
Date of re-validation/review:
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Full Module Title: DATABASE MANAGEMENT
Short Module Title: DM
Module Code: 2UZC603
Credit Level: 6
Credit Value: 15
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Dmitriy Pochitaev
421
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Option
Subject Board: BSc in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: EUZC507 Database Systems Development
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 40%, examination 60%
Special features:
Students will have access and exposure to an appropriate Enterprise level database system
such as SQL Server or Oracle
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The module uses a case study to investigate and solve problems associated with the
management of concurrent databases including database access via the world wide web. The
module introduces security aspects associated with multiple user access of shared data.
MODULE AIMS
The module aims to develop the student’s ability to identify and to resolve the practical problems
associated with the management of concurrent database systems. Students will be introduced to
the security aspects associated with multiple user access of shared data.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
After completing this module, the student is expected be able to:
1. explain the types of Client-Server applications and the advantages and disadvantages of
the Client-Server system;
2. explain concurrent access control and recovery techniques;
3. explain the function and importance of transactions and the properties of a transaction;
4. explain deadlock and livelock, and how to detect, prevent and resolve them;
5. discuss the implications of database security.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT
Client Server: two and three tiered architectures. Client-server vs File-server systems. Data
replication, central management, scalability, deadlock and livelock resolution.
Transaction Processing: types of transaction and transaction failure; support for single and
multiple user transactions, locking and concurrency controls. Recoverable transaction
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schedules. Backup and recovery from failures; checkpoints and transaction logs. Recovery via
roll forward and roll back.
Security Requirements: Account security, access security and system security.
Distributed database: Distributed database schema. Atomic commit criteria and problems, two
phase commit and three phase commit protocol.
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
Lectures, seminars/tutorials, formative tests and quizzes, interactive discussions and
simulations. Lectures will introduce key concepts while tutorials will have a very practical focus,
based on problem solving.
During Guided Independent Study weeks students will be provided with additional academic
support in the form of out-of-class-teaching activities that help to integrate, reinforce and induce
better understanding and deeper learning of students.
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
The module assessment is weighted in favour of the examination because the learning
outcomes require the students to explain the concepts involved in the control and management
of concurrent database systems.
The coursework will involve a single piece of practical work based on a database which will
assess the students ability to apply the concepts involved in managing a concurrent database. A
viva voce may be used to confirm a particular coursework mark.
ASSESSMENT RATIONALE
The in-course assignment, worth 40% of the module’s marks, allows students to work in their
own time to develop and implement concurrency controls on a shared database, thus focusing
on learning outcomes 2, 3 and 4.
The examination is designed to assess understanding of the whole module’s content, in a time
constraint environment.
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND WEIGHTING
Component
Unit
Weight
Learning Outcomes
Coursework
Individual 40%
2 access control
3 transaction and
4 recovery
management
Examination
60%
1–5
Description
Students will be given a case
study that they will use to
develop and implement
suitable concurrency controls
on a shared database.
2 hour 15 minutes closed book
examination covering the full
module range.
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
SOURCES
Essential Reading
Connolly, Begg & Strachan, Database Systems A Practical Approach to Design,
Implementation and Management, 3rd Edition, Addison-Wesley; ISBN 0-201-42277-8
Further Reading
David Sussman, Brian Francis, Chris Ullman, Juan Llibre, John Kauffman, Jon Duckett, David
Buser; Beginning Active Server Pages 3.0; Wrox, 2001; ISBN 1-861003-38-2
Dov Trietsch, Visual Basic Oracle 8, Programmers Reference, Wrox, 2000; ISBN 1-861001-78-9
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Other Resources
Database and server
Date of Initial Validation
Date of CASG approved modifications
Date of revalidation/review
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Full Module Title: BUSINESS INFORMATION SYSTEMS PROJECT
Short Module Title: BIS Project
Module Code: 2UZC699
Credit Level: 6
Credit Value: 30
Length: 2 Semesters
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Extension:
Lobar Mukhamedova
431
Host course: BSc (Hons) in Business Information Systems
Email:
[email protected]
Status: Core
Subject Board: BSc in Business Information Systems
Pre-requisites: Any five Level 5 modules
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Coursework 100 %
Special features: A supervisor is assigned to each student
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
The project module requires students to carry out their own piece of independent research under
the guidance of a supervisor. The research/development topic chosen must be appropriate
within the Business Information Systems area. A detailed project guide is provided which
contains comprehensive guidance to the project process.
MODULE AIMS
This module aims to
 Enable students to produce an extended piece of work covering a variety of activities related
to a single theme, utilising and extending knowledge and skills gained throughout the course
 Provide a forum for students to combine previously acquired knowledge and techniques with
newly research ideas and to communicate these effectively
 Facilitate students’ ability to work independently under the guidance of a supervisor on a
programme of their choice and develop it systematically
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LEARNING OUTCOMES
After the completion of this module, students are expected to be able to:
1. Carry out a comprehensive literature review of issues related to a selected area of
Business Computing and critically evaluate their findings.
2. Prepare a timetabled research plan and manage their time effectively so that they are
able to follow this plan
3. Demonstrate competency in aspects of: business needs analysis, business systems
design, and implement/review some aspects of the system.
4. Communicate a critical understanding of work undertaken and be able to analyse their
findings in a suitable manner and draw appropriate conclusions
5. Produce a well-structured and coherent report of an extended piece of work and be able
to defend this at a viva voce examination
6. Justify the methods and processes used in carrying out the project
7. Use creative thinking in approaching novel problems
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT

Identification of a suitable research or development possibility within Business
Computing

Use of a comprehensive literature review to investigate relevant issues and guide the
formulation of an appropriate solution or research hypothesis

Identification of resources and/or participant groups

Identification, development, execution and review of an appropriate development or
research strategy

In-depth written presentation of research carried out
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
This is a self-guided research module with individual supervision The project is an individually
supervised piece of work. Students will be expected to seek guidance at least fortnightly from
their supervisor throughout the project.
ASSESSMENT RATIONALE
The primary assessment tool is the final project report and the accompanying viva voce. These
provide a means for assessing the quality of the research per se, as well as the students’ critical
understanding of their work and their ability to communicate this effectively. The initial proposal
and progress report assess students’ ability to formulate and follow a timetabled research plan
and to be able to effectively communicate this.
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
Assessments will be judged on the following criteria








ability to independently carry out a relevant review of literature
integration of findings from literature review into planning and interpretation of research
ability to incorporate innovation within a realistic and scientific research plan
scope, depth and complexity of the work
development of new and existing skills
ability to work independently while making effective use of supervisor’s guidance
ability to formulate a logical, critical and effective written report of the research and to
defend this orally
demonstration of critical insight into their research findings
ASSESSMENT METHODS AND WEIGHTING
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The assessment for the module comprises
 an initial proposal (5% of module mark)
 a progress report and poster presentation (15% of module mark)
 a final report, approximately 10,000 words long, and normally supported by viva voce
examination (80% of module mark)
Assessment
Description
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
In-module
Research Proposal
5%
Progress Report & Poster
15%
Final Project
80%
1-4, 6
100% CW
End-of-module
2-7
8,000 to 10,000 words
(excluding references,
bibliography and appendices)
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
SOURCES
Barrass, R. Scientists must write: a guide to better writing for scientists, engineers and students.
Chapman & Hall (1978)
Dawson, C.W. (2000) The Essence of Computing Projects A Student’s Guide. Prenctice Hall.
Eunson, B. Writing technical documents. J.Wiley & Sons (1995)
Turk, C. Effective writing (2nd edn) John Kirkman (1989)
Date of Initial Validation
Date of CASG approved modifications
Date of revalidation/review
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Full Module Title: PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Short Module Title: PM
Module Code: 2UZB610
Credit Level: 6
Credit Value: 15 credits
Length: 1 Semester
School and Department: WIUT
Module Leader(s):
Rowan E. Wagner
Extension:
452
Email:
[email protected]
Host course: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Status: Option
Subject Board: BA (Hons) Business Administration
Pre-requisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Assessment:
Individual Assignmen 50% , End–of-module Exam 50%
Special features: None
Access restrictions: None
Summary of Module content:
Effective project management is fundamental to the success of projects in all areas of
business. This module aims to provide students with an understanding of the theory that
underpins modern project management practice, together with experience of applying
techniques through individual and group work. The content of this module covers the
common needs of projects in all areas of business, together with the specific needs of
business systems projects.
MODULE AIMS

enable students to understand the need for and importance of project management

provide students with an understanding of modern project management theory and practice

develop team working skills

develop an understanding of how to structure, organise and plan a small business project
using available computer software in preparing Gantt chart and Network Diagrams
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On completion of this module, the successful student should be able to:
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1. critically examine the need for project management techniques and roles.
2. plan, monitor and control a project.
3. manage a project budget.
4. evaluate the success of a project.
5. analyse and manage risk factors within a business project.
6. debate techniques for managing supplier and client relationships.
7. critically examine strategies for managing, developing and working within a team
environment.
INDICATIVE SYLLABUS CONTENT

Managing change and project success/failure factors.

Project organisation – roles, responsibilities, structures.

Project lifecycles and profiles.

Project planning, estimation, scheduling and resourcing.

Managing budgets.

Controlling, monitoring and reporting progress. Issue management.

Risk analysis and quality management.

Managing clients and suppliers.

Leadership, team roles, and the working environment.

Project evaluation and auditing.
TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODS
Teaching methods will include lectures, discussions, tutorials and the use of case studies.
Seminars will focus on the application of theory and techniques. These will be a mix of
individual and group exercises, and will help to prepare students for the module assessment.
ASSESSMENT RATIONALE
The in-module assignment has been developed to test some of the learning outcomes of the
module, to provide students with a chance to develop a rigorous and carefully developed piece
of work, and to gain a first hand understanding of the issues involved in organising and planning
a project.
The end-of-module examination is designed to test their ability to retrieve, understand and apply
project and change management theory to specific issues and problems and to be able to
conduct this analysis under a time constraint.
ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
The precise learning outcomes assessed are listed in the assessment methods and weightings
grid
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ASSESSMENT METHODS AND WEIGHTINGS
Assessment
Description
Weighting
Learning
Outcomes
Student
Time
In-module
individual
coursework
The development of project plans,
organisation, controls and
budgets for a business project.
Or the evaluation of a real-world
case study.
50%
2-5
15 hours
End-of-module
Unseen examination
50%
1,4,6,7
2 ¼ hours
Please note that qualifying mark for all components is 30%
INDICATIVE READING
Essential Reading
Larson, E. and Grey, C. (2006) Project Management: The Managerial Progress, International
edition, McGraw-Hill
Further Reading
1. Lock, Dennis (2000) Project Management, seventh edition, Gower
2. Cadle J. and Yeates D. (2001) Project Management for Information Systems, Prentice
Hall
3. Turner, Rodney (2003) People in Project Management, Gower
4. Walker, Anthony (2002) Project Management in Construction, Blackwell
5. Burke, R (2003) Project Management Planning and Control Techniques, Wiley
6. Mantel, S.(2005) Core Concepts: Project Management in Practice, Wiley
7. Meredith, S. and Mantel, S (2003) Project Management a Managerial Approach, Gower
8. Turner, R and Simister, S (2000) Gower Handbook of Project Management
Journals
1. International Journal of Project Management
2. Journal of Project Management
3. PM Network
The Learning Resource Centre provides access to a number of electronic journal collections
–
you
can
go
via
the
Online
Source
Resources
Section
(http://intranet/intranet/lrc/library/resources.htm)
Project Management Related websites
1. International Project Management Association (IPMA), www.ipma.com
2. Project Management Institute (PMI), www.pmi.com
3. Association for Project Managers (APM), www.apm.com
4. Project Management Wisdom, http://www.maxwideman.com/index.htm
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5. Project Management Forum, http://www.pmforum.org/
6. Project Management Today, http://www.pmtoday.co.uk/
7. Project at Work, http://www.projectsatwork.com/index.cfm
8. Project Management Software Solutions, http://www.welcom.com/
9. RAMP Risk Analysis and Management http://www.ramprisk.com/homepage/
Date of Initial Validation: September 2005
Date of CASG approved modifications
Date of revalidation/review: March 2007
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Section 10 WESTMINSTER INTERNATIONAL UNIVERSITY IN TASHKENT
Westminster International University in Tashkent (WIUT) was established in 2002 by Presidential
decree and is a fully accredited Public University of Uzbekistan. It has a partnership with the
University of Westminster (UK) a Public University of the UK established by Royal Charter. The
two universities have had a contract, since 2002 for the validation and support of the
development and delivery of the University of Westminster degrees at WIUT. This contract has
been renewed on 3 occasions and for the purposes of this course handbook the current contract
is from 2010-15. As part of the contract this course has been validated by the University of
Westminster to be of the same standard and quality as of a similar course delivered in London.
As such all students of this course are registered on the University Student Record system and
their academic performance and behaviour is governed by the regulations of the University of
Westminster. Each student will have a unique University of Westminster student identification
number as well as a unique WIUT student identification number.
The following links will help you to find out more information about the University and how it can
support you through your studies and also about what rights and responsibilities you have as a
student at the University of Westminster.
Careers Development Centre (CDC)
This service can help you plan your future by providing quality information, advice and guidance
on the options to consider when you leave the University. Information is also available on
vacation work, part-time work during your studies, courses and opportunities for voluntary
service.
You may use the service at any stage but we would advise you to make contact early in your
course. Full details of all vacancies advertised by CDC are available on the website.
For further information please go to http://career.wiut.uz/Default.aspx?lang=En
Student Housing Services
While studying at Westminster International University in Tashkent, students can either stay in
their own private accommodation or apply to live in the University Hall of Residence. There are
approximately 130 places in the Hall and international students will be given priority. However,
students will need to apply as soon as possible on receiving confirmation of a place at WIUT.
They may reserve a room by e-mailing to [email protected]
The WIUT Hall of Residence offers basic hostel accommodation. It is located within about 20
minutes traveling time of the University by public transport. The Hall is a nine-storey building
with a wide range of facilities including a computer lab, kitchen (for you to do your own cooking!),
gym for fitness activities and a health room on the ground floor. The first and second floors
consist of flats for teachers. The other floors are reserved for students. Each floor consists of
ten twin rooms and one twin room for disabled students and a shared kitchen with dining area.
Each two rooms have a shared shower, toilet and washbasin.
As residents, students will be required to have their own towels, cutlery and crockery and to
keep your room and communal areas clean and tidy. Hall Services will provide bedding and are
responsible for cleaning some communal areas. A Hall warden and nurse staff the Hall during the
day and a Security Guard is on duty 24 hours a day.
Student Health Services
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The health and well-being of staff/students is great importance and the University aims to ensure
a healthy and safe working environment for all. A range of services are provided which are
designed to prevent or minimize the risk of illness or injury occurring. These include ensuring
that good quality advice and support is available so that the health of staff is not adversely
affected by the work they do, as well as providing rehabilitation opportunities for employees who
do experience illness or disability, enabling them to recover and return to work.
The service aims to promote and maintain the health and well being of staff and is concerned
with the effects of work on health. It provides:

Regular health checks for anyone

General health checks and advice for anyone

Immediate treatment for some types of sickness or injury at work

Information on specialist agencies for personal and social problems

Advice and help for those returning to work following temporary or permanent disability,
surgery or long-term ill health.
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APPENDIX 1. Glossary of commonly used regulatory terms (Undergraduate courses)
All students should make sure that they have and keep for reference a copy of the current edition of
the Handbook of Academic Regulations. The following glossary should be read in conjunction with
Section 17, the Modular Framework for Undergraduate Courses. The full text of all academic
regulations may be read on-line at the Academic Registrar’s homepage at:
www.wmin.ac.uk/academicregistrars
Pass
The overall pass mark for all undergraduate Level modules is 40%. Students will have to attempt
and achieve at least 30% in the specified assessment element in addition to achieving an overall
module pass mark of 40% or above. When a mark for a component is below 30%, then the
module is not deemed to be passed even when the average between the components is over
40%.
A module may include both coursework and examination elements of assessment. The validated
Course Handbook and the detailed module guidance must specify the mode of assessment for
each module and the weighting of these elements.
Fail
If the overall module mark is less than 40% the module has been failed even if some elements of
assessment reached or exceeded the pass mark.
(See the Modular Framework for
Undergraduate Courses in the Handbook of Academic Regulations for details on action in the case
of failure.)
Condoned Credit (or Taken)
The term ‘Condoned Credit’ relates solely to undergraduate modules and it means to have
attempted a module, completed most or all of the assessment requirements and achieved an
overall module mark of at least 30%.
A result of Condoned Credit means that although the student has failed the module overall they
have broadly achieved the learning outcomes for the module such that the academic credits can
be counted towards the total needed for an academic award within the course scheme in which
they are registered. These credits are defined formally as Condoned Credits, and the module can
fulfil the pre-requisite requirements of a module at the next level, except where course specific
regulations require the pre-requisited module to be passed.
Undergraduate modular course regulations allow the equivalent of one 15 credit module at
each Level (4, 5 and 6) to be ‘Condoned’ and to count towards an Honours degree. However
some courses state that certain modules (e.g. cores) must be passed with an overall mark of at
least 40% to meet course specific regulations.
Critically, a student must achieve a status of ‘condoned’ in a module to be considered eligible for
reassessment (known also as referral or resit).
Modules for which a ‘condoned’ result is recorded will remain on a student’s profile and
transcript unless a pass is achieved on reassessment (also known as referral or resit). In cases
where a referral opportunity is offered but the student is not successful at reassessment, the
‘condoned credit’ record will remain on their profile and transcript. In cases where the module is
reattempted and a pass mark achieved, the ‘condoned credit’ record will still be retained on a
student’s profile to record the outcome of the first attempt.
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Attempt
For the purpose of counting the number of credits attempted for an award (details in the
Framework for Undergraduate Courses), to have ‘attempted’ a module means to have registered
for a module and not submitted a change of module registration indicating withdrawal from the
module by the deadline or have not submitted written notice of withdrawing from the course
between the meeting of the Assessment Board considering the results of that module. Critically, if
a student decides to withdraw from a module or their course but does not complete the necessary
notification forms by the due date they will be deemed to have failed the module i.e. to have used
up one attempt and the associated modular credits. Therefore, particular care should be taken to
ensure that a Change of Module Registration form is completed before the published deadline,
and/or that written notification of withdrawal from the course is provided before the Assessment
Board meets to consider the results of the module for that semester.
Reassessment /Referral
If a student fails to achieve an overall pass in a module and/or a satisfactory standard in any part
of the module, an Assessment Board may decide, at its discretion, to allow the student to be
reassessed (to resubmit coursework or resit exams for part or all of the module) provided that
they have achieved an overall module mark of at least 30%. The Subject Board will specify the
date for referred work in accordance with the approved University Calendar. A student will not
normally be reassessed in a part of the module assessment in which they have already achieved
the pass mark.
Any student who is offered reassessment but who does not take up the offer will retain the fail
mark originally recorded for the module. The overall mark for any module successfully completed
following reassessment/referral (resit) will be capped at the pass mark (40% for undergraduate
modules) irrespective of the actual mark the student achieves.
Re-attempt (retake)
Where a student has failed a module, the Assessment Board may permit the student to re-attempt
the module. Re-attempting a module means to study the module again with attendance. The
student must re-register for the module and complete all assessments (e.g. all coursework,
practicals, in-class tests, critical reviews of studio work, examinations or other form of assessment
requirements. This applies regardless of the marks the student achieved in any element of
assessment at the first attempt.
The actual marks awarded in a second attempt will be capped at the pass mark (40%) irrespective
of the marks achieved.
Modules may be attempted only twice (i.e. a first attempt and a subsequent re-attempt). At the
discretion of an Assessment Board, a student may be offered the opportunity of reassessment
once only on each occasion that they attempt the module provided that they have achieved a
Taken result with an overall module mark of at least 30% initially.
For the purposes of counting the number of credits that have been attempted towards the award of
an Honours degree, a student must not have attempted more than 330 credits at Credit Levels 5
and 6 (Modular Framework for Undergraduate Courses). A first attempt of any module will count
as an attempt, and a reattempt will count as a further separate attempt. However reassessment
(referral or resit) following failure at the first attempt does not count as a further separate attempt.
For example, if a student is reassessed in a 15 credit module following failure at the first attempt,
then the first attempt and the reassessment will count as 15 credits attempted (in total). If a
student then re-attempts a 15 credit module following failure in that module at the first attempt, the
first attempt and the re-attempt shall together count as 30 credits attempted (irrespective of any
reassessments).
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Refer
This term is used on student transcripts and profiles to indicate that an Assessment Board has
agreed to offer the student the opportunity of reassessment (re-sit) in a module (see
“reassessment” above). Students are reminded that when they are reassessed in a module or any
part of a module the overall mark will be capped at the pass mark (40%) regardless of the actual
mark they achieve.
Deferral
This term is used on student transcripts and profiles to indicate that a student has been granted
permission for a late assessment (or in some cases a further assessment) by a given date (this will
usually be as a result of a successful outcome of a student's Mitigating Circumstances
submission). In the case of a deferred assessment, the student will be awarded the actual mark
achieved (i.e. there is no penalty and the mark is not capped). Deferral coursework and
examination opportunities are offered during August 2007. For further details please contact the
Registry.
Differences between Reassessment and Reattempt
A student being reassessed in a referred module would not normally need to repeat
components of the assessment for the module that had already been passed. A student reattempting a module must complete the full assessment requirements irrespective of marks
achieved at the first attempt in individual components of the assessment.
A student being reassessed in a referred module would only be required to undertake
assessment and would not have to pay the module fee again. A student re-attempting a
module would have to repeat the module with attendance and would have to pay the full module
fee again.
A reassessment does not count as a further separate attempt for the regulations governing the
maximum number of credits that can be attempted for an Honours degree (330 credits at Credit
Levels 5 and 6, Modular Framework for Undergraduate Courses). A re-attempt does count as a
further attempt for these purposes.
A module being reassessed in the following academic year will not count towards the number of
credits being attempted in any one session in terms of the overall number of credits for which a
full-time or part-time student may register in any academic session (i.e. 135 credits for full-time
and 90 credits for part-time students at undergraduate level). A module being re-attempted
(with attendance) in the following session will be counted in this way.
Pre-requisite
Students may have to take or pass a certain module before they can study another. In this case
the first module is defined as “pre-requisite” for the second module. Unless the course specific
regulations require a pass in the pre-requisited module, a condoned result will suffice.
Co-requisite
Modules may be linked in such a way that a student is required to attempt one module at the same
time as another, in which case the two modules are defined as “co-requisites” for each other.
Dis-requisites (or restricted)
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Registration for a module may not be permitted if a student has previously studied a module with
a similar syllabus which has been designated as a dis-requisite, or which has approved access
restrictions.
Student Module Profile
Students are issued with a module profile at the end of each academic session. This shows the
module(s) for which they are registered, module results for modules which they have attempted
and re-assessment opportunities, where applicable; as well as results for previous academic
sessions. This is also available on SRS. Notes to accompany this are available from the
Registry.
External Transcript
An external transcript is issued upon completion of a course. It is the University’s formal record
of achievement of modules passed or Condoned, % marks and total number of credits awarded
to a student. It also confirms the level, title and classification of the final award. Students can
request an external transcript either to give to an employer, or an admissions tutor for a
programme of further study, or for the purposes of credit transfer.
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