Review U.S. History- SENF
Transition to Modern America
Twenties 1920-1929
Isolationism
Movement westward and Gilded Age (late 1800s)
Factory System
Immigration
Red Scare
Population shift to cities
Jazz Age
Inventions/ Industrialism
Social Darwinism
Immigration
Eugenics
Urbanization
Nativism
Political corruption and political machines
Changing role of women
Entrepreneurship (growth of big business)
Economic boom/consumerism
Philanthropy
Indian Policies
Labor Unions
Growth of railroad (transcontinental)
Cattle Industry Boom
Westward Movement and the Homestead Act
Laissez-Faire
Great Depression and New Deal
Depression (1929-1941)
Depression 1929 – 1941:
Crash of stock market
Great Depression
Dust Bowl
New Deal
Expansion of the Federal government
Progressive Era (1890-1920)
Opposed corruption and waste in government
Concerned with social injustice
Relief, Reform, Recovery
America’s Reaction to World at War
Civil Service Reform
Totalitarianism
Anti-trust acts
Alliances
Populism
Pearl Harbor
Interested in government reform at all levels
Internment
Muckrakers
Conservation
Reform
16th, 17th, 18th and 19th Amendments
Suffrage
Home front (volunteerism, victory gardens and war
bonds)
Mobilization
World War II
Axis and Allies
Prohibition
Multiple Front War
Pure Food and Drug Act
Military Leaders
Federal Reserve
Significant Contributions of Groups
Social Gospel Movement
Rise of World Power
Spanish American War and Expansionism – acquisitions
of land (Guam, Hawaii, Philippines, and
Puerto Rico)
Latin America (Panama Canal)
World War I 1914-1918 – Woodrow Wilson, League of
Nations, total war, technological advances,
Treaty of Versailles
Onset of Cold War and 1950s
Ideological war against Communism
HUAC
Truman Doctrine
Marshall Plan
Berlin Airlift
NATO
Domino Theory/containment
Korean Conflict
McCarthyism
Space Race
Berlin Wall (construction and fall of)
Cuban Missile Crisis
Important Dates
Civil Rights Movement
Political Organizations
Civil Rights Acts (1957 and 1964)
Voting Rights Act of 1965
Various Approaches to advocacy
Significant Supreme Court Cases
Presidential Actions and Congressional Votes
Significant Leaders
New Frontiers and Familiar Enemies
New Frontier – John F. Kennedy
Great Society – Lyndon B. Johnson
1898 – Spanish-American War
1914-1918 – World War I
1929 – Stock Market Crash, Beginning of the Great
Depression
1939-1945 – World War II
1957 – Sputnik: Beginning of the U.S-Soviet Space
Race
1968-1969 – Martin Luther King Jr. assassination and
U.S. lands on the moon
1991 – Cold War ends
2001 – terrorist attacks on World Trade Center and the
Pentagon
2008 – election of first black president, Barack Obama
Vietnam War
1970-1990
Nixon and relationship with China
Reaganomics
Peace through Strength
Involvement in the Middle East
Conservative Resurgence
1990- present
U.S. Involvement in World Affairs
Persian Gulf War
Balkan Crisis
September 11, 2001
Long term effects of government programs
2008 Presidential Election
CONSTITUTIONAL ISSUES RAISED BY FEDERAL
GOVERNMENT POLICY CHANGES DURING TIMES
OF SIGNIFICANT EVENTS
WW I – soon after declaring war on Germany and its
allies in 1917, Congress ruled that the U.S. mail
could not be used for sending any material urging "treason,
insurrection or forcible resistance to any
law." It punished offenders with a fine of up to $5,000 and a
five-year prison term.
Great Depression – Roosevelt’s attempt to increase the
number of Supreme Court justices from 9 to
13 would have created a shift in the “separation of powers”
and “checks and balances”.
WW II – soon after the bombing of Pearl Harbor,
President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066,
which authorized the military to remove JapaneseAmericans from America's West Coast and into
internment camps.
1960s – the debate regarding the Gulf of Tonkin incident
caused the creation of the War Powers Act,
which placed restrictions on the executive branch’s ability
to send American troops into combat.
9/11 – Patriot Act (Uniting and Strengthening America
by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to
Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism), purpose of the USA
PATRIOT Act is to deter and punish terrorist
acts in the United States and around the world, to enhance
law enforcement investigatory tools, and
other purposes.