Fatih University
Faculty of Engineering
Department of Electronics Engineering
Course Information for Industrial Automation Systems
I. COURSE DESCRIPTION
Course Code: EEE 533
Course Name: Industrial Automation Systems
Course Objectives: To provide an overview of industrial automation systems and give introductory concepts. To learn
control strategies at advanced level. To introduce plant-wide control and learn how to design such control systems.
Special Requirements: Loop-Pro Trainer® and MATLAB Release 2008b
Prerequisites: -
Instructor: Assoc.Prof.Dr. Erkan İmal,
Office: Bldg. EA-305,
E-mail: [email protected]
Office Hours: Monday 13:00-14:00, Tuesday: 13:00-14:00, Wednesday: 13:00-14:00
Teaching Assistant: Office: Office Hours: Look at the time-table on his office door.
E-mail: -
Textbook:
1- Process Dynamics and Control, D.E. Seborg, T.F. Edgar, D.A. Mellichamp, 2004, 2nd Edition, John Wiley & Sons,
Inc. ISBN: 978-0-471-00077-8. Book Web page: www.wiley.com/college/seborg
2- Practical Process Control Using Control Station 3.7, Doug J. Cooper, 2004, Control Station LLC. Book Web page:
www.controlstation.com
3- Process Control Instrumentation Technology, Curtis D. Johnson, 2006, 8th Edition, Prentice Hall. ISBN:
0-13-197669-9. Book Web page: www.uh.edu/~tech13v/pcit
References and Other Materials:
1. “Control Systems Technology”, Bateson, 5/e, Prentice Hall, 1996.
2. “Control Systems”, Bucek, Prentice Hall, 1989.
3. “Elements of Electronic Instrumentation and Measurement”, Carr, 3/e, Prentice Hall, 1996.
4. “Microcomputers and Modern Control Engineering”, Cassel, Reston, 1983.
5. “Automated Process Control Systems”, Hunter, 2/e, Prentice Hall, 1987.
6. “Industrial Control Engineering”, Jacob, Prentice Hall, 1988.
7. “Modern Control Technology”, Kilian, West, 1996.
8. “Programmable Logic Controllers”, Prentice Hall, 1988.
9. “Interfacing Sensors to the IBM PC”, Tompkins and Webster, Prentice Hall, 1988.
10. Internet Resources:
 www.sensorsmag.com
 www.controlmagazine.com
 www.icsmagazine.com
 www.ianmag.com
II. COURSE CONTENTS
Week 2
Introductory Material and Review …………………………….Seborg 1.1-14.6
Week 3
Introductory Material and Review ……………………………………… Seborg 1.1-14.6
Week 4
Feed-forward and Ratio Control ............................................. Seborg 15.1-15.7
Introduction to feed-forward control. Ratio control. Feed-forward controller design based on steadystate models. Feed-forward controller design based on dynamics models. The relationship between
the steady-state and dynamic design methods. Configurations for feed-forward - feedback control.
Tuning feed-forward controllers.
Week 4
Feedback, Feedforward and Ratio Control ................................................. Seborg 15.1-15.7
Introduction to feed-forward control. Ratio control. Feed-forward controller design based on steadystate models. Feed-forward controller design based on dynamics models. The relationship between
the steady-state and dynamic design methods. Configurations for feed-forward - feedback control.
Tuning feed-forward controllers.
Week 5
Enhanced Single-Loop Control Strategies ................................. Seborg 16.1-16.6
Cascade control. Time-delay compensation. Inferential control. Selective control / Override systems.
Nonlinear control systems. Adaptive control systems.
Week 6
Digital Sampling, Filtering, and Control ............................................... Seborg 17.1-17.6
Sampling and signal reconstruction. Signal processing and data filtering. z-Transform analysis for
digital control. Tuning of digital PID controllers. Direct synthesis for design of digital controllers.
Minimum variance control.
Week 7
Multi-loop and Multivariable Control........................................
Seborg 18.1-18.6
Process interactions and control loop interactions. Pairing of controlled and manipulated variables.
Singular value analysis. Tuning of multiloopPID control systems. Decoupling and multivariable
control strategies. Strategies for reducing control loop interactions.
Week 8
Real-Time Optimization ..........................................................................
Seborg 19.1-19.5
Basic requirements in real-time optimization. The formulation and solution of RTO problems.
Unconstrained and constrained optimization. Linear programming. Quadratic and nonlinear
programming.
Week 9
Midterm
Week 10
Model Predictive Control .......................................................... Seborg 20.1-20.7
Overview of model predictive control. Predictions for SISO models. Predictions for MIMO models.
Model predictive control calculations. Set-point calculations. Selection of design and tuning
parameters. Implementation.
Week 11
Process Monitoring .................................................................................. Seborg 21.1-21.5
Traditional monitoring techniques. Quality control charts. Extensions of statistical process control.
Multivariate statistical techniques. Control performance monitoring.
Week 12
Batch Process Control ...............................................................
Seborg 22.1-22.5
Batch control systems. Sequential and logic control. Control during the batch. Run-to-run control.
Batch production management.
Week 13
Introduction to Plant-wide Control .......................................................... Seborg 23.1-23.4
Plantwide control issues. Hypothetical plant for plantwide control studies. Internal ffedback of
material and energy. Interaction of plant design and control system design.
Week 14
Plant-wide Control System Design ........................................
Seborg 24.1-24.4
Procedures for the design of plantwide control systems. A systematic procedure for of plantwide
control system design. Case study: The reactor/flash unit plant. Effect of control structure on closedloop performance.
Week 15
Review
III. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS, TUTORIALS, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES
N/A
IV. EXAM DATES, GRADING POLICY AND ATTENDANCE
Exam Dates
Midterm Exam : 20 April 2009 (week 9)
Final Exams
: June 08, 2009 – June 19, 2009
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Grading Policy
Homework: 15 %, Quiz: 15%, Midterm Exam: 30 %, Final Exam: 40 %
Attendance (Clause 17 of the Undergraduate Regulation)
Classroom attendance is mandatory. Students, who are absent over 30% of the class time and 20% of the lab time,
automatically fail the course. Repeating students are exempt from attendance for a theoritecal course only if the
attendance is fulfilled at least once for that course before.
Honor Code: All work done on the exams will be done on your own and pledged. Students may discuss homework
concepts and approaches, but the work will be done by the individual. Group or copied solutions are not permitted.
Homework is considered pledged simply by its receipt.
Late Work and Examinations: Normally, homework is due one week from the assigned date, unless otherwise
indicated or previous arrangements are made. Late homework will be accepted due to sickness only. Students who
know that they are going to miss class and/or lab session should make arrangements in advance.
Only selected homework problems may be graded from the set turned in. The others will be checked for completion.
Exams will be closed notes, open book and in-class.
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ii. course contents