Ms. Bertalon
Name ___________________
History Fair Research
 A bibliography is a list of the sources you used when you did research.
 The purpose of writing a bibliography is to avoid plagiarism and give
credit to people when you use their words and/or ideas.
 It also allows your teacher to see the sources in which you found your
information.
 For the History Fair, you must write an annotated bibliography, which is
a bibliography that explains why each source was useful to you.
 For the History Fair, you must separate your bibliography into two
sections: Primary Sources and Secondary Sources. Turn to page 3 to
see an example of a completed annotated bibliography.
 First, you need to follow specific rules when writing a bibliography. Follow
the examples below depending on what type of source you use.
 If you are using a BOOK, follow this example:
Author’s Last Name, First Name. Title. City of Publication: Publishing Company,
Copyright Date.
Krull, Kathleen. A Kid's Guide to the Bill of Rights. New York: Avon, Daly, Smith Publishing
Company, 1999.
 If you are using an ENCYCLOPEDIA, follow this example:
Author’s Last Name, First Name. “Title of Entry”. Title of Encyclopedia. Year.
Murphy, Bruce. “Constitution of the United States”. World Book Encyclopedia. 2003.
 If you are using a WEBSITE, follow this example:
Author, company, or organization that wrote the website. "Title of Web Page." Date
you looked at it [Website Address].
U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. "Bill of Rights." December 20, 2007
[http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/charters/
bill_of_rights.html].
 If you are using an INTERVIEW, follow this example:
Name of person interviewed. Kind of interview (personal interview, telephone
interview, or E-mail interview). Date of interview.
Kirschner, Harold. Personal Interview. 20 December 2007.
Directions for writing an ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY:
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Open up a new, blank page in Microsoft Word.
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Type the word Bibliography at the top of the page and center it.
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Make two sections: Primary Sources and Secondary Sources
______
Follow the examples and type in the information that is required for the type of
source you are using.
______
Directly after the source information, type in your annotation (your explanation
of what specifically about this source helped you and what information you got
from it)
______
Skip a space between each source.
______
Put the sources that you used in alphabetical order by the author’s last
name (or the company name). If there is no author, alphabetize it by the title.
Do not number the list of sources.
______
The first line of each source should start at the margin, and every line after it
should be indented. The trick to make this work is the hold down to Control key
(Ctrl) and the Tab key at the same time.
______
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Look at the sample bibliography on the next page. Make sure your
bibliography looks like this.
Bibliography
Primary Sources:
Kirschner, Harold. Personal Interview. 5 December 2009. Harold Kirschner is my 85 year
old great-uncle. He lived through the Great Depression, and the interview helped me
to understand how difficult life was at this time. He told me about money problems and
ways that his family had to cut back on spending. We also discussed the New Deal
and how that made life a little better.
Secondary Sources:
Krull, Kathleen. A Kid's Guide to the Bill of Rights. New York: Avon, Daly, Smith Publishing
Company, 1999. This book was a great source because it explained the Bill of Rights
in detail and told about specific court cases. The section that was most helpful was on
freedom of speech where it explained exactly what you can and cannot do under the
first amendment.
Murphy, Bruce Benjamin. “Constitution of the United States”. World Book Encyclopedia.
2003. This encyclopedia article was helpful because it explained how the Bill of Rights
was made. It also told about important people who were involved in the creation and
the problems that they dealt with at the time. This helped me to understand why they
felt the need to create the Bill of Rights.
U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. "Bill of Rights." December 9, 2009
[http://www.archives.gov/national_archives_experience/charters/
bill_of_rights.html]. This site was helpful because it connected the American
Revolution to the creation of the Bill of Rights. It was helpful to read about the points of
view of the people who wrote the Bill of Rights.
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History Fair Research - Hewlett