26 June 2001
Page 1 of 256
TUESDAY, 26 JUNE 2001
____
PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF PROVINCES
____
The Council met at 14:03.
The
Chairperson
took
the
Chair
and
requested
members to observe a moment of silence for prayers
or meditation.
ANNOUNCEMENTS, TABLINGS AND COMMITTEE REPORTS - see
col 000.
NOTICES OF MOTION
Mrs J N VILAKAZI: Chairperson, I hereby give notice
that
I
shall
move
Council:
That the Council -
at
the
next
sitting
of
the
26 June 2001
Page 2 of 256
(1) notes with shock the death of a four-monthold
baby
who
was
allegedly
attacked
by
gigantic rats at Sebokeng Hospital;
(2) further
notes
that
the
hospital
medical
superintendent acknowledged that there is a
rat problem in the hospital;
(3) finds
it
unacceptable
precautions
ensure
were
the
that
not
safety
taken
of
the
required
timeously
patients
to
in
the
and
all
hospital; and
(4) calls
on
the
Department
of
Health
other structures involved with the safety of
patients to take precautions to prevent the
reoccurrence of such a nasty health hazard.
Ms B N DLULANE: Chairperson, I hereby give notice
that
I
shall
move
Council:
That the Council -
at
the
next
sitting
of
the
26 June 2001
Page 3 of 256
(1) notes that -
(a) the DA leader, Tony Leon, has finally had
the courage to admit that his party is
dominated by whites and that it has to
attract more blacks;
(b) Mr Leon admits that the African National
Congress has brought freedom to all South
Africans including himself; and
(c) the
division
which
manifests
itself
in
terms of leadership within the Democratic
Alliance poses a question whether a small
party
like
the
DA,
which
cannot
consolidate its own party and deal with
its
own
problems,
can
lead
the
entire
country;
(2) congratulates
presenting
ANC; and
the
their
Democratic
internal
Alliance
squabbles
to
on
the
26 June 2001
Page 4 of 256
(3) acknowledges that this entails that the DA
has finally realised that the ANC is the only
party that can bring a better life for all.
[Interjections.]
Mr K D S DURR: Chairperson, I hereby give notice
that
I
shall
move
at
the
next
sitting
of
the
Council:
That
the
Revenue
Council
to
look
calls
into
upon
all
the
cases
Receiver
of
of
improper
benefits received in cash or kind by any person
of official arising from the arms deal, as well
as any other similar Government transactions, and
to impose maximum penalties for nondisclosure of
benefits received.
INTERNATIONAL DAY AGAINST DRUG ABUSE AND ILLICIT
DRUG TRAFFICKING
(Draft Resolution)
26 June 2001
Page 5 of 256
Mnr P A MATTHEE: Voorsitter, ek stel voor sonder
kennisgewing:
Dat die Raad -
(1) daarvan kennis neem dat -
(a) dit
vandag
Internasionale
Dwelmmisbruik
en
onwettige
Dag
teen
Dwelmhandel
is;
(b) statistieke
Maart
van
vanjaar
April
wys
verlede
dat
daar
jaar
'n
tot
reuse
toename in dwelmgebruik is en dat veral
die syfer onder laerskoolleerlinge uiters
kommerwekkend is;
(c) dwelmbase hulle veral daarop toespits om
kinders as kopers en verkopers te werf;
en
(d) 'n grootskaalse gemeenskaplike poging van
ouers,
gemeenskappe,
polisie
en
ander
opvoeders,
die
regeringsinstellings
26 June 2001
Page 6 of 256
sowel as nie-regeringsorganisasies nodig
is om die dwelmprobleme van ons land op
te los en ons jeug uit dié bose wurggreep
te kry;
(2) sy
volle
steun
oplossings
te
verleen
vind
aan
vir
pogings
die
om
toenemende
dwelmprobleem onder ons bevolking en om ons
jeug
te
beskerm
teen
die
gewetenlose
uitbuiting deur dwelmbase; en
(3) 'n beroep op die Regering doen om maatreëls
te verskerp om die binnekoms van onwettige
dwelmmiddels in ons land te probeer voorkom.
(Translation
of
Afrikaans
draft
resolution
follows.)
[Mr
P
A
MATTHEE:
notice:
That the Council -
(1) notes that -
Chairperson,
I
move
without
26 June 2001
Page 7 of 256
(a) today
is
the
International
Day
against
Drug Abuse and Illicit Drug Trafficking;
(b) statistics from April last year to March
this year indicate that there has been an
enormous increase in drug use and that
the figure among primary school pupils in
particular is extremely alarming;
(c) druglords
recruiting
concentrate
their
children
as
efforts
buyers
on
and
suppliers; and
(d) a large-scale joint effort on the part of
parents,
communities,
educators,
the
police and other government institutions
as well as nongovernmental organisations
is
needed
to
solve
our
country's
drug
problems and to release our youth from
this evil stranglehold;
(2) lends its full support to attempts at finding
solutions
to
the
increasing
drug
problem
amongst our population and at protecting our
26 June 2001
youth
Page 8 of 256
against
unscrupulous
exploitation
by
druglords; and
(3) appeals
to
the
Government
to
intensify
measures aimed at the prevention of the entry
of illegal drugs into our country.]
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
ANNIVERSARY OF ADOPTION OF FREEDOM CHARTER
(Draft Resolution)
The CHIEF WHIP OF THE COUNCIL: Chairperson, I move
without notice:
That the Council notes that -
(1) today
marks
adoption
of
the
the
46th
anniversary
Freedom
Charter,
of
the
which
declared a nonracial, nonsexist South Africa
which belongs to all who live in it, black
and white;
26 June 2001
Page 9 of 256
(2) its visionary prescriptions have served as an
educational
disciplined
tool
in
struggle
the
to
protracted
bring
and
democracy
to
our land;
(3) today, we salute and pay tribute to all the
people
who
contributed
in
putting
together
this Charter;
(4) for
years,
the
Freedom
Charter
has
been
a
living document - for decades its eloquence
has adequately answered the question ``What
kind of South Africa do we want?''; and
(5) this vision described in the Freedom Charter
continues to inspire the struggles of South
Africa's
people,
to
guide
the
process
of
fundamental social change and its principles
remain at the heart of the objectives of the
ANC and the Government.
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
26 June 2001
Page 10 of 256
LANDMINES IN ERITREA
(Draft Resolution)
Ms M P THEMBA: Chairperson, I move without notice:
That the Council -
(1) expresses
landmines
its
dismay
which
are
at
the
tragedy
killing
our
of
fellow
African brothers in Eritrea;
(2) regrets
Ethiopia's
refusal
to
disclose
the
location of more landmines in Eritrea;
(3) supports
the
initiative
of
the
removal
of
landmines and regrets America's refusal to be
part of this initiative;
(4) congratulates South Africa for its role in
the campaign for the abolition of landmines
and weapons of mass destruction; and
26 June 2001
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(5) pledges more international assistance for the
strong proponent of the total abolition of
landmines.
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
NATURAL DISASTERS
(Draft Resolution)
Mnr J L THERON: Voorsitter, ek stel voor sonder
kennisgewing:
Dat die Raad -
(1) kennis neem van die feit dat -
(a) drie natuurrampe, 'n reuse aardbewing in
Peru, 'n tifoon in China en 'n vulkaniese
uitbarsting in die Filippyne, die wêreld
getref het; en
26 June 2001
Page 12 of 256
(b) meer
as
70
meer
as
150
mense
in
mense
Peru
in
die
gesterf
het,
tifoon
Chebi
omgekom het en dat meer as 27 000 mense
op 215 dorpies in die Filippyne dakloos
gelaat is deur die uitbarsting van die
Mayon-vulkaan; en
(2) sy skok uitspreek oor die lewensverlies en
ontberinge van die mense en simpatie betuig
met die onderskeie lande.
(Translation
of
Afrikaans
draft
resolution
follows.)
[Mr J L THERON: Chairperson, I move without notice:
That the Council -
(1) notes that -
(a) three
natural
disasters,
a
huge
earthquake in Peru, a typhoon in China
and
a
volcanic
eruption
in
the
Phillipines, have struck the world; and
26 June 2001
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(b) more than 70 people have died in Peru,
more
than
150
people
have
perished
in
typhoon Chebi and that more than 27 000
people in 215 villages in the Phillipines
have been left homeless by the eruption
of the Mayon volcano; and
(2) expresses its shock at the loss of life and
human suffering and conveys its sympathy to
the respective countries.]
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
PRESENTATION OF JAMNALAL BAJAJ AWARD TO ARCHBISHOP
DESMOND TUTU
(Draft Resolution)
Mrs
E
N
LUBIDLA:
notice:
That the Council -
Chairperson,
I
move
without
26 June 2001
Page 14 of 256
(1) notes with pride -
(a) the consistent contribution of Archbishop
Desmond
Tutu
toward
the
struggle
for
freedom of our people; and
(b) his critical leadership role in the Truth
and Reconciliation Commission; and
(2) therefore recognises with pride the Jamnalal
Bajaj award received by Desmond Tutu from the
High Commissioner of India, Mr S S Mukherjee,
yesterday, for furthering the Gandhian values
of nonviolence and passive resistance.
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
CALL FOR ASSISTANCE TO EMERGING AND SUBSISTENCE
FARMERS IN THE NORTH WEST
(Draft Resolution)
26 June 2001
Page 15 of 256
Mr J O TLHAGALE: Madam Chairperson, I move without
notice:
That the Council -
(1) notes with concern that -
(a) a large proportion of the emerging and
subsistence
farmers
in
the
North
West,
which is predominantly rural, are on the
verge of liquidation and bankruptcy due
to a lack of the necessary resources and
climatic conditions; and
(b) many of the rural dwellers who depended
on
agriculture,
their
main
which
employer,
had
are
always
now
been
facing
a
bleak future and this has aggravated the
cycle of poverty in the province; and
(2) calls on the powers that be to assist the
farmers to resuscitate this industry and to
stop allegations that the UCDP leader spoiled
26 June 2001
Page 16 of 256
the farmers with nonrefundable loans during
drought periods.
The CHAIRPERSON OF THE NCOP: Order! Is there any
objection to the motion? [Interjections.] There is
an
objection.
The
motion
will
therefore
become
notice of a motion.
GOOD WISHES TO NATALIE DU TOIT, AMPUTEE SWIMMER
(Draft Resolution)
Me E C GOUWS: Mev die Voorsitter, ek stel voor
sonder kennisgewing:
Dat die Raad -
(1) kennis neem dat -
(a) een
van
Suid-Afrika
se
beste
jong
swemmers, die 17-jarige Natalie du Toit,
se linkerbeen in
Februarie by die knie
afgesit is na 'n motorongeluk;
26 June 2001
Page 17 of 256
(b) hierdie dapper meisie weer op Sondag 1
Julie haar toetrede tot kompeterende swem
hervat ten spyte van die ongeluk; en
(c) sy die wenner van verskeie WP-titels en
nasionale
medaljes
voor
die
tragiese
ongeluk was; en
(2) haar alle sterkte en voorspoed toewens, ook
vir die moed aan die dag gelê.
(Translation
of
Afrikaans
draft
resolution
follows.)
[Ms E C GOUWS: Madam Chairperson, I move without
notice:
That the Council -
(1) notes that -
(a) one
of
swimmers,
South
the
Africa's
17-year-old
best
young
Natalie
du
Toit, had her left leg amputated at the
knee in February after a car accident;
26 June 2001
(b) this
Page 18 of 256
brave
comeback
to
young
girl
is
competitive
making
swimming
a
on
Sunday 1 July, despite the accident; and
(c) she was the holder of various WP titles
and
national
medals
before
the
tragic
accident; and
(2) wishes her well and good luck, also for the
courage she has shown.]
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
SEIZURE OF ILLEGAL ROCK LOBSTER AT THE WATERFRONT
(Draft Resolution)
Mr G A LUCAS: Chairperson, I move without notice:
That the Council -
(1) expresses its concern over the discovery and
seizure
of
3,37
tons
of
South
Coast
rock
26 June 2001
Page 19 of 256
lobster worth an estimated R1 million from a
vessel owned by the Hout Bay fishing industry
at the Waterfront yesterday;
(2) notes
that
the
same
company
was
last
week
linked to seizures of 10 tons of endangered
Patagonian Toothfish in a container belonging
to the company in New York;
(3) commends the Scorpions investigators and Sea
Fisheries inspectors on this breakthrough;
(4) is
of
the
view
that
the
South
African
Government has no room for poachers; and
(5) is of the firm belief that the investigators
will
use
their
skill
and
due
diligence
in
order to bring the perpetrators to book and
to deal with them with the full might of the
law.
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
26 June 2001
Page 20 of 256
INTERNATIONAL DAY AGAINST TORTURE
(Draft Resolution)
Ms B THOMSON: Chairperson, I move without notice:
That the Council -
(1) notes that -
(a) today
is
the
international
day
against
torture, affirming that everyone has the
right to freedom and security and should
not
be
deprived
arbitrarily
or
without
just cause;
(b) this has been made possible by the United
Nations
coalition
torture,
and
of
the
NGOs
summary
disappearances
largest
and
international
fighting
executions,
all
other
against
forced
forms
of
cruel and degrading treatment in order to
preserve human rights; and
26 June 2001
Page 21 of 256
(c) the convention against torture and other
cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment or
punishment
recognises
the
equal
and
inalienable rights of all members of the
human
family
and
is
the
foundation
of
freedom, justice and peace in the world;
and
(2) expresses
our
support
as
envisaged
in
our
Bill of Rights which protects security of the
person to be free from all forms of violence
from either public or private sources and not
to be tortured in any way.
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
FAST-TRACKING OF CRIMINAL PROCEDURE AMENDMENT BILL
(Draft Resolution)
The CHIEF WHIP OF THE COUNCIL: Chairperson, I move
the
draft
resolution
printed
Order Paper, as follows:
in
my
name
on
the
26 June 2001
Page 22 of 256
That the Council ratifies the decision the Joint
Programme Subcommittee took on 20 June 2001 in
accordance with Joint Rule 216(2), namely that
the
Criminal
2001]
be
Procedure
Amendment
fast-tracked
by,
Bill
where
[B
37
-
necessary,
shortening any period within which any step in
the legislative process relating to the Bill must
be completed, in order for the Bill to be passed
by both Houses of Parliament before Parliament
adjourns
in
June
2001
(see
Announcements,
Tablings and Committee Reports, p 733).
Motion agreed to in accordance with section 65 of
the Constitution.
APPROPRIATION BILL
(Policy debate)
Vote No 26 - Environmental Affairs and Tourism:
The MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND TOURISM:
Chairperson, it is indeed an honour and a privilege
for me to present my introduction to the policy
26 June 2001
Page 23 of 256
debate on the occasion of the anniversary of the
adoption of the Freedom Charter. Way back in 1955,
representatives
of
the
oppressed
people
of
this
country came together and declared for all of the
world to know and hear, ``South Africa belongs to
all who live in it.'' They were bold enough to
declare,
``The
people
shall
govern.''
That
was
right in the belly of apartheid and in the darkest
days of the oppression of our country, and many
critics thought that this was simply a pipe dream.
But
here
people,
we
and
privilege
are,
we
for
elected
are
us
to
representatives
governing.
be
It
conducting
is
of
a
this
the
great
debate
today.
When I addressed the National Assembly a few weeks
ago, I made an appeal: As South Africans we must
act while we can to protect the environment. This
requires decisive action and can only happen if all
three spheres of government act together. The NCOP
has
a
special
place
in
the
governance
of
our
country. This is where the three spheres interact
to give real and practical meaning to co-operative
governance on issues of pollution and waste, the
26 June 2001
growth
of
Page 24 of 256
tourism
and
the
management
of
our
protected areas and our coastline.
This unity in action is the best weapon to combat
poverty with practical programmes. I therefore wish
to use this opportunity to highlight some of the
practical ways we are working with provinces and
local
governments
tourist
issues
to
and
address
raise
environmental
some
concerns
and
that
I
believe we need to address in this relationship.
The
constitutional
role
of
provincial
and
local
government in waste management is critical. Refuse
removal, refuse dumps and solid waste disposal are
Schedule
5B
exclusive
cannot
functions
provincial
speak
of
of
local
government
legislative
an
effective
under
competence.
waste
We
management
system without talking about the role to be played
by provincial and local governments.
Currently, 566 million tons of municipal waste is
generated
every
year
by
mountain
of
waste.
Only
recycled
or
reclaimed
in
our
a
country.
fraction
any
way.
This
of
When
is
this
we
a
is
were
26 June 2001
Page 25 of 256
preparing for this speech, most municipalities were
unable to give us accurate figures on waste and
recycling even within their municipal areas. Where
is this mountain of waste going to?
There is a crisis pertaining to illegal landfilled
sites that continues unabated, and this includes
municipal
authorities.
Of
the
710
landfills
in
South Africa, 49% are illegal and do not comply
with environmental legislation. Some municipalities
are
complicit
in
this,
and
are
using
these
landfills illegally. Proper refuse collection is an
essential service and a basic right. At the moment,
40% of South Africa's people do not have a proper
domestic refuse collection system, which means that
waste piles up around their homes, degrades their
environments and affects their health. We have a
national
obligation
to
ensure
that
minimum
standards for waste management are met.
The
actions
taken
by
provinces
to
address
these
problems are clearly not adequate. In this regard
it is important that we do the basics right. A
consistent refuse removal mechanism and strategy,
26 June 2001
the
Page 26 of 256
provision
neglected
areas
of
basic
and
landfill
sites
in
effective
recycling
dustbins
the
proper
a
manner
are
things
in
previously
organisation
that
that
of
facilitates
can
be
done
with the current resources at our disposal. This
should
be
linked
to
environmentally
friendly,
integrated development plans for municipalities. We
have to act before it is too late.
My
department
has
actively
supported
waste
management projects around the country which aim to
demonstrate that waste management can be improved
on
a
sustainable
basis
and
that
jobs
and
development can be delivered as part of this. I am
proud to announce that this year we will spend an
additional R32 million on waste projects linked to
poverty
alleviation
Government's
overall
targets
work
and
on
contributing
urban
renewal
to
and
rural development.
On 25 September 2001 this year my department will
host a national waste summit in conjunction with
the nine provinces, as decided upon at a recent
Minmec, whose key objectives will be to engage all
26 June 2001
Government
practical
Page 27 of 256
agencies
and
strategies
to
other
stakeholders
implement
the
in
national
policy on integrated waste management. It will also
be a golden opportunity to increase awareness among
South Africans that they need to act before it is
too late.
The socioeconomic development of South Africa and
the health of its people can no longer be affected
by
uncontrolled
management.
year,
when
During
I
and
World
attended
unco-ordinated
Environment
the
main
waste
Week
this
function
in
Bloemfontein in Batho township, I announced that
next
year,
on
World
Environment
Day,
Government
would be announcing the name of what we consider to
be the cleanest town in the country and we would be
making available a reward of R1 million to that
town for being the cleanest town.
We went further, then, and said - and I will keep
this promise - that together with that, we will
name and shame what we consider to be the dirtiest
town
in
the
requesting,
country.
through
[Interjections.]
the
provincial
I
will
be
MECs
when
we
26 June 2001
Page 28 of 256
next get an opportunity to meet in Minmec, that we
start the build-up at the provincial level and that
we name the cleanest town for each of the nine
provinces and the dirtiest town in each province,
in a build-up to the national awards as such. I do
hope that I will get the co-operation of the NCOP
in unfolding this programme, because somebody is
going
to
have
to
make
what
is
an
acceptable
determination of which is the cleanest and which is
the dirtiest.
The
control
of
air
pollution
is
another
local
government function that currently is inadequately
performed. Only 131 municipalities do any form of
air quality monitoring, and of these only 97 take
any steps to ensure compliance. Most township areas
- and this is a shame - still fall outside declared
smoke
control
exposed
to
areas,
the
most
and
township
appalling
residents
levels
of
are
air
pollution from coal smoke and adjacent industries.
In parts of the Vaal triangle today one is not able
to see one's neighbour standing across the street
from where one is, because the air pollution is so
bad.
26 June 2001
We
have
Page 29 of 256
already
taken
steps
to
publish
new
guidelines for the reduction in the emissions of SO2
and next year it is our aim to present a clean air
Act, which will of course be a clean air Bill when
we
present
regularising
comes
it
here.
the
situation,
to
This
Bill
is
aimed
particularly
municipalities
at
when
fulfilling
it
their
responsibilities in this regard.
I
would
decision
bureau
like
to
in
capacity
to
announce
avail
the
pollution
for
random
that
we
aircraft
hotspots
of
to
monitoring,
have
the
taken
a
weather
increase
our
particularly
monitoring the emission levels that are coming from
industries.
The bioregional approach to conservation in South
Africa recently released by our department is an
indication
of
the
tremendous
progress
made
in
conservation in our country since 1994. Over 155
000 ha of land has been added to conservation. This
is the biggest expansion in any comparable period
in the history of conservation in South Africa. We
hope to grow the current 6% of conservation land in
26 June 2001
Page 30 of 256
South Africa to 8% over the next 10 years, in order
to sustain this trend.
The
provinces
have
a
critical
role
to
play
in
managing the conservation areas of our country, and
improving
the
standard
of
our
provincial
parks.
Much criticism has been levelled against the state
of some of our provincial parks and we indeed have
a problem in this regard. I am informed that in
every
single
province
there
has
been
a
steady
decline in real terms in the conservation budgets.
We are spending less and less in rands per hectare
on
managing
provincial
reserves.
Income
from
provincial reserves has also been declining and the
parks
suffer
back
to
the
been
working
in
provinces
central
where
Treasury.
actively
with
the
My
income
goes
department
provinces
to
has
address
this crisis, and in many instances is intervening
directly
to
protect
biodiversity
that
is
of
national and international significance.
I must say, though, that it is heartening to note
that
most
years,
provinces
increase
will,
their
over
budgets
the
for
next
three
conservation,
26 June 2001
Page 31 of 256
some even up to 40%. I believe that this stated
commitment needs to supported by the NCOP, and the
provinces should be asked to report on steps they
are
taking
to
protect
biodiversity.
I
think
initially there was not sufficient realisation in
provinces
that
provincial
parks
and
provincial
conversation areas are some of the most important
assets
that
provinces
have
and,
if
properly
managed, can serve to encourage economic activity
and
create
jobs.
We
hope
to
publish
draft
biodiversity legislation towards the end of this
year, which will set certain minimum standards for
conservation and biodiversity management, and aim
to
ensure
that
the
heritage
of
our
beautiful
country is protected for generations to come.
In some areas progress is commendable. Since 1994
this
country
parks
at
has
both
incorporating
the
established
national
155
and
000
a
total
of
26
provincial
hectares
that
new
level,
I
spoke
about into conservation. Other developments worth
noting
are
the
signing
of
the
memorandum
of
understanding for the establishment of the MalotiDrakensberg
Transfrontier
Conservation
and
26 June 2001
Page 32 of 256
Development Area between South Africa and Lesotho
just two weeks ago; the advance preparations for
the
establishment
of
the
Gaza-Kruger-Gonarezhou
Transfrontier Park between South Africa, Mozambique
and Zimbabwe; the consolidation of the Greater St
Lucia
Wetlands
Park,
under
the
World
Heritage
Authority, including some 280 000 ha of marine and
coastal land, and the addition of approximately 7
000 ha of land, which up to now has been under
Safcol commercial forestry; the addition of three
parks to the National Parks since 1994, and the
addition of 74 000 ha to the Addo Elephant National
Park, 77 000 hectares to the Karoo National Park
and 50 000 to Marakele National Park. This is an
indication
of
our
seriousness
about
conservation
and our resolve to maximise its contribution to the
upliftment of the poor.
Tourism is one of the key economic growth sectors
identified by the President in his state-of-thenation address this year. Many towns, townships and
rural areas around our country have already taken
advantage of the benefits of tourism and are using
their
local
heritage
to
create
jobs
and
make
26 June 2001
Page 33 of 256
development
happen.
Local
and
provincial
governments' role in building our tourism economy
is
extremely
important.
The
emergence
of
local
tourism forums and initiatives around the country
highlights the fact that many communities want to
own the tourism dream. With this amount of support
for our policies on tourism, we can conclude that
the
Welcome
campaign
is
beginning
to
take
root
amongst the people of South Africa.
Over the last year we have spoken about changing
the
face
of
tourism.
The
role
of
provinces
in
making this a reality cannot be overemphasised. The
role
of
local
tourism
is
government
critical
in
in
promoting
ensuring
township
that
the
participation of black entrepreneurs in the tourism
industry is enhanced. I would like to take this
opportunity
provinces
for
supported
represented
indaba
to
held
express
the
manner
emerging
for
in
my
the
gratitude
in
black
first
Durban
in
which
to
all
the
provinces
enterprises
time
April
at
to
the
this
nine
be
tourism
year.
We
experienced a 300% to 400% increase in the number
of
black-owned
enterprises
represented
there,
26 June 2001
largely
Page 34 of 256
as
a
result
of
the
support
and
encouragement given by the provinces.
We are also encouraged by the interest that the SA
Local
Government
operating
with
everybody's
discuss
a
structures
Association
my
department
business.
whole
in
has
Salga
range
order
to
of
taken
to
make
has
co-
tourism
undertaken
issues
give
in
to
within
practical
its
effect
to
policy programmes to promote tourism growth. At a
national
level
we
are
working
to
bring
more
visitors to the country and to boost tourism demand
for the wide array of cultural, natural and other
beauties of this country. The benefits of tourism
flow directly to communities and have become the
cement
for
building
a
better
life
for
all
our
people. I call on all spheres of government and
communities to act now to build the tourism dream
for our country, a wonder that lies waiting.
Addressing
poverty
is
critical
to
sustaining
a
high-quality coastal environment from which South
Africa
draws
significant
social
and
economic
benefits. All spheres of government, including the
26 June 2001
Page 35 of 256
private sector have a significant role to play in
promoting the sustainable use of coastal resources.
The
department
has
embarked
on
a
number
of
initiatives in excess of R150 million through its
partnership
programme
called
Coast
Care.
This
investment has been significantly bolstered by the
recently concluded contribution of R50 million from
the UK's Department for International Development
over the next three years to support a sustainable
coastal livelihoods programme.
Key focus areas of the mentioned programme include
piloting public and private sector strategies to
create and promote sustainable coastal livelihoods
for the poor and building national institutional
capacity
to
support
sustainable
coastal
development. Provision has been made to build the
capacity at provincial level, with the appointment
of regional co-ordinators.
Despite the above plans, there are those in society
who have taken to plundering our coastal resources
through poaching, the destruction of our coastline
by the building of illegal cottages or the driving
26 June 2001
Page 36 of 256
of vehicles on beaches. However, we have decided
that we are going to act while we can. Last week
the
Directorate
of
Public
Prosecutions
announced
the seizure of approximately 25 tons of Patagonian
Toothfish and rock lobster that allegedly was being
fished illegally and exported by a private company.
We will see more arrests and confiscations in the
next few months as a result of much improved cooperation with the law enforcement agencies in our
country.
However,
the
co-operation
of
coastal
provinces and towns in compliance is critical.
The
close
department
working
and
relationship
KwaZulu-Natal
between
Wildlife
has
my
meant
that we are able to provide effective policing and
control of all fishing and coastal activities in
the province. We are funding this activity through
a contract with KwaZulu-Natal Wildlife, paid out of
the revenues of the Marine Living Resources Fund.
This year we will negotiate similar contracts with
the Western Cape, Northern Cape and Eastern Cape
provinces, and aim to establish a coast-to-coast
comprehensive
enforcement
regime.
The
designation
of fishery control officer posts in provincial and
26 June 2001
Page 37 of 256
local authorities is already in progress and these
staff
members
are
assisting
departmental
law
enforcement officials with compliance operations on
a
regular,
well-co-ordinated
and
well-planned
basis.
Working for the Coast is a flagship programme of
the
department,
funding.
financed
This
through
capacity-building
poverty
relief
programme
is
structured around developing participants' literacy
levels,
business
knowledge.
skills
Currently
1
350
and
people
environmental
are
employed,
covering about 60% of the coast. The department has
committed
projects
R20
along
million
the
to
funding
coast
during
poverty
this
relief
financial
year.
By the year 2004 we plan to generate 5 000 direct
jobs per annum in support of the implementation of
the White Paper for Sustainable Coastal Development
in South Africa, targeting priority areas such as
the Eastern Cape.
26 June 2001
Page 38 of 256
The Blue Flag campaign is an international scheme
that rewards local authorities for providing safe
and
clean
beaches
and
marinas.
A
blue
flag
is
awarded annually to beaches and marinas that meet
environmental, amenity and safety criteria.
Currently, the Blue Flag campaign in South Africa
is in its second and final pilot phase with 14
participating
locations.
If
this
pilot
phase
is
successful, South Africa will be the first country
outside Europe to become a member of the scheme.
The
department
has
committed
R1,2 million
as
seeding finance for the programme. Sustainability
will
be
achieved
participating
this
comes
result
of
through
locations,
from
the
an
and
operating
the
increased
tourism
association
with
fee
for
motivation
for
revenue
the
Blue
as
a
Flag
campaign.
This year has seen the department move forward with
the implementation of the Marine Living Resources
Act
for
subsistence
fishers
in
all
four
coastal
provinces. Where a large number of fishers could be
accommodated, such as in the subsistence fishery
26 June 2001
for
West
Northern
Page 39 of 256
Coast
Cape,
rock
which
lobster
had
in
over
the
1 500
Western
and
entrants
in
2001, the plight of poor coastal communities was
eased significantly.
In the Western Cape access to the abalone resource
is
currently
going
ahead
for
a
further
200
applicants. In the Eastern Cape, permits to harvest
abalone have been issued in two sites, Hamburg and
the East London area, and access to other highvalue species such as East Coast rock lobster and
oysters has been granted to several hundred fishers
on the Wild Coast.
In
KwaZulu-Natal
management
of
all
subsistence
fishing is currently being done by the provincial
authority
supported
department.
harvesting
subsistence
In
is
all
for
fisher
financially
areas
direct
and
his
and
by
the
provinces
consumption
or
national
her
where
of
the
family,
the
challenge facing the department is to ensure that
continued access to resources remains sustainable.
26 June 2001
The
Page 40 of 256
Johannesburg
world
summit
to
be
held
in
September next year presents us with an enormous
challenge, but also a unique opportunity. The eyes
of the world will be focused on us as we play host
to over 100 heads of state and at least 50 000
delegates. We have to ensure that Johannesburg is
not
just
meaning
about
for
the
empty
promises,
poor
of
the
but
has
world.
It
concrete
is
our
challenge to mobilise communities to make an input
in shaping the agenda of this summit.
Logistical preparations for the summit are at an
advanced
stage.
Just
two
weeks
ago
the
UN
inspection team that visited Johannesburg expressed
satisfaction with the level of preparations.
The
imminent
hosting
of
the
international
conference of local issues in South Africa is an
ideal opportunity to build up to the summit with a
sense of the concrete discussions about sustainable
development that must be at the core of the world
summit.
26 June 2001
Involving
our
Page 41 of 256
constituencies
in
preparations
for
the summit is the best way to honour the confidence
shown by the UN in bestowing this responsibility on
our country. I therefore wish to call on the NCOP
to assist us in this regard, and facilitate debates
and
discussions
on
this
summit
and
its
preparations, not only in this House, but also in
the provincial legislatures and in local councils.
In
conclusion,
I
would
like
to
take
this
opportunity to express my gratitude to the MECs of
the
nine
provinces
for
the
high
degree
of
co-
operation I have received from them over the past
year.
I
also
wish
to
take
this
opportunity
to
express my gratitude to the select committee of the
NCOP
and
Moatshe,
its
for
chairperson,
the
valuable
the
Reverend
Peter
contribution
they
continue to make to the work of the Ministry and
the department. [Applause.]
Moruti P MOATSHE: Rre moradisi, motlotlegi Tona ya
Lefapha la Merero ya Tikologo le Bojanala, maloko a
a
kgethegileng
farologaneng,
go
ditona
tswa
tsa
kwa
dikgaolong
dikgaolo,
tse
maloko
a
di
a
26 June 2001
tlotlegang
Tikologo
Page 42 of 256
a
le
Ntlo
eno,
Bojanala,
Lefapha
bana
la
ba
Merero
gaetsho
ya
le
bokgaitsadi, ka re Pula!
Re setse re bone tsela eo motlotlegi Tona Valli
Moosa a tsosolositseng bojanala ba naga eno, le go
bo tlhatlhosa ka go tsenya mooko mo marapong ka
tsamaiso e e tlhwatlhwa ya mokgwa o o kgethegileng.
O
kgonne
maloba
go
e
e
dikhutshwane.
retolola
neng
A
e
tla
bojanala
mo
kgetholola
ka
bojanala
tsamaisong
ba
ba
jo
bonang
ya
dikobo
le
motswako o o nang le meribo ya setso le tlhago ya
bana ba mmala wa sebilo. Tona Valli Moosa gape a
re, phokoje go tshela yo o dithetsenyane.
Metsesetoropo, metseselegae, le tota kwa batho ba
itlhomileng
teng,
mafelo
a
a
fetogile
a
a
tlhwatlhwa a bojanala mo nageng ya rona. Baeti ba
na le tshono ya go etela mafelo a a neng a sa
etelwe mo nakong ya tlhabololotlhaolele. Diphetogo
tse, di gwetlha baagi botlhe ba Aforika Borwa go
tsaya
karolo
mo
katolosong
le
tlhabololo
ya
bojanala. Motswana a re, kodumela moepathutsi ga go
26 June 2001
na
lehumo
Page 43 of 256
le
le
tswang
gaufi.
(Translation
of
Tswana paragraphs follows.)
[Rev
P
MOATSHE:
Chairperson,
hon
Minister
of
Environmental Affairs and Tourism, delegates from
different
provinces,
premiers,
members
of
this
House, the Department of Environmental Affairs and
Tourism, my brothers and sisters, greetings!
We have already seen how the hon Minister Valli
Moosa
has
country
revived
through
and
his
uplifted
hard
tourism
work
and
in
this
remarkable
management style. He managed to change tourism from
what
it
used
to
be
in
the
past,
discriminating
against the poor. His tourism projects now include
African traditional rhythms and culture. Minister
Valli Moosa also said that one has to work hard in
order to succeed.
Townships,
settlements
rural
have
areas
and
become
even
remarkable
informal
tourist
attractions in our country. Tourists now have the
opportunity to visit areas which were not visited
during
the
apartheid
regime.
These
changes
26 June 2001
challenge
Page 44 of 256
all
participate
citizens
in
the
of
widening
South
and
Africa
to
development
of
tourism. An old saying goes, ``perseverance is the
mother of success.'']
Through the visionary leadership of the Minister,
South
Africa
has
been
able
to
unlock
its
vast
tourism potential to such an extent that we are
fast
becoming
a
global
player
in
the
tourism
industry.
Our
tourism
period.
industry
Having
transformation
laid
of
the
is
the
entering
an
foundation
industry,
we
can
exciting
for
the
now
move
forward to vigorously promote the growth of this
sector. This includes encouraging more people from
previously disadvantaged backgrounds to make use of
the new opportunities opening up in the industry.
But in order for us to proceed along this road, it
is important to deal with some of the remaining
obstacles, such as racism in the industry and the
lack
of
tourism
infrastructure
in
some
of
our
poorer provinces. These two factors have made it
26 June 2001
Page 45 of 256
difficult for black people to really take advantage
of the opportunities in the tourism sector.
The
number
through
of
people
the
red
entrepreneurs
from
industry
already
is
tape
have
too
that
managed
that
making
still
warned
who
it
low.
the
to
hinders
in
Some
industry
the
cut
black
tourism
experts
may
have
become
unsustainable if we do not make it more inclusive.
Despite these warnings, there are still people and
political
parties
who
industry
is
the
sole
September
of
last
year,
government
in
the
think
that
preserve
the
Western
New
the
of
whites.
NP-DP
Cape,
tourism
for
In
coalition
example,
organised a tourism indaba in Cape Town that was
addressed and attended by almost exclusively white
delegates. How on earth can one discuss the future
of tourism and the challenges facing the industry
in
the
absence
of
people
who
constitute
the
majority of the Western Cape's population?
Some
of
invented
these
new
white
tourism
strategies
such
companies
as
have
even
rent-a-black
to
26 June 2001
Page 46 of 256
give a nonracial appearance to their companies, yet
there is no equity between whites and blacks in the
companies. Those who deny that racism still exists
in
the
industry
Commission
has
are
been
dishonest.
called
upon
The
on
Human
a
Rights
number
of
occasions to investigate charges of racism by some
tourist resorts.
The racism of some South African tourism companies
has even been felt as far away as Mozambique. On 16
April this year Mozambique's top tourist official
accused a South African tourist company in the Gasa
province of racism, for having put up notices at
their resorts which read, and I quote, ``No entry
for
Mozambican
children.''
Children
of
foreign
tourists, including South Africans, were, however,
allowed in the resorts.
Tourism is commonly accepted as the one sector with
the greatest potential for job creation. However,
the sector needs to be completely deracialised if
it is to realise its job creation potential. It
should
have,
as
one
of
its
key
objectives,
the
encouragement of real black economic empowerment,
26 June 2001
Page 47 of 256
instead of the rent-a-black strategy followed by
some white tourism companies.
The other big problem inhibiting the growth of the
tourism
sector
tourism
is
the
skewed
infrastructure,
distribution
such
as
of
transport,
amenities and other supportive services.
Although we have very good tourism infrastructure,
this is mostly found in traditional destinations
such
as
Kruger
Johannesburg,
National
infrastructure
destinations
Durban,
Park.
is
such
as
Northern
Province.
tourism
to
The
found
the
northern
limits
area
Town
same
not
This
this
Cape
the
level
of
in
the
and
and
parts
emerging
of
dispersal
other
the
of
emerging
destinations, which are gifted with an abundance of
the
new
ecotourism
types
and
of
tourism
culture,
which
products
are
fast
such
as
becoming
favourite tourist attractions.
For a province such as the Northern Province, which
has great tourism potential, it is essential that
we
accelerate
the
provision
of
tourism
26 June 2001
Page 48 of 256
infrastructure
in
our
emerging
destinations.
The
North West province also has a great potential in
tourism. There are great plans in the pipeline for
this sector.
This
will
greatly
enhance
the
speeding
up
of
tourism development projects, such as the Bakenburg
tourism development project, the Blouberg cultural
village
and
hiking
trail,
the
Bolobedu
cultural
village and the Hatsama Dam cultural village.
The
select
committee
on
land
and
environmental
affairs will continue to support Government in its
efforts
to
rid
the
tourism
industry
of
the
obstacles which prevent the industry from realising
its full potential. This includes not only support
for
tourism
ensuring
development,
that
our
but
tourism
also
support
industry
in
develops
responsibly.
A key aspect of our tourism development strategy is
to make sure that it will be able to sustain future
generations. This means looking at the impact of
increased tourism on our ecosystem. I am pleased to
26 June 2001
Page 49 of 256
say that our Government is aware of the potential
harm which may be caused to our environment through
increased
tourism.
integrated
which
pollution
will
strategy
It
serve
to
deal
as
has
and
a
with
already
waste
management
holistic
the
developed
and
harmful
an
policy
integrated
effects
of
pollution and waste disposal, including those that
may be caused by tourism.
Modulasetilo,
motlotlegi
Tonakgolo
Valli
Moosa,
tikologo ya lefatshe la rona la Aforika Borwa e
botlhokwa go tsholwa sentle go feta mo malobeng. Go
tlhokega dithuto tse di ka tsibosang baagi ba naga
ka botlhokwa ba tikologo e e leng ya bona.
Baagi ba tshwanetse go ila leswe, mme go nne le
metseletsele ya diphephafatso go kgabaganya naga ya
rona ya Aforika Borwa jaaka Tona a setse a kaile.
Moradise, a go dirwe melao e e tla laolang gore
tikologo e tshwanetse go tsholwa jang. Se, se ka
tlhatlhosa maemo a bojanala fa tikologo ya rona e
le phepa, e bogega, e bile e ratega. (Translation
of Tswana paragraphs follows.)
26 June 2001
Page 50 of 256
[It is now more important to take care of the South
African environment than it was in the past. There
is
a
need
importance
to
of
educate
the
conserving
community
their
about
the
environment.
The
community must stop littering, and there should be
antilittering campaigns throughout South Africa, as
the hon the Minister has already indicated.
There should be laws governing the conservation of
our environment. A clean and attractive environment
would
elevate
the
standard
of
tourism
in
our
thank
the
country.]
I
want
Minister
to
take
for
his
this
opportunity
co-operation
to
with
the
select
committee; that cannot be left unmentioned. We want
to
wish
the
Minister
and
the
department
an
energetic time in future, as we move into the 21st
century, so that the environment and tourism sector
takes up the challenge and makes an impact upon the
entire world.
I want to thank the department in particular, the
members of the select committee and the provinces
26 June 2001
Page 51 of 256
as we interact with them as the NCOP from this end.
I want to thank those who are present here: the
MECs, chairpersons and special delegates.
Ka mafoko a ka re, pula a e ne! [Legofi.] [With
those
few
words,
I
wish
all
members
prosperity.
[Applause.]]
Dr
E
MECs
A
CONROY:
for
Chairperson,
environmental
hon
affairs
Minister
and
Moosa,
colleagues,
virtually all, if not all, religions and cultures
accept that nature was created by the Almighty for
His creatures to enjoy and to benefit from all its
different
facets:
nature
in
the
form
of
earth,
water, plants and animals, of which we, as human
beings,
are
the
custodians
and
which
we
have
a
sacred responsibility to protect and cherish.
The
DEPUTY
Mushwana):
CHAIRPERSON
Order!
Can
OF
you
THE
NCOP
speak
(Mr
into
microphone, hon member?
Dr E A CONROY: Must I start all over again?
M
L
your
26 June 2001
The
DEPUTY
Page 52 of 256
CHAIRPERSON
OF
THE
NCOP
(Mr
M
L
Mushwana): The clock is ticking.
Dr E A CONROY: We do so also for the sake of our
children and our children's children until the end
of time.
It is therefore necessary that we should have some
sort of mechanism that will unite our efforts to
protect
manage
our
it
God-given
in
a
natural
sustainable
heritage
way.
That
and
to
mechanism
exists in South Africa in the form of the Ministry
and
the
Department
of
Environmental
Affairs
and
Tourism.
The
strategic
approaches
of
the
department
to
performing this very important task placed on its
shoulders
through
and
the
are
sustainable
protection
resources;
through
the
the
promotion
economic
development;
of
our
empowerment
participation,
capacity-building,
of
the
natural
of
utilisation
and
all
environmental
research
and
growth
our
cultural
people
education,
information
services; the conservation of nature; the creation
26 June 2001
Page 53 of 256
of a better living environment and the improvement
of
the
present
and
future
quality
of
life;
the
building of a common patriotism and pride in our
natural
heritage;
potential
These
of
a
and
the
better
objectives
unlocking
life
deserve
for
our
of
all
the
our
full
people.
appreciation
and
applause.
It is reassuring to know that, in terms of the
National
Environmental
environmental
impact
Management
assessments
Act
of
1998,
are
not
only
needed, but insisted upon, before the construction,
upgrading and development of cableways, electricity
power
stations
and
nuclear
reactors;
roads,
airfields, railways, marinas and harbours; canals,
channels, dams, weirs, reservoirs and bulk water
supply schemes; sewage treatment plants and refuse
disposal
sites;
and
public
and
private
resorts,
including rezoning and changes in land use.
It
is
also
reassuring
to
know
that
we
have
officials and elected public representatives who do
not hesitate and are indeed prepared to stand up
and strictly enforce and apply these environmental
26 June 2001
protection
and
Page 54 of 256
instruments
constructed
in
against
the
structures
name
of
erected
so-called
development, like the recent well-publicised case
in the Tygerberg.
The Minister also assures us that the department
will not hesitate to legally pursue and order the
tearing down of illegal structures and will insist
on the rehabilitation of the land to its previous
state. It is reassuring also in the sense that,
with these measures in place, we can at least sleep
with one eye closed.
Soos met enige saak, is daar sekere aspekte in die
werksaamhede
van
die
departement
wat
kritiek
verdien. Ek verwys spesifiek na die hantering van
die sake van die Nasionale Krugerwildtuin. Agb lede
moet
my
verskoon
as
ek
my
kritiek
baseer
op
inligting wat ek uit die pers moes kry, aangesien
die Parkeraad se beamptes dit blykbaar nie nodig
genoeg
gevind
het
om
die
Gekose
Omgewingsake eerstehands in te lig nie.
Komitee
oor
26 June 2001
Bewerings
Page 55 of 256
word
gemaak
van
korrupsie,
afdankings,
swak administrasie en 'n grootskaalse verkwisting
van
geld.
Die
hoof
uitvoerende
beampte
het
byvoorbeeld onlangs teenoor ons erken dat hy nie
toegang tot die dienste van 'n finansiële amptenaar
het nie en dat hy een oggend wakker geword het met
die
skokkende
ontdekking
dat
die
Nasionale
Parkeraad finansieel in die rooi is.
Is dié aspek intussen al reggestel of word daar nog
in finansiële duisternis rondgetas? (Translation of
Afrikaans paragraphs follows.)
[Like with every issue, there are certain aspects
in the functioning of the department that deserve
criticism. I refer specifically to the handling of
the issues relating to the Kruger National Park.
Hon members should excuse me if I base my criticism
on information which I had to get from the press,
because officials of the Parks Board did not see
their way clear to informing the Select Committee
on Environmental Affairs on a first-hand basis.
26 June 2001
Page 56 of 256
Allegations
of
fraud,
dismissals,
poor
administration and extensive squandering of money
are
being
made.
The
chief
executive
officer
for
instance admitted to us recently that he does not
have
access
awoke
one
realisation
to
a
financial
morning
that
and
the
officer
came
to
National
and
the
Parks
that
he
shocking
Board
was
financially in the red.
Has this aspect been rectified in the meantime or
are they still groping in the financial darkness?]
According to the Sunday Times, antipoaching units
and research projects at the Kruger National Park
are under threat as the park's workforce is being
reduced
by
33%.
It
is
furthermore
reported
that
unions have warned that:
...
conditions
at
the
park
have
deteriorated,
with camps dirty and toilets broken ahead of the
winter holiday season.
The
warning
comes
as
the
park
faces
growing
financial problems and declining visitor figures.
26 June 2001
The
Page 57 of 256
Minister
might
wish
to
react
to
these
allegations which have been made in the press in
view of the fact that the National Parks Board has,
despite several requests to do so, not seen its way
open to enlightening the select committee of this
House on a first-hand basis.
In conclusion, I would like to propose that the
title
of
officer''
``chief
be
honorary
conferred
on
marine
the
conservation
Minister
in
recognition for his commendable management of the
Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism.
Mrs
Z
T
Minister
SEBEKEDI
(North
and
members
hon
West):
of
Chairperson,
this
august
hon
House,
allow me to reiterate the point that the Government
budget is a policy implementing tool.
People need to understand that this specific Budget
Vote has the primary purpose of facilitating and
implementing policies, plans and legislation that
will lead the tourism industry towards delivering
growth and prosperity to all South Africans while
ensuring
the
responsible
and
sustainable
26 June 2001
Page 58 of 256
utilisation of natural and cultural resources. The
department
should
co-ordinate
provincial
governments
and
regarding
all
liaise
aspects
with
of
tourism development.
Tourism is a highly complex industry characterised
by a huge variety
of heterogeneous role-players,
stakeholders and beneficiaries who differ in their
organisation, style, functions and objectives. This
necessitates close collaboration between the public
and
private
sector
and
organised
civil
society,
which local government is an integral part of. It
is thus necessary to identify component parts of
this complicated industry in order to effectively
manage it and understand the optimum role that each
one has to play.
A
lack
of
understanding
of
market
profiles
and
behavioural patterns provides the inherent danger
of
allocating
unsustainable
strategies.
resources
markets
and
and
product
efforts
to
development
26 June 2001
The
North
Page 59 of 256
West
is
cognisant
of
the
available
opportunity offered by tourism and has identified
the
requirement
for
market
intelligence
that
informs appropriate market and product development
strategies. As people's needs and desires change
over
time,
it
is
develop
products
demand,
especially
also
important
according
when
to
it
to
alter
changes
comes
to
in
and
market
placing
the
focus on the domestic market, which has a potential
to act as a buffer to counter the inevitable and
unpredictable
fluctuations
in
international
tourism.
Our
Constitution
clearly
provides
for
the
functioning of local tourism and beaches, amusement
facilities
and
municipal
parks
and
recreation,
which are functions associated with tourism, but
fall under local authorities.
This highlights the need for close co-operation in
this
respect.
strategies
tourism
National
should
activities
governance.
The
be
and
provincial
closely
for
the
aligned
sake
opportunity
of
tourism
with
local
co-operative
exists
for
26 June 2001
Page 60 of 256
municipalities
to
create
revenue-generating
activities through tourism projects.
But
the
place
newly
an
demarcated
additional
areas
of
jurisdiction
financial
burden
on
municipalities as they have to administer larger
areas, including rural areas within their areas of
jurisdiction, and all potential revenue-generating
sources are explored at local level.
So could Big Brother - I mean our department here and sister departments at provincial level please
be so kind as to give support to municipalities
that have marketing strategies aimed at introducing
their
local
areas
to
potential
tourists
and
investors?
Municipalities are in the remarkable position of
being able to have a direct impact on the local
economy as they have a resource base large enough
to
plan
and
implement
positive
interventions, including tourism promotion.
economic
26 June 2001
When
it
Page 61 of 256
comes
to
environmental
affairs,
our
concerns are about existing legislation regarding
waste management in South Africa. It is generally
fragmented, diverse and ineffectively administered.
The responsibility for executing waste management
functions and the enforcement of the current wasterelated legislation are not always clear as they
are spread over a number of national, provincial
and local government departments.
This unsatisfactory situation is compounded by the
fact
that
the
purposes
definition
of
of
``waste'',
environmental
for
the
conservation,
specifically excludes radioactive, mining and power
plant
waste.
Environment
This
should
Conservation
be
Act.
corrected
The
in
the
co-ordinated
management of these waste streams is an area of
particular concern and requires detailed attention,
especially
regarding
integrating
and
institutional
consolidating
issues
current
and
permit
requirements.
The impact of poor waste management, conditions and
practices on the health of people living in our
26 June 2001
Page 62 of 256
rural areas is significant in terms of the quality
of
life
and
the
education
and
development
opportunities of our communities.
The
lack
of
or
inappropriately
range
of
inadequately
designed
pollution
risks
maintained
systems
to
the
or
constitutes
environment
a
and
there are quite a number of places in the North
West that need to be urgently attended to in this
regard.
I
commend
leadership
progress
this
of
that
department,
Minister
it
has
Valli
made
in
under
Moosa,
its
the
for
able
the
transformation
process. I wish them good luck and success in all
their endeavours to achieve their objectives.
We
support
the
approval
of
this
Budget
Vote.
[Applause.]
Mrs A M VERSFELD: Dankie, Voorsitter. [Thank you,
Chairperson.]
26 June 2001
Page 63 of 256
The theme of the Minister's Budget Vote on 29 May,
as it is today, was that we must act while we can.
Since the Minister delivered his speech on 29 May,
two very important things have happened.
First, on 16 June South Africa became the first
associate member from outside Europe to have Blue
Flag accreditation. In the Minister's own words:
``This strong commitment from national Government
is important as Blue Flag is regarded as a national
flagship towards the implementation of the White
Paper for sustainable coastal development.''
Secondly, at the beginning of this month, we had
our
Coast
However,
Care
there
is
Environment
Week
one
town
coastal
celebration.
on
the
West
Coast which has no reason for celebration, because
of severe erosion of its beach. The relic coastline
indicates that if the status quo exists, the sea
would take about half of the town. This town is
Langebaan,
a
Ramsar
site
and
part
of
the
newly
proposed West Coast biosphere reserve, and thus of
enormous
site,
the
international
lagoon
importance.
supports
dense
As
a
Ramsar
populations
of
26 June 2001
Page 64 of 256
molluscs and crustaceans, as well as 71 species of
marine algae.
The lagoon is also the nursery for the development
of juvenile fish and gobies, klipfish, pipefish,
skates, rays and small sharks, including 15 regular
Palaearctic migrants. The extensive intertidal area
of the lagoon supports up to 55 000 water birds in
summer, most of which are waders. I think there are
approximately
23
species.
There
are
a
number
of
significant economic activities in the bay that are
directly dependent on the wellbeing of the lagoon
system, notably the Langebaan community, the West
Coast
National
Park,
mariculture
activities,
Mykonos, the navy, and the special forces.
Langebaan
and
plays
tourist
host
to
facilities
significant
on
the
West
recreational
Coat.
The
northern beach, which has been the focus of the
erosion, is an internationally renowned launching
area for windsurfing and kite surfing, activities
which
attract
tourists,
mainly
from
Europe,
who
consider Langebaan to be one of the world's best
windsurfing sites.
26 June 2001
Page 65 of 256
Ek wil vinnig 'n bietjie agtergrond gee van die
situasie.
In
1960
was
die
strandwydte
van
die
Langebaan-strandmeer 160 m. Dertig jaar later was
die wydte presies die helfte minder, naamlik 80 m.
Die tempo van erosie het met die jare dramaties
begin versnel, en in so 'n mate dat die 80 m wat
oor was in die laaste sewe jaar verdwyn het. Erger
nog is dat feitlik die helfte van hierdie 80 m
sedert 1994 verdwyn het.
Die erodering veroorsaak nou weer 'n opbou van sand
in
ander
gedeeltes
van
die
strandmeer
wat
tot
nadeel strek van die ekologie deurdat getykanale se
natuurlike vloei geaffekteer word. Genoemde faktore
was
dan
ook
die
oorsaak
dat
'n
rotsmuur
as
'n
tydelike noodoplossing gebou is om die dorp van 'n
ramp te red, want 75% van Langebaan-Noord lê 1 m bo
seespieël
en
50%
van
Langebaan
se
strandfront
-
huise en erwe - is dus in onmiddellike gevaar.
Verlede jaar is die rotsmuur met 'n verdere 260 m
verleng, maar nou vind erosie ook onder die seeoppervlakte plaas en bedreig dit die toon van die
rotsmuur deurdat 'n 3 m-sloep voor die muur gevorm
26 June 2001
Page 66 of 256
het wat die vooroor ineenstorting van die rotsmuur
tot
gevolg
kan
hê.
(Translation
of
Afrikaans
paragraphs follows.)
[I
quickly
want
to
give
some
background
on
the
situation. In 1960 the beach width of the Langebaan
lagoon was 160m. Thirty years later the width of
the lagoon was exactly half of that, namely 80m.
The
rate
of
dramatically
erosion
had
through
the
started
years
to
and
accelerate
to
such
an
extent that the 80m that was left totally vanished
over the last seven years. Even worse is the fact
that almost half of this 80m has vanished since
1994.
The erosion now creates a build-up of sand in other
parts of the lagoon that is to the detriment of the
ecology because some of the tidal channels' natural
flow has been affected. The said factors were the
reason
why
a
rock
wall
has
been
built
as
a
temporary emergency measure to save the town from a
disaster,
because
75%
of
Langebaan-North
is
1m
above sea level and 50% of Langebaan's beachfront houses and plots - were thus in immediate danger.
26 June 2001
Page 67 of 256
Last year the rock wall was lengthened by a further
260m,
but
now
erosion
is
also
taking
place
underneath the sea surface and it is threatening
the base of the rock wall because a 3m gully has
formed in front of the rock wall which can result
in a forward collapse of the wall.]
I would like to say to the Minister that we must
act
while
beach
we
erosion
can.
are
The
exact
unknown.
reasons
However,
for
a
severe
number
of
factors, some anthropogenic and some natural, are
thought to have contributed to this problem. For
example,
the
above-average
occurrence
of
high-
intensity northwest winds during winter, changes in
the size and position of the sandbanks south of
Skaapeiland, changes in the shape of the channel
carrying
the
ebb
tide
from
the
lagoon
between
Skaapeiland and the mainland, the repositioning of
the
sand
thereby
sediment,
shoal
to
preventing
which
a
more
the
could
southerly
natural
replenish
location,
recycling
the
beach,
of
past
dredging of sand northwest of Skaapeiland during
1975-76 and activities at the Saldanha Bay port may
26 June 2001
Page 68 of 256
have influenced the
broader Saldanha Bay system.
But what has been done?
The
coastal
engineers
were
tasked
with
investigating a more permanent solution presented
in an interim report in 1999. In March 2000 the
local
authority
commissioned
a
scoping
study
to
identify the long-term options - those presented by
coastal engineers and other stakeholders.
Part of this process was a specialist workshop to
assess the situation and consider proposals. This
workshop was held on 9 to 11 May and was attended
by
local
and
international
specialists
with
international
experience
models
and
in
the
local
in
specialists
knowledge,
sediment
construction
of
with
transport
groynes;
and
experts like Dr Ida Broker from Denmark, who is the
head of the coastal engineering department of the
Danish
Hydraulic
Institute,
and
Prof
Christopher
Flemming, an internationally recognised expert in
coastal engineering and coastal management.
26 June 2001
It
is
Page 69 of 256
important
to
note
that
the
natural
equilibrium of the beach has changed dramatically,
and the proposal from the experts is to work with
nature and to realign the beach. For the first time
there is consensus between local and international
experts, which is supported by the local community,
on the way that the beach should be restored.
There is also sufficient precedent to show that a
groyne is effective in creating a pocket beach that
is,
movement
putting
and
the
sand
trapping
it
back
through
there.
water
Judging
by
international experience and studies to date, there
are
very
few,
aesthetically
if
any,
pleasing
and
negatives.
a
tourist
It
can
be
attraction,
like the old pier in Cape Town and the jetty in the
Strand.
To
end
off,
the
permanent
solution
will
cost
approximately R20 million. The critical need is to
protect the existing infrastructure - houses, roads
and storm-water services - and to ensure that the
revetment
is
adequately
maintained
to
provide
protection for this winter. The proposed permanent
26 June 2001
solutions
Through
Page 70 of 256
should
be
different
government,
the
started
agencies,
National
with
for
immediately.
example
Disaster
Fund
local
and
the
Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism the Coast Care fund which the Minister has just
mentioned - we should be able to save Langebaan.
Only
when
it
is
seen
to
be
the
concern
of
Government can one look for outside funding.
I am sure the Minister would agree with me that the
problem
is
obviously
far
greater
than
a
local
authority or province can be expected to cope with.
Already an amount of R4,8 million has been spent
that
could
and
should
have
been
channelled
into
projects for growth. I am sure the Minister will
also agree with me that there is a need to ensure
that the integrity of an internationally protected
Ramsar site is not compromised and that we must act
while we can, before it is too late. [Applause.]
Nkk
J
N
VILAKAZI:
Sihlalo
ohloniphekileyo,
mhlonishwa ungqongqoshe wezeMvelo nezokuNgcebeleka
neNdlu
Sikhuluma
yonke
ehloniphekileyo,
ngezemvelo,
okungubuhle
usuku
lobu
oluhle.
esabuphiwa
26 June 2001
Page 71 of 256
nguMdali.
Kuba
siyabubona
yini
kithi-ke
na,
ukuthi
siyabazisa
lobu
nje,
buhle
sibuvikela
kanjani ekonakaleni nasekushabalaleni ukuze bungabi
yize leze noma bube udoti nje, into engabhekeki.
Ake sibheke nje kancane izifundazwe ezidume ngayo
le
mvelo.
IKapa
lidume
nge-Table
Mountain,
amagilebhisi enza iwayini, ulwandle oluhlangana eCape Point, i-Robben Island nokunye ongakucabanga.
Konke
lokhu
nokukugcina
kudinga
imali
kusesimeni
eshisiwe
esihle
ukukunakekela
sokuheha
izivakashi
uma zizongcebeleka.
IKwaZulu-Natali idume ngamahlathi, umoba nolwandle
olugudla
ugu
nezithelo
saKwaZulu-Natali
imfuyo,
izilwane
eziningi.
siluhlaza
nabantu.
cwe.
Indawo
Isifundazwe
Uhlaza
luheha
eluhlaza
nje
inhle. Izifundazwe zonke zinomlando wazo wezemvelo.
Ezinye
zidume
imithi
ngemigede
nezihlahla
yazo,
ezidumile,
amatshe
anomlando,
angazi
ngingabala
ngithini. Egameni le-IFP, lo Mnyango udinga imali
ezokwazi
ukwenza
eliphezulu
le
lokuheha
mvelo
igcineke
izivakashi.
Lo
iseqophelweni
Mnyango
ukuze
26 June 2001
uthole
Page 72 of 256
umnotho
othe
xaxa,
udinga
isabelo
semali
esithe xaxa.
IKwaZulu-Natali
idume
ngokuba
isifundazwe
esiphambili ekuheheni izivakashi ngobuhle baso. Uma
kodwa
kuthiwa
ibuye
ezinobuphofu,
lokhu
ongathi
kufakwa
uma
kusho
ibalwe
ukuthi
izimali
nezifundazwe
kunomcebo
kulungiswe
nje
imvelo
esinayo kule ndawo, ukhule kakhulu. (Translation of
Zulu paragraphs follows.)
[Mrs
J
N
VILAKAZI:
Chairperson,
hon
Minister
of
Environmental Affairs and Tourism and the House at
large, this is a good day since we are talking
about nature, something that God has given us. It
always depends on us how we realise, celebrate and
protect this beauty so that it cannot disappear and
be damaged and even become nothing but rubbish that
one will not want to look at.
Let us take a look at the provinces that are known
for the beauty of our nature. The Western Cape is
known for Table Mountain and grapes out of which
wine is made. It is also known for having a point
26 June 2001
Page 73 of 256
at which two oceans join. It is known for Robben
Island and many other things you can think of. All
these things need a lot of money to protect and
keep them at a level that will attract tourists.
The
KwaZulu-Natal
province
is
known
for
its
forests, sugar cane, the ocean that moves along the
coast and many kinds of fruit. This province is
completely
green.
This
is
what
attracts
people,
reared and wild animals. A green land is beautiful.
All provinces have a history about their nature.
Some are known for their strongholds, historical
rocks, popular trees, and I do not know what else
to add. In the name of the IFP, this department
needs money that will enable it to protect this
nature at a level that will attract tourists. This
department should be given enough funds so that it
will be able to develop the economy.
The KwaZulu-Natal province is known for attracting
tourist because of its beauty. Since it is grouped
under poor provinces, this means that there is an
economy that will grow if we put more money into it
and nurture the nature that we have.]
26 June 2001
Page 74 of 256
Chairperson,
hon
Minister
and
members
of
Parliament, South Africa enjoys the highest level
of biodiversity in the world. Our parks, mountains,
rivers, wetlands, wild animals and flowers and the
15 000 rock art sites that we have inherited are
our pride and the property of the generations to
come.
From
the
economic
point
of
view,
its
value
is
beyond calculation. Our country's rich heritage is
vast
and
staggering
in
its
proportions.
For
example, over 3 700 species occur in South Africa
and
nowhere
else
in
the
world.
The
Cape
floral
region is so unique that it has been designated as
one of the six kingdoms. No other country is host
to the entire plant kingdom.
Tourism, more than any other sector of the economy,
holds the potential to create jobs and stimulate
economic growth. The growing demand for cultural
tourism
proud
provides
history
renaissance.
the
and
opportunity
promote
to
reclaim
nation-building
our
and
26 June 2001
Page 75 of 256
In conclusion, the IFP extends its gratitude to the
Minister
and
members
of
his
department
for
the
professional and dedicated work that they have done
so far in this field. I also wish to take this
opportunity to call all members of this House to
join the Department of Environmental Affairs and
Tourism in the rewarding campaign to protect and
restore South Africa's proud natural heritage. I
urge all hon members, for the sake of the tourism
industry and for their own sakes, to take a long
and extended holiday. [Applause.]
Mr
G
C
Minister,
ADAMS
(Western
colleagues
and
Cape):
Chairperson,
members,
I
am
going
hon
to
stop short of actually agreeing with my colleague
to giving the hon the Minister an honorary award.
Nevertheless, I think that he has done a fine job
so far.
I would like to tell the hon the Minister that we
are now seven years into the miracle birth of a new
nation.
It
may
not
have
been
an
immaculate
conception, but a miracle birth it was. Seven years
after
democracy,
the
prevailing
and
inescapable
26 June 2001
Page 76 of 256
dynamic that confronts the national Government is
its failure to deliver to the most marginalised and
disadvantaged
communities.
Failure
to
deliver
to
the people is what is driving politics today. We
continue
fisher
to
hear
folk
in
of
a
pensioners
poor
and
dying
desperate
in
queues;
situation
trying to make a living from the sea; budgets in
key
delivery
portfolios
underspent;
wide-scale
corruption, and so on.
Whilst other ministerial portfolios have done much
worse, Environmental Affairs and Tourism has done
relatively well, but should not escape criticism.
Whilst I congratulate Minister Moosa, who clearly
has the spirit and energy to succeed, for his good
ideas and determination in getting delivery on the
ground, I cannot escape the conclusion that he has
also failed the people.
I say this because very little has changed for the
poorest and most marginalised people through the
policies of the national department. The Minister's
policies
still
do
not
have
the
support
of
the
subsistence fisher folk who continue to survive on
26 June 2001
the
scraps
Page 77 of 256
of
the
industry.
The
lot
of
the
subsistence fisher folk has worsened and many can
now
no
longer
urbanisation
are
live
off
their
the
only
sea.
refuge.
Crime
We,
in
and
the
province, unfortunately have to pick up the tab in
the form of increased social spending.
In
his
speech
in
the
National
Assembly,
the
Minister quoted Kurlansky, Huxley and others. Once
again,
one
hears
writers
talking
these
about
the
erudite
lot
philosophical
of
the
ordinary
people of whom they know nothing and never have
known
anything.
He
should
forget
about
what
the
philosophers and social commentators tell him and
go and listen to the fisher folk. He should go and
see what life is like for them. He should go up to
the west coast, small rural villages and hamlets
and listen to the people, and not listen to Huxley,
who tells him not to listen to the people.
I would like to tell the hon the Minister that
nobody is suggesting that we can fish our way out
of poverty or that the resource is limitless. We
indeed
applaud
him
and
his
department
for
26 June 2001
Page 78 of 256
protecting the fish resources and any increase in
the total allowable catch. To achieve this we must,
obviously, eliminate poaching. In the light of the
events of the past week, we must congratulate the
Minister on tackling not only the small poachers
through
Operation
poachers
business,
raids
by
who,
under
deplete
the
Neptune,
our
the
but
mantle
resources
Scorpions
also
of
by
big
respectable
the
confirm
the
a
ton.
The
long-held
suspicion that the established fishing industry is
as culpable of poaching as the petty criminal. I
would like to tell the hon the Minister that we are
behind him in his efforts to clean up the industry.
In his budget speech, the Minister boasted that 50%
of the rights issued in the pelagic sector are now
black-owned. Without going into the integrity of
that figure by stripping out the paper quotas, the
front
companies
and
the
shameful
fraud
that
is
being perpetrated in the name of ``black-owned'', I
would like to ask the hon the Minister how much of
that 50% represents transformation for the really
poor and marginalised; and then how much of the 50%
represents
patronage
for
the
party
faithful.
In
26 June 2001
effect,
the
Page 79 of 256
Minister's
policies
have
advantaged
those who have access to capital in one form or
another. Transformation must be transformation for
the benefit of the poorest and most marginalised
and not based on race tags, all the more so in that
the
integrity
of
the
transformation
is,
in
any
opportunities
for
event, in question because of patronage.
Ecotourism
presents
magnificent
our communities. I am not talking about the kind of
tourism that turns our townships and villages into
large open-air zoos, but genuine ecotourism which
is authentic in its experience and empowering to
our people. This is an alternative to trying to
fish our way out of the problems of poverty. We
urge the hon the Minister to aggressively promote
this sector as well as expand the Working for the
Coastline initiative.
I
must
also
commend
the
Minister
on
his
conservation efforts for natural areas. He has good
ideas and has made concerted efforts to ensure that
we
comply
with
internationally.
our
obligations,
There
are,
nationally
however,
and
still
26 June 2001
Page 80 of 256
fundamental
problems
questionable
developments
because
of
several
in
this
are
area.
still
uncertainties
Highly
proceeding
in
our
law.
Firstly, we must, as a matter of priority, ensure
that law reform, and, in particular, amendments and
regulations
to
the
National
Environmental
Management Act are promulgated. With the conflict
of laws and uncertainty as to what the law is we,
in
the
province,
are
being
litigated
against
by
both developers and conservationists. It is a nowin situation that benefits nobody. I would like to
ask the hon the Minister to please expedite the
process of giving us a clear legal framework.
Secondly, as Minister Moosa well knows, Koeberg in
the
Western
Cape
has
been
identified
as
the
preferred site ... [Time expired.] [Applause.]
Mr M A SULLIMAN: Chairperson, let me start off by
saying that I see that we have little gifts here
today. I do not know what this is, but it looks
like Mother Earth. If one looks at the gemstones
here, they look like tiger's-eye, and I think that
26 June 2001
Page 81 of 256
tiger's-eye
comes
from
the
Northern
Cape
as
a
province. [Applause.]
The national objectives of job creation, economic
growth, poverty alleviation and development are the
guiding
principles
programmes
economic
province
of
the
affairs
is
objectives.
informing
Northern
and
therefore
This
investment
is
Cape
tourism.
used
done
and
the
to
by
policies
and
department
of
Tourism
achieve
focusing
in
the
on
infrastructure
the
above
tourism
in
the
underprivileged areas where tourism potential aims
to empower previously neglected communities.
Given the important contribution which tourism can
make in achieving our development objectives, it is
essential that we create the kind of conditions, in
our
province,
which
will
ensure
a
thriving
provincial tourism industry.
As a first step, we have critically reviewed the
role
of
the
Northern
Cape
Tourism
Authority
and
came to the conclusion that its prime focus must be
to promote and market the province as a tourist
26 June 2001
Page 82 of 256
destination, whilst tourism development should be
the responsibility of the department of economic
affairs and tourism.
Secondly,
that
we
need
support
have
identified
immediate
and
enhance
and
a
number
ongoing
tourism
of
issues
attention
development
in
to
the
province, such as community tourism development, a
proper communications strategy, closer co-operation
with
the
national
Department
of
Environmental
Affairs and Tourism, and closer co-operation with
the private sector.
Community tourism development has been identified
as one of the growth sectors of our province which
need
focused
provincial
tourism
attention
and
assistance.
department
has
already
entrepreneurs
and
is
developing
their
tourism
engaged
assisting
products.
An
The
local
them
in
excellent
example of this is the Didimalang luxury guesthouse
in Galeshewe.
A peculiar problem experienced in this province is
the negative impact which newspapers such as the
26 June 2001
Page 83 of 256
Diamond Fields Advertiser have on the development
of tourism in our province.
This
problem
effective
has
highlighted
communications
the
strategy
need
to
for
combat
an
the
negative impact on local thinking which is often
fuelled
by
department
our
is
local
newspapers.
currently
in
The
provincial
discussions
with
the
Northern Cape Tourism Authority to set up a joint
communication process to change negative attitudes
and promote unity of purpose.
In
terms
of
closer
co-operation
between
the
provincial and national departments, the province
hopes to enlist national support for partnerships
that will seek to further develop the province as a
tourist destination.
At
the
same
time
the
provincial
department
is
engaging the private sector, most notably De Beers,
to venture into a partnership agreement jointly to
develop the Big Hole, which is one of the major
tourist
South
attractions
Africa.
The
in
the
above
province,
are
all
as
well
in
short-term
26 June 2001
Page 84 of 256
interventions which the provincial department hopes
to accomplish in the next one to two years.
The department of economic affairs and tourism has
also
developed
strategies
a
number
around
of
medium
tourism
and
long-term
development
in
the
province. As a medium-term strategy, the department
will create a genuine nodal attraction at Kimberley
which will provide the province with a solid kickstart for new tourism.
The
department
will
empowerment
fund
empowerment
through
also
that
a
establish
will
give
a
tourism
focus
to
community-public-private
partnership approach and provide support to ensure
access
support
to
appropriate
linked
with
entrepreneurial
national
incentives
financial
as
they
unfold.
The department will also create links with the SA
National Parks. Through this link the department
hopes to play a role in the development of national
parks in the region so as to maximise downstreaming
26 June 2001
business
Page 85 of 256
and
employment
opportunities
for
the
people in the Northern Cape.
The Northern Cape Tourism Authority will also build
networks
airline
with
and
tour
operators,
hotel
groups
travel
both
agents,
locally
and
internationally, and use these networks to drive
its own tourism promotion and marketing process.
Given the fact that the Northern Cape is not a
final
destination,
develop
existing
it
is
important
packages
for
to
create
travel
in
or
the
province and to market these through the networks.
This
will
boost
the
service
and
hospitality
industries in our province significantly.
The long-term interventions will no doubt begin to
define themselves as the outcome of growth in the
local industry. It is, however, likely that this
will
be
guided
by
the
so-called
important
to
reiterate
megatrends
of
tourism.
It
is
that
this
exercise
needs to be supplemented in order to secure unity
26 June 2001
Page 86 of 256
of purpose as to the way forward for the Northern
Cape. As a result, the main long-term intervention
should
be
to
implementation
support
of
the
specific
further
tourism
planning
and
development
opportunities as identified for each subregion.
All of these projects are of such significance that
commercial opportunities for the development of new
tourism products are anticipated. More importantly,
given our aspirations for small, medium and micro
enterprise development, a number of these projects
look likely to offer opportunities for communitybased tourism initiatives.
We in the Northern Cape are therefore in support of
the Budget Vote for the Department of Environmental
Affairs and Tourism. If someone is in need of some
fresh air and quietness, he or she should come to
the Northern Cape province. We have a slogan that
says: Follow the sun and not the crowds and you
will end up in the Northern Cape. [Applause.]
Mr M M MACKENZIE (KwaZulu-Natal): Chairperson, let
me first acknowledge the very positive steps that
26 June 2001
Page 87 of 256
are being taken by the Minister to ensure that our
environment
posterity,
assured
in
so
of
a
its
totality
that
the
is
main
well-managed
preserved
user,
for
tourism,
biodiversity
for
is
the
consumption of visitors.
Let me concentrate my limited time on an area which
has not yet reached problem status, but will soon
do so if we do not act, and that is the recognition
of
the
vulnerability
of
our
parks
and
protected
areas in all provinces to the lack of sustainable
policy
in
regard
to
the
land
areas
immediately
adjacent to our parks and protected areas.
It is an inescapable fact that historically local
people were alienated from their land in order to
establish
parks.
This
has
resulted
in
many
land
claims over parks and protected areas. It is now
necessary
to
find
means
of
rectifying
these
socioeconomic imbalances caused by the creation of
parks and protected areas. Local people have been
denied access to the material benefits which flow
from parks. The multiplier effect from tourism in
these
neighbouring
disadvantaged
communities
has
26 June 2001
Page 88 of 256
been almost nonexistent, and this has resulted in
the
management
and
operations
within
the
parks
becoming seriously problematic, in a socially and
politically hostile environment.
Many
parks
and
protected
countries are notorious
exist
between
neighbouring
results
from
resources
removals
the
communities.
illegal
land
in
developing
for the antagonisms that
management
exacerbated
or
areas
agencies
The
friction
utilisation
by
a
and
utilisation;
crop
usually
of
history
the
wildlife
of
or
forced
livestock
losses from herbivores and large predators; poverty
on the outside versus perceived opulence and plenty
for tourists and officials inside the fence; the
nonaccessibility of arks and protected areas and
their amenities and benefits for poor communities;
and perceptions among poor communities that only
the wealthy benefit.
The IUCN recognises that parks and protected areas
are
ecologically,
culturally
therefore
linked
buffer
economically,
to
the
zones
areas
are
politically
around
becoming
an
them,
and
and
accepted
26 June 2001
Page 89 of 256
norm internationally in both the developed and the
developing world. This is to reduce the hard-edge
effect of protected areas bordering on community
land. Conflict between protected areas and local
people
is
therefore
an
international
phenomenon,
but here it is aggravated by the political past.
The challenge therefore is to develop a home-grown
model
based
opportunities
relations
and
on
local
that
will
result
in
a
circumstances
immediately
win-win
and
improve
situation
for
both parties.
A proposed strategy exists and is well articulated
by Mr Hector Magome of SA National Parks, who has
been liberally quoted in this speech of mine. It is
therefore
viewed
as
essential
that
the
Minister
these
can
only
avail himself of this document.
There
are
overcome
risks
with
expertise.
involved
the
and
intelligent
These
communication
caused
bureaucratic
and
risks
by
use
are:
heightened
political
of
be
available
inappropriate
expectations;
constraints
and
inadequate advance planning; a lack of detailed and
26 June 2001
patient
Page 90 of 256
explanation
personnel
support
and
for
a
lack
the
of
internal
recognition
and
park
the
incorporation of this philosophy.
The success of the whole process will follow the
correct application of the principle of inclusion
as opposed to exclusion, with the concomitant flow
of revenues to the hitherto disadvantaged people.
Conservation
can
survive,
but
only
if
people
realise that to serve it correctly, all life needs
to be nurtured.
Lapha
enzansi
kwezwe
ngibona
ukuthi
amalungu
avamise ukudla izinhlanzi. Lapho ngivela khona mina
kudliwa inyama. Sithi thina uma amalungu eyithanda
inyama
kuhle
intibane.
asivakashele.
Imnandi
kanjani!
Siyofike
[Uhleko.]
siwosele
(Translation
of Zulu paragraph follows.)
[I have noticed that here in the southern part of
the country members of Parliament eat fish. Where I
come from people eat meat. What we are saying is,
if
members
of
Parliament
like
meat,
they
should
26 June 2001
Page 91 of 256
visit us. We will roast intibane [warthog] meat for
them. It is so delicious! [Laughter.]]
Mr K D S DURR: Chairperson, I wish to speak to the
Minister and in particular address the acquisition
of land for SA National Parks in the Western Cape.
I am speaking now of the West Coast National Park.
I
wish
to
raise
the
matter
of
a
farm
called
Langefontein, which is a few thousand hectares in
extent. This tract of land is currently owned by
the Department of Defence, but is superfluous to
their requirements, and the ownership of the land
is currently under review.
SA National Parks, whose land to the north of the
mentioned land, east of the R27, is contiguous with
Langefontein, has applied for the land, but there
are other competing interests. However, the land is
central
National
because
to
the
Parks
the
long-term
that
area
can
is
expansion
only
highly
be
plans
very
developed,
of
SA
limited,
and
will
protect the West Coast biosphere. The land can be
transferred
to
SA
National
Parks
at
no
because it already belongs to the Government.
cost,
26 June 2001
Page 92 of 256
The hon the Minister would know that only 1% of
West Coast fynbos is left. The rest has gone to the
plough, to development or to alien vegetation. The
Langefontein land in question is one of the last
opportunities the state has to increase the size
and the viability of the West Coast National Park
and to expand the biodiversity under its span of
control.
We
are
Minister
correctly
the
last
says,
generation,
who
might
as
have
the
these
opportunities. Since Langefontein lies to the east
of the West Coast National Park, it has slightly
better soils and hills, different botanical species
and a slightly higher rainfall, and thus would add
to the limited opportunity we have for adding to
the biodiversity of the park, since the principle
reasons
why
that
park
has
been
established
are
ornithological and botanical in nature.
The land has extremely low agricultural potential,
but it is rich in botanical species even at its
present size. Competing interests that would lead
to the subdivision of the land would condemn new
owners to poverty. The land can only be grazed by
domestic animals for about three months per year
26 June 2001
Page 93 of 256
and is not arable. So, even at its present size it
is an uneconomic unit, and to subdivide it into
smaller units would simply be condemning any future
owners to a life of poverty. The land would provide
the
opportunity
biodiversity
and
to
to
increase
rare
reintroduce
rare
botanical
species
of
animals.
The land also adjoins Elandsfontein. That is the
second reason why it is important to acquire this
land.
It
is
extensive
and
the
last
remaining
contiguous
with
the
land
park
that
and
is
that
possibly could ever be integrated into that park.
Also, one of those farms, Elandsfontein, has the
second
oldest
human
remains
in
Africa,
after
Sterkfontein, and there the University of Cape Town
has a permanent dig, an archeological site which is
of
considerable
interest
and
which
could
add
hugely, at some future time, to the enrichment of
the park as a whole. This area has high tourism
potential and therefore would create employment and
make the park more viable, because it will attract
more people. Thus the eastern side would be more
commercially viable.
26 June 2001
Page 94 of 256
The SA National Parks application is supported by
the
Western
Western
Cape
Cape
worldwide.
conservation
government
There
is
authorities,
and
the
conservationists
considerable
interest
from
around the world and I also hosted World Wildlife
Fund people here the other day. I ask the Minister
not to let the opportunity slip and I do not think
he
will.
I
would
like
to
quote
the
hon
the
Minister, who recently said, ``We must act while we
can.''
There
are
very
few
opportunities
left
in
that area, and none so attractive for conservation.
The
hon
the
Minister
would
know
that
the
park
cannot expand to the north. Langebaan lies to the
north.
It
also
cannot
expand
to
the
south.
Ysterfontein lies to the south. It can only expand
to the east, and the area to the east is almost
arable,
so
conservation
opportunities
are
very
limited, and we are the last generation to have a
chance
to
do
something
in
that
super-sensitive,
rare and fragile part of the world. I would like to
say to the hon the Minister that the matter has
been
dragging
on
for
months
if
not
years,
and
everybody would like a settlement and finality to
26 June 2001
Page 95 of 256
the situation so that they can get on with the task
of
conserving
and
developing
that
land
and
its
tourism potential. [Time expired.]
Ms Y M NAHARA (KwaZulu-Natal): Madam Chair, I would
firstly like to congratulate Minister Valli Moosa
and his departmental officials for the good work
and the explanations they gave us and for their
efforts in producing a budget document for such a
diverse
Ministry.
Those
who
were
in
the
select
committee would understand what I mean. This Budget
speech, delivered by the Minister today, will be
regarded in KwaZulu-Natal as a document, not just a
speech,
because
it
comes
at
a
time
when
the
department of environmental affairs and tourism in
KwaZulu-Natal and the nature conservation services
are busy working on the restructuring of the NCS,
the intention being to improve on the management of
our
nature
conservation
reserves
and
also
to
improve the standard of services that will attract
our visitors when they come to KwaZulu-Natal.
The increase in this Budget signals to us greater
commitment
by
the
Minister
in
ensuring
that
we
26 June 2001
deliver
Page 96 of 256
quality
services
in
our
respective
provinces. In our province, for instance, with its
diverse
and
rich
coastline,
we
are
particularly
pleased to hear that an amount of R42,5 million has
been
set
development
aside
for
of
spatial
the
environment
developmental
and
the
initiatives
along the East Coast.
We
are
also
encouraged
by
the
increase
for
environmental and planning co-ordination and marine
and coastal development. I want to place emphasis
on planning and co-ordination, and hope that coordination between provincial and local government
sectors will be addressed so that the roles and
responsibilities of these bodies are clear.
When one looks at townships and poor rural areas,
on the environmental side, what one sees there is
really discouraging, especially when we have been
in government for seven years. We still have poor
people
who
live
under
terrible
environmental
conditions. One is aware of the fact that some of
these
problems
are
district
responsibilities.
However, I think if the Minister could assist, and
26 June 2001
Page 97 of 256
emphasise and reprioritise some of these areas as
environmental sites, it would help a lot. It will
also make the people see and understand that we are
now living under a new government that takes care
of all its people. [Applause.]
Mr
D
SILKE
(Western
Cape):
Madam
Chair,
it
is
indeed a pleasure for me to enter this debate today
on
the
subject
positive
of
spin-offs
tourism.
for
Tourism
all
the
has
so
people
many
of
our
country that I really do not have to enumerate its
many benefits. Therefore it is a real pleasure for
me
to
be
Minister
here
of
on
behalf
business
of
the
Western
promotion
and
Cape's
tourism,
Minister Leon Markovitz.
When
dealing
with
tourism
from
a
Western
Cape
perspective, let me say that any tourist to the
Western Cape is also a tourist to South Africa, and
any tourist to the rest of South Africa is also
hopefully a tourist to the Western Cape. So I want
to talk from an inclusive point of view and just
highlight
within
my
concern
about
South
Africa.
I
tourism
want
to
very
address
broadly
in
my
26 June 2001
limited
issues
Page 98 of 256
time
of
available
getting
just
tourists
one
or
into
two
specific
South
Africa,
because I think that is the crucial element that we
need to discuss.
I want to highlight that one of the most critical
problems, I think, in bringing tourists to South
Africa,
and
increasing
a
problem
arrival
international
that
figures
airports,
is
is
an
at
impediment
South
Government's
to
Africa's
aviation
policy. I do believe that it is blocking tourism
flows to and within South Africa. We need to ensure
more competition and flight options on our major
routings, in particular from the United Kingdom to
South Africa.
During
our
high
booked
for
season
weeks,
flights
and
are
potential
often
visitors
fully
are
therefore blocked from coming to South Africa. The
United Kingdom comprises more than 20% of our total
foreign market and offers huge scope for further
expansion. It is no use staging a South Africa Week
in London, and directing millions of rands towards
marketing
in
the
UK
and
Europe
when,
in
fact,
26 June 2001
potential
Page 99 of 256
visitors
cannot
even
find
place
on
aircrafts flying into South Africa.
I know of many potential visitors who wish to visit
our lovely country, particularly during the high
season when they can travel. But, frankly, they are
simply put off and give up trying to find seats on
aircraft, because of the very restrictive policies
that exist in terms of the major airlines flying
into South Africa. Given the seasonal adjustments
in air tariffs as well, one cannot help feeling
that this protectionist policy is there to protect
the major airlines flying into South Africa, rather
than to really encourage those visitors that we so
desperately need.
Bold
steps
visitors
to
perspective,
gateway
to
are
therefore
South
Africa.
particularly
Africa,
I
required
Of
Cape
might
to
course,
Town,
add
that
channel
from
which
I
am
our
is
a
very
pleased that we now have a new airport, and I think
that the Airports Company has done a very fine job,
and we want to use it and see aircraft arriving.
Unfortunately, I have to report that, in fact, over
26 June 2001
the
last
Page 100 of 256
few
months,
there
has
been
a
decline,
rather than an increase, in international arrivals
in Cape Town.
The London to South Africa route is certainly the
big
problem
in
terms
of
increase
in
capacity,
especially with the reduction of flights from other
European
countries,
for
example,
those
flown
by
Sabena, from Belgium, and Austrian Airlines. This
has
created
a
limitation
on
the
seats
available
and, in fact, the problem is becoming more and more
acute.
There
are
fewer
seats
coming
into
South
Africa, and very few new flights are being allowed
or
sanctioned,
particularly
on
these
routes.
We
need a more liberal open-skies policy, and I really
ask the Minister to address this particular issue.
Whilst most South Africans have noticed a virtual
25% hike in international airline fares since April
of this year, it is internal air travel as well
that has become exorbitantly expensive, for South
African citizens and for visitors as well. SAA has
seemingly monopolised this market and the ongoing
saga
surrounding
the
remuneration
package
of
Mr
26 June 2001
Page 101 of 256
Coleman Andrews makes one think that we should be
making
airline
majority
of
travel
South
more
affordable
Africans,
who
would
to
the
love
to
undertake domestic holidays and do business, rather
than
lining
the
pockets
of
chief
executives
and
their cronies in such excessive ways.
For emerging small business entrepreneurs, it is
fast becoming impossible to extend their markets by
making
vital
business
trips
across
the
country.
Therefore if we are really serious about getting
tourism
to
flourish
geographically
Africa,
expensive
airline
access
in
a
long-haul
destination
and
like
and
South
affordability
are
paramount and these should receive prime attention.
Furthermore,
SA
Tourism,
formerly
called
Satour,
has clearly not optimised its mandate thus far. The
organisation is currently without a chief executive
officer and has had four CEOs in as many years.
There is no definitive marketing strategy and no
stringent monitoring and measuring of the impact of
the huge budget that has been raised in partnership
with the Business Trust.
26 June 2001
I
am
really
tourism
Page 102 of 256
upset
figures
measured
in
when
coming
terms
of
I
look
into
at
the
South
average
growth
foreign
Africa
...
as
[Time
expired.] [Applause.]
Mr F M MOKWELE (Northern Province): Chairperson,
hon members of the NCOP, hon Minister Valli Moosa,
hon
members
this
of
different
opportunity
to
legislatures,
express
allow
my
me
profound
appreciation at standing before this House today as
a
representative
of
the
Northern
Province's
legislature and its communities.
It is, indeed, a privilege to be entrusted with
this mammoth responsibility of ensuring that the
aspirations
province
of
thousands
towards
of
our
people
environmental
in
justice
the
and
sustainable tourism activities are made known to
the entire country and its leadership.
It would also be an act of treason if I did not
join the Minister and our colleagues here in saying
that today is a great day for us because we are
celebrating the 46th anniversary of the adoption of
26 June 2001
Page 103 of 256
the Freedom Charter as a guiding document towards
the
liberation
of
this
country.
However,
the
celebrations are taking place against the backdrop
of
great
strides
which
have
been
made
in
the
betterment of the lives of people in the country,
and our province in particular.
With, side by side, the national, provincial and
local spheres of government, in collaboration with
various social forces, the cause of our struggle
for
liberation
shall
definitely
triumph,
as
the
late combatant Comrade Oliver Tambo said in Durban
in 1991.
The Northern Province has, in the past six years,
identified
tourism
as
one
of
the
key
economic
sectors with the potential of unlocking the natural
and cultural resources found within its borders and
beyond.
The
Warmbaths
summits
on
growth
and
development strategy have given more impetus to the
province's self-realisation effort as a means to
move out of the bracket of being referred to as the
poorest province.
26 June 2001
The
Page 104 of 256
vision
of
a
golden
horseshoe
of
tourism
composed of countless game parks and transnational
peace
parks
neighbours
tourism
straddling
is
being
future
the
borders
realised
for
our
as
with
an
present
our
important
and
future
generations. The Government has since also realised
that on its own it cannot and should not run game
parks. It was within this understanding and context
that Government decided to allow communities and
the private sector to run these parks in a more
profitable
way.
The
role
of
Government
in
this
particular regard will be that of a facilitator in
creating the necessary environment.
The
Makuleka
story
is
known
to
us.
This
is
a
particularly good example of community effort to do
things
for
themselves.
To
this
end,
we
would
appreciate more resources being made available to
that particular community in order to realise its
objectives.
Talking
of
cultural
heritage
sites
which
are
in
abundance and untamed in the Northern Province, the
following
come
to
mind:
Mapungubwe,
Thulamela,
26 June 2001
Page 105 of 256
Makapansgat and other sites and artistic works by
the San.
The
current
policy
initiatives
by
hon
Minister
Moosa on the peace parks need to be commended. It
is the hope of the province that, at the end of
these
processes,
communities
Province
will
be
the
allowing
them
to
move
in
great
the
Northern
benefactors,
faster
on
the
thus
economic
development front. I wish to also quote the then
Deputy
President
Comrade
economic
Thabo
and
current
Mbeki,
development
on
summit
President,
the
hon
occasion
of
the
the
in
Warmbaths
on
26
February 1999, when he said:
We cannot say that we are moving forward if our
poorer provinces are not the ones that are moving
forward fastest.
It
is
a
critical
matter,
therefore,
that
this
meeting is about. I believe that all of us are
agreed on this point.
26 June 2001
The
Page 106 of 256
tourism
resort
and
gaming
budget
in
our
province is a paltry R44,612 million. It is within
this context that in order to realise our stated
objective the Department of Environmental Affairs
and Tourism needs to come and assist us.
Concluding
this
section
on
tourism,
I
wish
to
invite members of this august House to join the
communities
of
the
Northern
Province
in
their
cultural renaissance effort. What I am saying here
is
that
members
are
invited
to
the
Northern
Province. Members must walk with us on the ivory
route,
which
is
unparalleled
in
the
country
and
elsewhere in the world. We would use ox-wagons if
available, because of the toughness of the course,
but they are no longer there, so the 4X4s will
suffice, and we will be happy to provide them.
The sustainable management and use of our natural
resources is needed for biodiversity purposes in
terms
of
species
ecological
systems
protection,
protection.
enhancement
The
management
and
of
biodiversity contributes to the conservation of our
26 June 2001
Page 107 of 256
natural life-supporting systems such as wetlands,
clean water and air.
In
order
to
objectives,
provincial
system.
achieve
the
province
biobase
It
is
the
and
further
undertake
biomonitoring
catchment
areas,
develop
above
is
and
stated
developing
the
biodiversity
information
engaged
efforts
of
river
in
systems
conservation
to
within
strategies
and undertake annual grass monitoring processes in
protected areas, and game reduction proposals.
The province is currently working very hard on the
Waterberg biosphere area, as all members are aware.
We express our appreciation of the Minister and the
department's support on this particular issue. In
full bloom, this initiative should see communities
being integrated into a modern conservation area in
the beautiful parts of the bushveld.
It should be mentioned here that Nylsvlei has been
declared a Ramsar site, making it one of the few
declared wetland sites in the world. This site has
26 June 2001
limitless
Page 108 of 256
possibilities
for
conservation
and
tourist attraction.
While
the
province
accomplishing
critical
some
tasks,
biodiversity
wishes
of
the
in
these
to
most
section
particular
see
itself
important
dealing
is
and
with
currently
understaffed, and that is the greatest problem we
have. The situation needs to be corrected.
It is the view of the Northern Province that the
Department
of
Environmental
needs
be
actively
to
Affairs
involved
and
or
Tourism
make
more
resources available to correct this situation. If
the situation is not corrected or addressed, there
is a risk that some of the natural life-supporting
systems will be degraded to a point at which it is
impossible
instance,
to
clean
manage
water.
areas
These
that
produce,
for
are
catchment
and
wetlands areas.
Environmental education is being taken seriously in
our
province.
section
of
the
To
this
end,
department
of
the
environmental
finance,
economic
26 June 2001
Page 109 of 256
affairs, environmental affairs and tourism in the
province is ensuring that environmental education
is
integrated
into
the
school
curriculum
by
supporting Curriculum 2005 processes, with a view
to
developing
standards
for
environment-related
qualifications through the National Qualifications
Framework.
The
province
wishes
to
commend
the
Minister
for
ensuring that the provisions of Chapter 2, the Bill
of
Rights,
of
our
Constitution
are
implemented,
particularly section 24. This has been done through
the enactment, first and foremost, of the National
Environmental
Management
Act
of
1998.
All
our
legislation could derive much from its provisions.
As already stated, the scarcity of resources needs
to be addressed so as to ensure that functions such
as
environmental
impact
assessment
and
pollution
management receive the attention they deserve.
In
conclusion,
the
Northern
Province
wishes
to
support the Vote of the Minister and I do so on
behalf of the province. [Applause.]
26 June 2001
Page 110 of 256
Mr A E DE WET (Eastern Cape): Chairperson, I am
sure there is nobody in this Chamber here today who
would
not
be
aware
of
the
Wild
Coast
community
tourism initiative, and for that we thank the hon
the Minister. I am sure he is also reminded of the
day when we saw him in the Eastern Cape with his
scout hat, shorts and boots, walking along the Wild
Coast with our hon MEC. I must say right at the
outset that the hon MEC would dearly have liked to
be here today, to deliver his speech himself, but
it
is
my
honour
and
privilege
to
do
so
on
his
behalf.
The Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
administers various pieces of legislation, and a
number of concurrent competencies exist in terms of
that
legislation.
department
of
environment
and
In
the
finance,
Eastern
economic
tourism
is
the
Cape
the
affairs,
authority
responsible for most of these concurrent functions.
The Environmental Conservation Act makes provision
for
the
Africa.
conservation
This,
inter
of
biodiversity
alia,
provides
in
for
South
the
26 June 2001
Page 111 of 256
establishment and management of protected areas, as
well
as
the
sustainable
utilisation
of
natural
resources.
Protected
areas
functions
of
management
the
is
province,
one
as
of
the
core
as
the
well
department. National protected areas that occur in
the
Eastern
Park,
the
Cape
are
Mountain
the
Zebra
Addo
Elephant
National
National
Park
and
the
Tsitsikamma Coastal and Marine National Park, and
are being managed by SA National Parks.
Various joint provincial and national initiatives
are, moreover, taking place within the Eastern Cape
province.
These
Baviaanskloof
initiatives
Project,
the
are:
the
Greater
Greater
Addo
National
Park and the proposed Pondoland Park. The imminent
incorporation of the Woody Cape Provincial Nature
Reserve into the Greater Addo National Park is of
specific relevance in this regard.
Sustainable
core
resources
functions
numerous
of
utilisation
the
inspections
department.
and
site
is
one
This
visits,
of
the
includes
protected
26 June 2001
Page 112 of 256
flora permits, a certificate of adequate enclosure,
capacity permits, proposed game introduction, legal
and illegal gambling, crop damage and liaison with
role-players in the wildlife and tourism industry.
The
department,
international
moreover,
conventions
administers
on
behalf
various
of
South
Africa. Of specific relevance in this regard is the
Convention
for
the
International
Trade
in
Endangered Species, Cites, in terms of which the
Eastern Cape is yet to be appointed as a Cites
management
authority.
applications
thus
At
have
present,
to
be
all
referred
permit
to
the
Western Cape for approval, and this, in a province
where
the
hunting
and
the
trophy
industry
is
booming, is something that needs to be attended to.
The
National
alia,
aims
Environmental
to
promote
Management
the
Act,
application
inter
of
appropriate environmental management tools in order
to ensure the integrated management of activities.
Furthermore, in terms of the Act, each province has
to draft a provincial environmental implementation
plan,
and
once
it
has
been
submitted
to
the
26 June 2001
Page 113 of 256
department, implement it. I wish to state that the
Eastern Cape province has submitted a draft EIP to
the department.
The
EIA
regulations
seek
to
manage
and
regulate
activities that, in the opinion of the Minister,
may have a significant detrimental impact on the
environment.
It
impacts
proposed
of
landscapes,
entails
habitat
the
assessment
activities
and
biota.
on
of
the
ecosystems,
These
regulations
have been delegated to the province. However, under
certain
circumstances,
as
outlined
in
the
regulations, applications still have to be referred
to the department.
In addition to administering the EIA regulations,
the province also provides comments and input to
regional and local planning exercises, as well as
nonlisted developments, such as mining and rezoning
applications.
The province has no delegated authority as far as
waste
management
concerned.
However,
and
pollution
owing
to
the
control
absence
are
of
26 June 2001
Page 114 of 256
department officials, except those with Marine and
Coastal
Management,
within
the
province,
the
provincial staff normally find themselves becoming
heavily involved in various issues relating to this
function.
These
includes
monitoring,
the
inspection
of
pollution incidences and illegal dumping, providing
advice
and
support
to
local
authorities,
dissemination of information to the public, and,
lastly,
funding
and
assisting
with
waste-
management-related projects.
I now come to the Sea-shore Act. All structures
below the high-water mark, including the approval
and
annual
renewal
of
the
lease
agreements,
are
regulated in terms of this Act. The Act has been
delegated in its entirety to the province. However,
currently, these structures are only authorised in
terms
of
the
EIA
regulations,
while
the
administration of leases in terms of the Sea-shore
Act is yet to be implemented, and we urge that it
be done.
26 June 2001
Page 115 of 256
I now address marine and coastal management. This
function
is
performed
by
the
Department
of
Environmental Affairs and Tourism, as stated in the
Marine Living Resources Act. The province has no
delegated authority in terms of this Act. However,
various issues end up being the responsibility of
the province.
Most of the relevant provincial staff working in
the coastal nature reserves in the province have
undergone training as fisheries control officers,
but only some have been appointed as such, by the
MCM. In the absence of MCM staff in certain areas,
specifically noting the ex-Transkei, all marine and
coastal management functions are being performed by
the province, without any financial assistance or
resources from the department.
Furthermore,
until
clear
management
arrangements
with MCM are in place, and as far as the provincial
budget
allows,
only
priority
cases,
normally
of
abalone poaching, are being handled in the other
areas of the province. Field rangers do, however,
check on marine resources while on patrol within
26 June 2001
Page 116 of 256
reserves, and I must say that there is good cooperation with the local MCM staff, if they are
present.
With regard to subsistence fishing licences, the
process of awarding these licences at the various
communities in the Eastern Cape is being dealt with
by the MCM. MCM staff members, however, find it
difficult to operate effectively from Cape Town,
and this process is beset with difficulties. Upon
request from the MCM, the provincial officials have
attempted
to
provide
assistance,
but
found
the
process to be unclear and confusing. Not much has
been achieved as far as subsistence licensing is
concerned in the province.
The Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
has no regional office in the province. Its limited
presence
is
restricted
to
Marine
and
Coastal
Management, MCM, and fisheries control offices in
Jeffreys Bay, Port Elizabeth, Port Alfred and East
London. All these offices are totally understaffed,
with
the
result
that
there
is
a
huge
burden,
26 June 2001
especially
Page 117 of 256
with
coastal
management
issues
being
referred to the provincial officials.
It
is
an
delegated
adequate
accepted
functions
provision
therefore
management
should
of
be
budget
imperative
principle
that
followed
and
a
by
staff.
clear
that
the
It
is
management
arrangement between the department and the province
be
determined
arrangements
as
a
should
matter
be
put
of
in
urgency.
place
for
These
those
functions currently delegated to the province, as
well
as
prior
delegated
to
to
the
any
further
province
by
functions
the
being
Department
of
Environmental Affairs and Tourism.
With regard to the fishing industry, it must be
stated
that
disadvantaged
the
participation
persons
is
still
of
previously
minimal
in
real
terms. The control of the industry is still vested
in a few large companies. Our challenge is to alter
this
situation
manner.
in
a
responsible
and
sustainable
26 June 2001
Page 118 of 256
It is regrettable to note that for nearly the whole
of last year most fishers spent more time briefing
lawyers
and
attending
to
court
proceedings
than
catching fish. This is a a negative development.
This
is
owing
to
legal
action
instituted
by
unsuccessful applicants over the allocation of hake
longline quotas by the department. As a result of
this legal action, only a few quota holders managed
to slip through and actually catch fish in January
2000. This was the result of them getting their
permits
before
the
court
proceedings
were
instituted.
The Eastern Cape has, in the past, been generally
neglected in the wider development and growth of
the
fishing
concentration
sector.
of
the
is
to
This
fishing
has
led
to
industry
the
in
the
that
will
Western Cape.
Our
challenge
work
out
a
plan
spread the benefits of this marine resource along
our entire coastline. We are mindful that the fish
species have no boundaries in the waters.
26 June 2001
Page 119 of 256
The deep-water harbour that is being developed at
Coega
is
going
upgrading
and
to
provide
opportunities
expansion
of
the
for
the
fishing
infrastructure and facilities so as to be able to
grow the sector in a more responsible manner.
I now come to tourism in the Eastern Cape. The key
delivery outputs for this year are the formulation
of a provincial tourism development strategy, the
establishment of a hospitality and tourism school,
familiarisation and educational trips by regional
tourism
organisations
businesses,
business
and
training
sector
facilitating
the
emerging
and
trainer
training,
disadvantaged
programmes,
tourism
participation
month,
of
black
entrepreneurs in the tourism industry, developing a
provincial
heritage
route
map,
multifunctional
sports arenas and providing community development
support to the EU project
for the Wild Coast
-
again I express appreciation for the bags that we
have
been
registration
province ...
given
of
-
the
accommodation
co-ordination
and
facilities
the
in
26 June 2001
The
Page 120 of 256
CHAIRPERSON
OF
COMMITTEES:
Hon
member,
your
time has expired.
Mr A E DE WET: I conclude by saying to the Minister
that there is a belief in the Eastern Cape that
tourism
in
South
Africa
will
only
succeed
when
tourism in the Wild Coast succeeds. [Applause.]
Mr M V MOOSA: Chairperson, anybody who knows me in
this
House
knows
that
I
will
not
pass
up
an
opportunity to respond to the kind of cowardly and
dishonest speech that MEC Adams from the Western
Cape made.
I was really amused at the speech that he made,
because he said a number of things. He said that
the Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism
had failed the people, that he had issued fishing
licenses for patronage for the party faithful. He
said
that
the
Minister
was
only
interested
in
transformation for the poorest of the poor, that he
was playing tag with the rest, and so forth.
26 June 2001
Page 121 of 256
It is quite a joke hearing comments like that from
somebody who belongs to the party that caused the
whole debacle in the first place. I must remind MEC
Adams that he governs in a province where 90% of
the fishing interests are still controlled by white
monopoly companies, and he is doing nothing about
it. I want to remind him that 99% of the businesses
in the tourism industry, such as at the Waterfront,
are in the hands of white people.
In
this
province
where
he
governs,
99%
of
restaurants, hotel rooms and so forth are in the
hands
of
understands
white
about
people.
black
The
economic
only
thing
he
empowerment
and
tourism is to bus white people in beautiful luxury
buses through Khayelitsha and Bonteheuwel and show
them the poor little people of this country. That
is what he knows about black economic empowerment,
and then he makes statements like this.
It is shocking. It is absolutely shocking. I think
that he needs to get his own back yard in order, I
have some words for that, but I do not think they
are
appropriate
in
this
honourable
House.
But
I
26 June 2001
Page 122 of 256
believe he needs to clean that up before he comes
and
talks
about
these
kinds
of
things
in
this
House. But I am not going to waste any more time on
that. I am going to make my speech.
I
think
that
this
House
knows
very
well
that
Gauteng faces enormous challenges. I speak today on
behalf of Gauteng. Gauteng covers only 1,4% of the
country's land area and yet we sustain about 20% of
the
country's
population.
We
sustain
about
400
persons per square kilometre in our province. In
Gauteng we produce more than 40% of the country's
GDP and yet we sustain about 70% of the country's
workforce.
We experience a population growth much higher than
most
other
between
provinces.
1970
and
Some
1995
the
figures
show
population
that
of
our
face
the
province more than doubled.
What
this
means
is
that
together
we
challenges of the high demand on natural resources
that
urbanisation
brings
in
our
province.
It
impacts on our water and land resources. There is a
26 June 2001
high
Page 123 of 256
demand
housing,
services
roads,
recreational
sewage
for
waste
facilities
and,
mostly,
and
infrastructure,
collection
and
the
for
the
services,
management
of
management
of
employment opportunities.
As a representative of the province of Gauteng, I
want to say to the Minister that our province needs
firm strategies, crisis strategies, with regard to
two
issues,
namely
waste
management
and
air
pollution. I want to raise some of those things.
The Minister said that we, as a country, produce
566
million
indicate
tons
how
of
much
of
waste
that
per
year.
waste
I
comes
want
from
to
our
province. We assume that probably about 80% of the
country's
waste
is
being
produced
in
the
being
produced
at
little
province of Gauteng.
Domestic
waste
is
about
4,3
million tons per annum, health care waste at about
14 000 tons per annum and hazardous waste, which
includes the mines and power stations, probably at
about
1,8
million
tons
per
annum.
The
biggest
26 June 2001
Page 124 of 256
producers of waste in our province are the mines
and power stations, which, together, produce about
370 million tons of waste per annum, all in the
little province of Gauteng.
That demands some serious consideration about what
we are to do about waste management of a domestic,
industrial and effluent nature in the province of
Gauteng.
I
believe
that
the
Ministry
of
Environmental
Affairs and Tourism needs to embark on very severe
strategies in the province of Gauteng to manage its
waste
problem.
management
If
problem
we
in
can
sort
Gauteng,
we
out
the
will
waste
probably
have sorted out about 70% of the waste disposal
problems in this country. I think we will probably
also be able to put down a good model for waste
management in other provinces.
The Minister is right, our local authorities do not
have statistics in order to deal with this matter.
It is also not clear whether the mere delivery of
dustbins to areas which require these might solve
26 June 2001
the
Page 125 of 256
problem.
It
calls
for
a
more
comprehensive
strategy around how we are going to recycle waste.
What are we going to do about waste that can be
recycled into compost and so forth and waste that
is
completely
lost,
which
needs
either
to
be
incinerated or to have something else done to it?
I need to bring up another statistic. According to
statistics, about 300 million tons of the country's
most valuable topsoil gets washed off the land and
silts up the rivers and dams each year. Maybe there
is a relationship between how we recycle our waste
and what we do about the silting up of our topsoil.
I think something needs to be done at that level.
Regarding a waste management strategy, the Minister
mentioned
providing
an
award
or
prize
for
the
cleanest and dirtiest towns. It is a good idea and
it might get towns to realise that something can be
done. However, I am not sure whether that alone is
going
to
address
addressed.
In
management
and
the
some
air
issues
areas,
that
like
pollution
need
Gauteng,
are
to
be
waste
becoming
so
critical that it will do no good finding one town
26 June 2001
Page 126 of 256
that has done well and another that has not. We
need a holistic, integrated strategy with regard to
urban
renewal
and
urbanisation
in
the
Gauteng
province.
I want to speak on a few matters regarding air
pollution.
The
Minister
mentioned
the
Vaal
Triangle. Sasol, one of the biggest companies in
this country, produced R4,7 billion of profits last
year, but is probably one of the biggest culprits
concerning
emissions
air
pollution
generated
by
in
Sasol
that
and
the
area.
The
plants
at
Sasolburg probably cause more health problems in
the Vaal Triangle in people of all ages and deliver
more toxic emission into the air than I think any
other company anywhere in this country.
Sasol
has
been
speaking
about
sustainable
development issues, but it has become urgent that
we sit down with people in Sasolburg and say that
we
are
not
going
to
tolerate
emissions
of
that
kind. It is affecting the lives of the poorest of
the
poor.
The
communities
around
Sasol
and
26 June 2001
Page 127 of 256
Sasolburg, like Sebokeng and Sharpeville, are the
ones that really suffer because of the emissions.
I
also
want
to
say
that
in
Gauteng
we
have
experienced a very high level of emissions arising
from
motor
probably
vehicles.
higher
Motor
than
vehicle
international
pollution
is
guidelines
in
the Gauteng area.
This goes for all the core areas in Gauteng: the
Greater Johannesburg area and Tshwane, Ekurhuleni
and the Sedibeng areas. It would be useful if the
department could have a look at what could be done
about
motor
vehicle
emissions
in
some
of
those
areas. I know that some of these are section 76
powers,
Minister
but
I
engages
think
with
it
is
important
provincial
that
the
departments
and
local authorities in order to do something about
some of these levels of pollution.
The fear that we have in Gauteng is that we will
become like Tokyo. When that city was not managing
its air pollution well, citizens used to go out
onto the streets wearing gas masks in order to make
26 June 2001
Page 128 of 256
sure that they could breathe properly. We know that
in Mexico on the news on television one gets the
weather report, the pollen report, and then they
also have to give air pollution reports so that
people can decide: ``Today it is better to stay
indoors and wear a mask and not go out.''
Fortunately, our region at the tip of Africa is
known as one of those parts of the world where
biodiversity, and so forth, is still strong. We are
probably one of the third most biodiverse countries
in the world. When one looks at Johannesburg and
Gauteng the picture is quite different and quite
bleak. It is very important that we address that.
The
reports
for
Egoli
2010
indicate
that
Johannesburg citizens at the moment spend some R280
million
every
preparations
infections.
year
to
These
for
help
over-the-counter
them
infections
with
seem
medical
respiratory
to
be
caused
primarily by air pollution. That is R280 million a
year!
26 June 2001
Page 129 of 256
We also know that one of the big culprits of air
pollution is energy and the way energy resources
are being used. Coal and coal burning is a big
issue. In the big houses, in the luxury townships,
we switch on a light and we think that everything
...
The CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES: Order, hon member,
your time is up.
Mr M V MOOSA: Chairperson, is my time up already?
[Laughter.]
I
spent
too
much
time
attacking
the
MEC. [Applause.]
Rev M CHABAKU: Chairperson, this day is specially
timed to have this plenary session in this House
when
it
is
the
46th
birthday
of
the
Freedom
Charter. So I say, happy birthday, Freedom Charter,
happy birthday! [Interjections.]
Haak Vrystaat! [Go, Free State!]
There is a Portuguese saying - and I will not say
it in Portuguese, although I do speak Portuguese -
26 June 2001
Page 130 of 256
that goes: ``Visits always give pleasure: if not
arrival, then the departure.''
On behalf of the Free State, I would like to convey
to the Minister that his recent visit to us gave
pleasure both in the arrival and in the departure.
The Free State is honoured to have been selected to
host the launch of Environment Week on 5 June this
year.
This
auspicious
historic
Batho
occasion
suburb
of
was
celebrated
Bloemfontein
in
the
where
the
ANC, of course, was founded in 1912. Minister Moosa
was able to pay a visit to the historic Mapikela
House, the home of the first treasurer-general of
the ANC. Local supporters in the crowd were very
excited to hear the announcement of the Clean City
competition by the Minister. Hence, the pleasure in
the departure, as many of the people hurried home
to begin working on plans to win the million which,
of
course,
is
a
challenge
to
the
rest
of
the
country. The Free State is determined to take the
kudos, of course.
26 June 2001
The
Free
tourism
Clean
Page 131 of 256
State's
has
City
also
department
accepted
concept.
In
of
the
fact,
environment
challenge
we
have
of
gone
and
the
even
further with the implementation of a pilot project
in Mangaung, Bloemfontein, which is supported by
the departments of local government and housing,
health and environment and tourism. This has been
named the Healthy City project.
As Free Staters, we are very concerned about the
problem
recent
of
toxic
occasions
materials
in
our
waste
we
have
transportation.
had
province.
spillage
Our
appeal
On
of
two
toxic
to
the
Minister is that the legislation in this regard be
revisited, given urgent attention and strengthened
where necessary.
Of grave concern to us is the lack of proper waste
dumping sites in many of our rural municipal areas.
A co-ordinated approach between the departments of
local government, water affairs and environmental
affairs could rectify this situation speedily. The
Department
directly
of
Health
involved
in
should
this
probably
interaction,
also
be
as
the
26 June 2001
number
of
Page 132 of 256
people
scratching
for
morsels
of
food
among the discarded waste appears to grow daily.
This will not only lead to the deterioration of our
health
standards,
but
most
certainly
will
discourage visitors to our smaller towns, which are
in dire need of that added income.
We in the Free State have great respect for the
Minister's handling of the tourism industry. His
decisive
decision-making
confidence
signing
of
to
the
innovative
impresses
and
gives
thinkers.
The
recent
Drakensberg-Lesotho
transfrontier
agreement is one such project. With the stroke of a
pen,
South
African
product
owners
and
tourism
innovators can legitimately engage in cross-border
initiatives to mutual benefit. An issue which still
needs attention, however, is how to speed up border
post crossings for tourists.
The Free State is grateful to the Minister for his
initiative in making Satour the mover and shaker
responsible for the generation of greater tourist
numbers
to
South
Africa,
leaving
provinces
to
improve tourism statistics in their own domain. For
26 June 2001
Page 133 of 256
the first time in three years, the Free State's
department
of
environment
and
tourism
has
the
funding available to implement projects within our
disadvantaged communities.
Currently, the Free State has a very active tourism
industry
centred
mainly
around
the
following:
privately owned game farms where game viewing, game
hunting and wing shooting safaris are available;
nature farms which offer hiking trails, overnight
facilities, horse riding, sailing, mountaineering,
fishing, 4x4 trails, ecotourism, historic sites and
San
paintings;
facilities,
provide
a
and
both
numerous
in
network
towns
of
bed
and
stopover
and
on
breakfast
farms,
places
for
which
weary
travellers.
The above facilities, however, are still largely in
the
hands
of
only
11%
of
the
province's
inhabitants. A huge challenge confronts the Free
State
MEC
and
the
department
of
environment
and
tourism to try to transform this ownership through
value
adding,
population
can
so
that
become
the
part
majority
of
this
of
the
industry,
26 June 2001
Page 134 of 256
without diminishing the role of the current product
owners.
A lack of knowledge regarding the spin-offs from
tourism and a clean environment for the province
and its people is still a problem. Rectifying this
problem
is
the
highest
challenge
facing
our
department in the Free State. This message has to
be
given
exposition
from
the
grass
roots
right
through to the highest level of function within the
province.
All
our
people
need
to
know,
to
be
reminded and reminded of the great opportunities
which benefit the province and its people if, as
individuals, they are prepared to become involved,
be it as goodwill ambassadors with smiles on their
faces, or as pickers up of all the rubbish and
cleaners of their own home environment.
Each and every one of us as South Africans can
contribute
to
making
our
areas
safer
and
more
tourist-friendly by talking to and sharing with our
friends and neighbours the importance of movement
and feeling secure for any visitors.
26 June 2001
Page 135 of 256
The dictionary defines a tourist as one who travels
for pleasure, usually, sightseeing and staying in
hotels.
This
definition
might
have
to
change
as
more and more of these tourists stay in guesthouses
and bed-and-breakfast facilities.
means,
on
the
other
hand,
This, of course,
that
not
only
big
businesses are benefiting from visitors, but also
an ordinary average person who has a home with a
room or bed to spare if he or she so wishes.
The
dictionary
also
says
that
a
tourist
is
any
person who travels, not only persons from another
country. More and more South Africans are choosing
to travel within the boundaries of this beautiful
land of ours. The more they travel and experience
the
differences
in
the
cultures
of
the
various
areas and local people, the more we should see a
greater
tolerance
amongst
our
and
diversely
understanding
developing
constitutionally
related
people. The standard of living is improving within
the disadvantaged communities through the ANC-led
Government's
resultant
implementation
infrastructure
of
its
improvement
policies.
is
The
creating
26 June 2001
new
Page 136 of 256
opportunities
for
even
more
cross-culture
initiatives.
There are many people and student exchanges into
and
from
African
our
very
exchange
communities.
system
A
supported
truly
by
South
business,
Government and communities could further fast-track
the demolition of racism, misconceptions and fear.
One
does
not
have
to
rewrite
a
book.
Continued
support of and further implementation of the wellestablished AFS interculture-type programmes could
be used.
I truly believe that such a system could accelerate
the
united
would
like
South
to
African
see.
society
School
so
many
pupils,
of
us
students,
professionals and all other people interested in
broadening their life experience within our country
could participate. George Bernard Shaw said that
there
are
only
two
qualities
in
the
world,
efficiency and inefficiency, and only two sorts of
people, the efficient and the inefficient. There is
still too much inefficiency in South Africa, and in
the Free State too, for us to be able to capture a
26 June 2001
big
enough
Page 137 of 256
section
of
the
huge
financial
opportunities generated by international tourism.
Only yesterday, it took one woman more than five
phone calls and longer than half an hour to make a
reservation at a leading hotel for a single night's
booking. [Interjections.]
The CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES: Order! Carry on, hon
member.
Rev M CHABAKU: Is there curry?
The CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES: Order! I said, carry
on, hon member.
Rev M CHABAKU: I thought that the Chairperson said
that there was curry. [Interjections.]
Only yesterday, it took more than five phone calls
and longer than half an hour to make a reservation
at a leading hotel for a single night's booking.
What kind of impression does this make on visitors
from overseas? Nobody can allow opportunities to
26 June 2001
slip
Page 138 of 256
through
their
inefficiency.
Urgent
fingers
because
attention
also
of
needs
sheer
to
be
given to the agricultural and ...
The CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES: Order! Hon member,
your time is up.
Rev M CHABAKU: Chairperson, this was on behalf of
my MEC, who, at the last moment, could not come. I
tried my best. [Applause.]
Mr D M KGWARE: Chairperson, hon Minister, members
from the provinces and colleagues, I am standing in
the shoes of my MEC, Dawid Rooi. I would like to
just
raise
programmes
issues
since
we
around
have
the
already
environmental
touched
on
the
tourism. I will also have to leave some of the
issues because I have 14 points that I just want to
raise for the sake of the department.
Regarding
directorate
staff
had
and
to
budgetary
cope
with
constraints,
serious
the
staff
and
budgetary constraints during the past two financial
years,
1999-2000
and
2000-01.
A
total
staff
26 June 2001
Page 139 of 256
complement of only three environmental officers has
dealt with environmental issues ranging from waste
management and pollution control to environmental
impact
assessment
reports
and
applications,
the
evaluation of mining and prospecting environmental
management ...
Mr M V MOOSA: Chairperson, on a point of order:
Will the hon member take a message back to his MEC
that
Gauteng
Northern
will
Cape
so
sell
that
all
its
waste
to
they
can
improve
the
their
budget? [Laughter.]
Mr D M KGWARE: No, we do not want it.
The CHAIRPERSON OF COMMITTEES: Order! Hon member
over there, please sit down.
Mr
D
M
KGWARE:
Chairperson,
a
total
staff
complement of only three environmental officers has
dealt
with
issues
community-based
such
as
coastal
environmental
management,
awareness
and
education campaigns, asbestos, asbestosis and the
London court case on asbestosis compensation. These
26 June 2001
Page 140 of 256
are a number of the areas that the directorate is
dealing with.
The budget to carry out this function has also been
limited to R1,2 million and R950 000 in the two
years, 1999-2000 and 2000-01, respectively.
Regarding
links
provincial
with
the
directorate
head
of
office,
environment
the
and
conservation could not effectively and adequately
link up with the head office in Pretoria. As a
result, most inputs which head office required the
province to address were not attended to. That has
been mentioned in paragraph 2 above.
The Orange River Mouth at Alexander Bay was long
declared a Ramsar site by the Ramsar convention.
However, the site lost its status because of the
negative impacts on it from the mining, flooding,
etc of the Orange River.
Plans
were,
original
however,
Ramsar
site
under
status
way
of
to
the
restore
the
mouth
and
26 June 2001
Page 141 of 256
transfer the overall management to the directorate
in the year 2002-03.
Regarding
the
together
transfrontier
with
the
conservation
Namibian
area,
counterparts,
the
Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism's
head
office
intends
to
declare
the
Ais-Ais
Fish
River National Park in Namibia and the Richtersveld
National
Park
particular,
tourism
in
this
South
move
industry
conservation
Africa
as
aimed
at
is
and
management
the
in
a
TFCA.
boosting
environmental
the
area.
In
the
and
Eventually,
the Orange River Mouth Ramsar site will be part of
the planned TFCA which will be managed jointly by
South Africa and Namibia.
Regarding coastal management, the Northern Cape has
nearly
380
km
of
coastal
line
on
the
Atlantic
Ocean. Management of the coast is handled by the
province
on
behalf
of
the
Marine
and
Coastal
Management Directorate in Cape Town.
Coastal
cleanup
provincial
job
projects
creation
which
and
are
poverty
part
of
the
alleviation
26 June 2001
Page 142 of 256
campaign will be implemented in due course from a
British aid package to South Africa.
Nine
communities
of
municipalities
have
been
identified for the implementation of the cleanup
project
in
Calvinia,
Garies,
the
province.
Sutherland,
Groblershoop,
These
Loxton,
Prieska,
communities
Klipfontein
Kimberley
are
near
Landfill
Site, Colesberg and Noupoort.
It is planned that in each community 50 men and
women will be employed on a short-term basis for
three
months
at
R30
per
person
per
day.
The
implementation starts on 1 July 2001. This project
is part of the premier's poverty alleviation and
job creation programme in the province.
Regarding waste management and the third tier of
Government,
most
municipalities
and
local
government district councils in the third sphere of
government have failed to cope with the demands for
sound waste management practice within their area
of jurisdiction, and I think that the Minister has
already mentioned that.
26 June 2001
All
Page 143 of 256
environmental
projects
require
appropriate
programmes
sustainable.
conservation
programmes
capacity-building
dedicated
in
personnel,
management
through
environmental
education
for
The
directorate:environment
building
educational
to
their
order
is
them
succeed
in-house
materials
and
and
strengths
and
be
and
in
budgetary
provision for this exercise.
Regarding
asbestos
and
asbestosis,
the
Northern
Cape is bearing the negative impacts and brunt of
previous asbestos mining in the province.
The Department of Minerals and Energy is currently
rehabilitating derelict asbestos mines and the live
asbestos
dumps
within
former
mining
perimeters
which are contaminated. Areas outside the mining
boundaries
are
currently
not
covered
by
that
department.
We also have the remote granite and nuclear waste
area
of
Namaqualand.
In
the
province
this
is
currently used as a subterranean disposal site of
nuclear waste from the South African nuclear power
26 June 2001
Page 144 of 256
plant stations. This province has no expertise or
facilities
for
the
effective
monitoring
of
this
type of radioactive waste disposal.
Geological and geophysical prospecting and drilling
in the Atlantic Ocean have led to the recovery of a
commercial deposit of gas and petroleum, nearly 80
km
from
the
coast
at
Hondeklipbaai.
Full-scale
production of oil and gas is expected to commence
in 2003. Environmental impacts of this industrial
activity will have to be managed in a sound manner.
Regarding the monitoring of environmental impacts
of the developmental projects, all development has
such impacts, either in the short term or in the
long term. It is imperative that the impacts should
be
monitored
appropriate
regularly,
remedial
so
that,
measures
can
if
be
need
be,
effected
timeously. The Northern Cape has unfortunately, due
to
personnel
and
budgetary
constraints,
never
carried out an effective monitoring role, in spite
of the mandate it has to do so.
26 June 2001
In
Page 145 of 256
conclusion,
the
challenges
that
the
Northern
Cape faces in handling environmental issues within
its boundaries are daunting but manageable. Given
the appropriate budgetary provisions and logistical
support in personnel and equipment, it will be easy
to
ensure
that
a
regulatory
framework
on
sound
environmental management is upheld. With time we
will cope and exceed even better.
Chief M L MOKOENA: Chairperson, there is something
fishy.
Like
the
hon
Moosa,
I
am
terribly
disappointed by some comments made by the hon MEC
from the Western Cape, who, instead of coming up
with suggestions or solutions, chose to attack and
accuse
the
Minister
and
his
department
for
not
doing enough. What a pity. Unfortunately, he was
just preaching to the converted and, maybe to try
to respond to what he said, will make people not
notice
the
difference.
The
select
committee
undertook a study tour to Kalk Bay, Hout Bay and
Saldanha
Bay
on
24
May
2001,
as
part
of
our
oversight function. The main aim of this tour was
to do the inspection in loco, after the committee
26 June 2001
received
Page 146 of 256
some
complaints
from
people
in
those
areas.
We carefully listened to what people had to say.
After those meetings, a report was compiled and a
copy thereof was sent to the department for their
scrutiny and response. We are happy and delighted
to learn that the department has started addressing
some of the issues raised. The impossible is often
the
untried.
I
am
not
going
to
fathom
this
industry, because we will be discussing the issue
with the department immediately after adjournment.
What
makes
political
me
sick
parties
and
is
the
behaviour
politicians,
like
of
some
the
hon
Adams, who now want to use the frustrations and
desperation
of
our
people
to
score
political
points. It pains me to know that the very same
people did not care a damn about the plight of our
people in the past. Now they want to be seen as
people
who
are
fighting
and
championing
cause. What a shame! [Interjections.]
their
26 June 2001
Page 147 of 256
The question is: Where were they all this time?
They had all the time in the world to rectify and
correct this mess created by their regime. Instead,
they did not. They were just sleeping and snoring.
[Laughter.] Let them be warned that we are watching
them.
I would like to thank the hon the Minister and his
department for the rehabilitation of
mine dumps.
The programme will save many lives. It is pleasing
to
know
that
waste
management
is
high
on
the
department's agenda. Another worrying factor is to
realise that many factories do not use designated
spots or areas for dumping. They use any available
open space for dumping. I can only urge the hon the
Minister to be very hard on them. In mining, we
have
direct
beneficiaries.
beneficiaries
Can
I
find
out
and
from
the
indirect
hon
the
Minister what role is played by mining companies
and
the
Department
of
Minerals
and
Energy,
when
mining dumps are rehabilitated? I do not think it
is fair for the Department of Environmental Affairs
and Tourism to carry this burden alone.
26 June 2001
Page 148 of 256
Let me thank the hon the Minister for a job well
done,
informally
recognising
tourist
guides.
Legislation to this effect was passed last year. In
the past nobody cared about them. I would like to
urge
the
departments
to
make
sure
that
these
tourist guides are properly trained to enable them
to market our country, because we will know that if
one shoots at the moon, even if one misses, one is
still high.
It
is
just
unfortunate
that
we
could
meet
SA
National Parks. We would love to engage them about
some activities in our parks. Hopefully, when we
come back from our recess we will meet to look into
some
of
these
Minister
tell
various
me
how
issues.
far
Can
we
the
are
hon
with
the
the
transformation or realignment of this section? The
attitude of some officials in this section leaves
much to be desired. There are some officials who
behave
as
if
these
parks
are
now
their
family
property. Trouble usually starts like fun. Maybe I
should just leave it there, hoping that when we
meet, some of these issues will be clarified. My
26 June 2001
Page 149 of 256
policy is: Just tolerate imperfect friends, because
perfect friends do not exist.
With this dynamic, vibrant and humble Minister and
his department's policy, the ANC will find it very
difficult not to support his Budget Vote. I wonder
what would have happened by now if the ANC was not
in charge. For the first time in the history of
this
country,
our
people
are
in
warm,
safe
and
reliable hands. The ANC fully supports this Vote
and congratulates the Minister on a job well done.
[Applause.]
The MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND TOURISM:
Mr
Chairperson,
many
issues
have
been
raised
in
this debate, and I would like to thank the many
participants who have obviously put in quite a lot
of time and energy to prepare for the debate. As a
result of the many issues that have been raised, I
do hope that I will be able to respond to them in
the time allotted to me, and that with the hon
chairperson having just taken the chair and being
full of energy, he might not be in a hurry to call
me to order when my time has expired. [Laughter.] I
26 June 2001
Page 150 of 256
do not know if the Rules allow for pleading from
the microphone.
Let me start off by expressing my gratitude to Rev
Peter Moatshe, the chairperson, who has made the
important
point
that
many
of
the
black-owned
emerging enterprises - SMMEs - are having a great
deal
of
difficulty
getting
on
their
feet
as
a
result of a whole range of factors, one of which is
the red tape.
I think this is an important point, because it is
one
thing
tourism
to
encourage
business
and
blacks
become
to
part
get
of
into
the
the
tourism
economy. Creating the actual environment for that
to work is another, because at the end of the day,
if
one
opens
up
a
bed-and-breakfast
place
or
something of that sort, or a curio shop, or a small
hotel or whatever, one will need somebody to come
and stay there. One will need a sign on the road
that says ``hotel'', or ``bed and breakfast in this
direction''. One will need to be featured on maps
and all of those sorts of things. One will need the
26 June 2001
banks
to
Page 151 of 256
co-operate
with
one
because
tourism
businesses typically go through cycles.
Unfortunately,
cyclical
in
patterns
our
country
which
we
we
still
are
have
trying
the
to
do
without. During peak periods there is a clutter of
business and then during off-seasons there is no
money coming in for the business at all. One needs
the
co-operation
of
banks,
often
for
cash-flow
problems that arise as a result of this.
This
is
a
problem.
We
have
been
working
very
closely with the Business Trust in this regard. The
Business Trust has now started what is called the
enterprise development programme and allocated an
amount, if I am not wrong, of about R60 million to
that programme. The aim of the programme is just to
help businesses get on their feet. It is not to
loan money, put up infrastructure or anything of
that sort. But where somebody has set up a small
business,
it
gets
that
business
on
its
feet
by
making all of the right sorts of connections and by
giving training, for example, to the owner if the
person needs training, and such sort of backup. It
26 June 2001
Page 152 of 256
is aimed precisely at that. The department tells me
that
many
thousands
of
real
businesses
will
be
created in the next few years as a result of this
programme, so it is quite an important programme.
That
there
are
distortions
in
the
tourism
infrastructure is, again, a fair point - I think and it is something that we are looking at. The
department has got what it refers to as the patis,
the priority areas for tourism infrastructure or
something. I do not know exactly what it stands
for.
They
have
many
acronyms.
But
they
have
identified a number of priority areas around the
country
for
This
where
is
tourism
the
infrastructure
infrastructure
development.
funds
will
be
directed over the next few years.
We
are
National
also
involved
Treasury
in
to
discussions
direct
some
with
the
of
the
infrastructure funds that the Minister of Finance
announced
during
his
presentation
of
the
Budget
into that fund. We are working very closely with
the Minister of Transport and the province to get
the N2 road through the Wild Coast finally built.
26 June 2001
Page 153 of 256
The Minister of Transport has reported to me that
everything is in place for the construction of that
road to get going. He and I will be going on a site
visit within the next few weeks.
As far as the reports on SA National Parks are
concerned,
I
must
tell
the
hon
Conroy
that
SA
National Parks, like other conservation agencies in
our country, does go through financial difficulties
from time to time and it is no secret that it is
going
must
through
say
financial
that
much
of
newspapers
has
tended
hyperbolic.
Like
any
difficulties.
the
to
However,
reporting
be
business
I
in
the
inaccurate
and
enterprise
or
any
institution, one may find, from time to time, that
one is overstaffed and has got to shed staff.
It happens in the Public Service and in private
business, and it will happen in the parks. At times
one absorbs staff and at times has to let go of the
staff,
and
the
parks
in
some
areas
are
in
the
process of letting go of staff. One would not find
a person who is being retrenched thanking the boss
very much, thanking him or her for retrenching him,
26 June 2001
Page 154 of 256
saying that the boss is doing the right thing and
that he or she agrees with the boss's strategy. One
will not find that. One is obviously going to find
such a person saying that without him or her this
park
is
going
to
collapse
and
is
going
to
be
destroyed. That is what workers who get retrenched
anywhere and in any sector would say. I think one
should take it with a pinch of salt. But that is
not to say that SA National Parks is flush with
money.
It
is
department
Treasury
is
and
in
financial
working
the
very
parks
in
difficulties.
closely
order
to
My
with
the
ensure
that
those financial difficulties do not result in any
serious problems as such.
We see it essentially as a cash-flow problem, which
arose as a result of a number of factors, one of
which
was
the
dip
in
the
tourism
numbers,
particularly to the Kruger National Park, which is
the
biggest
During
the
collapsed
parks
in
income
period
driver
of
completely
quite
a
the
and
in
SA
floods
that
difficult
National
tourism
put
the
position.
Parks.
numbers
national
The
second
matter that caused the problem was the doing away
26 June 2001
with
of
Page 155 of 256
what
used
to
be
called
the
transport
subsidy to the national parks for the maintenance
of
the
roads
and
such
things.
But
we
are
in
discussions now with Treasury to reinstate some of
those subsidies. We are also in discussion with SA
National Parks to put in place whatever systems are
needed
to
get
it
on
its
feet.
So
there
is
no
crisis, I must assure hon members, because I think
South Africans have the national parks very close
to their hearts. It is important for us to say that
there is no crisis.
Recently, when the President went to examine some
of the reconstruction work that was done after the
floods in the Kruger National Park and surrounding
areas, he addressed a gathering at Skukuza in the
Kruger National Park. I would want to refer hon
members to his speech - one should get it on his
website - where he spoke about how Government sees
the
that
national
we
parks.
have
protection,
no
the
He
doubt
made
it
in
our
safeguarding
and
absolutely
clear
minds
that
the
upkeep
the
of
national parks must remain one of the priorities of
26 June 2001
the
Page 156 of 256
Government.
We
will
do
everything
to
ensure
that they do remain the jewels that they are.
An important point was made by Mrs Z T Sebekedi
about domestic tourism. I think this is a point we
should not underestimate, that is the importance of
domestic visitors within the tourism economy as a
whole.
While
we
international
do
everything
visitors,
to
domestic
encourage
tourism
will
always be the most reliable source for our tourism
industry.
International
tourist
numbers,
as
has
been said quite correctly, can easily fluctuate,
and
on
a
happening.
huge
If,
scale,
for
depending
example,
the
on
economy
what
is
of
the
source market collapses, one is going to find fewer
tourists coming, or if we get some bad publicity,
there would be fewer tourists coming. But domestic
tourists are always reliable. If there are floods
in
Mozambique,
domestic
tourists
will
not
say,
``This year we are not going to Cape Town,'' as
international
tourists
do.
cancel
trips
Cape
their
to
International
Town
when
tourists
there
are
floods in Mozambique, because they do not really
understand the geography of the place. So we must
26 June 2001
Page 157 of 256
do everything to grow domestic tourism, and I hope
that we will succeed in doing that.
Regarding the question raised by the hon Versfeld,
the erosion at Langebaan is a matter which we need
to look into quite seriously. We must bear in mind
that these sorts of occurrences are often a result
of poor planning and bad development, although, as
the member has pointed out quite correctly, natural
causes also are a cause, but often it is just poor
planning and bad management.
We now have the National Environmental Management
Act in place, and one of the things that we can say
is that in future such things will certainly be
avoided.
My
department
would
be
interested
in
playing a role in the rehabilitation of the beach
there, and I am informed by the department that we
have not received any proposal as such from either
the
municipality
or
the
province,
and
we
would
interact with the province in this regard to see
what steps can be taken.
26 June 2001
Page 158 of 256
Usually in situations like those, the department
would get a request from either the province or the
municipality and we would then try to look at where
we can find the resources and what steps can be
taken.
I must agree with the hon Vilakazi that all of the
hon members here, when they rise on Thursday, would
be taking a long and extended holiday. After what
we heard about the Northern Province, perhaps that
is where we should go in order to promote tourism
in that province.
On the remarks of the MEC Glen Adams there have
already been responses to those, but let me say
that the uncharacteristic belligerence of MEC Adams
may
be
based
on
a
lack
of
information
or
on
inaccurate information. Firstly, I must say that
prior to 1994 the poor people living in fishing
villages
along
the
coast
had
absolutely
no
say
whatsoever in the fishing industry. They were cut
out and thus were not part of fishing at all. After
1994 this portfolio fell into the hands of somebody
from the MEC's own alliance, during the time of the
26 June 2001
Government
Page 159 of 256
of
National
Unity,
when
the
NP
was
running this portfolio.
It was only much later then when my predecessor, Dr
Pallo Jordan, came into this post that the Marine
Living Resources Act was passed, and the process of
transformation and that of attending to the needs
of the poor had begun. Legislation was in place
when I came into this portfolio which started the
process of actual implementation as such.
During the time when the MEC's alliance partner was
in government, as anybody can tell the MEC, the
actual
substance
something
that
of
the
was
fishing
completely
industry
was
neglected
and
misunderstood by the NP government.
So what is it that we have done? There has been a
great
deal
of
transformation
over
the
past
few
years in terms of the ownership patterns of the big
companies.
In
terms
of
blacks
gaining
equity
in
some of the big companies, there has been a great
deal of transformation. Secondly, when it comes to
the allocation of quotas to new entrants, a very
26 June 2001
Page 160 of 256
large number, in fact over 50% of all of the quota
holders, now are people who were not in business
before 1994. All of these are new quota holders.
They are not all big and successful, but they are
new quota holders. The MEC might not have known
about that.
When it comes to the subsistence fisheries, for the
first
time
this
year
we
were
able
to
issue
subsistence permits all along the coast. In places
like the West Coast, for the first time in their
lives, women were directly given permits to harvest
fish. If one had gone to visit the people in Elands
Bay, Lambert's Bay or Doring Bay, and places like
those, those women would say that it was not even
in their dreams that one day they would be given
permits to fish. Perhaps the MEC did not have all
of this information.
Regarding poverty relief, last year my department
spent
R70 million
directly
on
poverty
relief
projects, and I am not talking about fishing. That
is
putting
money
into
the
pockets
of
the
poor
people doing a whole range of different sorts of
26 June 2001
projects.
Page 161 of 256
This
year
we
will
be
spending
R99 million, and if one takes the trouble to look
at
the
MTEF
R175 million
is
one
will
earmarked
see
for
that
my
next
year
department
to
spend directly on poverty relief projects.
In my main presentation I spoke about the Coast
Care programme and various others. All of those are
poverty relief projects, and, for the first time,
we actually have some injection of money going into
these poor coastal areas. It is something that has
never happened before. Then I must say that the
MEC's attempt to quote my speech in the National
Assembly was a bit of a failure because he quoted
me incorrectly.
What I was saying about the Huxley commission was
that they adopted the view that the observations of
the ordinary fishermen were not important. That is
a point that I was making. I was saying that we
must not make the same mistake ourselves.
What the MEC also does is he presents a very empty
intellectualist approach. The MEC says, ``Let us
26 June 2001
Page 162 of 256
listen to the ordinary people, let us not read big
books.'' That is what the MEC says. Firstly, Mr
Adams must be told that I do not need him to tell
me to be in touch with the ordinary people. I can
assure him that I have been in touch with them and
I am in touch with more ordinary people, not only
along the coast, but all over the country, than he
will frankly ever be for the rest of his life,
because that is all that I have done.
The MEC attacked an intellectual tradition which
exists, I must say, within the ruling party, but
certainly within my department also; one which we
are proud of. Our scientists in the department do
read big books and we are not ashamed of that. I
will tell the MEC why. That is because in countries
where they have not managed their fishing stocks on
a
proper
today.
In
scientific
South
basis,
Africa,
they
our
are
hake
suffering
stocks
are
increasing. Last year, we granted a total allowable
catch of 155 000 tons. This year, it went up to 166
000 tons. Some of the big stocks - apart from those
that
are
being
poached,
like
abalone
pelagics, hake, etc, are increasing.
-
like
26 June 2001
In
Europe,
Page 163 of 256
the
catch
is
decreasing.
The
caught
stocks had to be cut by about 50%, and if the MEC
had completed the speech he was quoting, he would
have seen that. As a result of that, the fishing
fleets in Europe are at a standstill right now.
That is because we are serious about what we do. We
want to engage in rigorous intellectual activity on
which we base our policies, and that is something
that I would really recommend to the Western Cape.
I
think
that
if
they
develop
an
intellectual
tradition in the Western Cape, they will not be
sorry about that.
On the comments of the hon Sulliman, I must say
that I am one of those who adopt the view that the
Northern Cape has lots and lots of potential for
tourism, especially if one takes into account that
it is a very big province from a geographical point
of view, and it has a relatively small and sparse
population.
Growth in tourism could make a very big difference
to the socioeconomic standards of the population in
the Northern Cape. I was in Namibia recently and
26 June 2001
Page 164 of 256
had discussions with my counterpart there. We hope
that
very
shortly
agreement
for
we
will
the
Richtersveld-Ais-Ais
be
able
to
establishment
Transfrontier
sign
the
of
the
Conservation
Area in order to boost tourism in that part of
Southern Africa even more.
The point which Mr McKenzie made about the need for
co-operation
with
communities
which
are
next
to
parks is well taken. I think that it is something
that we will have to work on an ongoing basis.
The hon Durr raised interesting suggestions about
the
West
Coast
National
Park.
I
certainly
found
that interesting and I think that it is a matter
that we will certainly pursue for the consolidation
of the area. It may well appear to members and me
that the parcel of land which the SANDF has under
its control currently is not really needed by them,
but I can assure hon members that when my directorgeneral speaks to the generals, they will have very
complex and complicated reasons why they need it.
But it is something worth pursuing, I think.
26 June 2001
Page 165 of 256
The hon Silke spoke about the airlines policy, and
this
is
a
department
matter
and
that
the
we
are
Department
seized
of
with.
Transport
My
are
interacting very regularly. It is a very difficult
situation.
thought,
It
once
is
one
not
as
gets
simple
into
the
and
easy
bowels
as
of
I
the
problem, but it is certainly something that needs
to addressed.
His
sentiments
were,
in
a
certain
sense,
also
shared by the President in his state-of-the-nation
address,
when
he
said
that
this
year
we
must
increase airline frequencies and capacity into and
out of South Africa. It is something that we are
working on.
As far as the work of South African tourism is
concerned, I must tell him that, notwithstanding
the observations that he has made, the observation
that
has
been
made
by
the
industry
and
people
around the world, is that SA Tourism is doing much
better than it has ever done before. In fact, it
has come out of a very old archaic way of working
and transformed itself into a modern organisation.
26 June 2001
Page 166 of 256
Let me assure hon members that there are some very
hard-working
representatives
of
SA
Tourism
in
various parts of the world who are doing excellent
work.
Much
more
needs
to
be
done,
there
is
no
question about that. But I do think that quite a
good
job
is
being
done,
under
very
difficult
circumstances. [Time expired.] [Applause.]
Debate concluded.
AIRPORTS COMPANY AMENDMENT BILL
(Consideration of Bill and of Report thereon)
Ms P C P MAJODINA: Chairperson, hon members, the
object of the Airports Company Amendment Bill is to
effect a minor change to and remove an irregularity
in the Airports Company Act.
In terms of the current Airports Company Act, the
Airports Company of South Africa, generally known
as Acsa, is granted a five-year permission to levy
charges
related
to
airport
core
activities.
[Interjections.] Being in a minority is not nice.
26 June 2001
The
DEPUTY
Page 167 of 256
CHAIRPERSON
OF
COMMITTEES:
Order!
continue, hon member.
Ms
P
C
those
P
MAJODINA:
activities
Airport
that
core
are
activities
essential
to
are
the
functioning of the airport, such as runway fees.
However,
such
they
as
do
not
commercial
include
businesses
incidental
located
matters
at
the
that
the
airport.
Section
12(11)(a)
of
the
Act
states
regulating committee may, after consultation with
Acsa
and
other
interested
parties,
amend
any
condition of the permission given to Acsa to levy
airport charges, with the approval of the Minister
of Transport and Acsa. The proposed amendment seeks
to remove the anomaly of the regulating committee
having to consult with Acsa regarding a proposed
change of condition and then having to obtain the
approval of Acsa and the Minister of Transport.
In terms of the amendment, the regulating committee
will no longer have to obtain the approval of Acsa,
26 June 2001
Page 168 of 256
but it will still have to consult with the company
on any proposed changes. [Applause.]
Debate concluded.
Declaration of vote:
Dr P J C NEL: Chairperson, the New NP believes that
although the amendment is regulatory in nature, it
is
an
important
piece
of
legislation.
The
Bill
serves to amend the Airports Company Act of 1993,
so as to make new provisions for the amendment of
the
conditions
of
the
permission
issued
to
the
Airports Company to levy airport charges, with the
approval
of
the
Minister
of
Transport
and
the
company.
Previously
the
Act
required
the
regulatory
committee to consult with the company and to obtain
the approval of the company, as well as that of the
Minister.
The
effect
of
the
amendment
is
that
although the regulating committee will still have
to consult with the Airports Company on any change
26 June 2001
Page 169 of 256
to levies, it will not have to obtain the company's
approval.
My party believes that this is a sensible ruling,
and therefore supports the Bill. [Applause.]
Bill agreed to in accordance with section 75 of the
Constitution.
ROAD ACCIDENT FUND AMENDMENT BILL
(Consideration of Bill and of Report thereon)
Ms P C P MAJODINA: Chairperson, being a chairperson
means one can speak twice in a Chamber.
Road
safety
programmes
have
become
indispensable
tools in our fight to limit the expenses incurred
by
the
Government
financial
costs
in
dealing
resulting
with
from
the
road
enormous
accidents.
Every year the Government has to allocate huge sums
of money as a result of a large number of road
accidents.
The
money
we
spend
in
response
to
accidents could be put to better use in addressing
26 June 2001
Page 170 of 256
some of our more pressing social problems, such as
poverty alleviation.
Furthermore, the large number of road accidents has
wider
social
strain
on
implications.
our
health
It
system,
places
with
many
enormous
victims
needing expensive treatment, such as surgery over
an extended period. It also impacts negatively on
our
economic
growth
through
the
reduced
productivity of victims who need weeks and months
to recuperate before they can resume work.
To reduce our expenses incurred as a result of road
accidents, we need to spend more money on their
prevention. For this reason, we should welcome the
Road Accident Fund Amendment Bill. The Bill seeks
to amend the Road Accident Fund Act in order to
authorise a fund to make financial contributions to
road safety programmes and projects approved by the
Minister
of
Transport,
such
as
the
Arrive
Alive
campaign.
Although the impact of this amendment may not be
felt immediately, it will have a number of positive
26 June 2001
spin-offs
Page 171 of 256
in
provinces,
the
but
long
also
term,
not
the
Road
for
only
for
the
Accident
Fund
itself. [Interjections.] Liyangxola eli lungu. [The
hon member is making a noise.]
Provinces
Alive
will
campaign
be
able
budgets
to
augment
with
funds
their
Arrive
obtained
from
this fund. These funds will in turn be used to
increase motorists' awareness of road safety and to
encourage them and pedestrians to observe all road
traffic
measures.
The
effects
of
an
increased
observance of road safety measures will mean fewer
road
accidents
which,
in
turn,
will
reduce
the
number of claims brought before the Road Accident
Fund. This amendment will clearly result in a winwin situation for everybody involved in road safety
and should be supported by all of us. [Applause.]
Debate concluded.
Declaration of vote:
Dr
P
beskou
J
C
die
NEL:
Mnr
die
Voorsitter,
wysigingswetsontwerp
as
die
Nuwe
wenslik
NP
omdat
26 June 2001
Page 172 of 256
die stuk wetgewing nou aan die Padongelukfonds die
bevoegdheid
verleen
om
bydraes
te
maak
tot
padveiligheidsprojekte en -programme wat deur die
Minister goedgekeur is. Tot dusver was alle bydraes
wat
die
Padongelukfonds
byvoorbeeld
tot
die
Kom
Veilig Daar-veldtog gemaak het onwettig aangesien
daar
geen
voorsiening
daarvoor
in
die
Padongelukfondswet van 1996 gemaak is nie.
Dit is nie 'n gesonde toedrag van sake nie. As in
ag geneem word dat sowat 10 000 mense jaarliks hul
lewe op ons paaie verloor en die totale beraamde
uitgawe vir die staat as gevolg van padongelukke
waarin derduisende mense beseer en vermink word in
die
jaar
2000
R13,8
miljard
beloop
het,
is
dit
nodig dat alle projekte wat deur die departement
geloods word, uit alle oorde ondersteun behoort te
word.
My party wil die hoop uitspreek dat die Departement
van Vervoer alles in sy vermoë sal doen om die
Padongelukfonds, wat tans teen 'n geweldige verlies
van R10,48 miljard funksioneer, so spoedig moontlik
op 'n gesonde sakegrondslag te plaas. Dit is nodig
26 June 2001
Page 173 of 256
om die fonds in staat te stel om 'n substansiële
belegging in veiligheidsprojekte te maak.
Dit is ook belangrik dat dié beleggings dividende
sal
oplewer
vermindering
in
in
die
vorm
van
'n
ongelukeise
wat
teen
aansienlike
die
fonds
ingestel word.
Die
Nuwe
NP
(Translation
steun
of
die
wetsontwerp.
Afrikaans
[Applous.]
declaration
of
vote
follows.)
[Dr P J C NEL: Mr Chairperson, the New NP regards
the amendment Bill as expedient because this piece
of
legislation
will
now
grant
the
Road
Accident
Fund the power to make contributions to road safety
projects and programmes which have been approved by
the Minister. Thus far all contributions made by
the Road Accident Fund, for example, to the Arrive
Alive campaign, were regarded as illegal because no
provision was made for this in the Road Accident
Fund Act of 1996.
26 June 2001
Page 174 of 256
This is not a healthy state of affairs. If one
takes into account that approximately 10 000 people
die
on
our
estimated
billion
cost
in
accidents
roads
for
the
in
annually
the
year
which
and
state
2000
that
the
total
to
R13,8
amounted
as
a
thousands
result
upon
of
road
thousands
of
people are injured and disabled, it is necessary
that
all
projects
which
are
launched
by
the
that
the
department should be supported by everyone.
My
party
wishes
to
express
the
hope
Department of Transport will do everything in its
power to bring the Road Accident Fund to a sound
business foundation as quickly as possible, because
currently it is functioning at an enormous loss of
R10,48
fund
billion.
to
make
This
is
necessary
substantial
to
investments
enable
in
the
safety
projects.
It is also important that these investments yield
dividends in the form of a substantial reduction in
accident claims which are lodged against the fund.
The New NP supports this Bill. [Applause.]]
26 June 2001
Page 175 of 256
Bill agreed to in accordance with section 75 of the
Constitution.
The Council adjourned at 17:21.
__________
ANNOUNCEMENTS, TABLINGS AND COMMITTEE REPORTS
MONDAY, 25 JUNE 2001
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
National
Assembly
and
National
Council
of
(JTM)
25
Provinces:
1.
The Speaker and the Chairperson:
(1) The
Joint
Tagging
Mechanism
on
June 2001 in terms of Joint Rule 160(6),
classified the following Bill as a money
Bill:
26 June 2001
Page 176 of 256
(i) Revenue
Laws
Amendment
Bill
[B
36
-
2001] (National Assembly - sec 77).
TABLINGS:
National
Assembly
and
National
Council
of
Provinces:
Papers:
1.
The Minister of Finance:
Explanatory
Memorandum
on
the
Revenue
Laws
Amendment Bill, 2001 [WP 2-2001].
2.
The
Minister
for
Justice
and
Constitutional
Development:
(1) Government Notice No R.354 published in the
Government Gazette No 22239 dated 20 April
2001,
Amendment
of
Regulations,
made
in
terms of 81(2) of the Attorneys Act, 1979
(Act No 53 of 1979).
26 June 2001
Page 177 of 256
(2) Government Notice No R.373 published in the
Government Gazette No 22265 dated 30 April
2001, Rules regulating the conduct of the
proceedings of the various Provincial and
Local Divisions of the High Court of South
Africa:
Repeal
of
Rule
37A,
and
Transitional Provisions, made in terms of
section 6 of the Rules Board for Courts of
Law Act, 1985 (Act No 107 of 1985).
(3) Proclamation
No
R.28
published
in
the
Government Gazette No 22247 dated 20 April
2001,
Commencement
of
section
4
of
the
Criminal Procedure Amendment Act, 1997 (Act
No 76 of 1997) from 20 April 2001.
(4) Government Notice No 898 published in the
Government Gazette No 22250 dated 20 April
2001,
Directives
under
section
4
of
the
Criminal Procedure Amendment Act, 1997 (Act
No 76 of 1997).
(5) Proclamation
No
R.29
published
in
the
Government Gazette No 22261 dated 30 April
26 June 2001
Page 178 of 256
2001, Extension of the period of operation
of sections 51 and 52 of the Criminal Law
Amendment Act, 1997 (Act No 105 of 1997),
made
in
terms
of
section
53(2)
of
the
Criminal Law Amendment Act, 1997 (Act No
105 of 1997).
(6) Government Notice No R.423 published in the
Government Gazette No
22284 dated 18 May
2001, Regulations in terms of the National
Prosecuting
terms
of
Authority
section
40
Act,
1998,
read
with
made
in
sections
16(3) and 25(2) of the National Prosecuting
Authority Act, 1998 (Act No 32 of 1998).
(7) Proclamation
No
R.31
published
in
the
Government Gazette No 22333 dated 28 May
2001,
Dissolution
of
the
Committee
on
Amnesty, made in terms of section 43(2) of
the
Promotion
Reconciliation
1995).
of
Act,
National
1995
(Act
Unity
No
34
and
of
26 June 2001
3.
The
Page 179 of 256
Minister
of
Environmental
Affairs
and
Tourism:
Report
of
the
Department
of
Environmental
Affairs and Tourism for 2000-2001 [RP 67-2001].
COMMITTEE REPORTS:
National
Assembly
and
National
Council
of
Provinces:
1.
Report of the Joint Committee on Revenue Laws
Amendment Bill on the
Revenue Laws Amendment
Bill [B 36 - 2001] (National Assembly - sec
77), dated 25 June 2001:
The
Joint
Amendment
Committee
Bill,
on
having
Revenue
considered
Laws
the
subject of the Revenue Laws Amendment Bill
[B 36 - 2001] (National Assembly - sec 77),
referred to it and classified by the Joint
Tagging Mechanism as a Money Bill, reports
that
it
thereon.
has
concluded
its
deliberations
26 June 2001
Page 180 of 256
TUESDAY, 26 JUNE 2001
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
National
Assembly
and
National
Council
of
Provinces:
1.
The Speaker and the Chairperson:
(1) Assent by the President of the Republic in
respect of the following Bills:
(i)
South
African
Sports
Commission
Amendment Bill [B 2B - 2001] - Act
No
7
of
signed
by
2001
(assented
President
on
to
and
22
June
Service
Bill
2001); and
(ii)
South
African
Weather
[B 54D - 2000] - Act No 8 of 2001
(assented
to
and
signed
President on 22 June 2001).
by
26 June 2001
(2) The
Page 181 of 256
Joint
Tagging
Mechanism
(JTM)
on
26
June 2001 in terms of Joint Rule 160(3),
classified the following Bills as section
75 Bills:
(i)
Merchandise Marks Amendment Bill [B
33 - 2001] (National Assembly - sec
75).
(ii)
Trade Practices Amendment Bill [B 34
-
2001]
(National
Assembly
-
sec
75).
(iii)
Companies
Amendment
Bill
[B
35
-
2001] (National Assembly - sec 75).
(iv)
National Parks Amendment Bill [B 38
-
2001]
(National
Assembly
-
sec
75).
(3) The following papers have been tabled and
are now referred to the relevant committees
as mentioned below:
26 June 2001
Page 182 of 256
(1) The following paper is referred to the
Portfolio
the
Committee
Portfolio
on
Public
Committee
on
Works,
Transport,
the Portfolio Committee on Housing, the
Portfolio
and
Committee
Forestry
Committee
on
Water
and
on
the
Provincial
Affairs
Portfolio
and
Local
Government. It is also referred to the
Select
the
Committee
Select
Public
Committee
Environmental
Committee
on
Affairs
on
Services,
on
and
Local
Land
the
and
Select
Government
and
Inter-Ministerial
Task
Administration:
Report
Team
of
on
Development
the
Construction
for
the
period
Industry
November
1997 to April 2001.
(2) The following paper is referred to the
Portfolio Committee on Foreign Affairs
and to the Select Committee on Economic
Affairs for information:
26 June 2001
Page 183 of 256
Agreement between the Government of the
Republic
of
People's
South
Government
Republic
of
Commission
of
of
of
the
and
of
on
a
the
Binational
Co-operation,
section
the
Democratic
Algeria
establishment
terms
Africa
tabled
231(3)
of
in
the
Constitution, 1996.
(3) The following paper is referred to the
Portfolio
Committee
Constitutional
Select
the
on
Standing
paper
to
The
Report
and
the
and
of
contained
in
the
referred
to
the
is
Committee
and
Security
Affairs.
Auditor-General
following
Justice
Development
Committee
Constitutional
on
on
Public
Accounts
for consideration and report:
Report and Financial Statements of the
Legal
Aid
Board
for
1997-98,
1998-99
and 1999-2000, including the Report of
the
Auditor-General
on
the
Financial
26 June 2001
Page 184 of 256
Statements
for
1997-98,
1998-99
and
1999-2000.
(4) The following paper is referred to the
Portfolio
and
Committee
Forestry
Committee
on
on
and
to
Land
and
Water
Affairs
the
Select
Environmental
Affairs:
Government Notice No R.509 published in
Government
June
Gazette
2001,
compulsory
Measures
to
No
22355
Regulations
National
conserve
dated
relating
Standards
water,
made
8
to
and
in
terms of section 9(1) and 73(1)(j) of
the Water Services Act, 1997 (Act No
108 of 1997).
National Council of Provinces:
1.
The Chairperson:
26 June 2001
Page 185 of 256
Bills passed by National Council of Provinces
on 26 June 2001: To be submitted to President
of the Republic for assent:
(i)
Airports Company Amendment Bill [B 20 2001] (National Assembly - sec 75);
(ii)
Road Accident Fund Amendment Bill [B 21 2001] (National Assembly - sec 75).
2.
The Chairperson:
Message
from
National
Assembly
to
National
Council of Provinces:
Bills passed by National Assembly on 26 June
2001 and transmitted for concurrence:
(i).. Revenue Laws Amendment Bill [B 36 - 2001]
(National Assembly - sec 77).
As the Joint Committee on Revenue Laws
Amendment Bill reported on the Bill (see
Announcements,
Tablings
and
Committee
26 June 2001
Page 186 of 256
Reports, p 793), it was not referred to a
committee of the Council. It has been put
as an Order of the Day on the Order Paper
of the Council for consideration.
(ii) Appropriation
Bill
[B
10
-
2001]
(National Assembly - sec 77).
The Bill has been referred to the Select
Committee
on
Finance
of
the
National
Council of Provinces.
(iii) Administration
of
Rationalisation
Estates
Bill
[B
Laws
24B
Interim
-
2000]
(National Assembly - sec 75) (introduced
as
Administration
of
Estates
Amendment
Bill [B 24 - 2000] (National Assembly sec 75).
The Bill has been referred to the Select
Committee on Security and Constitutional
Affairs
of
Provinces.
the
National
Council
of
26 June 2001
(iv)
Page 187 of 256
Agricultural
Research
Amendment
Bill
[B
25B - 2001 (Reprint)] (National Assembly
- sec 75).
The Bill has been referred to the Select
Committee
Affairs
on
of
Land
the
and
Environmental
National
Council
of
Provinces.
(v)
Close Corporations Amendment Bill [B 31B
- 2001] (National Assembly - sec 75).
The Bill has been referred to the Select
Committee
on
Economic
Affairs
of
the
Council
of
National Council of Provinces.
TABLINGS:
National
Provinces:
Papers:
Assembly
and
National
26 June 2001
1.
The
Page 188 of 256
Minister
for
Justice
and
Constitutional
Development:
(a) Report of the South African Law Commission
on a New Sentencing Framework, Project 82
[RP 57-2001].
(b) The
Fourth
Interim
Report
of
the
South
African Law Commission on Aspects of the
Law Relating to Aids, Project 85 [RP 402001].
COMMITTEE REPORTS:
National
Assembly
and
National
Council
of
Monitoring
Committee
on
Provinces:
1.
Report
of
the
Joint
Improvement of Quality of Life and Status of
Children, Youth and Disabled Persons on Study
Tour to Germany, dated 9 June 2001:
The Joint Monitoring Committee on Improvement
of
Quality
of
Life
and
Status
of
Children,
26 June 2001
Page 189 of 256
Youth and Disabled Persons, having undertaken a
study tour to Berlin, Germany, from 7 to 14
October 2000, reports as follows:
A.
Background
The study tour took place as a result of
the Committee's decision to meet the German
Parliamentary
Committee
on
Labour
and
Social Affairs as well as non-governmental
organisations
children,
youth
(NGOs)
and
concerned
disabled
with
persons.
A
programme for the delegation was compiled
by Mr G Setlhoke and Mr J Beck from the
Office
of
the
South
African
Embassy
in
of
the
Berlin.
1.
Composition of delegation
The
delegation
comprised
following:
Members of National Assembly:
Ms M S
Maine (ANC); Mr L Nzimande (ANC); Ms E
26 June 2001
Page 190 of 256
Gandhi (ANC); Mrs Mbuyazi (IFP); Mr V
Gore (DP); and Ms M Rajbally (MF).
Members
of
Provinces:
Mr
delegation
Mkhaliphi
National
Council
of
B
-
of
Willem
(Eastern
leader
Cape);
(Mpumalanga);
Mr
Mr
T
J
Setona
(Free State); and Mr N Raju (KwaZuluNatal).
In addition, three personal assistants
and the Committee Secretary accompanied
the delegation.
2.
Terms of reference
To study the German -
(1) policy
of
and
legislation
children,
persons;
youth
in
and
respect
disabled
26 June 2001
Page 191 of 256
(2) policy and programmes in respect of
children,
youth
and
disabled
persons,
And to learn about -
(3) how
their
carries
parliamentary
out
oversight
its
function
and
the
policy
legislation
of
children,
of
monitoring,
especially
and
committee
implementation
youth
in
and
of
respect
disabled
persons;
(4) the
role
of
governmental
NGOs
in
monitoring
policies
and
programmes, and their effectiveness
in meeting the needs of children,
youth and disabled persons.
3.
Objectives of trip
(1) To
learn
drawbacks
from
the
successes
experienced
by
and
the
26 June 2001
Page 192 of 256
Germans
in
the
fields
outlined
above.
(2) To
take
these
experiences
into
account in developing own policies
and legislation.
(3) To
develop
monitoring
own
oversight
functions,
taking
and
into
account the German experience.
4.
Consultations and briefings
Meetings were held with the following:
(1) Dr
Beate
Schmidt-Behlau,
Dr
Jorg
Maywald and Mr Karl Spath, of the
National
Coalition
for
the
Implementation of the UN Convention
for
the
Protection
Rights in Germany.
of
Children's
26 June 2001
Page 193 of 256
(2) Mr
Burkhard
Director
of
Wilke,
the
Managing
Germany
Central
Institute for Social Matters.
(3) Dr
Hartmut
Section
for
Prevention,
and
Haines,
Basic
Head
of
Programmes
Rehabilitation,
Rights
of
the
of
Policy
Integration
of
Disabled People.
(4) Mr Bernhard Schneider, Head, and Dr
Gerhard Polzin, Assistant Head, of
Interministerial
Staff
Representative
of
Government
Affairs
for
the
at
Federal
concerning
Disabled People.
(5) Dr Dolly Conto Obregon, Director of
the
International
Archive
Research
Street
and
Children
Counselling
Centre.
(6) Dr
Edith
State
Niehuis,
Secretary,
Parliamentary
and
Mr
Jochen
26 June 2001
Page 194 of 256
Weitzel,
Deputy
Head
of
Division
for Children and Youth Policy.
B.
Meeting with Ambassador
Prof Bengu, the South African Ambassador to
Germany,
briefed
the
delegation
on
the
Binational Commission between South Africa
and
Germany,
facilitating
for
the
high-level
purpose
dialogue
promoting
co-operation
on
national
concern
South
Africa
focal
areas
to
of
key
and
issues
of
and
Germany.
The
following
identified
for
five
further
were
consultation
and
negotiation:
1.
Educational and vocational training.
2.
Promotion
of
the
private
particularly small businesses.
sector,
26 June 2001
3.
Page 195 of 256
Low-cost
housing
and
infrastructural
development.
4.
Rural
development
and
management
of
natural resources.
5.
Government and administrative advisory
services,
particularly
at
provincial
level.
The
delegation
the
Embassy
was
is
further
at
informed
present
that
involving
churches and the private sector to assist
in
the
elimination
of
poverty
in
South
Africa. Strategies have been developed by
the Embassy to ensure collaboration between
the
government,
the
private
sector
and
very
good
churches.
The
Germans
have
developed
policies on education and skills training
in
order
to
unemployment.
deal
A
with
study
poverty
of
these
and
in
particular would be of use to South Africa.
26 June 2001
Page 196 of 256
The delegation noted that the South African
government is embarking on policies aimed
at transformation and development, and that
the Committee will benefit from this study
tour.
C.
Consultation
for
1:
German
Implementation
of
National
UN
Coalition
Convention
for
Protection of Children's Rights in Germany
1.
Introduction
The
delegation
was
briefed
by Dr Beate Schmidt-Behlau, Dr
Maywald
and
Mr
Karl
Spath
Jorg
of
the
Coalition.
The delegation learnt that on 24 May
1995, 40 German NGOs, engaged in the
field of child and youth welfare and
policies,
Coalition.
formally
By
founded
September
1999,
the
the
number of affiliates had risen to 90
organisations,
covering
a
broad
26 June 2001
Page 197 of 256
spectrum
of
areas
pertaining
to
the
rights of the child.
2.
Aims of Coalition
(1) To encourage and monitor government
action
towards
implementation
of
the convention.
(2) To
invite
promotors
cross-section
towards
the
of
from
a
society
to
implementation
convention,
and
conferences,
broad
of
to
workshops
act
the
hold
and
open
fora on relevant issues.
(3) To
discuss
convention
and
in
disseminate
Germany
for
the
all
children up to the age of 18.
(4) To
support
children
the
and
discussion
involvement
young
and
the convention.
people
of
in
the
implementation
of
26 June 2001
Page 198 of 256
(5) To
exchange
process
information
of
on
the
implementation
at
international
level
members
activities
about
and
inform
in
the
international field through the NGO
group in Geneva.
3.
Structure and working method
Since
March
1996
the
German
Child
Welfare Alliance has been hosting the
secretariat of the Coalition. Start-up
funding
foundation
was
provided
Deutsche
from
the
Jugendmarke
and
enabled the Coalition to employ a fulltime co-ordinator and secretariat for a
year.
Further
funding
from
the
German
government has been secured up to the
year 2001. A steering committee of 16
members,
eight
of
whom
represented
organisations affiliated to the German
Child Welfare Association, agreed on a
26 June 2001
Page 199 of 256
list
of
principles,
statutes
and
regulations.
Its
decisions
among
all
based
members,
regularly,
months.
are
about
In
and
every
March
on
consensus
it
two
2000
meets
to
the
three
steering
group nominated Mike Corsa and Dr Jorg
Maywald as speakers of the Coalition,
for two years. In accordance with the
member
organisations,
this
group
develops a plan of action and decides
on
strategies
to
promote
the
implementation of the convention.
As
a
follow-up
recommended
in
observations
steering
themes
on
the
of
the
group
mentioned
concluding
Committee,
examined
in
activities
the
the
particular
statement
of
the Coalition on the government report
submitted
to
the
Committee
on
the
Rights of the Child in Geneva in 1995.
26 June 2001
4.
Page 200 of 256
Topics covered
Working
groups
are
sometimes
established to draw up recommendations,
policies
and
discussed
then
in
strategies.
the
steering
forwarded
Parliament,
public,
the
to
implementation
to
the
media
and
promote
of
the
These
are
group
and
government,
the
broad
the
full
convention
in
their respective areas.
Topics that have been dealt with since
the establishment of the Coalition, are
-
(1) the
rights
of
the
child
in
the
reform of parent and child law;
(2) ecological rights of children;
(3) rights of asylum-seeking children,
child
soldiers
children in war;
and
the
rights
of
26 June 2001
Page 201 of 256
(4) rights of children in institutions,
for example in the school system;
(5) rights
of
needy
children
and
allocation of resources;
(6) rights of disabled children;
(7) rights
of
children
without
German
passports.
5.
Ministerial support
The
Ministry
Affairs
for
has
suitcases",
libraries
the
consists
of
materials
financed
which
and
promote
Youth
were
Family
1 200
"media
distributed
institutions
convention.
a
and
selection
currently
working
A
of
to
to
suitcase
the
best
available
in
Germany on children's rights, including
a video series on 20 articles of the
convention by German TV, music, books
and
a
public
relations
manual
for
26 June 2001
Page 202 of 256
teachers,
social
professionals,
in
workers
order
to
and
make
the
convention widely known.
They have a law which bans violence,
especially
corporal
including
emotional
children.
There
programmes,
violence,
are
for
punishment,
also
example
against
interesting
a
programme
aimed at helping children catch up on
what they did not learn at school, and
a programme called "youth in work" for
young people who cannot find jobs. The
project endeavours to skill the youth
for specific jobs and then find them
employment.
Their
definition
interesting.
They
of
children
define
a
is
also
child
as
being from birth to 14, and a youth as
being 14 to 18.
Their education takes longer than other
countries:
Preprimary
learning
takes
26 June 2001
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place from three to six years. Entrance
is at seven years, and they spend 19
years at school. They therefore enter
university
or
other
tertiary
institutions at a fairly mature age of
over
24,
and
they
complete
their
education at between 26 and 30 years of
age.
They
therefore
enter
the
job
in
each
market at a much later stage.
They
have
an
ombudsperson
State, looking into children's issues.
These
ombudspersons
administration
and
administration.
towards
are
within
reports
Their
ensuring
main
to
aim
protection
the
the
is
of,
provision for and participation towards
the best interests of the child. They
ensure
that
approach
on
there
is
a
children's
comprehensive
issues;
for
example, when they plan traffic laws,
they
take
account.
children's
needs
into
26 June 2001
6.
Page 204 of 256
What seemed to work well
(1) The structured working relationship
between
seemed
the
to
government
bring
positive
and
NGOs
results,
and thus the movement is growing.
(2) Media
idea
suitcases
are
for
dissemination
the
an
excellent
of
information.
(3) Extra
programmes
for
learners
who
cannot cope.
(4) The
longer
period
of
education
results in a more mature and better
skilled workforce.
(5) The idea of ombudspersons and the
consultative
children.
7.
Lessons learnt
mechanisms
involving
26 June 2001
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(1) They have access to more funds.
(2) They
have
a
low
rate
of
unemployment.
(3) They
do
not
have
infrastructural
backlogs.
(4) They do not have a large illiterate
population.
(5) They do not have problems of stark
poverty.
D.
Consultation
2:
German
Central
Institute
for Social Matters
1.
Introduction
The
delegation
briefing
Wilke,
sessions
Managing
Institute.
stores
had
The
consultation
with
Director
Institute
information
Mr
on
a
and
Burkhard
of
the
collects
and
database
and
26 June 2001
Page 206 of 256
supplies information to those who need
it.
2.
Budget
The
Institute
is
to
a
large
extent
self-sustaining. It is partly financed
by the Ministry of Social Affairs, and
70%
comes
from
charity
organisations,
from the interest on fees derived from
auditing charity organisations and from
fees paid by various organisations and
individuals
for
the
provision
of
information.
3.
Focus
The Institute provides services mainly
in Berlin. It supplies information on
social
issues,
leaders
in
the
field,
books and articles on issues of social
interest,
organisations
lists
in
of
the
charity
field
of
26 June 2001
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environmental and animal protection and
developmental aid.
4.
Method of operation
The
Institute
research,
does
but
not
collects
conduct
research
material from universities and provides
it
to
the
clients.
They
also
gather
information from literature, scientific
journals and books.
5.
Clients
Information is provided to students and
private
Labour
associations;
and
the
the
National
Minister
of
Coalition
on
the Implementation of the Convention of
the Child; industry and commerce; the
German
and
Chancellor
Catholic
students
of
of
Cities;
associations;
social
welfare
donors
work;
universities of applied science.
and
and
26 June 2001
6.
Page 208 of 256
Kinds of services provided
(1) Information on CD ROM.
(2) Books.
(3) Monograph.
(4) Magazines.
7.
What seemed to work well
(1) Centralised
collection
and
dissemination of information.
(2) Efficient and well-run service.
8.
Obstacles
(1) Lack
of
infrastructure
in
rural
areas would make a centre of this
kind inaccessible to many.
(2) Cost would be a problem.
26 June 2001
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(3) Poverty would make it difficult for
people to pay for services, hence
self-sufficiency would be difficult
to attain.
E.
Consultation
Prevention,
3:
Basic
Programmes
Rehabilitation,
Policy
of
and
Rights of Disabled People
1.
Introduction
The delegation had a consultation and
briefing
session
with
Dr
Hartmut
Haines, Head of the Section.
The briefing focused on the following:
(1) Accessibility
of
buildings
for
disabled people.
(2) Social levy system.
(3) Integration
system.
and
special
schooling
26 June 2001
Page 210 of 256
(4) Training of disabled people.
(5) Monitoring role of the Section on
policy related to disabled people.
2.
Accessibility of buildings
New
buildings
established,
are
accessible to disabled people, but old
ones are not. Future planning on the
construction
buildings
and
will
reconstruction
take
into
account
of
the
needs of the disabled.
3.
Policy in respect of disabled
(1) To
take
steps
disability
is
to
ensure
reduced
that
through
preventative measures.
(2) To ensure that disabled people are
fully
integrated
mainstream,
must
have
failing
special
into
the
which,
they
provisions
in
26 June 2001
Page 211 of 256
order
to
obtain
education
and
become self-sufficient.
4.
Interesting areas
(1) Social levy system.
(2) Integration
and
special
schooling
system.
(3) Training of disabled people.
(4) Employment of disabled people.
A law requires that every employer must
employ
at
least
5%
(previously
6%)
disabled people. Should they receive an
application from a disabled person and
select a "normal" person for the job,
then, to the extent that they are not
fulfilling
the
5%
requirement,
they
have to pay a levy to the government
(for
Those
not
who
complying
do
employ
with
the
quota).
disabled
people,
26 June 2001
Page 212 of 256
but do not have the full quota, pay a
levy of 200 DM. Those who do not employ
any
disabled
people,
however,
pay
a
much higher levy. This levy goes into a
fund to be utilised for the needs of
the disabled.
5.
What seemed to work well
The levy system was unique and seemed
to achieve its goals.
6.
Obstacles
Access to buildings, etc, was not well
developed.
F.
Consultation 4: Head and Assistant Head of
Interministerial Staff at Representative of
Federal
Government
Disabled People
1.
Introduction
for
Affairs
concerning
26 June 2001
Page 213 of 256
The delegation had a discussion with Mr
Bernhard
Schneider,
Gerhard
Polzin,
the
the
Head,
and
Assistant
Dr
Head.
Their briefings focused on -
(1) the legal framework; and
(2) the integration of disabled persons
in the Federal Republic of Germany.
According
to
section
Rehabilitation
medical
should
necessary
to
of
Harmonisation
services
cover
10
all
for
Act,
rehabilitation
areas
prevent
the
a
of
support
threatening
disability, to eliminate a disability,
to
alleviate
it
or
to
prevent
its
aggravation.
According to section 100 of the Act, an
employer with a workforce of 16 or more
are obliged to ensure that at least 6%
of
the
workforce
disabled persons.
comprise
severely
26 June 2001
Page 214 of 256
This obligation applies not only to the
private
sector,
employers.
but
The
also
to
federal
public
employment
service monitors the fulfilment of this
obligation
through
compensatory
employers
a
system
levies
who
obligation.
payable
fail
The
of
to
revenue
by
meet
from
the
these
levies may only be used for employment
promotion and vocational advancement in
respect
of
details
are
Disabled
severely
disabled
embodied
Persons
in
the
persons;
Severely
Compensatory
Levy
Regulation.
2.
Rehabilitation of disabled persons
(1) If
a
person
physical,
suffers
mental
or
from
a
psychological
disability, he or she is entitled
to
assistance,
regardless
cause of disability.
of
the
26 June 2001
Page 215 of 256
(2) Benefits
such
financial
benefits
regardless
receives
as
a
of
medical
are
whether
disability
and
provided,
the
person
pension
or
not.
(3) Where
necessary,
rehabilitation
provided
through
medical
benefits
are
hospitals
or
special facilities.
(4) Vocational
rehabilitation
benefits
assist to help a disabled person to
keep or get a job.
(5) This
also
include
other
forms
of
employment and vocational promotion
assistance,
aimed
at
making
it
possible for a disabled person to
find adequate and suitable work in
the job market or in a workshop for
disabled people.
3.
Vocational youth training centres
26 June 2001
Page 216 of 256
These centres work in conjunction with
firms
in
their
respective
regions
to
provide initial vocational training for
young
disabled
persons
who
require
medical, psychological and educational
assistance
as
a
result
disability.
Germany
has
of
their
built
up
a
network of 46 vocational youth training
centres with a capacity for some 12 300
trainees. Eight of these centres with
an admission capacity of approximately
2 300 are located in the former East
Germany.
4.
Vocational retraining centres
The
centres
firms
also
work
in
the
regions
retraining
and
further
disabled
adults
psychological
Germany's
retraining
who
and
network
centres
together
and
similar
of
has
provide
training
require
28
with
for
medical,
assistance.
vocational
capacity
for
26 June 2001
Page 217 of 256
15 000 trainees. Seven of these centres
are located in eastern Germany.
5.
Vocational training centres
These
centres
are
special
rehabilitation centres for people with
mental disabilities. They aim to help
people,
realistically
assessing
their
job prospects so that they can rejoin
the
mainstream
courses
There
for
are
job
market
training
currently
or
go
on
or
retraining.
eight
vocational
training centres, with a total of 457
places.
6.
Vocational rehabilitation clinics
These
clinics
are
special
for
persons
disabilities,
paraplegic
or
such
as
heart
rehabilitation
with
head
special
injuries,
diseases.
At
present, Germany has 17 such clinics,
26 June 2001
Page 218 of 256
with 2 780 beds, in the western part of
the country.
7.
Workshops for disabled persons
These workshops offer suitable jobs for
persons
who
temporarily
are
unable
permanently
to
find
or
employment
in the open market, due to the nature
or severity of their disability.
They provide disabled persons with an
opportunity
regain
to
develop,
the
increase
ability
to
or
work
productively, and to earn a wage while
doing so. At present, Germany has 640
State-approved
workshops
which
offer
166 000 jobs; 173 of these workshops,
with
approximately
located
in
persons
health,
eastern
working
workshops
27 000
are
Germany.
in
covered
accident,
jobs,
each
under
long-term
pension insurance schemes.
are
Disabled
of
these
Germany's
care
and
26 June 2001
8.
Page 219 of 256
Special provision for severely disabled
persons
As a severely disabled person, one can
claim
benefits
to
assist
in
compensating for disadvantages arising
from
disability.
These
benefits
are
normally contingent on the existence of
specific health conditions, and include
-
(1) tax concessions (in particular, the
standard
allowance
for
disabled
persons);
(2) free public transport;
(3) reduced vehicle taxes;
(4) special parking facilities;
(5) exemption from radio and television
licence fees.
26 June 2001
9.
Page 220 of 256
Free public transport
If
a
disability
significantly
reduces
mobility in respect of road traffic or
if a person is incapacitated or deaf,
he or she is entitled to free public
transport on production of a pass that
is marked accordingly. This applies to
trams,
buses,
suburban
trains
and
railway travel, where they are part of
an
integrated
regional
transport
system. The subsidiary system of free
transport
is
limited
to
second
class
travel on local trains within 50 km of
the person's home.
10. What worked well
(1) The
four-step
approach
that
has
been developed, has a lot of merit.
It is clear and precise about the
different
categories
of
disabled
persons and who qualifies for what
kind of assistance.
26 June 2001
Page 221 of 256
(2) Their
youth
development
programme
is also a very good model.
11. Obstacles
Lack of funds is a problem, but not the
major problem.
G.
Consultation
Children
5:
Archive
International
Research
and
Street
Counselling
Centre
1.
Introduction
The
delegation
had
consultation
and
discussion with Dr Dolly Conto Obregen,
Director
of
the
Centre.
The
briefing
focused on the number of activities and
projects in respect of the main task of
the
centre
-
street
children,
in
Germany as well as in other locations,
such as Africa, Asia, Latin America and
Europe.
26 June 2001
2.
Page 222 of 256
Background of Centre
The Centre was established in 1984 to
document the work already achieved and
the
different
children
1994,
or
approaches
street
the
to
children.
Centre
systematically
homeless
Since
has
involved
been
in
the
situation of street children, both from
a
research
perspective
and
from
a
rehabilitative and service perspective.
Since
then,
the
Centre
has
realised
that, in order to be able to develop
lasting solution approaches, political
intervention, international discussions
and networking are needed. At present,
the Centre has developed four projects
in respect of street children.
(1) Information desk project
The main focus of this project is
the
collection
of
documentation,
project evaluation, publications of
26 June 2001
Page 223 of 256
any kind (books, scientific papers
and
materials
sectors),
available
and
to
from
to
both
all
media
make
these
researchers
as
well as the public. The aim is to
accelerate
street
research
children
approaches
concerning
and
towards
a
to
develop
solution
for
this category of person.
(2) Research project
Based on the analysis of existing
approaches, the Centre attempts to
demonstrate
new
research
fields
with this project, where a network
of
institutions
and
individuals
aspire to seek practical solutions.
(3) Counselling project
The findings from the documentation
and research activities on the life
of street children has contributed
26 June 2001
Page 224 of 256
to
the
counselling
work
directed
towards the following:
(a) Political
institutions,
scientists,
educational
specialists,
teachers,
NGOs,
street
pupils,
workers,
students
of
social science and humanities,
and towards all people who are
interested, and active, in the
field.
(b) Offering
package
students
to
a
service
prepare
for
practical placements abroad, as
well as for activities in Latin
America,
Asia,
Africa
and
Europe.
3.
Main work activities
The
main
work
activities
of
the
Institute focused on the following four
issues:
Documentation;
public
26 June 2001
Page 225 of 256
relations;
placement;
training
and
courses
regional
and
and
international networking.
(1) Documentation
(a) Archives about street children
all over the world.
(b) Articles
in
newspapers
and
magazines.
(c) Unpublished documents.
(d) CD-Roms, internet publications.
(e) Photo exhibitions.
(2) Public relations
(a) Series
of
lectures,
and video evenings.
seminars
26 June 2001
Page 226 of 256
(b) Discussions
in
schools
and
conferences
and
institutions.
(c) Specialised
benefit events.
(3) Training course
(a) Street
workers/educational
specialists.
(b) Methodological
planning
of
projects.
(c) Monitoring and controlling.
(d) Teachers as multipliers.
(4) Placement
(a) Preparation
of
students
practical placement abroad.
for
26 June 2001
Page 227 of 256
(b) Practical placement in Africa,
Asia, Latin America and Europe.
(5) Regional
and
international
networking
(a) Exchange
of
experiences
and
reinforcement of dialogue.
(b) Improvement
of
scientific
co-
operation.
(c) Intercultural encounters.
4.
What worked well
(1) The
research
and
rehabilitation
programmes are good.
(2) Focus on the disabled is also good.
5.
Obstacles
26 June 2001
Page 228 of 256
Placement
of
children
abroad
is
not
such a good idea.
H.
Consultation
6:
Parliamentary
State
Secretary and Deputy Head of Division of
Children and Youth Policy
1.
Introduction
Dr
Edith
Niehuis,
the
Parliamentary
State Secretary, and Mr Jochen Weitzel,
Deputy
the
Head
of
the
delegation
governmental
Division,
on
policy
the
and
briefed
German
programme
in
respect of children and youth.
2.
Child and youth policy
The Federal Republic of Germany has a
wide-ranging
system
of
and
child
socially
and
youth
underpinned
services.
Child and youth services describe the
area
of
social
work
that
serves
to
26 June 2001
Page 229 of 256
promote the development of young people
outside school.
3.
Youth reports
Of particular importance to the child
and youth policy are the youth reports
on the situation of young people and
the welfare achievements of child and
youth
services,
which
the
government
has
to
Bundestag
and
Bundesrat
parliamentary
assessing
situation,
proposals
and
youth
report
the
overall
further
provide
situation
the
in
the
reports
services,
should
to
each
Apart
analysing
the
on
present
term.
and
federal
from
current
contain
developing
child
and
third
an
in
each
overview
of
respect
of
child and youth services.
The youth report have, inter alia, two
important functions. These are to make
the public aware of the situation of
26 June 2001
young
Page 230 of 256
people,
spheres
and
of
activities
to
encourage
society
which
to
will
all
take
on
promote
the
interests of children and young people.
As already mentioned, child and youth
policy
cuts
policy
areas.
presented
across
in
many
Family
the
family
different
reports
policy
are
area.
The nine youth reports and four family
reports
which
document
detail
have
studies
the
conditions
appeared
which
situation
of
children,
to
date,
describe
in
and
living
young
people
and families in Germany. These reports
also have a considerable impact on the
legislative
process
on
youth,
family
policy,
on
children
and
specific political measures.
4.
What worked well
(1) Media protection is well-run.
and
on
26 June 2001
Page 231 of 256
(2) Youth programmes are good.
5.
Obstacles
Funding.
6.
Principle
of
responsible
subsidiary
for
child
bodies
and
youth
services agencies
One of the main features of child and
youth
services
voluntary
make
a
and
is
the
activities
statutory
commitment.
In
bodies.
the
field
of
NGOs
of
youth work, day care for children and
residential care, the voluntary sector
provides most services and facilities.
7.
Statutory youth services
Statutory
another
youth
the
youth
dimension
services
voluntary
services
of
system.
youth
the
represent
child
and
Together
with
services,
they
26 June 2001
Page 232 of 256
implement the Child and Youth Service
Act at three levels:
(1) Federal level
The
Federal
Ministry
for
Family
Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and
Youth is responsible for preparing
legislation and financing measures
of
national
importance
and
programmes intended to serve as a
model for the child and youth plan
of the federation.
(2) Local self-government level
They
have
to
legislate
for
their
own areas. Child and youth policies
are
developed
by
voluntary
organisations within the parameters
of
the
Federal
Services.
UN
Act
Convention
on
Child
and
and
the
Youth
26 June 2001
Page 233 of 256
(3) State level
Programmes for child and youth care
have
to
be
drafted
for
the
development of youth.
8.
Voluntary
services
structure
at
three
levels
(1) National
level
(at
this
level
models for projects are developed).
(2) State or provincial level.
(3) Local or municipal level.
In addition, to ensure uniformity and
cross-border
government
uniformity,
has
now
the
federal
appointed
a
Committee of State Secretariat, and it
reports
to
the
Youth
Ministry.
Parliament,
they
also
have
commission,
comprising
all
a
In
youth
parties.
There are youth offices responsible for
26 June 2001
Page 234 of 256
advisory,
co-ordinating
planning
and
and
regional
further
training
functions.
9.
Local child and youth services agencies
The
main
burden
of
statutory
youth
services work falls on youth offices in
districts
and
administrative
in
towns
districts
which
in
are
their
own
right.
The
Child
entrusts
relating
and
them
to
Youth
with
Services
all
individual
Act
decisions
welfare
cases
and with responsibility for curatorship
by the youth office and guardianship.
10. Participation by young people
Youth
participation
services
is
requirement,
element
for
not
but
the
in
shaping
youth
merely
a
procedural
also
an
essential
effectiveness
of
the
26 June 2001
Page 235 of 256
service
itself.
Service
Act
principle
The
lays
that
Child
down
and
Youth
a
basic
and
young
as
children
people are to be involved, in line with
their
level
of
development,
in
all
decisions concerning them, taken by the
statutory youth services bodies.
According
youths
to
this
must
Act,
be
children
informed
and
in
an
appropriate manner of their rights in
administrative
proceedings
proceedings
before
the
and
in
guardianship
court and the administrative court (s8
-
Child
and
Youth
Services
Act).
Furthermore, the law expressly provides
for
the
young
participation
people
in
the
of
children
selection
of
or
an
institution or foster home within the
scope
outside
of
socio-educational
the
family
(s36
-
provision
Child
Youth Services Act).
11. Media and protection of young persons
and
26 June 2001
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Section
6
of
dissemination
the
of
Act
regulates
writings
the
harmful
to
young persons. It sets out cases where
the media must be regarded as a source
of
danger
to
the
young.
Among
media
representatives likely to cause serious
harm to young persons, are those who -
(1) are racist;
(2) deny the holocaust;
(3) glorify violence;
(4) play down violence;
(5) represent
which
violence
violates
human
in
a
manner
dignity,
for
instance child pornography.
Media
members
putting
young
persons
seriously at risk are indexed by law.
In other words, there are restrictions
on making their work available.
26 June 2001
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12. Laws relevant to children and youths
In
addition
to
the
basic
provisions,
there are many general laws such as the
German
Civil
Code,
the
German
Penal
Code, the Federal Social Assistance Act
and the Employment Promotion Act, which
are
of
particular
children,
There
young
are
significance
people
also
and
laws
to
families.
which
deal
exclusively with the specific problems
of
children
and
young
people,
for
example the -
(1) Juvenile Court Act;
(2) Protection of Young Persons at Work
Act;
(3) Promotion
of
the
Voluntary
Social
Services Year Act;
(4) Promotion
of
the
Voluntary
Ecological Service Year Act;
26 June 2001
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(5) Vocational Training Act;
(6) Vocational
Training
Assistance
through Planning and Research Act;
(7) Adoption
Procedures
and
Implementation Act;
(8) Federal Education Grants Act;
(9) Child and Youth Services Act.
13. What worked well
(1) The string of laws are good.
(2) They
are
able
to
tackle
the
aftermath of HIV/AIDS.
I.
Guided tours
The delegation went on three guided tours
of historic significance.
26 June 2001
1.
Page 239 of 256
House of Wannsee Conference
Introduction
In this house, on 20 January 1942, 14
top
officials
bureaucracy
of
and
the
Obergruppen-führer
chief
of
Office,
the
the
SS,
led
Reinhard
Reich
discussed
implementation
ministerial
SS
Heydrich,
Security
the
of
by
Main
organisational
the
decision
to
deport to the East and murder the Jews
of Europe. The meeting was called the
"Wannsee
the
Conference".
Conference,
Eichmann,
was
The
summary
prepared
found
in
by
1947
of
Adolf
in
the
files of the German Foreign Office.
On
the
50th
anniversary
of
the
Conference, 20 January 1992, a memorial
and education centre was opened in the
villa.
The
sections:
house
now
has
three
26 June 2001
Page 240 of 256
(1) Permanent exhibit
This
exhibits
documents
the
conference,
but
not
only
also
its
history, starting in 1933, and its
conseguences
until
provides
information
entire
basic
process
1945.
of
on
it
the
segregation,
persecution, deportation and murder
of
European
Jews.
A
separate
section deals with the history of
the building.
The
photographs
without
as
exception
well
as
sources,
the
used,
a
and
time.
from
few
were
were
almost
officials,
private
German
unpublished
Exceptions
were
at
German
Jewish activities after 1933, taken
by Jewish press photographers, and
the liberation of the concentration
camps
in
cameramen.
1945,
shot
by
Allied
26 June 2001
Page 241 of 256
(2) Educational section
This section offers youth and adult
group study days or longer seminars
geared
and
towards
specific
professions,
in
or
interests
out
of
school. A wide range of subjects is
offered.
(3) Mediotek
This contains the standard academic
literature, fiction and eye-witness
reports on Nazi history, literature
on
Jewish
history,
racism
and
works,
a
anti-Semitism,
neo-Nazism,
document
reference
collection
on
microfilm and microfiche, a picture
and
sound
videos.
archive,
These
films
materials
and
are
available for use on the premises
by
seminar
participants
individual visitors.
and
26 June 2001
2.
Page 242 of 256
Sachsenhausen former concentration camp
The visit revealed the horrors of Nazi
rule and the inhuman conditions under
which prisoners were forced to live.
3.
Gandhi to Walesa Museum
This Museum was housed in a building
used as an office at the Check Point
Charlie Border Post. It is dedicated to
non-violence
action
struggle
human
for
comprehensive
information,
and
non-violent
rights.
It
collection
photographs
and
is
a
of
material
in respect of six different non-violent
struggles around the world.
It is of importance to note that South
Africa and Germany have certain common
features:
(1) There
are
situations,
similarities
in
that
in
both
both
are
26 June 2001
Page 243 of 256
transforming
issues
of
and
grappling
poverty,
with
unemployment,
racism and degradation.
(2) Germany
their
has
more
problem
is
resources,
not
as
and
huge
as
ours.
(3) They
are
also
integrating
two
States and creating new systems and
policies in terms of international
best practice.
The
tour
therefore
has
revealed
many
lessons of importance for South Africa.
J.
Recommendations
1.
To SA National Youth Commission
(1) Germany
has
access
to
more
funds
than we do. They have a low rate of
unemployment,
they
do
not
have
a
major infrastructural backlog, they
26 June 2001
Page 244 of 256
do
not
have
a
large
rate
of
illiteracy and they do not have as
much poverty as South Africa.
The
Committee
strategy
of
comprising
recommends
media
that
the
suitcases,
publications
on
children's rights made available to
the youth, be studied closely with
a view to copying it.
(2) Their
vocational
youth
centres
and
vocational
centres
are
excellent
training
retraining
methods
of
passing on skills to young people.
It may be a good programme to copy.
(3) Their programme of youth reports to
be
presented
term,
with
to
Parliament
proposals
for
each
further
development and giving an overview
of
the
situation
of
youth
and
children, is an excellent method of
constant review and planning. These
26 June 2001
Page 245 of 256
reports
are
holistic
also
based
approach.
For
on
a
example,
there were nine youth reports and
four
family
Committee's
reports
reports
during
visit,
and
helped
when
the
those
looking
at
legislation and policy issues.
The Committee recommends that the above
be investigated further.
2.
To Department of Social Development
(1) They have a comprehensive system of
social
assistance,
which
needs
to
be studied to help our planning for
a
comprehensive
system.
Apart
social
assistance
from
social
assistance, they offer benefits to
all disabled persons, whether these
persons
receive
social
assistance
or not. There is a system of tax
concessions, free public transport,
reduced
vehicle
taxes,
special
26 June 2001
Page 246 of 256
parking
facilities
and
exemption
from radio and television licences.
The
Committee
recommends
that
the
above be investigated further.
(2) They have
areas
a clear policy in four
of
assistance
for
the
disabled:
(a) Social
assistance
for
persons
suffering from physical, mental
or
psychological
regardless
of
the
disability,
cause
of
disability.
(b) Medical
benefits
and
rehabilitative
are
provided
for
anyone who needs it, regardless
of whether the person receives
a disability grant or not.
(c) Education in an open school as
well as special schools geared
26 June 2001
Page 247 of 256
towards
vocational
rehabilitation is provided for
those who are trainable and may
be able to work. They also get
assistance
to
enable
them
to
who
can
compete
in
keep a job.
(d) For
the
those
open
levy
market,
system
there
to
is
a
encourage
employers to employ and promote
them.
The levy system is legislated,
and says that at least 5% of
the
staff
must
be
of
every
disabled.
employer
If
receives
application
for
non-disabled
selected,
employer
a
job
person
then,
to
the
an
an
and
a
is
extent
that the 5% requirement is not
met, that employer has to pay a
levy
to
the
government.
26 June 2001
Page 248 of 256
Employers who do not employ any
disabled persons, pay a higher
levy than those who employ some
but
have
quota.
The
not
fulfilled
money
goes
their
into
a
fund to be used for the needs
of the disabled.
The
Committee
recommends
that
the
above be investigated further.
(3) Legislation and policy are designed
to
and
apply
at
local
national,
government
provincial
level.
There
are problems in ensuring uniformity
while
allowing
for
local
peculiarities.
The Committee recommends that this
interesting area be studied further
by
those
child
policy.
and
looking
youth
at
comprehensive
legislation
and
26 June 2001
Page 249 of 256
(4) The Committee also recommends that
the German control over the media
in the interest of children also be
studied further, in order to look
at
openness
against
a
degree
of
censorship.
3.
To Department of Education
(1) The
introduction
of
vocational
training for young people and the
relationship
centres
and
between
and
training
employers,
industries
make
factories
the
training
relevant and ensures that students
are
trained
for
the
work
they
intend to do. This is working well
and
helps
to
focus
on
skills
development.
(2) They
have
schooling,
a
longer
which
period
ensures
of
that
workers are more mature and better
26 June 2001
Page 250 of 256
able
to
handle
the
stresses
and
strains of work.
(3) Their efforts to integrate disabled
children
into
the
main
stream
of
education, while also ensuring that
some
specialised
retained,
is
an
schools
are
experience
from
which we can learn in our education
transformation process.
The Committee recommends that the above
be investigated further.
4.
To Department of Labour
(1) The
co-operation
Department
education
of
between
Labour
sector
in
and
the
the
vocational
training is worth copying.
(2) The
levy
system
to
encourage
employers to employ disabled people
is
also
an
important
system
to
26 June 2001
Page 251 of 256
further
study,
with
a
view
to
implementation.
The Committee recommends that the above
be investigated further.
5.
To Office of Deputy President
Policies
and
legislation
applied
by
the
compiled
Germans
have
and
many
important features, as outlined above.
The Committee recommends that these be
studied further in order to see what is
already in place in our country, what
we
still
need
to
do
and
how
we
can
adapt some into our own legislative and
policy framework.
6.
To Joint Monitoring Committee
(1) The Germans have a conference with
NGOs
and
groups
of
children
and
youths to discuss issues identified
26 June 2001
Page 252 of 256
by
them
and
to
look
at
ways
of
overcoming problems. Thus they can
identify what is happening on the
ground and what the feeling is, and
then
come
These
up
are
Ministers,
with
suggestions.
submitted
to
look
to
at
the
possible
legislation or policy shifts. This
is
a
good
way
of
involving
the
sector in a constructive way and in
ensuring that laws and policies are
not static, but continually change
to provide for new needs.
(2) They
also
research
and
material
a
a
unique
central
resource
bank,
all
aspects
on
development
Such
have
issues
facility
can
can
be
where
of
found.
assist
in
ensuring that there is a flow of
information and that people do not
repeat
what
previously,
but
has
are
been
tried
enriched
those previous experiences.
by
26 June 2001
Page 253 of 256
The Committee recommends that the above
be investigated further.
7.
To Department of Arts, Culture, Science
and Technology
(1) Three
museums
were
visited,
and
each was unique in its historic and
comprehensive
research
Interestingly,
looking
for
they
content.
were
further
still
history
and
artifacts. Each also had a specific
educational content, and encouraged
schools,
universities
communities
to
seminars
such
and
as
participate
discussions.
poverty,
unemployment,
are
exhibitions
and
violence,
depicted
then
Important
lessons
preserve,
collect,
in
Issues
racism
degradation
disseminate
and
and
in
the
discussed.
on
how
to
annotate
and
information,
learnt from these museums.
can
be
26 June 2001
Page 254 of 256
(2) South
Africa's
racism,
history
apartheid,
of
the
wars,
freedom
struggle, peaceful negotiations and
accommodation
of
diversities
are
important lessons for posterity. If
collected, preserved and annotated
comprehensively,
important
it
can
message
become
for
an
the
international community.
The Committee recommends that the above
be investigated further.
K.
Conclusion
The Committee delegation was well received
by
their
German
institutions
and
counterparts
federal
at
all
the
ministries.
The
study tour was rich in briefing sessions,
to
enable
experiences
us
to
with
compare
those
Republic of Germany.
of
South
African
the
Federal
26 June 2001
Page 255 of 256
The German social levy system, the training
and employment of disabled persons and the
youth
services
programmes
served
as
good
examples for our country, with a view to
improving the quality of life and status of
our children, youth and disabled persons.
Report to be considered.
National Council of Provinces:
1.
Report
of
the
Select
Affairs
on
the
Business
Practices)
Committee
Consumer
Amendment
on
Economic
Affairs
(Unfair
Bill
[B
28
-
2001] (National Council of Provinces - sec 76),
dated 26 June 2001:
The Select Committee on Economic Affairs,
having
considered
Consumer
Practices)
Affairs
Amendment
the
subject
(Unfair
Bill
[B
of
the
Business
28
-
2001]
(National Council of Provinces - sec 76),
26 June 2001
referred
Page 256 of 256
to
it,
reports
amendments [B 28A - 2001].
the
Bill
with