Red = Prior Learning from CCGPS
Yellow = State changes/rewording
Purple = Footnote from CCGPS
Teaching Guide
Troup County School System
CCGPS Math Curriculum Map
Second –Second Quarter
NBT = Numbers Base Ten
OA = Operations & Algebraic
Thinking
MD = Measurement & Data
G =Geometry
Continue to work on and assess NBT.2 and NBT.3 through routines, WMPWMV, Number Talks and classroom discussions.
CCGPS
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.NBT.8 Mentally add 10 or 100
to a given number 100–900, and
mentally subtract 10 or 100 from a
given number 100–900.
MCC2.NBT.8
This standard asks students to mentally add or subtract
either 10 or 100 to any number between 100 and 900.
Students need to work with pre-grouped objects so
that they can discover that when one adds or
subtracts 10 or 100 that only the digit in the tens or
hundreds place changes by 1.
In first grade, students had to mentally
find 10 more or 10 less than a two digit
number without having to count and
explain the reasoning used. Students also
had to subtract multiples of 10 in the
range 10 – 90 from multiples of 10 in the
range of 10-90 using concrete models or
drawings and strategies based on place
value, properties of operations, and/or
the relationship between addition and
subtraction.
Click on the standard to view the
assessment page.
Essential Questions
How can I mentally add 10 or 100
to a number?
The use of a hundreds board is especially helpful in
teaching this particular standard when adding or
subtracting by 10. This visual aid allows students to see
how numbers increase and decrease from one row to
another.
Examples:
 100 more than 653 is _____
 10 less than 870 is ______
 “Start at 248. Count up by 10s until I tell you to stop.”
In this standard, problems in which students cross
centuries should also be considered.
Example: 273 + 60 = 333.
System Resources
Whole Group
Addition Strategy Notebook
Subtraction Strategy Notebook
BBY:
 Dots
 What’s My Place, What’s My
Value?
Harcourt Math:
 6.1
 8.1
 20.1
 21.1
Think Math:
 Chapter 2: Lesson 5
 Chapter 10: Lessons 7, 8, and 9
Skip Count on Sheet (scroll to pg.47)
Game of 10s and 1s (pg.41)
How can I mentally subtract 10 or
100 from a number?
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
1
CCGPS
Example/Vocabulary
System Resources
MCC2.NBT.8
MCC2.NBT.8
MCC2.NBT.8
Learning Village:
 Where Am I on a Number Line
Revisited
 Base Ten Pictures Revisited pg. 52
Vocabulary
add/addition
subtract/subtraction
mentally
Other Lessons:
 +10 Skip Counting Paths
 Add and Subtract 100 on the
Number Line
Differentiation Activities
Hands-On Standards:
 Adding 10 or 100 Lesson 8
 Subtracting 10 or 100 Lesson 58
Learning Village:
 What’s My Number? Revisited
 Shake, Rattle, and Roll Revisited
 Take 100 Revisited
 What’s My Number pg. 32
Other Lessons:
 Race Around (+10) Ver.1
 Race Around (+10) Ver.2
 Race Around (-10)
Activities for Differentiation
Plus or Minus Stay Same game
(pg.16)
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
2
CCGPS
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.NBT.5 Fluently add and
subtract within 100 using strategies
based on place value, properties of
operations, and/or the relationship
between addition and subtraction.
MCC2.NBT.5
The standard algorithm for addition and subtraction is
not taught in second grade. This standard calls for
students to use pictorial representations or strategies to
find the solution. Students are able to demonstrate
fluency when they are accurate (answer correctly),
efficient (basic facts computed within 4-5 seconds)
and flexible (use strategies such as decomposing
numbers to make ten, using properties of operations,
etc.).
In first grade, students had to add
within 100, including adding a two-digit
number and a one-digit number, and
addition a two-digit number and a
multiple of 10, using concrete models or
drawings and strategies based on place
value, properties of operations, and/or
the relationship between addition and
subtraction.
Misconception Document: NBT.5-9
Click on the standard to view the
assessment page.
Essential Questions
What strategy or strategies work
best for me when I am adding two
digit numbers?
What strategy or strategies work
best for me when I am subtracting
two digit numbers?
Examples of Addition Strategies for 67 + 25:
 Place Value Strategy: I broke both 67 and 25 into
tens and ones. 6 tens plus 2 tens equals 8 tens. Then I
added the ones. 7 ones plus 5 ones equals 12 ones.
I then combined my tens and ones. 8 tens plus 12
ones equals 92.
 Commutative Property: I broke 67 and 25 into tens
and ones so I had to add 60 + 7 + 20 + 5. I added 60
and 20 first to get 80. Then I added 7 to get 87. Then
I added 5 more. My answer is 92.
 Counting On and Decomposing A Number Leading
to Ten: I wanted to start with 67 and then break 25
apart. I started with 67 and counted on to my next
ten. 67 + 3 gets me to 70. I then took away three
from 25 which gave me 22. I then added 2 more to
70 to get 72. I then added my 20 and got to 92.
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
System Resources
Whole Group
Addition Strategy Notebook
Subtraction Strategy Notebook
BBY:
 Dots
 What’s My Place, What’s My
Value?
Harcourt Math:
 4.1, 4.5 (Properties of Operations)
 6.1, 8.1 (Place Value)
 5.2, 5.3, 5.4 (Relating + & -)
Think Math:
 Chapter 1: Lessons 4, 5, 6, & 7
 Chapter 2: Lesson 5
 Chapter 8: Lesson 3
Learning Village:
 Different Paths, Same Destination
pg. 40
 Addition Strategies pg. 84
 Multi-digit Addition Strategies
pg. 79
 Multi-digit Addition Strategies
Revisited pg. 81
 Subtraction with Regrouping
pg. 98
3
CCGPS
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.NBT.5
MCC2.NBT.5
Examples of Subtraction Strategies for 63 – 32:
 Relationship Between Addition and Subtraction: I
broke apart both 63 and 32 into tens and ones. I
know that 2 plus 1 equals 3, so I have 1 left in the
ones place. I know that 3 plus 3 equals 6, so I have a
3 in my tens place. My answer has a 1 in the ones
place and 3 in the tens place, so my answer is 31.
 Adding Up From Smaller Number to Larger Number:
32+8 = 40, 40+20 = 60, 60+3 = 63 so… 8+20+ 3 = 31
 Incremental Subtracting:
63 – 3 = 60, 60 – 10 = 50, 50 – 10 = 40, 40 – 8 = 32
so……. 3 + 10 + 10 + 8 = 31
 Subtraction by Place Value:
63 – 30 = 33, 33 – 2 gives 31
Here is an example of using an empty number line as a
visual for the problem 72 – 39.
System Resources
MCC2.NBT.5
Other Lessons:
 2 Digit Addition Split
 2 Digit Subtraction Split
 Four in a Row with Near Doubles
(Version 2)
 Four in a Row with Near Doubles
(Version 3)
 Base Ten Addition
 Base Ten Subtraction
Arrow Cards (scroll to pg.36)
How Far to 100 (scroll to pg. 42)
Differentiation Activities
Learning Village:
 Take 100 pg. 78
 Number Destinations pg. 45
 Mental Math pg. 68
Other Lessons:
 Close to 100
 Keep on Doubling
 Number Wheel Spin
Vocabulary
place value
properties of operations
relationship between addition and subtraction
fact families
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
Activities for Differentiation
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
4
CCGPS
MCC2.NBT.6 Add up to four twodigit numbers using strategies
based on place value and
properties of operations.
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.NBT.6
This standard asks students to add up to 4 two-digit
numbers by applying place value strategies and
properties of operations.
Example: 43 + 34 + 57 + 24 = ____
In first grade, students had to solve
addition word problems that called for
addition of three whole numbers whose
sum is less than or equal to 20.
System Resources
Whole Group
Addition Strategy Notebook
BBY:
 Dots
Harcourt Math:
 TE 173A - Getting Started
 TE 175A - Getting Started
 TE 179A - Getting Started
Think Math:
 Chapter 8: Lesson 6
 Chapter 10: Lesson 6
Click on the standard to view the
assessment page.
Misconception Document: NBT.5-9
Learning Village:
 Base Ten Pictures Revisited pg. 52
Other Lessons:
 Make 100

Beat Calculator (pg.92)
Essential Questions
Hands-On Standards:
 Adding Two-Digit Numbers Lesson
6
Learning Village:
 Take 100 Revisited pg. 75
Toll Bridge Puzzle
Activities for Differentiation
Differentiation Activities
What strategies can I use to add
two-digit numbers?
Vocabulary
add/addition
two-digit number
strategy
place value
properties of operations
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
5
CCGPS
MCC2.NBT.9 Explain why addition
and subtraction strategies work,
using place value and the
properties of operations.
Explanations may be supported by
drawings or objects.
In first grade, students had to use
addition and subtraction strategies and
explain the reasoning used.
Click on the standard to view the
assessment page.
Misconception Document: NBT.5-9
Essential Questions
How can I use objects, pictures, or
words to explain why addition
works?
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.NBT.9
This standard calls for students to explain using
concrete objects, pictures and words (oral or written)
to explain why addition or subtraction strategies work.
The expectation is that students apply their knowledge
of place value and the properties of operations in their
explanation. Students should have the opportunity to
solve problems and then explain why their strategies
work.
Example: There are 36 birds in the park. 25 more birds
arrive. How many birds are there? Solve the problem
and show your work.
 Student 1: I broke 36 and 25 into tens and ones and
then added them. 30 + 6 + 20 + 5. I can change
the order of my numbers, so I added 30 + 20 and got
50. Then I added on 6 to get 56. Then I added 5 to
get 61. This strategy works because I broke all the
numbers up by their place value.
 Student 2: I used place value blocks and made a
pile of 36. Then I added 25. I had 5 tens and 11
ones. I had to trade 10 ones for 1 10. Then I had 6
tens and 1 one. That makes 61. This strategy works
because I added up the tens and then added up
the ones and traded if I had more than 10 ones.
System Resources
MCC2.NBT.9
Whole Group
Have students record what they are
doing with pictures, numbers, and
words in math journals.
Two Digit Computation
Differentiation Activities
Learning Village:
 Take 100 Revisited pg. 75
Activities for Differentiation
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
How can I use objects, pictures, or
words to explain why subtraction
works?
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
6
CCGPS
MCC2.NBT.9
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.NBT.9
Students should also have experiences examining
strategies and explaining why they work. Also include
incorrect examples for students to examine.
Example:
 One of your classmates solved the problem 56 - 34 =
__ by writing ―I know that I need to add 2 to the
number 4 to get 6. I also know that I need to add 20
to 30 to get 20 to get to 50. So, the answer is 22. Is
their strategy correct? Explain why or why not?
 One of your classmates solved the problem 25 + 35
by adding 20 + 30 + 5 + 5. Is their strategy correct?
Explain why or why not?
System Resources
MCC2.NBT.9
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
Vocabulary
add/addition
subtract/subtraction
strategy
place value
properties of operations
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
7
CCGPS
ONLY TEACH ONE STEP THIS
QUARTER. TWO STEP COMES NEXT
QUARTER
MCC2.OA.1 Use addition and
subtraction within 100 to solve
one and two step word problems
by using drawings and equations
with a symbol for the unknown
number to represent the problem.
Problems include contexts that
involve adding to, taking from,
putting together/taking apart
(part/part/whole) and comparing
with unknowns in all positions.
(See Table 1)
Click here for Table 1
Addition and subtraction within 5,
10, 20, 100, or 1000. Addition or
subtraction of two whole numbers
with whole number answers, and
with sum or minuend in the range
0-5, 0-10, 0-20, or 0-100
respectively.
Example: 8 + 2 = 10 is an addition
within 10, 14 – 5 = 9 is a
subtraction within 20, and 55 – 18
= 37 is a subtraction within 100.
In first grade, students used addition and
subtraction within 20 to solve word
problems. They also used objects,
drawings, and equations with a symbol for
the unknown number to represent the
problem.
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.OA.1
This standard calls for students to add and subtract numbers
within 100 in the context of one and two step word
problems. Students should have ample experiences working
on various types of problems that have unknowns in all
positions, including:
Result Unknown: There are 29 students on the playground.
Then 18 more students showed up. How many students are
there now? (29 + 18 =__)
Change Unknown: There are 29 students on the playground.
Some more students show up. There are now 47 students.
How many students came? (29+ _ = 47)
Start Unknown: There are some students on the playground.
Then 18 more students came. There are now 47 students.
How many students were on the playground at the
beginning? (___ + 18 = 47)
See Table 1 at the end of this document for more addition
examples as well as subtraction examples.
This standard also calls for students to solve one- and twostep problems using drawings, objects and equations.
Students can use place value blocks or hundreds charts, or
create drawings of place value blocks or number lines to
support their work. Examples of one-step problems with
unknowns in different places are provided in Table 1. Two
step-problems include situations where students have to add
and subtract within the same problem.
One- Step Example: Some students were in the cafeteria. 24
more students came in. Now there are 60 students in the
cafeteria. How many were in the cafeteria to start with?
System Resources
Whole Group
BBY:
 Dots
 What’s My Place, What’s My
Value?
Think Math:
 Chapter 2: Lessons 7 and 9
 Chapter 4: Lessons 1 and 2
 Chapter 8: Lesson 10
 Chapter 10: Lesson 7
Learning Village:
 Subtraction Story Problems pg.
105
 Counting Mice pg. 113
Other Lessons:
 Close to 100
 Add – Change Unknown Word
Problems
 Add – Start Unknown Word
Problem
 Take From – Change Unknown
Word Problems
 Take From – Start Unknown Word
Problems
 Change Unknown Powerpoint
(thanks Lisa Whelan)
 More Add Word Prob Examples
(thanks Lisa Whelan)
What’s My Job Addition Poster
What’s My Job Subtraction Poster
What’s My Job Comparing Poster
Click on the standard to view the
assessment page.
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
8
CCGPS
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.OA.1
Essential Questions
How do I know which operation
to use in a one-step word
problem?
System Resources
MCC2.OA.1
MCC2.OA.1
 Student A: I thought, “What and 24 makes 60?” So, my
equation for the problem is □ + 24 = 60. I used a number line
to solve it. I started with 24. Then I took jumps of 10 until I got
close to 60. I landed on 54. Then, I took a jump of 6 to get to
60. So,
10 + 10 + 10 + 6 = 36.
What are some different situations
in which we would subtract?
 Student B: I thought, “There are 60 total. I
know about the 24. So, what is 60 – 24?”
What are some different situations
My equation for the problem is 60 – 24 = □.
in which we would add?
I used place value blocks to solve it. I
started with 60 and took 2 tens away.
I needed to take 4 more away. So, I broke up
a ten into ten ones. Then, I took 4 away. That
Vocabulary
left me with 36. So, 36 students were in the
cafeteria at the beginning. 60 – 24 = 36
add
adding to
putting
together
subtract
taking from
taking apart
comparing
one-step
two-step
equation
unknown
symbol
solve
Differentiation Activities
Hands-On Standards:
 Addition and Subtraction
Lesson 1
 Writing Number Sentences
Lesson 2
Learning Village:
 Every Picture Tells a Story
pg. 119
Other Lessons:
 Word Problems (One Step)
 Word Problems (Two Step)
 Wacky Word Problems
 Addition Word Problems
 Sub Word Problems
Solve Story Problems (pg.20)
Story Problem Centers (pg.45)
Activities for Differentiation
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
]
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
9
CCGPS
MCC2.MD.5 Use addition and
subtraction within 100 to solve word
problems involving lengths that are
given in the same units, e.g., by
using drawings (such as drawings of
rulers) and equations with a symbol
for the unknown number to
represent the problem.
In first grade, students only solved word
problems within 20.
Click on the standard to view the
assessment page.
Essential Questions
How can I solve word problems
involving length?
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.MD.5
This standard asks students to apply the concept of
length to solve addition and subtraction word
problems with numbers within 100. It is important that
word problems stay within the same unit of measure.
Students can use drawings, rulers, pictures, and/or
physical objects to solve the problem. They may also
use equations. It is important to note that equations
may vary depending on students’ interpretation of the
task.
Example: In P.E. class Kate jumped 14 inches. Mary
jumped 23 inches. How much farther did Mary jump
than Kate? Write an equation and then solve the
problem.
 Student A: My equation is 14+___ = 23 since I am trying
to find out the difference between Kate and Mary’s
jumps. I used place value blocks
and counted out 14. Then I
added blocks until I got to 23. I
needed to add 9 blocks.
 Student B: My equation is 23 – 14 = ___. I drew a
number line. I started at 23. I moved back to 14 and
counted how far I moved. I moved back 9 spots. Mary
jumped 9 more inches than Kate.
System Resources
Whole Group
BBY:
 Dots
 What’s My Place, What’s My Value?
Harcourt Math: no match
Other Lessons:
 Linear Measurement Word
Problems
 More Length Word Problems
Arm Span Problems (scroll to pg.60)
Differentiation Activities
Learning Village:
 Solving Problems on a Number Line
Activities for Differentiation
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
Vocabulary
length
equation
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
10
CCGPS
MCC2.MD.6 Represent whole
numbers as lengths from 0 on a
number line diagram with equally
spaced points corresponding to the
numbers 0, 1, 2, ..., and represent
whole-number sums and
differences within 100 on a number
line diagram.
During this quarter continue number
line to include numbers 0 to 100.
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.MD.6
This standard asks students to represent their thinking
when adding and subtracting within 100 by using a
number line. Students should build on their experience
from first quarter using evenly spaced points on a
number line to an open number line.
Example:
Karen has a rope that is 82 inches long. She cuts off 37
inches to give to her friend for a jump rope. How many
inches does she have now?
System Resources
Whole Group
BBY:
 What’s My Place, What’s My Value?
Harcourt Math: no match
Think Math:
 Chapter 1: Lessons 4, 5, 6, and 7
 Chapter 11: Lesson 1
Human Number Line (scroll to pg.69)
Creating A Number Line (scroll to
pg.64)
Adding on Number Line (pg.59)
Solve Word Problems Using # line
(pg.67)
This is new learning.
Click on the standard to view the
assessment page.
Differentiation Activities
Essential Questions
How do I create a number line that
can help me solve addition and
subtraction problems?
Vocabulary
sum
difference
number line
Hands-On Standards:
 Whole Numbers as Lengths on a
Number Line Lesson 6
Learning Village:
 Where Am I On a Number Line?
pg.27
 Solving Problems on a Number Line
Activities for Differentiation
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
11
CCGPS
MCC2.MD.10 Draw a picture graph
and a bar graph (with single-unit
scale) to represent a data set with
up to four categories. Solve simple
put-together, take-apart, and
compare problems using
information presented in a bar
graph.
Example/Vocabulary
MCC2.MD.10
This standard calls for students to work with categorical
data by organizing, representing and interpreting data.
Students should have experiences posing a question with
4 possible responses and then work with the data that
they collect.
Example: Students pose a question and the 4 possible
responses. Which is your favorite flavor of ice cream:
Chocolate, vanilla, strawberry, or cherry?
See Table 1 – Click here
In first grade, students had to organize,
represent, and interpret data with up
to three categories; ask and answer
questions about the total number of
data points, how many in each
category, and how many more or less
are in one category than in another.
Students display their data using a picture graph or bar
graph using a single unit scale.
System Resources
Whole Group
BBY:
 Dots
Harcourt Math:
 TE 45B - Alternative Teaching
Strategy
 TE 47B Advanced Learning &
Language Arts Connection
 3.5
 3.6
Think Math:
 Chapter 5: Lessons 2, 4, and 5
Other Lessons:
 My Favorite Holiday Song Graph
 Collecting and Representing
Data
 Build It Graph It Unit (scroll through
this unit and find great blackline masters
for creating graphs)
Click on the standard to view the
assessment page.
What Pattern Block???? (scroll to pg.76)
Differentiation Activities
Other Lessons:
 Button Bar Graph
 Button Pictograph
Essential Questions
How can I use a picture graph to
organize data and answer
questions?
How can I use a bar graph to
organize data and answer
questions?
picture graph
data set
categories
horizontal
Vocabulary
bar graph
scale
title
vertical
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
Activities for Differentiation
Click here for other lessons and
assessments
12
Standards for Mathematical Practice – 2nd Grade
1. Make sense of problems and
persevere in solving them.
2. Reason abstractly and
quantitatively.
3. Construct viable arguments and
critique the reasoning of others.
4. Model with mathematics.
5. Use appropriate tools strategically.
6. Attend to precision.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in
repeated reasoning.
In second grade, students realize that doing mathematics involves solving problems and
discussing how they solved them. Students explain to themselves the meaning of a problem and
look for ways to solve it. They may use concrete objects or pictures to help them conceptualize
and solve problems. They may check their thinking by asking themselves, “Does this make sense?”
They make conjectures about the solution and plan out a problem solving approach.
Younger students recognize that a number represents a specific quantity. They connect the
quantity to written symbols. Quantitative reasoning entails creating a representation of a
problem while attending to the meanings of the quantities. Second graders begin to know and use
different properties of operations and objects.
Second graders may construct arguments using concrete referents, such as objects, pictures,
drawings, and actions. They practice their mathematical communication skills as they participate
in mathematical discussions involving questions like “How did you get that?”, “Explain your
thinking,” and “Why is that true?” They not only explain their own thinking, but listen to others’
explanations. They decide if the explanations make sense and ask appropriate questions.
In early grades, students experiment with representing problem situations in multiple ways
including numbers, words (mathematical language), drawing pictures, using objects, acting out,
making a chart or list, creating equations, etc. Students need opportunities to connect the
different representations and explain the connections. They should be able to use all of these
representations as needed.
In second grade, students consider the available tools (including estimation) when solving a
mathematical problem and decide when certain tools might be better suited. For instance, second
graders may decide to solve a problem by drawing a picture rather than writing an equation.
As children begin to develop their mathematical communication skills, they try to use clear and
precise language in their discussions with others and when they explain their own reasoning.
Second graders look for patterns. For instance, they adopt mental math strategies based on
patterns (making ten, fact families, doubles).
Students notice repetitive actions in counting and computation, etc. When children have multiple
opportunities to add and subtract, they look for shortcuts, such as rounding up and then adjusting
the answer to compensate for the rounding. Students continually check their work by asking
themselves, “Does this make sense?”
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
13
Table 1: Common Addition and Subtraction Situations.13
Add to
Take from
Put together/ take
apart15
Compare16
Result Unknown
Two bunnies sat on the grass. Three
more bunnies hopped there. How
many bunnies are on the grass now?
2+3=?
Change Unknown
Two bunnies were sitting on the
grass. Some more bunnies
hopped there. Then there were
five bunnies. How many bunnies
hopped over to the first two?
2+ ? = 5
Five apples are on the table.
Three are red and the rest are
green. How many apples are
green?
3 + ? = 5, 5 – 3 = ?
Start Unknown
Some bunnies were sitting on the
grass. Three more bunnies
hopped there. Then there were
five bunnies. How many bunnies
were on the grass before?
?+3=5
Some apples were on the table. I
ate two apples. Then there were
three apples. How many apples
were on the table before?
?–2=3
Total Unknown
Three red apples and two green
apples are on the table. How many
apples are on the table?
3+2=?
Addend Unknown
Five apples are on the table.
Three are red and the rest are
green. How many apples are
green?
3 + ? = 5, 5 – 3 = ?
Difference Unknown
(“How many more?” version):
Lucy has two apples. Julie has five
apples. How many more apples does
Julie have than Lucy?
Bigger Unknown
(Version with “more”):
Julie has three more apples than
Lucy. Lucy has two apples. How
many apples does Julie have?
Both Addends Unknown14
Grandma has five flowers. How
many can she put in her red
vase and how many in her blue
vase?
5 = 0 + 5, 5 = 5 + 0
5 = 1 + 4, 5 = 4 + 1
5 = 2 + 3, 5 = 3 + 2
Smaller Unknown
(Version with “more”)
Julie has three more apples than
Lucy. Julie has five apples. How
many apples does Lucy have?
(“How many fewer?” version):
Lucy has two apples. Julie has five
apples. How many fewer apples does
Lucy have than Julie?
2 + ? = 5, 5 – 2 = ?
(Version with “fewer”)
Lucy has 3 fewer apples than
Julie. Lucy has two apples. How
many apples does Julie have?
2 + 3 = ?, 3 + 2 = ?
(Version with “fewer”)
Lucy has 3 fewer apples than
Julie. Julie has five apples. How
many apples does Lucy have?
5 -3 = ?, ? + 3 = 5
Five apples were on the table. I ate
two apples. How many apples are on
the table now?
5–2=?
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
14
Footnotes from Table 1:
13
6Adapted
from Box 2‐4 of Mathematics Learning in Early Childhood, National Research Council (2009, pp. 32, 33).
14
These take apart situations can be used to show all the decompositions of a given number. The associated equations, which have
the total on the left of the equal sign, help children understand that the = sign does not always mean makes or results in but always
does mean is the same number as.
15
2Either
addend can be unknown, so there are three variations of these problem situations. Both Addends Unknown is a productive
extension of this basic situation, especially for small numbers less than or equal to 10.
16
For the Bigger Unknown or Smaller Unknown situations, one version directs the correct operation (the version using more for the
bigger unknown and using less for the smaller unknown). The other versions are more difficult.
First Grade Glossary:
Addition and subtraction within 5, 10, 20, 100, or 1000. Addition or subtraction of two whole numbers with whole number answers,
and with sum or minuend in the range 0‐5, 0‐10, 0‐20, or 0‐100, respectively. Example: 8 + 2 = 10 is an addition within 10, 14 – 5 = 9
is a subtraction within 20, and 55 – 18 = 37 is a subtraction within 100.
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
15
Standard
Additional Resources for Professional Development
MCC2.NBT.8
BLAST Professional Development Video 2.NBT.5-9
Math Misconceptions 2.NBT.5-9
Math Videos – scroll down to addition and subtraction sections (all videos are excellent, just remember students
are not using the standard algorithm to regroup in 2nd grade)
BLAST Professional Development Video 2.NBT.5-9
Math Misconceptions 2.NBT.5-9
BLAST Professional Development Video 2.NBT.5-9
Math Misconceptions 2.NBT.5-9
BLAST Professional Development Video 2.NBT.5-9
Math Misconceptions 2.NBT.5-9
Teaching Student Centered Mathematics K-3, John Van de Walle and LouAnn Lovin, pages 310-321
MCC2.NBT.5
MCC2.NBT.6
MCC2.NBT.9
MCC2.MD.10
Troup County Schools 2014
2nd Grade Math
CCGPS Curriculum Map
Second Quarter
16
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