PHOTOPAYSAGE
LandscapeRepresentation
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA
October 15th to 17th, 2015
Debora Hunter, Untitled, from the series, Landmarks: Photographs from Taos New Mexico, © 2004. UNM
Art Museum, 2012.6.1
Front Cover: J. B. Jackson, “Connections,” Interstate, Roads, and Structures, March, 1971. From the J. B. Jackson
Pictorial Materials Collection Center for Southwest, UNM, 2-H-04. © 2015, used by permission of the UNM School
of Architecture and Planning (SA+P).
A FRENCH / AMERICAN DIALOGUE
2 SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE
3
THURSDAY Registration, Film Screening,
Opening Reception, Exhibit Opening,
5 FRIDAY Registration, 4 Sessions,
Exhibit Opening, Repeat Screening of Films
10 SATURDAY
Registration, 5 Sessions, Closing
Reception, Book Signing, Exhibit Opening
15 ORGANIZERS AND SPONSORS
16ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
DINGBATS from Landscape magazine, 19511966, used by permission of Peter Goin and
Paul F. Starrs, Black Rock Institute, Reno,
Nevada, copyright holders for the magazine.
1
SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE
All sessions at Garcia Auditorium in George Pearl Hall unless otherwise indicated
THURSDAY
2:30 Registration, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall, until 5:30
3:00 Screening of Films about J. B. Jackson
5:30 Opening Reception and Exhibit Opening, Zimmerman Library
FRIDAY
8:30 Registration, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall, until 4:00
9:00 Welcome and Session 1: Cultural Landscape Photography
10:45 Coffee Break
11:00 Session 2: Interrelation of J. B. Jackson’s Photography and Theory
12:30 Lunch, visit exhibitions
1:45 Session 3: Aesthetic Predilections and Visual Narratives of J. B. Jackson
3:15 Refreshment Break
3:30 Session 4: Contemporary Landscape Interpretation
5:30 Exhibit Opening, University Art Museum, College of Fine Arts
7:00 Repeat Screening of Films about J. B. Jackson with Filmmaker Commentary
SATURDAY
8:30
Registration, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall, until 2:00
9:00 Session 5: Inhabited and Natural Landscapes
10:0 Coffee Break
10:45 Session 6: Photography and the Practice of Landscape Architecture
12:15 Lunch
1:00 Session 7: Old and New Topographics: Historical Points of View
2:00
Session 8: Photography, Art and the Politics of Landscape
3:30 Refreshment Break
3:45 Session 9: Comments and Concluding Discussion
5:30 Closing Reception, Book Signing and Exhibit Opening. Rainosek Gallery, Pearl Hall
2
THURSDAY OCTOBER 15
REGISTRATION
2:30 - 5:30, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall
SCREENING OF FILMS ABOUT J. B. JACKSON
3:00 - 5:20, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
3:00 J. B. Jackson’s Legacy. Janet Mendelsohn and Chris Wilson, with
videographer Miguel Gandert. Albuquerque: UNM Historic Preservation and
Regionalism Program, 2007.
3:35 Figure in a Landscape. Janet Mendelsohn and Claire Marino with the
Conservation Foundation. Santa Monica: Direct Cinema Limited, 1988.
4:25 The Love of Everyday Places. Bob Calo. San Francisco: KQED-TV, 1989.
These films have been re-mastered and re-issued on the DVD entitled, J.B. Jackson
and the American Landscape. The DVD is available as an insert with the special
hardback edition of Drawn to Landscape: The Pioneering Work of J. B. Jackson. It is
also distributed separately by Documentary Educational Resources (www.der.org),
Watertown, Massachusetts.
Repeat Screening beginning with Filmmaker Commentary, Friday, 7:00, see p. 9.
J. B. Jackson at the Hilltop Steak House in Saugus, Massachusetts, 1987, during the filming of
Figure in the Landscape: A Conversation with J. B. Jackson. © Janet Mendelsohn 2015, used by
permission.
3
THURSDAY OCTOBER 15
OPENING RECEPTION
5:30, Willard Room and Great Hall, Zimmerman Library
Welcoming remarks
Chaouki Abdallah, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs
Michael Kelly, Director, Center for Southwest Research and Special Collections
Audra Bellmore, Center for Southwest Research
EXHIBIT OPENING
5:30, Waters Room, Zimmerman Library Exhibit through December 11th.
Documenting the Cultural Landscape: The J.B. Jackson and Chester Liebs Collections, curators, Audra Bellmore, Erin Fussell and Katelyn Bladel. Display cases portion of exhibit continues October 12 - December 11.
The Center for Southwest Research, University Libraries, University of New Mexico is
the repository for two important collections documenting U.S. cultural landscapes.
The John Brinkerhoff Jackson Papers and Pictorial Collection highlight the work of
the internationally celebrated scholar and landscape historian. The Chester H. Liebs
Papers and Pictorial Collections highlight the work of an early leader and educator in
the U.S historic preservation movement. Together these two collections form the core
of an effort on the part of the CSWR to collect materials documenting the vernacular
landscape, particularly through photography.
NEBA Roast Beef Sandwiches and Mike’s Submarines, Latham, New York, Chester Liebs, 1982.
Courtesy of Chester H. Liebs Papers, MSS 843 BC 843-0067, Center for Southwest Research, UNM.
4
FRIDAY OCTOBER 16
REGISTRATION
8:30 - 4:00, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall
AN INVITATION TO DIALOGUE
9:00 - 9:15, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Frédéric Pousin, Chair, French Organizing Committee, see page 8.
Chris Wilson, Chair, American Organizing Committee , see page 13.
SESSION 1: CULTURAL LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY
9:15 - 10:45, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Timothy Davis, “Visualizing Vernacular Landscapes.”
A U. S. National Park Service historian, Davis contributed to Drawn to Landscape: The
Pioneering Work of J. B. Jackson. His history of NPS attempts to balance preservation
and access in iconic American landscapes, National Park Roads: A Legacy in the
American Landscape, is forthcoming from the University of Virginia Press. He has also
contributed to Perspectives in Vernacular Architecture, Studies in the History of Gardens
& Designed Landscapes, Landscape Journal, Everyday America: Cultural Landscape
Studies after J. B. Jackson, and Mapping American Culture.
Monique Sicard, “Bernard Plossu’s Landscapes and New Mexico: in Favor of a Genesis of Photography.”
Sicard is the Director of the Research Team, Genesis of Visual Arts, at the Centre
National de la Recherche Scientifique (National Centre for Scientific Research), Paris,
and also co-heads the ANR program, Photopaysage. In 2010, she initiated a new
discipline, “Photographic Genetics,” modeled after the contemporary French critical
movement, “Literary Genetics.” By examining various stages of photographic creation,
she restores an important part of the intentions of the author. Her publications
include François Arago (2013), and the edited volume, Photo-graphies, Genesis 40/15
(2015).
Brian Goldstein, Session Chair.
Historian Brian Goldstein is assistant professor at the UNM School of Architecture and
Planning. His book, The Roots of Urban Renaissance: Gentrification and the Struggle
Over Harlem, is forthcoming from Harvard University Press.
COFFEE BREAK
10:45 - 11:00, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall
5
FRIDAY OCTOBER 16
SESSION 2: THE INTERRELATION OF J. B. JACKSON’S
PHOTOGRAPHY AND LANDSCAPE THEORY
11 :00 - 12:30, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Paul Groth, “J. B. Jackson’s Slides: Landscape Categories for Thinking and Learning.”
Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, Groth studied with J. B.
Jackson, and upon Jackson’s retirement in 1979, took over teaching his courses in
the history of American cultural landscapes. Groth is the author of the award winning
Living Downtown: The History of Residential Hotels in the United States (1994), as well
as co-editor of two collections of essays: Understanding Ordinary Landscapes (with Todd
Bressi, 1997) and Everyday America: Cultural Landscape Studies after J. B. Jackson
(with Chris Wilson, 2003).
Jordi Ballesta, “J. B. Jackson: Field Research and Amateur Photographic Practices.”
Jordi Ballesta is a contract researcher (ENSP and CNRS) in Paris where he contributes
to the research program Photopaysage. He is also an associate researcher at the labs
UMR Géographie-Cités (CNRS) and CIEREC (Université Jean Monnet). His research
examines the photographic field notes of researchers, mostly in geography and
landscape studies. Among other essays, he has published “Park City de Lewis Baltz: entre
topo, topio et géo-graphies, in Carnets du paysage.”
Richard Longstreth, Session Chair.
Professor of American Studies and director of Historic Preservation at George
Washington University, Longstreth is currently president of the Frank Lloyd Wright
Building Conservancy. Among his numerous books are City Center to Regional Mall:
Architecture, the Automobile, and Retailing in Los Angeles, 1920-1950 (1997), and Road
Trip: Roadside America, From Custard’s Last Stand to the Wigwam Restaurant (2015).
LUNCH BREAK
12 :30, Visit Exhibitions
6
J. B. Jackson,
Rex Club, about
1970. From the
J. B. Jackson
Pictorial Materials
Collection Center
for Southwest,
UNM, 4-L-03.
FRIDAY OCTOBER 16
SESSION 3: THE AESTHETIC PREDILECTIONS AND VISUAL
NARRATIVES OF J. B. JACKSON
1:45 - 3:15, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Helen L. Horowitz, “The Discerning Eye behind J. B. Jackson’s Camera.”
Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz is Sydenham Clark Parsons Professor, emerita, at Smith
College. Her 2002 Rereading Sex: Battles over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in
Nineteenth-Century America was a finalists for the Pulitzer Prize in History. In addition
to editing Landscape in Sight: J.B. Jackson’s America (1997), she is author of Culture
and the City (1974), Alma Mater (1984), and Wild Unrest (2011). Her latest book,
tentatively titled A Taste for Provence, is forthcoming from the University of Chicago
Press.
Bruno Notteboom, “‘Landscape is a Rich and Beautiful Book, We Have but to Learn to Read It’: J.B. Jackson’s Visual and Textual Discourse in the
Journal Landscape.”
Bruno Notteboom is a research professor at the University of Antwerp, Faculty of
Design Sciences. His PhD dissertation (Ghent University, 2009) focused on urban
planning and landscape iconography in Belgium, 1890-1940. He is one of the initiators
of the Recollecting Landscapes project (www.recollectinglandscapes.be), editor of
a book on the Belgian urban photographer Edmond Sacré, and an editor of OASE
Journal for Architecture and of Journal of Landscape Architecture. In 2013 he was a
visiting scholar at the Institute for Urban and Regional Development, UC Berkeley.
Chester Liebs, Session Chair.
Preservationist and landscape historian Chester Liebs is author of 世界が称賛
した日本の町の秘密 (Secrets of Japanese Cities the World Admires: SustainableInfrastructure Lessons from Japan, 2011). His recent donation of his field slides, and
the resulting on-line archives at UNM includes images originally published in his
classic work, Main Street to Miracle Mile: American Roadside Architecture (1985).
REFRESHMENT BREAK
3 :15, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall
7
FRIDAY OCTOBER 16
SESSION 4: CONTEMPORARY LANDSCAPE INTERPRETATION
3 :30, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Frédéric Pousin, “A Renewed Photographic Observatory for Exploring the Metropolitan Territory of Marseille.”
Frédéric Pousin is an architect, a Research Director at the C.N.R.S. (National Centre
for Scientific Research), Paris, and recently taught and headed research at the
national school of landscape architecture (ENSP) in Versailles. He currently heads
the ANR program Photopaysage. Recent publications include, Seeing from Above: the
Aerial View in Visual Culture (with Mark Dorrian, 2013); “Urban Cuttings: Sections and
Crossings,” in Landscape, Vision, Motion (2012); and “Aerial Views and the Future of
Metropolitan Paris,” New Geographies 4, Scales of the Earth (2011).
Matthew Coolidge, “Anthropogeomorphology is Everywhere: Projects of the Center for Land Use Interpretation.”
Matthew Coolidge is the founder and director of the Center for Land Use
Interpretation, an education and research organization based in Los Angeles. The
Center produces exhibitions, presentations, tours, publications, online resources, and
other public programs that examine, describe, and explain the built landscape of the
nation.
Virginia Scharff, Session Chair.
Virginia Scharff, is Associate Provost for Faculty Development, Distinguished Professor
of History, and Director of the Center for the Southwest at UNM. Among her numerous
studies of mobility, gender and cultural landscape are Taking the Wheel: Women and
the Coming of the Motor Age (1991); Seeing Nature Through Gender (2003); and The
Women Jefferson Loved (2010).
8
Édouard Baldus, Untitled , 1860. UNM Art Museum, 72.648.
FRIDAY OCTOBER 16
EXHIBIT OPENING
5 :30, University Art Museum, College of Fine Arts. Exhibit through March 12, 2016.
Vernacular in Place: Old and New Topographic Photography, curators, Miguel Gandert and Chris Wilson
Old. Starting in the 1600s, painters and later photographers of romantic
landscapes composed picturesquely balanced views of nature, punctuated by a
classical ruin or snippet of rural life. Yet from the invention of photography in France
in 1839, some photographers instead surveyed city panoramas or walked its streets
reveling in the everyday. This exhibit first samples this canon of land- and city-scape
photography as taught at UNM by historian Beaumont Newhall and collected by
founding museum director Van Deren Coke in the late 1960s and 1970s.
New. Amid the counterculture and anti-authoritarian zeitgeist of these years,
a younger generation—many UNM students and faculty—overturned the canon of
landscape photography. Those assembled in the New Topographics exhibition of
1975 and kindred artists turned their cameras on gas stations, industrial parks, and
the edge of suburbia building into the desert. Their cool, deadpan, ironic, yet loving
embrace of the contemporary landscape resonates in the work of photographers to
this day.
REPEAT SCREENING OF FILMS ABOUT J. B. JACKSON
7:00, , Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall. For additional information on the films, see p. 3.
7:00 Commentary on the making of the films, Bob Calo and others.
7:15 Figure in a Landscape. Janet Mendelsohn and Claire Marino with the
Conservation Foundation. Santa Monica: Direct Cinema Limited, 1988.
8:05 The Love of Everyday Places. Bob Calo. San Francisco: KQED-TV, 1989.
9:00 J. B. Jackson’s Legacy. Janet Mendelsohn and Chris Wilson, with videographer
Miguel Gandert. Albuquerque: UNM Preservation and Regionalism Program, 2007.
Thomas Barrow, Dart, from the series, Cancellation, © 1974. UNM Art Museum,
74.257.
9
SATURDAY OCTOBER 17
REGISTRATION
8:30 - 2:00, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall
SESSION 5: INHABITED AND NATURAL LANDSCAPES
9:00 – 10:30, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Miguel Gandert, “Space, Time and Photography: The Influences of
Edward T. Hall and J. B. Jackson.”
Award-winning photographer Miguel Gandert is Distinguished Professor of
Communication and Journalism, and Director of the Interdisciplinary Film and Digital
Media program at UNM. Among his publication are Nuevo México Profundo: Rituals of
an Indo-Hispano Homeland (2000); Hermanitaos Comanchitos: Indo-Hispano Rituals
of Captivity and Redemption (with Enrique R. Lamadrid , 2003), and, as photographer,
The Plazas of New Mexico (2011).
Sabine Delcour, “How to Belong to a Place?”
Photographer Sabine Delcour received a master degree in Photographic Image at the
University of Paris 8. For twenty years her photography has investigated the unique
relationships of body and territory, of speech and sharing, of image and reality. For
her, taking photos consists in occupying a “here,” a direct and insistent presence,
linked to an “elsewhere,” something outside of the frame, which makes the frame
more complex.
Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, Session Chair.
Elizabeth Barlow Rogers is the president of the Foundation for Landscape Studies, the
champion of New York City’s Central Park, and a distinguished writer on landscape
history and preservation, including the classic Landscape Design: A Cultural and
Architectural History (2001).
COFFEE BREAK
10:30 – 10:45, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall
10
Miguel Gandert,
Bathers, Civic Plaza,
Albuquerque, ©
1982.
SATURDAY OCTOBER 17
SESSION 6: PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE PRACTICE OF LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE
10:45 – 12:15, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Laurie Olin, “Seeing is Believing/Looks are Deceiving: Postwar Landscape Architecture Practice and Photography.”
Landscape architect, educator and author Laurie Olin guided such signature projects
of OLIN Studio—the LA practice which he founded in 1976—as the National Gallery of
Art Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC; The Getty Center in Los Angeles; and Bryant
Park in New York City. Professor of Practice at the University of Pennsylvania, he is also
the former chair of the Landscape Architecture Department at Harvard University.
Marie-Madeleine Ozdoba, “Rendering the Site, Rendering the Project: Uses of Photography in the Landscape Architecture Practices of Agence Ter and Bureau Bas Smets.”
Marie-Madeleine Ozdoba is a PhD candidate in visual culture studies at the Ecole des
hautes études en sciences sociales, Paris. She holds degrees in architecture, and in
Art theory, and practiced in architecture and urban planning in Vienna, London and
Paris. Her research explores the cultural dimensions of architectural visualization.
Since 2013, she has worked at the research laboratory of the School for Landscape
Architecture (ENSP) in Versailles, and is currently a visiting student at the University of
Chicago.
Katya Crawford, Session Chair.
Katya Crawford, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture, UNM. Her design (with
Sue Frye), “Foxes in the Garden,” was selected for installation at the International
Garden Festival, Domaine de Chaumont-sur-Loire, France (2012). Her publications
on landscape representation include “The Thirty-Second Landscape,” Aether: The
Journal of Media Geography (2012); “Looking up, Looking down,” Journal of Landscape
Architecture, (with Phoebe Lickwar, 2014).
LUNCH BREAK
12 :15
11
SATURDAY OCTOBER 17
SESSION 7: GALLERY TALK
VERNACULAR IN PLACE: OLD AND NEW TOPOGRAPHICS (see page 9)
1 :00 - 1:45, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Lin Chi-Ming, “New Topographics: Historical Points of View.”
Lin Chi-Ming is Professor and Director of the Department of Arts and Design at the
National Taipei University of Education, Taipei, Taiwan. His research interests concern
the study of images, aesthetics and contemporary French thought. His books include
Realistic Photography and Photo-reportage (with Shiao Jun-Sen, 2004), and Multiple
and Tension: On the History of Photography and Photographic Portraiture (2013).
He is also an art critic and curator, as well as a translator of Baudrillard, Foucault,
Benjamin, and Jullien.
Kymberly Pinder, Session Chair.
Dean of the College of Fine Arts, and Interim Director of the UNM Art Museum, Pinder
co-curated its current exhibition, “Necessary Force: Art in the Police State.” She edited
Race-ing Art History: Critical Essays in Race and Art History, while her scholarship has
also appeared in The Art Bulletin, The Art Journal, Third Text, and The African American
Review. Her next book, Painting the Gospel: Black Public Art and Religion in Chicago, is
forthcoming from the University of Illinois Press in 2016.
Frank Gohlke, Landscape, Albuquerque, New Mexico, © 1974. UNM Art Museum, 76.96.
12
SATURDAY OCTOBER 17
SESSION 8: PHOTOGRAPHY, ART AND THE POLITICS OF
LANDSCAPE
2:00, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Raphaële Bertho, “From the American Survey to the French Mission, What Photographic Landscape Policy?”
Raphaële Bertho is a photographer, PhD in Art History and Associate Professor at
Tours François Rabelais University. Her 2010 dissertation, “Landscapes on Request,
Photographic Missions in France and Germany in the 1980s and 1990s,” contributed
to her 2013 book, La Mission photographique de la DATAR, le laboratoire du territoire
contemporain. Her research focuses today on the institutional, artistic, professional
and vernacular uses of photography and visual representations of region since 1945.
Lucy Lippard, “Looking, Then Seeing: Critical Landscape Photography in the Changing West.”
Lucy Lippard is a writer, activist, and sometime curator. Since 1966, she has published
24 books on contemporary art, cultural studies, and place, including Mixed Blessings:
New Art in a Multicultural America (1990), Partial Recall: Photographs of Native North
Americans (1992), The Lure of the Local: Senses of Place in a Multicentered Society
(1997), and Undermining: A Wild Ride through Land Use, Politics, and Art in the
Changing West (2014).
Laura Harjo, Session Chair.
Laura Harjo, Assistant Professor of Community and Regional Planning, UNM. A
scholar of and activist for human rights and native sovereignty, Harjo has served as
the Muscogee (Creek) Nation’s Ambassador to the United Nations. She serves on the
board of directors of the Indian Land Tenure Foundation.
REFRESHMENT BREAK
3:30, Crit Bridge, Pearl Hall
SESSION 9: CONCLUDING COMMENTS AND DISCUSSION
3:45, Garcia Auditorium, Pearl Hall
Chris Wilson
J. B. Jackson Professor of Cultural Landscape Studies at UNM, Chris Wilson is editor
of Everyday America: Cultural Landscape Studies after J. B. Jackson, (with Paul Groth,
2003), the lead author and editor of The Plazas of New Mexico (2011), and editor of
Drawn to Landscape: the Pioneering Work of J. B. Jackson (with Janet Mendelsohn,
2015).
Frédéric Pousin (See page 8)
Dean Geraldine Forbes Isais
13
SATURDAY OCTOBER 17
CLOSING RECEPTION
5:30, Rainosek Gallery, Pearl Hall. Music by the UNM Jazz Quartet.
Book Signing Drawn to Landscape: The Pioneering Work of J. B. Jackson,
Editors, Janet Mendelsohn and Chris Wilson, editors; contributors, Douglas Adams, Robert Calo, Timothy Davis, Miguel Gandert, Paul Groth and Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz; publisher, George F. Thompson.
Exhibit Opening Photographic Notes on the Road: J. B. Jackson, 1955-1989,
curator, Jordi Ballesta. Exhibit through November 11
The J. B. Jackson Collections at the UNM Center for Southwest Research contain
manuscripts, talks, reading notes, letters and annotated slides. However, the only
example of Jackson making field notes is a unique field diary written during a 1957
trip through Virginia, the Carolinas and Georgia. In the absence of other field notes,
the 5,500 Kodachrome and Ektachrome slides in the collections suggest that he
preferred these photographic notes to written notation. While Jackson also made
drawings in the field, his much more numerous slides provide the primary source for
apprehending his way of studying landscapes.
This exhibition focuses on Jackson’s collecting and recording methods. The
images he chose to capture during brief roadside pauses while traveling by car and
motorcycle reveal his brand of empirical and itinerant geography. Excerpts from the
1957 journal, four of his drawings, and maps recreating his travel routes will help
contextualize his field slides, sixty-six of which appear as prints in the exhibition.
J. B. Jackson, Dillon Beach, 1971. From the J. B. Jackson Pictorial Materials Collection Center for
Southwest, UNM, 2-F-13.
14
CONFERENCE ORGANIZERS
Ecole nationale supérieure du paysage de Versailles (ENSP)
School of Architecture and Planning (SA+P) , University of New Mexico
Center for the Southwest Research, University Libraries, University of New Mexico
Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Paris (CNRS) Conference Co-Sponsors
All sponsor UNM, unless specified otherwise. Special thanks to these organizations.
Without their financial and other support this conference would not have been
possible.
Agence nationale de la recherche, Paris (ANR-13-BSH3-0008-01)
Center for the Southwest, History Department
College of Fine Arts
George F. Thompson Publishing, Stanton, Virginia
George Pearl Endowment, SA+P
Gruet Winery, Albuquerque
Historic Preservation and Regionalism Program, SA+P
Interdiciplinary Film and Digital Media Program
Landscape Architecture Program, SA+P
Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs
The FUNd at the University of New Mexico Art Museum, Center for the Arts
UNM Organizing Committee
Audra Bellmore, Associate Professor, University Libraries
Katya Crawford, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture
Miguel Gandert, Distinguished Professor of Communications and Journalism
Brian Goldstein, Assistant Professor of Architecture
Laura Harjo, Assistant Professor of Community and Regional Planning
Gianna May, graduate student, History Department website
Chris Wilson, Committee Chair, J. B. Jackson Chair of Cultural Landscape Studies
French Organizing Committee
Jordi Ballesta, Researcher, ENSP-Versailles
Aurèle Crasson, Assistant Director at ITEM-CNRS-Paris
Sonial Keravel, Lecturer, ENSP-Versailles
Marie-Hélène Loze, Associate Professor, ENSP-Versailles
Marie-Madeleine Ozdoba, Research Assistant, ENSP-Versailles
Monique Sicard, Researcher, CNRS-Paris
Frédéric Pousin, Committee Chair; Research Director, CNRS-Paris
15
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Thanks to all of those who have contributed to the conference:
From the SA+P: Monique Rubio, Lisa Stewart, Melissa Gallegos, Cruz Armendariz,
Chelsey Begay, Valerie Basquez, Beth Rowe, Brayra Lara, Doug Bell, Chris Stewart, and
Linda Bailly. For preparing the conference post card, printed program, and etc.: Katya
Crawford, Ted Weber and Mo Convery. School leadership, for throwing their support
behind the conference: Geraldine Forbes Isais, Michaele Pride, Mark Childs, Alf Simon,
Francisco Uviña and Eric Bernard.
From the University Libraries: Michael Kelly, Erin Fussell, Katelyn Bladel, Maxine
Marks, Cristina Miller, Jennifer Eggleston, Connie Kelly, Amy Mullins, Cynthia Gonzalez
and Ed Padilla.
For translation of discussions, Claire-Lise Bénaud from the University Libraries,
and Walter Putnam and Raji Vallury from the Foreign Languages and Literatures
Department.
From the University Art Museum: Kymberly Pinder, Sherri Sorensen-Clem, Stephen
Lockwood, Steven Hurley, Mariah Carillo and Daniel Linver.
From the Center for the Southwest, History Department: Virginia Scharff, Gianna
May and Jenn McPherson.
And to the many people who will make contributions after this program goes to
press.
SA+P
In addition to fostering creative design and planning, community-engaged
scholarship, and innovative research as in this conference, the UNM School of
Architecture and Planning offers undergraduate majors, graduate professional
degrees, and graduate certificates in:
Architecture
Community and Regional Planning
Landscape Architecture
Historic Preservation and Regionalism
Urban and Regional Design
For more information about these dynamic programs, visit the SA+P website:
http://saap.unm.edu
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J. B. Jackson, The Strip, Signs; Commercial I. March 1972. From the J. B. Jackson Pictorial
Materials Collection Center for Southwest, UNM, 3-G-18. © 2015.
John Lovell, J. B. Jackson in San Jose, New Mexico, during the filming of Bob Calo’s
documentary, J. B. Jackson and the Love of Everyday Places, photo © 1987.
Back Cover: Sabine Delcour, The Builders, © 2000.
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