WEST WINDSOR
& PLAINSBORO
NEWS
WW-P’S FREE COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER
WWPINFO.COM
Letters: New Parking Rules Affect Windsor Haven
WW Council Dickers Over Reimbursement
State Transit Village Designation Sought For Junction
Settlement in Plainsboro Cop Termination Case
Police Reports
33
Classifieds
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ISSUE DATE: JUNE 25, 2010
The Class of 2010: North & South
Graduation Day. Students at WW-P’s two high schools graduated on June 18.
A list of graduates and more pictures begin inside on page 17. Pictured above
are retiring South Principal Chuck Rudnick, Ciara Schoenauer, Darian Lanzetta,
Sarita Patankar, and Erica Simi. Below are North’s TJ Johnson, Sara Lieber,
Denise Pyfrom, and Jaclyn Silva.
Photos by Brian McCarthy
NEXT ISSUE: JULY 9
New Administrators Take
Helm in WW-P District
by Cara Latham
the middle school level. The WWP school board appointed him as
s the WW-P school district the new principal during its meetsaid goodbye to another se- ing on June 15.
nior class this month, it alA native of Kearny, Dalton
so parted ways with four of its prin- earned his undergraduate and
cipals and its director of guidance. graduate degrees from St. Peter’s
But it also welcomed two new College in Jersey City. His father
administrators and promoted a worked for the United States Post
third as the school year came to a Office, and his mother worked as a
close. The WW-P school board secretary at the Newark Housing
hired Gerard Dalton to replace Authority.
longtime principal Art Downs at
When he was 16 years old, he
Community
worked
after
Middle
and
school with stuRick Charwin
dents from a
Gerard Dalton has been
to
replace
Catholic school.
named principal at
Nancy IcenHe continued to
hower as the
Community Middle
do so through
district’s dihigh school and
School, while Rick
rector of guidcollege, where
Charwin will take over
ance.
he went to
as director of guidance.
The WW-P
school for busischool board
ness. He worked
has not named
in the finance inreplacements for South Principal dustry for a few years, but always
Charles Rudnick and Millstone missed working in a school enviRiver Principal Mary Ann Isaacs.
ronment. “It’s your first love; it’s
the thing you’ve always done,” he
hat began as a career in the said.
financial industry has transHe began teaching sixth grade,
formed into nearly two decades in and throughout his career, found
public education for Gerard Dal- that teaching at the fifth, sixth, and
ton, who has been appointed as the seventh grade levels was the best
new principal at Community Mid- fit for him. “I found that the middle
dle School.
school was a favorite place for
Dalton, who replaces longtime me,” he said. “I enjoy working
principal Art Downs, who is retir- with the young adolescents and all
ing this year after serving as the the challenges it brings.”
school’s only principal, is bringing
with him longtime experience at
Continued on page 9
A
W
DAY-BY-DAY IN PLAINSBORO & WEST WINDSOR
For more event listings visit
www.wwpinfo.com. For timely updates, follow wwpinfo at Twitter
and on Facebook.
Friday
June 25
Drama
Miss Connections, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Comedic mystery by Marvin
Harold Cheiten of Princeton.
$27.50 to $29.50. 7 p.m.
Playwright’s Lab, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and
Montgomery streets, Trenton,
609-392-0766.
www.passagetheatre.org. $15. 7 p.m.
The Wizard of Oz, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com. Family musical classic. $10; $7 for children.
Blankets, seat cushions, and insect repellent are recommended.
Picnics welcome before show.
Food available. Parking fee of $5.
7:30 p.m.
Sordid Lives, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, 609570-3333. www.kelseytheatre.net.
Drama to benefit the James Tolin
memorial fund. $25. 8 p.m.
The Threepenny Opera, Princeton Festival, 185 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-537-0071. www.princetonfestival.org. Musical featuring music of Kurt Weill and
lyrics by Bertolt Brecht. $40. 8
p.m.
The Heidi Chronicles, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater,
609-258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Wendy Wasserstein’s Pulitzer Prize winner. $16. 8 p.m.
Ragtime, Villagers Theater, 475
DeMott Lane, Somerset, 732-8732210. www.villagerstheatre.com.
Musical. $18. 8 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Princeton University,
Bernstein Gallery, Robertson Hall,
609-258-2222. www.princeton.edu. Last day for “How You See
Me,” an exhibit of more than 50
works of art and poetry created by
HomeFront clients focuses on
how others see them and how
they see themselves. 10 a.m.
Artists Network, Lawrenceville
Main Street, 2683 Main Street,
3
11
14
21
34
Summer Gardens:
Mary Painter, below
right, has created a
garden of ‘outdoor
rooms,’ which can be
seen on the Greening of
West Windsor Garden
Tour, Saturday, June
26. See story page 35.
Lawrenceville,
609-647-1815.
www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by
area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Summer Art Sale, Garden State
Watercolor Society, Princeton
Shopping Center, 301 Harrison
Street, Princeton, 609-394-4000.
www.gardenstatewatercolorsociety.org. Original art works in
watercolor, oil, pastel, and mixed
media; both framed and unframed. Noon to 5 p.m.
A Last Hurrah, Gallery 125, 125
South Warren Street, Trenton, 609989-9119. www.gallery125.com.
Closing reception to celebrate the
artists and supporters to mark the
six years a success. The gallery
closes on Saturday, June 26. Music
and refreshments. 6 to 9 p.m.
Continued on page 23
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
Views & Opinions
JoanJoanEisenberg
Eisenberg
Joan
Eisenberg
Office:
609-951-8600
x110
Joan
Eisenberg
RE/MAX
Greater
Princeton
Office:
609-951-8600
x110
Mobile:609-306-1999
Princeton
Forrestal
RE/MAX
GreaterVillage
Princeton
[email protected]
Office:
609-951-8600
x
110
Mobile:609-306-1999
Princeton Forrestal Village
Mobile:609-306-1999
www.JoanSells.com
[email protected]
Office:
609-951-8600 x 110
[email protected] com
Mobile:609-306-1999
www.JoanSells.com
[email protected]
To the Editor:
PIACS Is Misusing
Charter School Law
They decided not to pursue the option since many costly modifications were needed. PIACS is also
trying to get a change in zoning to
have a school in a facility zoned for
he founders of the Princeton commercial businesses.
We understand the kindergarten
International
Academy
class
at PIACS is full. That is not a
Charter School (PIACS)
surprise
since parents in West
misused the intent of the charter
Windsor
and
Plainsboro are going
school law to get their school apto
get
full-day
kindergarten at the
proved on an expedited basis in the
school
when
the
district only offers
waning days of the Corzine admina
half-day
program.
As taxpayers
istration. In spite
and
voters we
of their rhetoric,
have
questions
the simple fact is
for
the
decision
the
proposed How can the Departmakers
regardschool is a bou- ment of Education
ing
their
desire
to
tique
private allow PIACS to use a
push
this
bouschool
mastique school at
querading as a facility that would not
the expense of
charter school. be approved to host a
taxpayers
in
The taxpayers in public school kinderthese
communithe townships afgarten?
ties at a time
fected were not
when
every
given a choice to
politician
is
talkfund or not to
ing
about
ways
to
reduce
property
fund this non-public education intaxes.
stitution.
How can the Department of EdWe understand PIACS is again
ucation
force taxpayers in West
trying to take advantage of proceWindsor
and Plainsboro to fund a
dures at the township level. They
full-day
kindergarten
program at
want to use a substandard facility
PIACS
when
the
taxpayers
can not
to house their school. A few years
afford
to
fund
the
program
at the
ago, when faced with a shortage of
WW-P
public
school
district?
classroom space, the West WindHow can the Department of Edsor-Plainsboro Regional School
ucation
allow PIACS to use a facilDistrict looked at the same facility
ity
that
would not be approved to
to house its kindergarten children.
Owner/Sales
Associate
Village G
rande V
alues
VILLAGE
GRANDE
VALUES
These Wonderful Homes are Located in West Windsor in the Village Grande Active
Adult Community. The Exceptional Clubhouse Includes Indoor and Outdoor Pools,
Tennis, Recreation Rooms, Exercise Rooms, and Social Rooms. The Community is
Close to Major Roads, Shopping & Commuter Train.
West Windsor: 2BR, 2BA
freshly painted home with
many upgrades including
gleaming Hdwd flrs in the LR,
DR, KIT, FR & Sunroom. The
Kit features light maple cabs
and Lge Center Island. MBR
w/tray ceiling & MBA w/soaking tub & stall shower.
FR w/door to yard, 2FBA.
Extensive landscaping affords privacy. $300,000
T
NEW LISTING
DU
West Windsor: 2BR, 2 Full
BA. Hardwood flooring in
Entry, Living Room, Dining
Room and added Sunroom.
Living Room features gas
fireplace and Dining Room
with crown molding and
bay window. Double French
doors lead to Sunroom and
large deck. Great location
backing woods. $268,900
CE
D
West Windsor: 3BR, 3BA,
+Loft. Vaulted Living Room
& Dining Room. Eat-in
Kitchen w/island with breakfast bar, sunny breakfast
area w/slider to deck. FR
adjacent to Kitchen. 1st Fr
MBR w/2 walk-in closets,
MBA w/soaking tub & shower. Additional 1st floor BR,
+full Hall BA. Loft area
w/neutral décor, 3 rd BR
w/Full BA. Corner location
adjacent to common space.
$329,000
RE
2
The News welcomes letters. Mail them to 12 Roszel
Road, Princeton 08540. Fax them to 609-243-9020.
Or E-mail them: [email protected]
Call Joan Today for More Information or to see a Property!
Office: 609-951-8600 x110 Mobile 609-306-1999
HOT! HOT! HOT!
WEST WINDSOR/PLAINSBORO
SALES INCREASING!
NOW IS THE TIME TO SELL!
WEST WINDSOR STATISTICS FOR MAY & JUNE
Units
Listed
Date
June
May
Totals
June
May
Totals
Listed
Avg.
Pended Units
Sold
Sold Volume
Sold Avg.
36 20,766,999 $576,861 11 25 12,455,000 $498,200
45 26,546,985 $589,933 32 23 10,096,400 $438,973
81 47,313,984 $584,123 43 48 22,551,400 $469,820
PLAINSBORO STATISTICS FOR MAY & JUNE
Units
Listed
Date
Listed Volume
Listed Volume
24 10,155,876
32 13,673,500
56 23,829,376
Listed
Avg.
Pended Units
Sold
$423,161
$427,296
$425,524
Sold Volume
13 17 7,024,250
11 24 8,934,543
24 41 15,958,793
Avg.
DOM
37
65
50
Sold Avg.
Avg.
DOM
$413,191
$372,272
$389,238
55
59
57
All Statistics taken from Trend MLS.
TWO GREAT WEST WINDSOR HOMES FOR SALE!
Call Donna to View!
OPEN HOUSE SUN 6/27 1-4 PM
9 CANDLEWOOD. 4 beds 2.5 baths office or
5th bedroom. Full finished basement. Inground
pool on approx 1acre. Backs to Preserved land.
Impeccable. $610,000.
16 PIEDMONT DRIVE - Walk to Princeton Jct.
Train. 2.15 ACRES OF LAND. Cul-de-sac location. 6 beds, 3 full baths. You must see this
home to appreciate it. $550,000.
CIRCLE OF EXCELLENCE AWARD WINNER 2002-2009
Former Teacher, Top-Producing Realtor
Make the Educated Choice!
DONNALUCARELLI.COM
Cell: 609-903-9098 • Office: 609-799-3500
See Me and More Info at My Website:
[email protected]
53 Princeton-Hightstown Rd. • Princeton Junction, N.J.
DONNA LUCARELLI
Richard K. Rein
Editor and Publisher
Cara Latham
News Editor
Lynn Miller
Community News Editor
Brian McCarthy
Craig Terry
Photography
Vaughan Burton
Production
Diana Joseph-Riley
Martha Moore
Account Representatives
Bill Sanservino
Production Manager
Lawrence L. DuPraz 1919-2006
Founding Production Adviser
Euna Kwon Brossman
Michele Alperin, Bart Jackson
Pritha Dasgupta
Jennifer Bender
Phyllis Spiegel
Caroline Calogero
Contributing Writers
For inquiries, call 609-243-9119.
Fax: 609-243-9020.
E-mail: [email protected]
Home Page: www.wwpinfo.com
Mail: 12 Roszel Road, Suite C-205,
Princeton, NJ 08540
© 2010 by Richard K. Rein.
JUNE 25, 2010
host a public school kindergarten?
If anything the standards for charter schools should be stricter than
standards for public schools since
charter schools have no taxpayer
oversight in the form of elected
representatives.
How can the zoning board in
Plainsboro approve the request for
a change in zoning in an expedited
manner when such a request is going to cost the taxpayers in Plainsboro twice? First the charter school
is going to take money away from
the public schools to the tune of
$800,000. Second, it is going to
convert the property from
office/commercial use to educational use; in other words convert
from a property tax-paying facility
to a tax-exempt facility. The taxpayers in Plainsboro can not afford
this loss of ratable at a time when
our property taxes are increasing
substantially this year.
We urge both state and local
elected officials to consider the
detrimental effect of this boutique
school before the final approval is
granted.
Diana Li, Kathy Liu,
Shirren Wang, Nancy Wu,
Dawei Wang, Jia Mi
Plainsboro
New Parking Rules
Affect Residents
The Biggest Healthcare Reform Could
Well Be You
By Andrew Miller, MD, MPH
A
s confusing as the healthcare debate has been over
the past year, one of the farthest-reaching changes now taking
place in the practice of medicine
has nothing to do with new legislation. Instead, it is the emerging role
that we — as patients and families
— are expected to play. Increasingly, health professionals are asking patients to be part of the healthcare team. This is especially true
for older adults.
If you are a senior about to be released from the hospital, you have
a one in five chance of being rehospitalized within 30 days of your
discharge. For some health conditions, such as heart failure, heart attack (acute myocardial infarction),
pneumonia, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),
hospital readmission rates are even
higher. Many of these re-hospitalizations may be preventable.
New Jersey is one of only 14
states chosen to participate in a national pilot program to help identi-
fy the best ways to ensure coordination as you move from one care
setting to the next, from hospital to
home, or to a nursing home, a rehabilitation facility, or within a hospital. These movements are referred to as “care transitions.”
The New Jersey Care Transitions Project (NJCTP) focuses on
Educated and motivated patients and their
families can have an
impact now in avoiding
re-hospitalization.
seniors at high risk of re-hospitalization. While the project is concentrating on 44 communities in
Burlington and Camden counties,
the lessons being learned have
statewide implications. National
data shows that re-hospitalization
rates decline when people become
more knowledgeable about and involved in their own healthcare.
If you are about to be discharged
from the hospital, you should:
Ask the nurse or doctor three
questions — “What is my worst
problem?” “What do I need to do?”
“Why is it important for me to do
this?” Be sure you understand the
answers.
Ask the social worker or nurse
about help you may need when
leaving the hospital and how you
can get that help.
Once home, you should:
Review all discharge information, including when to make appointments with doctors for follow-up care;
Read up on the new medications
prescribed in the hospital, fill the
prescriptions, and make an updated
list of medications;
Contact the doctor right away if
you are having problems with your
illness or have questions about
your treatment plan.
Another way to take more control over your healthcare and help
ensure you receive the most appropriate care is by using a personal
health record (PHR). A summary
of your overall health, the PHR also includes a list of all medications
you are taking. The very act of
compiling a PHR gives you a deeper understanding of your own
health, allowing you to make informed decisions. It also helps doc-
THE NEWS
tors and other healthcare providers
better coordinate your care.
While some of the provisions in
the recent health care reform legislation will take years to come into
effect, educated and motivated patients and their families can have
an impact now in avoiding re-hospitalization.
Andrew Miller, MD, MPH is
co-leader of the New Jersey Care
Transitions Project and Director of
Physician Services at Healthcare
Quality Strategies Inc. (HQSI), the
nonprofit Medicare quality improvement organization (QIO) for
New Jersey. Free PHRs are available on the HQSI website,
www.hqsi.org.
Miller, who is board certified in
Public Health and General Preventive Medicine, is a graduate of
Princeton University and Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, and he earned
his MPH at the Harvard School of
Public Health.
Miller and his wife, Lynne Ruff,
MD, have been West Windsor residents since 1982. Their daughters,
Becky and Lisa, both went through
the West Windsor-Plainsboro
schools and graduated from High
School South.
M
ayor Shing-Fu Hsueh says
that declining property values are a major factor in rising taxes for West Windsor residents.
But in Windsor Haven condominium home values have been
threatened by his administration,
which imposed major cuts in onstreet parking, making the community a much less attractive place to
live and raise a family.
Rather than working with residents to solve the problem and develop constructive parking solutions, the Mayor brazenly claimed
that no parking has been removed.
This was an argument rejected
by the many neighbors who cannot
find anywhere to park for their
families and guests and who are
now at risk of being ticketed by police.
Proper parking rules attract wide
support –– not least by helping
keep roads clear for emergency vehicles. But wiping out much-needed parking that communities have
relied on for many years without
considering the impact it will have
is appalling.
I urge residents of other condominiums in West Windsor to stay
alert to the activities of the administration using the Open Public
Records Act. They should demand
that the mayor properly consult all
residents when making these extraordinary decisions.
Anthony Singer
43 Ketley Place
AAPSG Thanks All
For Year’s Success
O
n behalf of the African American Parents’ Support Group
executive committee I want to
thank each and every one of you for
your leadership and support of the
AAPSG and our children this past
school year.
We have had an exciting year of
achievements in our partnering on
information resource programs for
parents and students and enrichment opportunities.
Highlights of our successes for
the school year include:
Continued on following page
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Princeton Junction, NJ 08550
RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
3
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4
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
we face challenging budgetary times, the
AAPSG is committed to continuing our partnership with the WW-P School District to
Continued from preceding page
address the critical issue of our time of the
Expanded back-to-school night informa- achievement gap facing African-American
students in our school district.
tional and resource tables.
Eliminating the achievement gap requires
An annual college planning event hosted the muti-prong approach of school, commuby Colgate University.
nity, parental engagement, strategic reAnnual informational program on navi- sources, committed pedagogic strategies
gating the school district hosted by our prin- that promote positive messages that our children can achieve their dreams of success, a
cipals.
culturally embracing curriculum, and a diAnnual black history program showcas- verse school district of faculty, guidance
ing the theatrical and musical talents of our counselors, administrators, and support staff
children.
who reflect our student population.
As we transition during this coming
Informational and resource events on
school year in our ww-p
community service, inschool district leadership
ternship, and summer
ranks, the AAPSG is cauopportunities for our
The AAPSG is committiously optimistic that we
children with our comted to addressing the
will see more Africanmunity partners includachievement gap facing
American principals, asing Plainsboro and
sistant principals, faculty,
West Windsor townAfrican-American stuguidance and other key
ship recreation and sodents in our district.
staff hired and retained incial services, Trenton
to the WW-P school disBig Brother and Big
trict.
Sister, and Princeton HealthCare Systems.
We are most excited about continuing the
Striving for excellence in a program
positive and healthy working relationship to
where more than 500 children and youth
ensure the success of all children in our wonwere recognized for their academic and
derful school district. We will double our efleadership gifts. The new program compoforts to ensure that public education does not
nent also showcased the artistic, musical,
suffer but continues to thrive despite antiand oratory gifts of our children.
public education policy direction coming
A summer math enrichment program in from the current state government.
July to help our children get a head start for
We wish those of you headed for retirethe new school year.
ment the best and thank you for your years of
New summer early education reading ini- dedicated service and commitment to our
tiative in partnership with the West Windsor children and to quality public education the
branch of Mercer County Library and the WW-P district is known for providing.
We look forward to another school year
WW-P district commenced this week with
of
building even greater opportunities for
more than 30 parents and children reading
learning and growing for WW-P school disAfrican-American literature together.
trict children.
An AAPSG Facebook page, a new youth
Thanks for your incredible support and to
corner, and youth engagement program are your staff for this great school year.
being launched.
Barbara Edmonds
Thanks to your support in our 25th an- President, AAPSG
niversary year we continue to grow. While
Letters & Opinions
PLAINSBORO
$334,900
Beautiful 2 bedroom, 2 bath
Princeton
Crossing townhouse. Living
room w/vaulted
ceil and fireplace, dining rm,
spacious eat-in
kit. Large master
bedroom and
master bath.
Attached garage.
MLS5726623
MLS5726623
MLS5726705
PLAINSBORO
$289,900
Desirable 2 bedroom Brittany
townhouse.
Recently repainted, newer carpeting & newer
kitchen appliances. Fireplace
in Living rm, finished Loft, patio.
Interior location.
MLS5726705
MLS5714089
MLS5726394
PLAINSBORO
$535,000
Spacious 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath Princeton Crossing
home w/open flr plan. Eat-in kitchen w/ granite
counters & stainless appliances; 2-story family rm
w//fpl; Master ste w/vaulted ceiling. MLS5714089
WEST WINDSOR
$469,900
Beautifully maintained Colonial on wooded lot.
Freshly painted inside & out. Refinished HW flrs,
LR/DR combo, spacious Family rm; new appliances in updated kitchen. MLS5726394
MLS5721157
MLS5722838
WEST WINDSOR
$699,900
Move in ready 5 BR, 3.5 BA Colonial in prestigious
Le Parc II. Freshly painted interior, new carpeting,
Kit w/granite counters, finished bmst., backyard
to open space. MLS5721157
WEST WINDSOR
x$949,500
Exquisitely appointed 5 BR, 3.5 BA Colonial
in Waterford Estates. Wonderful open floor plan to
entertain indoors and out; in-ground pool, bonus rm,
guest ste. MLS5722838
Cranbury Twp
$979,000
TRULY GORGEOUS! 5 bdrm/3.5
bath w/Guest suite. Sweeping staircase in foyer. Fabulous location custom inside & out. LS#5603323
Marketed by Maureen Provenzano
(609) 924-1600
East Windsor Twp
$199,900
Hurry to see this engaging 2BR/2BA
condo. Security and intercom systems, cozy fireplace. Cathedral ceilings, eat-in kitchen, central air.
LS#5662860
Marketed by Rozana Yoosuf
(609) 799-2022
East Windsor Twp
$209,000
Move quickly to secure this welcoming 2-bedroom townhome. Eat-in
kitchen, central air. It deserves a
prize for real comforts. LS#5724707
East Windsor Twp
$229,900
Settle with style in this very pleasing
3BR/2+BA townhome. Family room,
eat-in kitchen, central air. Pamper
the family with this nugget.
LS#5681654
East Windsor Twp
$309,900
Rare opportunity in desirable
Windsor Woods. 3BR/2.5BA townhome w/main fl master, backs to
woods. Updated kitchen, vaulted
ceilings & garage. LS#5711449
Plainsboro Twp
$1,050,000
Custom 5BR/5BA home surrounded
by preserved land! Grand dressing
room, gourmet kitchen, finished basement, 3-car heated garage, 7-yrs
young! LS#5622978
Marketed by Judith Monahan
(609) 799-2022
Marketed by Annie Battash
(609) 799-2022
Marketed by Beth Miller
(609) 924-1600
Marketed by Marion Brown
(609) 924-1600
E
US PM
O
H 1-4
N 7
PE /2
O N6
U
S
Plainsboro Twp
$1,090,000
Walk into the wonderful, warm style
of this fashionable 5BR/4+BA residence ideally sited on 0.75 acres.
Cozy fireplace. Family room, pantry.
LS#5725666
Marketed by Lana Chan
(609) 799-2022
Princeton
$229,900
Taste reigns in this delightful 2-bedroom condo. Cozy fireplace. Eat-in
kitchen, central air. Hard-to-resist
appeal! LS#5678718
Princeton Junction
$469,000
Get ready to snap up this deluxe
3BR/2+BA home. Cozy fireplace.
Family room. A jewel with many
facets! LS#5678709
Princeton Junction
$569,000
Distinctive 4BR/2+BA home situated
on 0.52 acres. Cozy fireplace. Family
room.
A
top-caliber
home!
LS#5719120
Somerset
$263,900
End your search with this very special
2BR/2+BA townhome. Cozy fireplace. Cathedral ceilings, skylights,
breakf. rm. Central air. LS#5721805
South Brunswick Twp
$455,900
37 Liberty Drive. Discover the ideal
style that comes with this 4BR/2BA
residence on a corner lot. Family
room, cathedral ceilings, skylights.
LS#5700458
Marketed by Lana Chan
(609) 799-2022
Marketed by Lana Chan
(609) 799-2022
Marketed by Lana Chan
(609) 799-2022
Marketed by Sydney Chung
(609) 799-2022
Marketed by Dharmista Patel
(609) 799-2022
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West Windsor Twp
$485,000
Just minutes from the Princeton Jct
train station, this 3BR/2.5BA home is
perfect. Totally renovated, you can
just move right in. LS#5726425
Marketed by Phyllis Hemler
(609) 924-1600
West Windsor Twp
$688,000
Bright & open 5 bedroom home
w/hardwood floors, soaring ceilings &
spacious rooms. Perfect for entertaining & family time. Walk to train.
LS#5715591
Marketed by Marion Brown
(609) 924-1600
West Windsor Twp
$719,900
GORGEOUS!
Remodeled
&
Fabulous! 4bdrm/2ba in Kings Point.
Beautiful landscaping! Private backyard! Upgrades & custom features
throughout. LS#5644507
Marketed by Maureen Provenzano
(609) 924-1600
West Windsor Twp
$724,999
5 BR, 2.5 bath, new gourmet kitchen,
open floor plan with skylights, hardwood floors, Berber carpeting, finished basement. Spacious backyard.
LS#5713682
Marketed by Wendy Merkovitz
(609) 924-1600
www.prufoxroach.com
Princeton Home Marketing Center Princeton Junction Office
253 Nassau St.
44 Princeton-Hightstown Rd.
609-924-1600
609-799-2022
West Windsor Twp
$769,000
Estates at Princeton Jct, near train,
Toll Brothers Mansfield Colonial.
Gorgeous 4 BR, 3.5 BA, finished
basement w/ bath. 4 yrs young
LS#5720070
Marketed by Roberta Parker
(609) 924-1600
An Independently Owned and Operated Member of the
Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which
there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race,
color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin.
West Windsor Twp
$775,000
14 Hawk Drive. Perfect Location!
Outstanding Landscaping! 5 bedrooms, 3 Full Baths. Bright, Spacious
Contemporary. LS#5716036
Marketed by Marcy Kahn
(609) 924-1600
Mortgage · Title · Insurance
Everything
You Need.
Right· Here.
Right Now.
Mortgage
· Title
Insurance
Everything You Need. Right Here. Right Now.
The Perfect Settlement…We Guarantee It!
JUNE 25, 2010
NEW LISTING!
Suburban Mom
by Euna Kwon Brossman
tering, accessorizing, and depersonalizing. All of this can help increase appeal and sale price and decrease time on the market.
“If there are personalized colors,
if the carpet is dirty, the floors are
worn, or the towels and bedding
What exactly does it
mean to stage a home?
It’s the process of
making a home appeal
to the greatest common
denominator of buyers.
haven't been refreshed, to the potential buyer it’s a reflection on
how the entire home has been kept
and maintained,” explains Rachel.
“Something as simple as a worn
towel can leave a negative impression with the buyer. They wonder if
they can’t buy a five dollar towel,
have they taken care of the water
heater? And that costs the seller.”
“Life is so hectic for people today, so most of them want a
turnkey home. They don’t want a
fixer-upper, and they want to see
neutral,” says Tracey. “If you invest in some paint, if you buy some
new carpet, if you buy fresh towels,
you’re not wasting money. The
money that you do put in, you’re
going to get back tenfold.”
RADHA CHEERATH
peals to homebuyers and what
might offend. People also have to
understand that how you live in
your home now and how you market your home for sale are two
completely different things. That’s
where we can really help.”
“The process of staging is frugal,” adds Tracey. “People confuse
it with the process of interior design. Our first objective is to keep
the costs down because we know
home sellers don’t want to invest a
lot of money. It’s about repurposing.
“We can go into a linen closet
and find brand-new towels. We’ll
use a little money to make huge enhancements for big impact. A big
green plant in the corner gives life
to a room that may not have had life
before. Fresh flowers, relocating
furniture, all of this can make the
difference in selling your home
quickly for the most profit.”
Contact Tracey or Rachel at
Staged Right LLC, Home Staging
& Design. Tracey Merrill, 609915-9310 or [email protected] Rachel Pincus, 609610-3633 or [email protected]
BROKER ASSOCIATE
“Excellence is not an act, but a habit”
• NJAR Circle of Excellence Award Gold Level ‘03-‘09
• Mercer County Top Producers Association ‘01-‘10
Email: [email protected]
Office: 609-799-8181
Cell: 609-577-6664
26 Lakeshore Drive, Princeton Junction, NJ
RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
Impeccably maintained, landscaped,
and in move in condition colonial
on a rarely offered location. Serene
park like lot backing to green acres.
Entrance foyer graced with hardwood
flooring. Sunny Eat-in-Kitchen, with
gorgeous views of the backyard.
Entertain in the family room
with cozy wood burning fireplace.
Spacious master bedroom suite
with walk in closet, and attached
bath, Generously sized additional
bedrooms. Multi level wood deck
extending the length of the home,
offering a magnificent view of the
backyard with mature plantings
including apple and peach trees.
Professionally landscaped backyard
provides privacy, and backs
to preserved green acres. Located
approx 2 miles from Princeton
Junction train station, ideal for NYC
commuters. Close proximity to major
highways, shopping, and blue ribbon
west Windsor Plainsboro schools.
All major systems of the home have
been updated and are under home
warranty. Offered at $669,900
50 Princeton-H
Hightstown Rd • Princeton Jct. NJ
609-7799-88181
LONG & FOSTER
Real 609-936-2525 x
Estate
Professional, Experienced & Educated Agents
33 Princeton-Hightstown Road
Princeton Junction, NJ 08550
T
Joseph Gulino
Broker/Sales Associate
Mary E. Weaver
Broker/Sales Associate
Dir: 609-936-2525 x2554
ABR, GRI, ASP
ABR, CRS, SHS
Cell: 609-213-0548
[email protected]
Dir: 609-936-2525 x5384
Dir: 609-936-2525 x5365
Cell: 908-578-0545
[email protected]
Cell: 609-865-8223
[email protected]
Matthew O'Connell
Josephine “Josie” Rost
Maria DePasquale
SRES
Sales Associate, ASP,
Home Mortgage Consultant
Dir: 609-936-2525 x2549
FHA Specialist
Cell: 609-851-2377
[email protected]
Dir: 609-936-2510
Cell: 609-439-9684
[email protected]
Broker/Sales Associate
ABR, GRI
Dir: 609-936-2525 x5370
[email protected]
ABR: Accredited Buyer’s Representative • CRS: Certified Residential Specialist
ASP: Accredited Staging Professional • GRI: Graduate Realtor Institute • SHS: Senior Housing Specialist
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Hopewell
$324,900 (orig. $339,000)
Located in the beautifully maintained and peaceful
Hopewell Grant community, this lovely 3 bedroom
townhome boasts a light, airy, open floor plan, fireplace, windowed master bathroom with large soaking
tub, separate laundry room, 2 car garage with several
amenities, including clubhouse and pool.
Call Joe Gulino, 609-213-0548
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West Windsor
$695,000
Spacious 5 BR 3.5 BA Colonial. Kit. boasts oak cabinetry, granite counters, top of the line appls., ceramic
tile floor & 2 pantries. Crown molding in the foyer, LR
and DRs give this home a gracious air. Impressive FR
w/new HW floors, brick FP, skylights and a wet bar
area. Main floor also has a BR and full BA. Grand
master suite w/a sitting rm., master BA w/jacuzzi tub,
skylights & double walk-in closets. Backs to new
walking trail so you & your family can enjoy the 123
acre comm. park & pool w/out ever crossing a street.
Call Lori Ann Stohn 609-750-5384
East Windsor
125 Hickory Corner Rd. A paver walkway leads to this
5 + bdrm, 2 bath expanded cape on .63 park-like acres.
This comfortable home has newer energy saving features, including windows, storm doors, roof, siding,
furnace, hot water heater and more. Beautiful hardwood floors in most rooms. A sunny family room has
a wall of windows overlooking treed yard. There is an
attached 2 car garage with attic plus 36' x 18' outbuilding for the hobbyist. Conveniently located just
off Rte 130, close to shopping and transportation
routes.
Call Mary Weaver 609-865-8223
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Matthew O'Connell
Have a comment?
E-mail your thoughts to our
editor: [email protected] wwpinfo.com.
Or add your opinion to the
discussion to the stories posted online at www.wwpinfo.com. Signed comments will
be considered for the print
edition of the WW-P News.
Lori Ann Stohn
Broker/Sales Associate
CE
racey Merrill lives in West
Windsor with her husband,
Jim, an acoustical consultant
whose work includes concert halls
and university libraries.
Their son, Luke, 11, is going into seventh grade at Grover Middle
School. Daughter Hayley, 13, is
going into ninth grade at High
School South. In recent years,
Tracey worked as personal assistant for Bob Hillier, the worldrenowned architect who owns his
own architecture firm in Princeton.
“I picked up so many details and
nuances about architecture from
him and all about flow and color, so
I learned what I loved on the job,”
says Tracey. “If you’re lucky, you
come back to doing work you’re
passionate about. So I’m extremely
lucky.”
Rachel’s husband, Steven,
works in New York as an IT recruiter. Their daughter, Nicole, 12,
is going into seventh grade at
Grover and son, Ben, 14, is going
into ninth grade at High School
South. Rachel majored in finance
in college and then worked in sales
in New York’s garment district.
Life took the family out to live in
California. In 2000 she was recruited into the home-staging business
by the realtor who sold them their
home, who was impressed at the
way Rachel had put their house together after their move.
“Sometimes it just helps to have
a neutral party, someone who doesn't have judgment clouded by emotions,” says Rachel. “We’re also
extremely aware of what’s going
out there. We have our pulse on the
market, so we understand what ap-
RE
DU
T
oday's real estate scene is
still very much a buyer's
market, so if you're looking
to sell, you're going to need all the
help you can get. And just like that,
on cue, enter Staged Right, a home
staging and design company started by two suburban moms from
West Windsor.
The concept of home staging is
still relatively new in this area, but
it's something that's been hot in
other areas of the country, especially the West Coast, for two decades.
And if you're a fan of HGTV, you
know that home decorating, design, and staging shows currently
rule the roost.
“Whether it’s a job interview or
selling your house, you never get a
second chance to make a first impression,” says Tracey Merrill.
“Staging your home means showcasing it to its fullest and best potential to make it stand out from the
rest on the market. It helps maximize investments and increase
profitability.”
“For most people, their home is
their largest investment, and since
the real estate market has taken
such a huge hit in recent years it’s
especially important to put your
home in the best possible light,”
says Rachel Pincus, the other half
of Staged Right. “Real estate
agents love a home that’s been
staged because they know the
home is going to look exactly how
they want, with no unpleasant surprises.”
Tracey and Rachel’s business
partnership sprang out of a friendship that began eight years ago
when Tracey’s son, Luke, and
Rachel’s daughter, Nicole, started
kindergarten together at Maurice
Hawk School. Tracey was developing a reputation in town as the
“organizing” lady.
She had an eye and talent for
helping people clear the clutter in
their homes and create calm out of
chaos. Meanwhile, Rachel was fast
becoming known as the “color” lady because she had a flair for helping people choose the best paint
colors to dress up their homes and
make them stylish and comfortable. She had been running Staged
Right out of her home, but back
then, all her work was in New
York’s Westchester County because the concept of home staging
there was popular in a way that had
not yet caught on locally. Each
woman was aware of the other’s
talents and passions. After years of
talking about going into business
together, this year, they finally
made the leap.
“We figured four eyes are better
than two,” laughs Rachel, “and it
was time because now, people get
it, and the work is coming our way.
It’s another layer to creative selling. When people live in their
homes, they have a lot of emotions
wrapped up in them, and it’s difficult for them to envision what
needs to be done. They know
something needs to be done, but
they don’t know where to start, and
that’s where we come in.”
“The kids are older,” says
Tracey, “so it was a good time for
us to figure out a way to do something together and follow our
dreams. At the same time, we are
really helping people get to a place
where they need to be if they are
ready to sell their homes.”
So what exactly does it mean to
stage a home? It’s the process of
making a home appeal to the greatest common denominator of potential buyers. It includes everything :
creating an open floor plan, declut-
THE NEWS
Home Mortgage Consultant
FHA Specialist
NMLS 239152
Lawrenceville
$417,000
8 Port Mercer Rd. Pristine single family corner property in desirable Yorkshire Woods. This 3 bedroom ,
2.5 bath features brand new granite counter tops in
kitchen and bath, and new Stainless Steel appliances.
Home freshly painted throughout. Plus full finished
basement and so much more. Close to all shopping and
major commuter routes.
Call Maria DePasquale 609-851-2377
609.936.2510 Tel
609.439.9684 Cell
866.359.1339 eFax
[email protected]
www.mattoconnell.com
33 Princeton-Hightstown Road
Princeton Junction, NJ 08550
West Windsor
$489,000
Beautifully updated 5 BR 3.5 BA home. Taste-fully
decorated, crown mould., recessed lights. Wood flrs.
Kit. w/granite countertops. Cer. tile flr. & backsplash;
coordinating appls. DR w/new cust. built in china cab.
Paver patio & lndscpd. fenced backyard. Gas FP. MBR
ste. w/sit. rm., dress. rm., vaulted ceil., wood-burning
FP, skylights & balcony. 5th BR ste. on main flr.
Adjoining full BA. All BAs updated w/new fixtures &
cust. painting.
Call Josie Rost 609-306-2074
5
6
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
People In The News
In This Market You Need
an Experienced Agent & Good “Karma”
Karma Estaphanous
Broker/Sales Associate
Over 18 Years full time Agent
NJAR Circle Of Excellence (96-09)
Re/Max Hall Of Fame – 2007
Re/Max of Princeton
www.karmarealtor.com
[email protected]
Office: 609-452-1887 x 7080
Cell: 609-851-4844
343 Nassau St
Princeton, NJ 08540
CALL NOW FOR A NO-COST PROPERTY
MARKET EVALUATION
Helping You Choose the Right Home
Is Claire’s Specialty.
WW-P News
Scholarships
E
rica Gbekel of West Windsor received the West Windsor-Plainsboro News High
School South Scholarship. She begins her college experience this
summer at Xavier University of
Louisiana with classes in public
speaking and language arts.
Born in Manhattan and raised in
Brooklyn, she moved to West
Windsor with her family five years
ago. “It was a big change from the
busy city,” she says. “My parents
chose the area for the school district.”
Her mother, Diana, is a registered nurse at Robert Wood Johnson Hospital in Hamilton. Her father, Eric, is an accountant who
commutes by train to New York
City. She has a younger brother,
Marcus, and a younger sister,
Danielle.
Gbekel (pronounced Beckel)
has been a volunteer at Princeton
Hospital and a Sunday school
teacher at St. David the King. She
worked on the yearbook at South.
She also received a scholarship
from the African-American Club.
Her plans are to major in biology.
“The scholarships will help further
my career,” she says.
J
oanna Chapman received the
WWP News scholarship at High
School North. Born and raised in
Plainsboro, she will major in political science at Seton Hall University in the fall. She is working at Super Fresh this summer.
Erica Gbekel, left, of High School South and Joanna
Chapman of North were this year’s recipients of the
West Windsor-Plainsboro News Scholarships.
She attended Wycoff, Millstone, and Community Middle
schools, as well as North. A choir
member since elementary school
she was able to travel to London.
She was in the ensemble cast for
“High
School
Musical,”
“Camelot,” and “Joseph and the
Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” as well as dramas. “Music
and theater are something I really
enjoy doing but I’m not making a
career out of it,” she says. “Dancing is not my strongest but I can
hold my own.”
Her sisters, Robin Januszewski, 32, lives in Pennsylvania with
two children; and Kristin
Januszewski, 30, graduated from
Boston University with a bachelor’s degree in psychology, and
works at Eden. They both graduated from West Windsor-Plainsboro
High School (now South). Her
mother, Betsy Scott, is a registered
nurse.
“The scholarship was a huge
surprise and I was really honored to
receive it,” she says. “It is a huge
weight lifted off our shoulders and
will help pay for books.”
Maritime Award
George Li, an eighth grade student at Grover Middle School, was
honored by the National Maritime
Historical Society award for his individual documentary on submarine history presented at the New
Jersey History Day State Competition held May 1t at William Paterson University. His research, in
considering the NHD theme of “Innovation in History, Impact, and
Change,” determined when the submarine became a viable weapon of
war, and the implications for naval
warfare since World War I.
Li’s project was facilitated by
Joan Ruddiman, coordinator of
the PRISM Program at Grover
Middle School.
JUNE 25, 2010
Realty Insights by Donna Reilly
O
vestment through economic
ups and downs, keep these
points in mind:
1. CONTROL YOUR DEBT.
Keeping your overall debt low,
and maintaining your credit
rating are paramount, especially for when you need to refinance your mortgage.
2. PROTECT WHAT YOU
HAVE. If you're not in negative
equity, congratulations! To
keep your position strong,
avoid taking a home-equity
loan, which would risk putting
you in negative equity if the
value of your property drops.
3. REVIEW YOUR MORTGAGE ON A REGULAR BASIS. Rates are at alltime lows.
It may be time to review your
mortgage with your lender, to
see if you should lock in your
rate or adjust your terms now.
It's important to stay on top
of the latest news in the real
PLEASE JOIN OUR CAREER SEMINARS!
Century 21 Abrams
Hutchinson & Associates
64 Princeton Hightstown Road
Princeton Junction, NJ
Navigating Choppy Real Estate Waters
ver the past couple of
years, you may have
heard of homeowners
being "underwater" or "upside
down" in their mortgages.
These terms refer to negative
equity, when borrowers owe
more on their mortgages than
their homes are worth. How
does this happen?
Negative equity can occur
when a property declines in
market value, resulting in a
current value that's less than
what the homeowner paid for
the property. It can also occur
when the homeowner increases his or her mortgage debt.
As well, negative equity can be
the fallout of the combination
of these two things.
Reports indicate that more
than 24 percent of all U.S. residential properties with mortgages were in negative equity
at the end of last year. To
weather your real estate in-
THE NEWS
Questions answered regarding:
• Income Potential
• Real Estate School
Locations & Times
• Licensing Requirements
• General Overview
estate market, and within your
own neighborhood. Please remember to visit www.WestWindsor-Homes-NJ.com or
call me on my cell at 609-4623737 any time for more information.
Donna Reilly, Weichert,
Princeton Office, 350 Nassau
Street, Princeton. 609-9211900. Home: 609-860-8498.
www.DonnaReilly.com
[email protected]
Gloria Hutchinson
Owner/
Sales Associate
Ed Bershad
Manager/
Broker Associate
Why Choose
Century 21 Abrams,
Hutchinson & Associates?
• #1 Brand
in Real Estate
• Leader in the Local
Marketplace
• Onsite Training
• Busy Office with
over 100 Agents
We Look Forward
to Meeting with you!
Call 609-945-4115
for details and dates!
64 Princeton Hightstown Rd
Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 Abrams, Hutchinson
609-683-5000
& Associates
Rates are at all-time lows. It may be time to review your mortgage with
your lender, to see if you should lock in your rate or adjust your terms.
Faith
Kristopher and Sean Centofani of Plainsboro were among
seven young people who were confirmed as members of Princeton
United Methodist Church last
month. For information about the
church, located at the corner of
Nassau and Vandeventer streets in
Princeton, call 609-924-2613.
Dance
Taylor Birnbaum, 16, has been
dancing at Galaxy in West Windsor for 12 years. She studies ballet,
jazz, lyrical dance. She began
studying dance at age three in Staten Island. She is a student dance instructor at the dance school.
A member of the competition
team at the Galaxy of Dance, Birnbaum participated in DanceXplosion’s regional competition in
Sparta last month. The team earned
the Xcalibur Award which is
awarded to the highest scoring
group with “Ballet Gone Bad,” a
routine that features the entire team
with dancers from ages 5 to 18.
“This award was extra special as
it recognized the talents and efforts
of all my dancers from my
youngest, right up to my graduating seniors,” said Kelly Gorner, the
studio’s director and choreographer. “It gives me great pleasure to
teach both my recreational dancers
as well as my competitors. Dancing
contributes to the growth of selfconfidence in all participants.”
A rising senior at High School
South, Birnbaum is a member of
the National Honor Society and the
Math Honor Society. She has also
been a section editor of the yearbook since her freshman year.
Her sister, Brittany, a graduate
of High School South and University of Miami, will attend law
school in the fall. Her brother, Andrew, is at University of Maryland.
Their mother, Darlene, is assistant
to the dean of art and design at
Fashion Institute of Technology in
New York City. Their father, Alan,
is an attorney at CitiGroup.
New Officers
Miki Krakauer of West Windsor was installed as president of the
Trenton-Lawrence Chapter of
Hadassah at the Runway Restaurant on May 25.
New board of directors for the
United Federation of Princeton
Mercer Bucks include Mark
Merkovitz of West Windsor as
vice president of campaign, and
Stacey Wasserman of West
Windsor as women’s campaign
president. They were installed at
the annual meeting on Thursday,
June 24, at at Adath Israel Congregation, in Lawrenceville.
Births
The University Medical Center
at Princeton has announced the following births:
Daughters were born to Plainsboro residents Daneen A. and Ted
Spitaletto, June 7; and Dorothy
Mensah and Richard Ewusie,
June 10.
Deaths
Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA. Survivors include a
brother, Anthony Cortez Stokes of
Plainsboro.
Janet Falzarano White, 48, of
Spartanburg, South Carolina, died
June 10 at Regional Hospice
Home. Survivors include a sister,
Regina Prieto of West Windsor.
Donations may be given to the
American Cancer Society, c/o
Look Good/Feel Better Program,
154 Milestone Way, Greenville,
SC 29615.
Melville Carroll Brown, 92, of
Key Biscayne, Florida, died June
10. He lived with his family in
West Windsor in the early 1960s.
Cards may be sent to his daughters,
Cathy Crescioni, 9615 Parkside
Trail, Champlin, MN 55316; Valerie Brown 166 Grassmarket, San
Antonio, TX 78259; or Vicky
Fields, 19611 Encino Way, San
Antonio, TX 78259.
Tironia Porcha Stokes, 20,
died on June 6 at University of
Continued on following page
408 Plainsboro Rd
Plainsboro, NJ 08536
Visit our neighborhood websites:
T: (609)716-9600
F: (609)716-9602
1-888-637-6188
www.M3Realty.com
www.OurWalkerGordonfarm.com • www.OurPrincetonCrossing.com
www.OurGroversMill.com
Real Estate Agent
Sales Positions
Available, Now Interviewing…
Come Join Us
• No Desk Fee
•No Franchise Fee
• High Commission
Split of 70/30*
Call for a confidential appointment.
*Subject to sales experience/sales volume.
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
West Windsor - Beautiful colonial features 4 bed rooms •
study room • conservatory room • 3½ baths • 2 car garage •
full finished basement • 9 ft ceiling on the 1st floor • crown
molding • kitchen with 42" cherry cabinets • granite counter
tops and center island • 2nd floor features a spacious master
suite with sitting area and master bath with dual vanities •
shower and soaking tub with Jet • princess suite • Jack and Jill
bath • two bedrooms and upgraded bathrooms. $899,000
Plainsboro - Crossing at Grover’s Mill...prime loc, quiet neighborhood. A real pleasure to show. Well appointed, tastefully
decorated, like a model home. Hardwood flr throughout, gourmet kit, custom window treatments, cathedral ceiling family
room, fully fin. bsmt w/custom bar, M. bed. rm. w/seating area,
prof. landscaping w/paver patio. $939,000
Hamilton - 1977 Well-maintained & bright contemporary
split w/side entry, 2-car garage. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 2-story
entry foyer. Living room w/cathedral ceiling & brick wall fireplace. Brand new windows, furnace. 2-yr. gas & hot water
heater. 4-yr. new AC and new roof. Brand new gutters. Carpet
in family rm. HW in other areas. New kitchen w/ new cabinets,
stove, exhaust fan & dishwasher. Ceramic flrs. 5-yr. deck.
Move-in condition. A must see! $389,000
East Brunswick - Fee simple ownership only $40+monthly
maintenance fee, priv.back yard, for playground, veg/flower
garden. Move in condition. Brazian cherry wood flrs, updated
kitchen, newer appliances. Freshly painted interior, power
wash exterior. Full finished bsmt w/office. Spacious rms w/family rm on flr level. Best buy in town. $349,900
7
8
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
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JUNCTION
BARBER SHOP
33 Hightstown Rd., Princeton Jct.
ELLSWORTH’S CENTER (Near Train Station)
Hrs: Tues - Fri: 10am - 5:45pm
Sat: 8:30am - 2:30pm
609-799-8554
Continued from preceding page
Xiaoping Zheng, 86, of West
Windsor, died June 12. Arrangements were by Brenna Funeral
Home, 340 Hamilton Avenue,
Trenton.
Aneta Bauder Zinetti, 75, of
Cherry Hill died June 12 at
Brighton Gardens of Cherry Hill.
She formerly lived in West Windsor for 30 years. A charter member
of the Twin W First Aide Squad,
she was a former member of
Princeton Junction Fire Company
and a Red Cross instructor. Survivors include her daughters and
sons-in-law, Gail and Terry
Moomaw and Susanne and James
Basilone; her son, Bruce Zinetti;
four siblings, Nancy, Roy, Frank,
and JoAnn; four grandchildren;
and eight great-grandchildren. Donations may be made to Morriston
Baptist Church, 20291 Southeast
33 Street, Morriston, FL 326683485
Helen A. Porto, 76, died June
13, in the University of Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Survivors include a
daughter and son-in-law, Patricia
and Pat Morabito of Plainsboro.
Donations may be made to St. Jude
Children’s Research Hospital, 501
St. Jude Place, Memphis, Tennessee 38105.
Abraham Jachzel, 86, of Fair
Lawn died June 13. Survivors include a daughter and son-in-law,
Gloria and John Putrino of West
Windsor. Donations may be made
to the United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum, in Washington, D.C.
Herbert O’Brien Sr., 89, of
Woodbridge died June 16, at JFK
Medical Center, Edison. Survivors
include a sister, Alice Leach of
Plainsboro. Donations may be
made to the Shetland Sheepdog
Rescue Group at: SSPSNJ 370
Union Avenue, Bridgewater
08807.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Donations may be made to the
American Heart Association, 1
Union Street, Suite 301, Robbinsville 08691; or St. George
Greek Orthodox Church, 1200
Klockner Road, Hamilton 08619.
Michael B. Zapantis, 62, of
West Windsor died June 16 at his
home. Born and raised in Brooklyn
Heights and Long Island City, New
York, he lived in West Windsor
since 1998.
A graduate of City University of
New York, School of Engineering,
Class of 1969, he received a master
of science in transportation planning from the Polytechnic Institute
of Brooklyn in 1971 and juris doctor from New York Law School in
1978.
Zapantis was admitted to practice before the United States Patent
and Trademark Office in Patent
Cases in 1978, attorney and counselor of the Supreme Court of the
United States in 1982, as well as attorney and counselor of the United
States Court of Customs and Patent
Appeals. He was also a licensed engineer in New York, New Jersey,
and Connecticut.
As a licensed attorney, Zapantis
served on the New York Patent Bar
and was currently serving as the
deputy director, Procurement Department, Port Authority of New
York and New Jersey. He was
working with both state and federal
agencies on the new development
leading to the restoration of the
World Trade Center property.
Survivors include his wife of 31
years, Victoria Zapantis; his
daughter, Melanie N. Zapantis;
two sons, Michael J. and Kristofer
A. Zapantis; his sister and brotherin-law, Genevieve and David Zirman of Flushing, NY, and his
nephew, Jamie Zirman, of
Lorraine Sassman, 86, of
Plainsboro died June 17 in the University Medical Center at Princeton. Born in Massachusetts, she
was a longtime resident of Plainsboro. She retired after 20 years of
employment as a secretary with
Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation of Princeton.
Survivors include her husband,
George W. Sassman; two sons and
daughters-in-law, James and Marion Sassman, and Kevin and Diane
Sassman; three grandsons, James
Sassman Jr. and his wife, Vanessa,
and Daniel and Patrick Sassman;
and three great-granddaughters,
Breanna, Korri, and Ashlin.
Bradford J. Griffin, 92, of
Suffield, Connecticut, died June
17, in West Windsor. Survivors include a daughter and son-in-law,
Jill Griffin and Bill Farren of West
Windsor. Donations may be made
to the Visiting Nurses Association
of Central Jersey Hospice, 176
Riverside Avenue, Red Bank, NJ
07701 or the Office of Radio &
Television-Catholic Mass, 15
Peach Orchard Road, Prospect, CT
06712.
Carolyn Rachel Gefner, 34, of
San Francisco, California died
June 22. Born in Great Neck, New
York, she was a former Plainsboro
resident. Survivors include her
mother, Marjorie Gefner, of Lumberton; and a brother, Charles
Gefner. Funeral services and burial
are Sunday, June 27, at 11:30 a.m.
at New Montefiore Cemetery,
Farmingdale, New York.
JUNE 25, 2010
THE NEWS
New Administrators
Continued from page 1
For the past eight years, Dalton,
who lives in Asbury Park, has
worked in the Clinton Township
school district, where he served as
principal of the Clinton Township
Middle School for the past six. Before Clinton, he was working as a
principal of a small school of only
83 children nearby. The role was
part of a shared services agreement, and officials were looking at
the possibility of merging the
school. That’s when he moved over
to Clinton Township.
He has previously taught in
Chester Township, Warren Township, and Newark. In Clinton, he
has had experience over the last
few years in school expansion. He
was charged with building a new
school: everything from working
with school staff in the referendum
process to designing and actually
opening the school. The new facility is now in its third year of operation.
“I think I can bring with me experience of great instruction and
being able to supervise, and a
knowledge of middle schoolers
and their development needs,” Dalton said.
Dalton said he looks forward to
getting to know his colleagues and
understanding what is in place to
analyze what needs to continue and
what needs to be improved.
“I’m going to be going through a
lot of discussion and analysis,” said
Dalton. “I don’t think it’s the proper thing to go in and make changes
unless you’re charged with it. You
need to see what’s going well and
honor history before you jump in
and make dramatic changes.”
Dalton said he was drawn to the
WW-P district because of its reputation. “I needed an opportunity for
growth where I could bring my
contributions, and where I could also learn,” he said. “After the first
interview, I had that feeling that
this could be a place to do that.”
Dalton’s salary for the upcoming school year will be $147,530.
R
ick Charwin began his career
as a music teacher, moved on
to guidance counselor, eventually
becoming a guidance director, and
then became an assistant principal.
Along the way, he has served as a
radio talk show host, run his own
business as a therapist, and has also
enjoyed life as a musician.
Now Rick Charwin will begin a
new chapter of his life as the WWP school district’s newest director
of guidance, replacing Nancy Icenhower, who retired this year.
How he got to WW-P is even
more interesting. The opportunity
to come to WW-P came as a result
of a lost one, particularly a job he
lost at the high school in Bernards,
where he was an assistant principal. His position, as well as several
others, were eliminated this year
due to budgetary constraints.
“I had a lot of different interviews and offerings, but the only
one that really seemed to be perfect
for me was this one in WW-P,” he
said. “Had I known about this, even
if I were still here, it would have
been a position that would greatly
interest me because of the quality
of the district and the people in it.”
Charwin says he hopes to apply
his myriad of life experiences to his
new role in the district. Because of
those varied experiences, “you’re
much more real when you work
with kids,” he said. “I’ve been out
in the word and have done some interesting things.”
He grew up in Woodbridge,
graduating from high school there
Rebecca Rogers
Gerard Dalton
Rick Charwin
before attending Berklee College
of Music in Boston. He earned his
undergraduate degree from Kean
University in music education. He
later earned a master’s in counselor
education, also from Kean, and
then a doctorate degree in education from Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale.
Charwin began his career as a
music teacher and band director.
“That’s where my original love is,
and I carried it with me through today,” he said. He then became a
guidance counselor and became interested in administration. “I
thought I could do a lot of good
things for kids if I got to be in
charge of the department, includ-
ing setting directions and putting
everybody on a consistent path,” he
said.
He began at the Rumson-Fair
Haven district, and later moved to
the Bridgewater-Raritan school
district. He served as a guidance
counselor and later as a director for
about 20 years before coming to
Bernards High School, where he
acted as an assistant principal. Because there were only four administrators, though, his duties were
widespread.
“I’m excited about this new
challenge,” he said, adding that he
is excited to work in a district “so
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9
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
Kathryn Baxter, Realtor Associate
www.kathybaxter.com
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West Windsor, NJ - 3 Haverford Rd - Beautiful 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath Colonial in Heatherfield on over an acre
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Kathryn Baxter
Henderson Sotheby's International Realty
37 North Main Street • Cranbury, NJ 08512
Office: 609-395-0444 • Cell: 516-521-7771
Home: 609-730-0088 • Fax: 609-730-0087
Email: kathrynmbaxter[email protected]
Continued from preceding page
dedicated to excellence. It seems like a perfect fit.”
Charwin lives in Asbury — a Hunterdon
County town outside of Clinton — where he
and his wife, Melissa, moved last November. Even before he began his career, Charwin was exposed to the educational process.
His father was a salesman for Wrigley’s
gum, while his mother was a business manager for the Eagleton Institute of Politics on
Rutgers’ Douglas Campus.
Outside of education, he has done voiceover work for commercials and has spent the
last 10 years as the host of an entertainment
talk show on WDVR FM, a full-service,
family-oriented FM station operating at 89.7
Mhz from Delaware Township, NJ. It utilizes a translator on 91.9 Mhz in
Lawrenceville to serve the Lawrenceville,
Princeton, and Trenton area and points
south.
He views the volunteer gig as his way of
giving back to the community that is also
“fun and rewarding.” In addition, he is a musician and also a licensed therapist who runs
his own private practice in Warren. “You
work hard all day and maybe do a radio show
one night, and see some patients on another,” he said, pointing out that he usually
works every day except Sundays. “Life is
short, and you want to get the most you can.”
Charwin said his therapy work allows
him to hone his skills in working with parents and kids.
The WW-P school board approved his
hiring at its meeting on June 15. He said he
has already been communicating and planning with his new colleagues through Email. “Everybody has been so welcoming
and wonderful,” he said. “I think transitions
can be very easy if everybody is on the same
page, and it seems like everyone in this district is on the same page.”
Charwin said he looks forward to seeing
what is working well and what he can do to
encourage those initiatives, but also see
where he can make improvements. “I’m not
looking to reinvent the wheel, but bring the
David Argese
knowledge I have and experience I have and
make the excellent work even better,” he
said.
“I couldn’t be more excited about the new
challenge and looking at what was an unfortunate incident with the budget, which has
become such a blessing, a gift,” he added. “I
feel really lucky.”
Charwin’s salary for the upcoming school
year will be $137,076.
D
avid Argese is excited about returning
to the elementary level in WW-P, this
time as Dutch Neck’s acting principal.
Argese was approved by the school board
on June 15 to move from his current position
as assistant principal at Grover to principal
at Dutch Neck. Prior to being appointed as
assistant principal, a position he has held for
one year, he spent the previous five years as
the district’s elementary math and science
curriculum supervisor.
Argese has an undergraduate degree from
Trenton State College (the College of New
Jersey) and has done graduate work at Arcadia University, Georgian Court University,
and Rider University, where he recently
completed his principal certification.
He started off his teaching career with
two years at Notre Dame High School in
Lawrence, coming to WW-P as a teacher at
Community Middle School. From there, he
JUNE 25, 2010
Reimbursement Takes Center Stage
W
by Cara Latham
hile the devil may be in
the details in setting a
new reimbursement policy, most council members seemed
to be on the same page when it
comes to one idea — eliminating
the current flat, monthly mileage
and meal allowance of $250 given
to certain township employees.
The issue of reimbursements,
and how to handle them, has been a
recurring issue over the past two
years. The council gave it another
shot on June 14 when it reviewed a
draft ordinance proposed by members Charles Morgan and Linda
Geevers. Ultimately, however, the
council assigned Township Attorney Michael Herbert to draft a policy based on the discussion.
The debate was not over the
need for a clear standard. Rather,
the debate surrounded whether the
council was overstepping its authority under the Faulkner Act
form of government in trying to
create a new, detailed ordinance
became a teacher at Grover Middle
School when it first opened in
1999. He left the district for about a
year to become a K-12 math supervisor in Hillsborough before coming back as WW-P’s math and science curriculum supervisor, where
he spent five years before taking on
the position of assistant principal at
Grover.
“I knew I wanted to eventually
go back to the elementary level because I really loved it,” said Argese
about his newest position. Because
of the number of retirements, the
opportunity became available this
year after administrative realignments. Argese said he spoke with
the superintendent about the possibility of going back to the elementary level.
Because of his former position
as an elementary level supervisor,
he has previously worked with the
staff at Dutch Neck. “They’re very
passionate about teaching, about
kids, and about best practices,” he
said. “They’re constantly learning.”
One example is the school
staff’s recent formation of a book
group after reading a book that focuses on the learning styles specific to boys. During a meeting earlier
this year that was facilitated by a
retired teacher from Dutch Neck,
Argese was telling a group of
teachers from Dutch Neck about
the book that he and others at
Grover were reading, and over 20
of the teachers at Dutch Neck
formed a group and began reading
the same book. “Someone took the
lead, and over 20 people signed up
to learn more,” he said.
Further, the district’s PTSA organizations were able to get the author of the book to come to the district in November to speak to anyone in the district who is interested.
“They’re a really passionate
group of teachers who are very
open to continuously learning to
provide the best possible program
to their students,” said Argese.
“I’m very excited to go over there.”
Argese said his main goal for the
year is to get to know the parents,
students, teachers, and staff, spending time “getting to know them and
soliciting ideas from the staff and
the community regarding what
they would like to see at Dutch
Neck.”
Among his ideas for the future
are carrying over the “Let Me
Learn” program that has been piloted at Grover. “You can actually
that would be engrained into the
township code.
But as township officials prepare to head into rounds of negotiations with all of the employee
unions this year, eliminating the
current monthly allowance could
prove detrimental to the collective
bargaining process, argued Business Administrator Robert Hary.
“We’re reinventing the wheel here
when it’s not necessary,” said
Hary, who argued that guidelines
for employee reimbursements belonged in the administration’s policy and procedures manual and not
in an ordinance.
However, Herbert told the council it has authority in two ways: it
has the right to establish polices,
which could include abolishing the
monthly allowance and replacing it
with a voucher system; and approving contracts. “Council can direct the administration and say,
‘We know you are going to negotiate the contracts, but we don’t want
to have the $250 a month in
there,’” Herbert explained.
“You have to approve the contracts ultimately. I think you can
have a broad idea as to what you
want in a policy under your budgetary contract approval. You can
have general statements and a resolution saying, ‘This is how we’d
like you to proceed.’”
The idea to re-examine the reimbursement policy first came in
2008 the idea of creating a reimbursement policy surfaced after the
council deliberated a 50 percent
council raise from $5,000 a year to
$7,500, and then a salary increase
for the mayor from $17,685 to
$25,000.
Proponents argued that the raises would eliminate the need for
submitting reimbursement forms
and dealing with questions that
could be raised when it comes to
determining which reimbursements are associated with the job.
Opponents said that expenses legitimately accrued by council
members as part of township busi-
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Continued on following page
start it lower in the sixth grade,” he
said. “They learn about their learning styles and learning patterns,”
he said. “You really empower kids
to make those decisions on how
they are learning.”
Argese said he does not know
whether he will implement the program this year, but hopes to include
it in the future.
Administrator
Contracts OKed
T
he WW-P school board has approved a five-year contract extension for its highest administrator,
Superintendent
Victoria
Kniewel. The board also approved
the contracts for the district’s three
assistant superintendents on June
15.
All members of the WW-P district’s central office staff, including
the superintendent and assistant superintendents, have agreed to a pay
freeze for the upcoming school
year. The administrators are not
part of a union.
The contracts for Larry Shanok,
the assistant superintendent for finance, Russell Lazovick, the assistant superintendent for curriculum
and instruction, and David Aderhold, the assistant superintendent
for planning and pupil services, expire on June 30, 2011. Kniewel,
whose contract would have also
expired on June 30, 2011, has been
awarded a four-year contract extension to expire on June 30, 2015.
Kniewel’s salary is frozen for
this year at $192,676. Typically,
the board agrees to review
Kniewel’s salary at the conclusion
of each school year. Kniewel asked
that 1.5 percent of her base salary
be contributed toward her health
insurance costs beginning on
Thursday, July 1, rather than waiting until the mandated date of July
1, 2012.
Under a new state law, public
employees will be required to contribute 1.5 percent of their base
salaries to their healthcare costs
when their current contracts expire.
The remainder of the employees
outside of the unions will begin
paying the 1.5 percent in 2012, as
permitted under state law. The administrators’ contributions will begin at the same time unionized employees would begin paying.
Shanok’s salary is $165,854.
Aderhold makes $144,000, while
Lazovick has a salary of $137,500.
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THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
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ness should be submitted and reimbursed.
Morgan argued then, however,
that he submitted vouchers that
still had not been paid, and controversy broke out over the legitimacy
of those reimbursements. One was
reimbursement for a conference
call and another was reimbursement for taking Planning Board
Chairman Marvin Gardner to
lunch to discuss the board’s involvement in the redevelopment
process.
The issue resurfaced in September, 2009, when Morgan pointed to
the $250 blanket reimbursement
for the mayor as a reason a clear reimbursement policy was needed.
Morgan had argued that a $14
voucher for parking the mayor submitted in addition should have
been included in the mayor’s $250
blanket travel reimbursement, and
not approved as an additional reimbursement. The issue resurfaced
again earlier this month, when
Morgan questioned a claim submited by Councilwoman Linda
Geevers. Both he and Geevers had
drafted their own policies in the
past, but came together before the
June 14 meeting to work together
on a draft.
The ordinance drafted by Morgan and Geevers terminates the
monthly meal and travel allowances and institutes specific
standards to govern reimbursements. The proposal included a
provision that specifies the township would not violate any negotiated terms under union contracts,
but sets a policy for the negotiation
process. Vouchers for reimbursement would have to be submitted
within 30 days of the occurring expense, and the administration
would have to get it on the bills and
claims list within 30 days, Morgan
explained.
The voucher process is divided
into travel and meals. The policy
states that the least expensive
mode of transportation will be used
whenever reasonably possible, and
that no amount will be reimbursed
for travel between home and the
employee’s regular place of work.
The proposal also calls for an employee to use public ground transportation for township business
when practical and appropriate.
For example, said Morgan, if the
mayor had to attend a conference in
New York City, it might be cheaper and more reasonable to pay for a
train fare rather than paying for
employees’ mileage and toll expenses. However, as Geevers argued, “you don’t want to require
the mayor to take a train into Trenton for a meeting,” Morgan said.
“So that’s why we have ‘economical’ and ‘practicable’ and ‘appropriate’ in here. It gives discretion.”
In addition, the proposal called
for township vehicles to be used
whenever possible. “Mileage will
not be reimbursed, but gasoline
will be reimbursed in its actual
cost. Tolls and parking would be
reimbursed for actual cost,” Morgan explained. He said an employee could be reimbursed for travel,
including tolls and parking, if no
reasonable township vehicle is
available.
With regard to meals, the ordinance proposed that the actual cost
of meals will be reimbursed, subject to a limit, when the meal “occurs during the course of performing duties on behalf of the township, and where work stops for the
meal and work resumes after the
meal,” explained Morgan, who
reasoned that road crews plowing
the road can stop for a meal and go
back to work and be reimbursed.
“My lunch with the Planning
Board chair would not be reimbursable under this idea,” he said.
“There was no work before. We
had lunch, and there was no work
after.”
In addition, the meal reimbursements would contain limits: the actual cost of the meal up to $15 for
breakfast, including tip, $20 for
lunch, including tip, and $30 for
dinner, including tip. “Tips don’t
exceed 15 percent of 18 percent,
where mandated by restaurant policy,” said Morgan. The actual costs
of meals will be reimbursed up to
$75 per day in cases where township business requires an extended
‘I don’t think we’re
saying we don’t want to
pay someone. We’re
saying we want to do it
in a different fashion.’
workday or trip out of the township, such as the League of Municipalities convention, Morgan said.
Alcohol and in-room reimbursements will not be reimbursed, “the
point being if you really need a
candy bar, don’t pay $6 for it” in
the hotel room, he said.
Councilwoman Diane Ciccone,
however, said that she was opposed to the provision that allowed
reimbursements at times when
“works stops.”
“If I’m a Public Works guy, and
I’m on the road, and I stop for lunch
and then I go back on the road,
we’re paying for the lunch,” she
said. “I’ve never heard of paying
for employee lunches. I’ve heard
of paying for lunches if you are
away from your normal workspace. If you’re going to a conference or continuing education
courses, you’re there away from
your normal work environment.”
“That means anyone in this office can be reimbursed for these
meals,” she added. “They stop, go
to lunch, and come back to the office and get reimbursed for it.”
Morgan said he understood her
point, but reiterated it was only a
draft.
Herbert asked, however, “Do
you really want to put this into an
ordinance? Ordinances are permanent documents, and this includes
setting prices.” He said the ordinance involved to much minutia.
Hary agreed. “We’ve established policy,” he said. “We’ve
talked about the most cost-efficient
way of providing transportation.
Numbers change. It doesn’t belong
in an ordinance.”
Hary said the council also needed to understand that “providing
your own vehicle for business purposes is not a condition of employment.”
Ciccone said that just because
the council is eliminating the
monthly allowance does not mean
the township is mandating that the
employee provide his or her own
vehicle. “What this is saying is we
take it out, and you’re going to get
reimbursed for actual mileage,”
Ciccone said. “You’re just not going to get $250 automatically.”
Council President George
Borek said that at his job, the accountant got rid of the flat rate reimbursement and replaced it with a
policy that reimbursed for actual
mileage. “It’s a clean way of handling it,” he said, adding that the
township should be discouraging
the use of vehicles anyway. And if
one needs to be taken, it can be
arranged so that a township vehicle
can be used. “I don’t think we’re
saying we don’t want to pay some-
one. We’re saying we want to do it
in a different fashion.”
Years ago, the township had a
large fleet of municipal vehicles,
but opted out of continuing the
practice for a number of reasons,
including the costs of maintenance, that the township did not
have its own mechanic, and costs
associated with insurance and replacement. All of those factors do
“not make it advantageous to have
a fleet of vehicles. In addition, you
would have more vehicles in an already-full parking lot.” The township already has a small fleet of vehicles used for certain off-roading
purposes.
“If you look at the most cost-effective way of doing it from all
standpoints, it makes sense to provide the vehicle allowance,” said
Hary. “That’s why it was negotiated. It wasn’t negotiated as a benefit, but rather an allowance.” The
allowance also keeps the budget
predictable, he said. “It’s done in a
fashion where we know where our
expenses are going to be.”
He suggested that council provide feedback during discussions
of the specific contracts, where it
can look for more economic and
cost-effective measures. He also
said that the full-day allowance of
$75 was too expensive. Currently,
township employees are allowed
only up to $35 a day when they are
out. “We do use our discretion here
to make it work.”
Morgan, however, said that by
his calculation, the township could
save up to $9,000 just by implementing a reimbursement voucher
policy. When Herbert suggested
having the council pass a resolution with generic policies in place,
Morgan said the problem with resolutions are that they are passed but
are easily forgotten. “An ordinance
is there; it doesn’t go away.”
“We need it in the code if we are
serious about it,” he said. He said
he did not mind cutting back the
specific monetary limits in favor of
a broader description.
Still, Hary said, “once you put
this in writing, you hamstring your
ability to negotiate. We may find
that they will leave the $250 allowances, and we’re going to get
concessions or something more
important to us” in the collective
bargaining process.
“As a council, and in terms of
the budget, we have to be accountable for almost every penny,” said
Ciccone. “When you look at every
penny, and you see a blanket $250
across the board that has worked
for years, the question comes now:
is it working going forward, and
should be look at actual mileage?”
She said that even if the township
breaks even, it would show accountability.
While Morgan pushed for an ordinance, Ciccone said a resolution
would give breathing room for negotiations. If Hary comes to council with regard to a specific contract and says that a union is willing
to give certain valuable concessions in exchange for the monthly
allowance, the council will not be
restricted if it has a resolution setting general policy. Geevers said,
however it would be easier with a
simple policy.
Borek said the mayor has indicated that he is willing to “set up
parameters before someone gets
reimbursed for mileage, that they
would have to meet certain thresholds.” When Morgan asked for
specifics, Borek said it was a general conversation, but that the mayor is willing to discuss thresholds.
Herbert volunteered to draft a
measure and get it back to council
in a month.
JUNE 25, 2010
Residents to Opt In
at Walden Woods
D
eemed a “win-win” situation
for both West Windsor and the
16 homeowners in the Walden
Woods development, officials are
proposing a solution requiring the
homeowners to opt in to listing
their homes at either market rate or
affordable value.
But the proposal raised various
questions from members of the
Township Council. Could the
township even give residents an
option? Is there any way to guarantee continuing credit for these
homes past a third-round obligation, even when the state Council
on Affordable Housing is proposed
to be dismantled?
Regardless, the council voted 31, with Linda Geevers abstaining
and Charles Morgan voting “no” to
ask professionals to draft a resolution. The resolution is expected to
be drafted and put on the agenda
some time in July.
After a nearly two-year process
of battling to have affordable housing restrictions removed from their
property deeds, the Walden Woods
residents received a letter from
COAH last month stating it would
give West Windsor Township the
full number of credits for the
homes, but grant the residents 10year — as opposed to 30-year —
affordable housing restrictions,
making them eligible now to receive market value for their homes.
“In West Windsor’s third round
housing element and fair share
plan, the Walden Woods development is included as part of the prior
round obligation,” states the letter
from Sean Thompson, the acting
executive director of COAH.
“COAH does not require the deed
controls of units fulfilling the prior
round obligation extend through
the entire third round. As a result,
West Windsor may receive prior
round credit for the units in the
Walden Woods development.”
Walden Woods, on Bear Brook
Road, was created in the 1990s
through the Operation Bootstrap
Program, which was part of the
United States Department of Agriculture Mutual Self-Help Housing
Program. The program accepted
“sweat equity” in lieu of a down
payment, eliminating the primary
impediment to home ownership for
low-income families, up-front
cash. Once the homes were built
and occupied, they would fall subject to a 10-year affordable housing
restriction.
More than 10 years later, according to homeowners’ deeds, the
‘We don’t want to put
those people out of their
homes. This is the
fairest way of treating
our residents.’
affordable housing restrictions
should be lifted, along with all of
the other restrictions that came
with the program. The township
and the state Council on Affordable Housing, however, had debated whether the properties were
subjected to the 30-year affordable
restrictions until 2028.
Upon receiving the letter, resident Voytek Trela, who with his
wife, Caryn, have been serving as
the de-facto representatives of
their development, asked the township to pass a resolution memorializing the action.
During the June 14 meeting, the
proposal was vetted. Business Administrator Robert Hary said he
met with Planning attorney Gerald
Muller and Tax Assessor Steve
Benner and came up with a strategy
that would involve sending a letter
to all 16 homeowners, asking them
if they would like to be converted
to market rate units, as stated in the
COAH letter, or if they would like
to be maintained as an affordable
unit under the 30-year restriction.
“The letter would have an estimated amount that they would expect to have to pay in increased
property taxes as a result of the
conversion to market rate units,”
stated Hary in a memo to council.
“Residents would sign the letter
committing to either option, and
their decision would be binding.”
The township would record an
instrument setting forth the 30year restrictions for those who
choose that option, said Hary.
“We don’t want to put those
people out of their homes, so that’s
why my recommendation is that,”
explained Hary during the discussion. Opting out of affordable rates
would mean that those residents
would have to pay taxes on a market rate, which is most likely higher. “This is the fairest way of treating our residents, especially in remembering what they’ve been
through.”
Councilwoman Diane Ciccone
said she believed giving the residents the option was the fairest way
to handle the situation. “We’re not
losing our credits for the third
round, and we’re merely giving the
residents the option to go to market
rate,” she said. “I can’t support
forcing someone to go to market
rate if they don’t want to, or they
can’t afford it.”
Geevers, however, said she was
surprised at the options. “I thought
the letter was very clear in that it
was a 10-year deed restriction,”
she said. “We would get credit
through 2018. It is explicit — I
don’t know that there is a choice
there.”
In addition, when the matter first
became an issue, “we were told
they either had to be all market or
all affordable, and now, all of a
sudden, that has changed.”
However, Township Attorney
Michael Herbert said he and
Muller reviewed the matter. “We
have the option to do it,” he said.
“My recommendation is that is the
fairest way of handling it. This is a
way of allowing each of the homeowners to take their positions.”
Voytek Trela echoed Geevers’
comments. He also had understood
there to be an “all or nothing” situation. However, “I think we should
be treated as all or nothing when it
comes to the original restriction,
but in terms of anyone signing on
for additional restrictions, that
should be an individual choice. I
really don’t see a conflict there.”
Because Geevers questioned
whether the township had the authority to allow the residents to opt,
she abstained on voting to have the
administration draft a resolution.
Morgan voted against the proposal for other reasons. He said the
situation was not a win-win without assurances from COAH that it
will continue to receive credit in
addition to the third-round obligations.
The legislature is considering a
bill that would abolish COAH, but
“we should not assume the legislature is going to pass the bill,” said
Morgan. “We can’t assume that
even if the legislature passes the
bill that the courts won’t strike it
down. These residents deserve a
fair shake, and I absolutely support
THE NEWS
them. But we have another 25,000
residents of this town who also deserve a fair shake.”
Morgan suggested the council
pass two resolutions: the first to accept the letter from COAH as not
only giving the township credit for
the third round, but in going forward; the second would be Hary’s
proposal on condition the township
receives that assurance.
“A win-win includes permanent
protection,” said Morgan. “If we
find out in three or five years that
this is a constitutional issue, we are
going to be screwed. We have a
sympathetic governor, and we
have a sympathetic COAH, and we
should be asking for these things
now.”
Township attorney Michael
Herbert said that even if COAH is
dismantled, municipalities’ fair
share obligations will not be.
“These folks will be in limbo unless you adopt some kind of resolution.”
Morgan also said that the council should take the opportunity to
discuss other lingering affordable
housing issues, including that the
affordable housing restrictions on
the Avalon Watch development
will also soon expire.
Ciccone suggested dealing with
the Walden Woods issue first. “I
think we can give some closure to
these residents and take up the bigger issue at another time. I don’t
want to keep them in limbo.”
Said Herbert: “Right now, we
have no protection beyond 2018 no
matter what we do, so we don’t lose
a thing by adopting this policy. We
have no protection beyond the third
round.”
“There are many things to speculate about, but here, you have a
Continued on following page
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14
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
To Be or Not To Be
A ‘Transit Village’
from each; up-to-date information
on grants, loans, programs, and
other opportunities; priority fundspecific issue that can be resolved,”
ing where feasible; and access to
he added.
special information meetings, edumajority
of
Township
Council
Hsueh echoed his statement.
cational programs, and research inmembers
have
given
their
“There are always issues we don’t
know,” he said. “You’ve got to stamp of approval to the town- formation.
Morgan, however, questioned
make a decision based on what you ship’s request to be considered for
the
designation’s impact on the onTransit
Village
designation
under
know already. I don’t think it’s fair
going
InterCap litigation and questhe
state
Department
of
Transfor this issue to be hanging out
tioned what the designation of a
portation.
there.”
What the township administra- “transit village” could mean in
With the council voting to move
tion
admitted it thought was a non- terms of development near the train
forward, Council President George
controversial
issue, however, faced station. “Some would say it’s urBorek asked that the affected resifrom
Councilman banization of the train station,” he
dents be contacted when the matter criticism
Charles Morgan, who voted said. “Some people would say it’s
is placed on the agenda.
against it because he felt the admin- implicitly blessing higher buildistration provided insufficient in- ings.”
“This is a really big deal,” he
formation.
The resolution, approved 4-1 on added. “I can’t make an informed
June 14, asks the DOT to designate decision on it.”
Township Attorney Michael
the township as a Transit Village
and affirms the township’s willing- Herbert said the designation “will
ness to “accept meaningful growth have absolutely no impact on the
in terms of jobs, housing, and pop- InterCap litigation.”
“Let’s try to stop all of these ruulation within the transit village
development district.” The resolu- mors,” said Mayor Shing-Fu
Hsueh in retion also states
sponse to Morthe township’s
gan’s
comcommitment to
Applying for ‘Transit
ments. “All of
implementation
Village’ designation unthis will have to
of the “compact,
comply
with
der the DOT will pave
mixed-used,
our
redeveloptransit-supportthe way for grants, priment plan.”
ive
vision”
ority funding, and techIn
March,
called for in the
nical assistance.
2009, the councriteria for descil adopted a reignation. Landdevelopment
scape architect
Dan Dobromilsky has been ap- plan for the 350-acre Princeton
pointed as the township’s primary Junction train station area. The
plan calls for a total base number of
contact person for the initiative.
If designated, the township 483 housing units consisting of 311
would be eligible to receive special market-priced units and 172 affunding for smart growth initia- fordable housing units. As for nontives once it meets a majority of the residential development, the plan
criteria established by the program. proposes 207,910 square feet of reThe program, called the Transit tail with the potential option to inVillage Initiative, was created by crease retail floor area in District 1
the DOT and sets up a “Transit Vil- — which encompasses the 25 acres
lage Task Force,” with members off Washington Road owned by Inconsisting of 11 state agencies: the terCap Holdings — by an additionNew Jersey Transit; the Depart- al 67,500 square feet along with
ment of Community Affairs; the 7,500 square feet of added office
Department of Environmental Pro- space.
If the option for 75,000 square
tection; the Redevelopment Authority; Council on the Arts; Main feet of additional commercial
Street New Jersey; the Economic space is implemented, it would add
Development Authority; the Office an obligation for nine more affordof Smart Growth; and the Housing able housing units. This would
bring the total redevelopment area
and Mortgage Finance Agency.
The goal is to increase transit residential unit count to 496, with
ridership, reduce automobile con- 311 market units and 185 affordgestion, and improve air quality in able units.
Referring to the funding incenNew Jersey, the township’s resolution states. Once designated, the tives, Councilwoman Linda Geevtownship would be provided with a ers said she did not “see a downcontact person in each of the 11 side” to asking for designation.
state agencies; technical assistance “It’s going to be very competitive
to get any grant money.”
Morgan asked the council to
postpone the vote until the next
business meeting so more information could be gathered. “I’m wondering what the urgency is,” he
said.
Also, the township has never
used the term “transit village” to
describe redevelopment, he said.
“The contract with Hillier did not
call for them to develop a transit
At Skey & Bhattacharya, our mission is to represent you and manage
village; it called for them to do a reyour case through effective negotiation or litigation in order to resolve
development plan,” he said.
your difficulties in the most efficient way possible. With over 30 years
The mayor and business adminof experience, Skey & Bhattacharya understands the legal process
istrator Robert Hary said the muand has the knowledge necessary to predict likely results and avoid
nicipalities designated under the
possibly expensive and needless litigation so that you can move
program received funding last year
just for being designated and that
ahead with your new life quickly and return to a sense of normalcy.
the automatic funding would probably not be available in future
‡ )DPLO\0DWULPRQLDO/DZ
years.
‡ 'LYRUFH6HSDUDWLRQ
When pushed for more clarifica‡ 'RPHVWLF9LROHQFH
tion,
Hsueh said he believed the
‡ &XVWRG\&KLOG6XSSRUW$OLPRQ\
township
could apply for as much
‡ 3UH1XSWLDO3RVW1XSWLDO$JUHHPHQWV
as $110,000 in grants under the
‡ :LOOV7UXVWV(VWDWH3ODQQLQJ
program this year. Beginning in the
new fiscal year on July 1, however,
the funding will probably be no
/DZUHQFH&RPPRQV6XLWH
longer available, he said. “That
%UXQVZLFN3LNH/DZUHQFHYLOOH1-
money can be used for any issue related to development around the
(609) 896-8100
train station,” Hsueh said.
www.sbfamilylaw.com
Continued from preceding page
A
Summer Sunday Service at 9.30 a.m., July 4-September 5
Tuesdays at 10.30 a m., Meditation Group
Wednesdays at 9:15 a.m., Healing Service
Skey&
Bhattacharya
Attorneys-at-Law
JUNE 25, 2010
Council President George
Borek said that the simple possibility of getting a grant should move
the process forward. “The question
is: do you move forward and hope
to get a grant, or whether you don’t
move forward and then you lose an
opportunity.”
However, “the question is what
opportunity are we losing?” Morgan replied, recalling a procedure
supported by the council that requires the administration to bring
details of contracts to council 30
days before it is expected to approve them. He said these types of
requests should be subject to the
same procedure. “I’m not opposed
to this,” he said. “I’m the first one
to say, ‘Let’s get grant money if we
can get grant money.’ I’ve approved every grant money request
that has ever come before us,” he
said. “But we have a sky is falling
statement with nothing substantive
to it. There are no specific statements about specific grant application deadlines.”
Morgan, who earlier questioned
items on the list of bills and claims
approved during the meeting, said
the lack of specific information
about the urgency for approval and
benefits to the township was another example of how his requests to
the administration for more information on a variety of subjects continued to be ignored.
Hsueh said the administration
“did not see this as controversial”
and therefore did not prepare a
packet of information on the subject prior to the meeting.
Earlier in the meeting, during
discussions on bills and claims,
Hsueh accused Morgan of asking
“nonsense questions” in his requests to Hary about various bills
and claims and other requests.
Morgan had been questioning the
township’s purchases of bottled
water for employees and a food reimbursement for $84.69 to a senior
center employee that did not include a clear description of the
event for which she was being reimbursed for providing food.
Morgan said the township
should not be paying for employees’ bottled water. “I’m concerned
that we continue to allow it to be an
expense of the township.”
He also asked why the township
was providing meal reimbursements to 10 employees to attend
professional development. Hary
said the employees were construction code officials attending a seminar to bring them up-to-date with
township code. He did not know
specifically the details behind the
$84 meal reimbursement to the senior center employee, but said the
employee usually uses her own
credit card to purchase food for certain events and is later reimbursed
by the township.
When Hsueh told Morgan he
should have sent an E-mail to Hary
before the meeting to ask clarification, Morgan said he had grown
frustrated with Hary, who has ignored his requests on numerous
items.
Hsueh said Morgan’s requests
usually created legal implications,
and the administration has to run
the requests by counsel before responding. But the current request
for more information “has no legal
implications. This one is very
straightforward.”
Councilwoman Diane Ciccone
asked whether the administration
could provide information ahead of
time when relevant items are on the
agenda. Background information
could have avoided 20 minutes of
discussion, she said.
Responded Hary: “You could
argue the same point about every
resolution on there. We did not see
this one as being controversial.”
Rather, he characterized the resolution as “boiler plate.”
Still, Morgan requested that as a
condition of approval, the council
require the administration to divulge specific information about
the possible grants.
Township attorney Michael
Herbert said it was not necessary to
include the request as a condition,
and Hsueh and Hary said they
would provide information to
council members in the days after
the meeting.
Morgan voted against approval
“for procedural reasons, not substantive reasons,” he said.
Green Resolutions
A
s West Windsor officials continue the process for certification under the Sustainable Jersey
program, the council has approved
two resolutions that affirm the
township’s commitment to green
initiatives.
The resolutions, approved June
14, are necessary in order for the
township to become certified under
the program, which provides access to grants and helps municipalities to find funding opportunities
to continue becoming more sustainable.
Princeton HealthCare System
invites area residents to attend out
Board of Trustees meeting at 6 p.m. on June
28, 2010. It will be held at the Plainsboro Public
Library, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, New
Jersey, 08536. This meeting is open to the
public and will include an update on the
replacement hospital project, financial
performance and quality. There will be
time for questions and answers.
Please call 609.252.8785 to RSVP or to
request more information. Princeton
HealthCare System holds an open Board
meeting on an annual basis.
Grant Support for
Disabled Residents
THE NEWS
15
handful of residents with
special needs and their family members urged West Windsor
Council on June 14 to apply for a
$20,000 grant from the state Department of Community Affairs
for the development of recreational programs for individuals with
disabilities.
The measure, which was unanimously approved later during the
meeting, allows the mayor to apply for the grant. If it is successful
in obtaining the grant, West
Windsor would be required to
match 20 percent of the total
amount to comply with the requirements of the grant.
Joan Nester, whose son Robert
went through the West WindsorPlainsboro school district’s special program, told council that
“since he has been out of school,
there has been little opportunity,
and he needs support, as do his
peers.”
The concerns were echoed by
Hope Corman, whose daughter
benefited from the recreational
programs offered in the township.
Having the opportunities “fills a
very important void in the lives of
our adult children” after leaving
school, she said. The programs allow them to “maintain ties with
peers with whom they went to
school.”
There are “very few social and
recreational opportunities,” and
“for many years, this has been an
under-served group in the community,” she added.
As an economist, she said she
understood the importance of
keeping costs down, but said that
the grant covers 80 percent of the
costs of running the program,
with a majority of the rest of the
costs being covered through registrations. In the worst case scenario, it would cost the township
$4,000, she said.
Her daughter, Jessica, also
spoke during the meeting. She
told the council that she went
through the program at Maurice
Hawk, Community, and High
School South. For the past six
years, she has worked at Wegman’s. She said she has enjoyed
the recreation programs, including yoga and dance offered by the
township for residents with disabilities. “Please continue these
activities,” she said.
Nantanee Koppstein, another
resident whose child has a disability, also urged the council to approve submitting the grant. If successful, the opportunities “will
expand fivefold.”
Each of the council members
stressed the importance of passing
the resolution allowing the grant
application. Councilwoman Diane Ciccone said the move could
help meet the township’s goal of
social sustainability by ensuring
“everyone can grow and thrive as
a member of the community.”
The first resolution authorizes
the township’s commitment to
pledge continuation and expansion
of its sustainable land use planning
practices, while the second resolution authorizes the township’s commitment to promote green building
practices within the township.
The first resolution pledges that
township officials will reach out to
neighboring communities concerning land use decisions and take into
consideration regional impacts;
continue the creation of transportation choices with a complete streets
approach by considering all modes
of transportation, including walking, biking, and transit; protect natural resources; use its zoning power to allow for a mix of residential,
retail, commercial, recreational,
and other land uses; foster a diverse
mix of housing types and locations;
incorporate green design into municipal buildings; among others.
The second resolution pledges
that the township will implement a
green building policy that will consider opportunities to incorporate
green building measures into the
design, construction, operation and
maintenance of municipal buildings and facilities and will encourage green design for commercial,
quasi-public, and residential buildings.
Michael Hornsby, chairman of
West Windsor’s Environmental
Commission, said the deadline to
apply for certification to the program is September 15.
The resolutions are elements of
the Sustainable West Windsor plan
that was already adopted in 2009.
In addition to the resolutions,
members of the Environmental
Commission are currently working
on anti-idling and “complete
streets” (in conjunction with the
West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance) resolutions to bring
before council, said Hornsby.
In October, 2009, West Windsor
became one of the towns in the
state with a sustainability element
as part of its Master Plan aimed at
incorporating more environmentally-friendly initiatives into future
township development. The sustainability element, offers goals,
objectives, strategies, and targets
to direct township operations to-
ward more sustainable practices.
The sustainability element helps
define what is meant by “sustainable,” identifies specific strategies
and actions, and enables the township to have the authority to implement the initiatives through ordinances. The plan also devises
progress by using a tracking system, in order to monitor which initiatives the township undertakes as
it moves along. The plan also identifies “responsible parties” for each
initiative that officials thought
would be charged with studying
and undertaking each of the individual initiatives.
Officials began working on the
plan in August, 2007. The sustainability element comes as a direct
result of the Sustainable West
Windsor Plan that was developed
by Rutgers’ Edward J. Bloustein
School of Planning and Public Policy, in coordination with the Environmental Commission, in August,
2007. The township received fund-
A
Continued on page 20
16
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
JUNE 25, 2010
THE NEWS
Congratulations, Class of 2010: Pirates & Knights Take Flight at the Sun Center
High School South
High School South, Class of
2010, held comencement ceremonies at Sun Bank Center on Friday, June 18. Among those graduating were:
A
Elizabeth Abraham, Shreya Agarwal, Salman Akhtar, Jonathan Alex
Altiero, Sofia Lianne Alvarez, Shiv
Teja Annapareddy, Andrew Annobil,
Maria Apreleva, Sabrina Beth Arias,
Pinar Arikan, Meenakshi Arumugam, Ralph Aurora, Kevin
Awasthi, and Kostadinos S. Axiotis.
B
Hyun Woo (Alice) Bae, Simran
Bains, Molly J. Bandeh, Younah
Bark, Keshav Basavapatna, Mark
Damon Benjamin, David J. Bertles,
Roy Emerson Bhame, Kanupriya
Bhargava, Aakash Bhatia, Yevgeni
Birioukov, Andrew M. Bliach,
Matthew Bobchin, Sagar Kumar
Bohra, Samuel Blackman Boyles,
Keighly Bradbrook, Ryan Brazel,
Christopher William Bromberg,
Corey Rodney Brooks, Jennifer M.
Burek, and Sara Burnosky.
C
Claudia Priscila Cabrera, Kenson
Cadet, Katherine S. Calder, David
Calves, Joseph Charles Camaratta,
Alexander D. Campbell, Karen Elizabeth Campbell, Michael Cao, Kriz
Anne Caparino, Rachel Sydney
Carandang, Carol Paola Cardona,
Shawn David Carrick, Jennifer Lynn
Catalano, Andrew M. Chan, Michelle
Tianyun Chang, Nicole Chau, Fatima Cheema, Christina Chen,
Howard Chen, Michael Choi, Arun
Chopra, Deisy Cifuentes, Michael J.
Cintron, Kimberly Anne Clifton, Ariel
Sobel Cohen, Dylan Daniel Cohen,
Jessica Ashlee Cohen, Robert Cohen, Amanda Marie Colonna, Matti
R. Conover, Dillon Raymond Constantine, Ashleigh Ruthann Crivelli,
Monica G. Cruz, and Brisa Raquel
Cully.
D
Jack James Dennehy, Christopher Mark Derks, Kunal Desai, Malhar Desai, Sundeep Singh Dhillon,
Soumya Dhulekar, Gareth Leslie
Dicker, Erik Ryan Dixon-Anderson,
and Zachary Andrew Donohue.
E
Matthew David Earle, Daniil
Egorov, Ariel Lynn Eland, Eric Erentsen Enkeev, Danielle Elizabeth
Erickson, Omar A. Espinal, and Emily Espinosa.
F
Chongluen (Alan) Fang, Yurani
Madvi Farfan, Nicholas Wilhelm
Feibel, Lena Nicole Feingold, Carly
Friedlander, and Melissa Catherine
Fryer.
G
Naveen Galla, Ronak Rajesh
Gandhi, Wenyu Gao, Yifan Gao,
Grace Elizabeth Garbini, Anushri
Gaur, Nikitha Reddy Gavva, Erica
Shika Gbekle, Rishika Ghosh,
Gabrielle Marie Giambagno,
Danielle Christine Gilbertson, Tanvir
Singh Gill, Aditya Girish, Rachel
Laura Goldberg, Justino Alfonso
Gonzalez, Emilsy K. Gonzalez
Salazar, Ilya Grabylnikov, Jasmine
Caroline Grant, Robert Grbic, Amber
M. Green, Stefanie K. Grossmann,
Dev K. Grover, Kristen LeRae
Grzywacz, Wendy Gu, Julissa Lena
Guadagni, Nupur V. Gulati, Alexander Guo, Aditi Gupta, Kamna Gupta,
Karan Gupta, Nikita Gupta, and
Shama Gupta.
H
Heather Jean Hafford, John Haggerty, Zachary Halperin, Julia Hanley, Sri S. Harathi, Madhumitha Harishankar, Glenn Ryan Harris,
Mahvish Hashmi, Irmak Hatiboglu,
Melissa Hekl, James H. Herts, Corey
Elizabeth Hillman, Suzanne
Hochberg, Eric Bernard Hoff, Sung
Keun Hong, Jake Hoyne, Matthew
James Hsu, Alex Z. Huang, Annie
Huang, Zachary M. Hundertmark,
Evan P. Hunter, and Austin Hwang.
I
Sushil Inaganti and Michael John
Ireland.
J
Vishesh Jain, Naveed Jamal,
Elisa Rose Jankoski, Benjamin Todd
Jankowski, Sameer Jaywant, Ian
Jin, Daniel E. Joe, Steven Joe, Jarrett Anthony Johnson, Lindsey M.
Joseph, Stefan Juang, Lindsey Jun,
Wooyeol Jung, and Raimond Jurkhadze.
K
Maciej Kadlubowski, Neha Kamat, Ruturaj Kanbur, Victoria Paige
Karas, Stella Angel Karcnik, Christopher Kardaras, Prabsharan Kaur,
Meredith Ann Ketchmark, Kamran
Khaliq, Ashraf Mohamed Khamiss,
Anmol Khan, Sheena Khan, Dmitry
Khrabrov, Aanchal Khurana, Ji Suk
Kim, Lindsey Kim, Saehan Kim, Yeun Joo Kim, Dylan Klein-Denk,
Richard Klieger, Pooja S. Kolluri,
Samir S. Koppolu, Zachary Michael
Krakower, Robert J. Krug, Stephanie
Lai Ku, Gregory Kuhlman, Rhea Kumar, Veena V. Kumar, and Grace
Chau-Ying Kwok.
Bridget Riley and Julia Duprat of High School North.
Senior Class President Caroline Bourassa.
L
Gabriel La Torre, Rahul R.
Lakhwani, Darian Colby Lanzetta,
Christopher Lee, Dana R. Lee,
Kyung Lee, Samantha Y. Lee, Seon
Joon Lee, Victoria Elizabeth Lee,
Yujin Lee, Sara E. Lemley, Jessica
Continued on following page
Retiring South Principal Charles
Rudnick presides over his final
WW-P South Graduation.
South’s Chris Matthews, Jack Dennehy, and John Haggerty.
17
18
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
Continued from preceding page
Y. Leong, Brandon Lee Lerner, Hannah Joy Leventhal, Corinne E.
Lewin, Rebecca Melissa Lewinson,
Michael Patrick Li, Jason William
Light, Matthew J. Lilly, Christina Lim,
Andi Liou, Elaine Liu, Hanbo Liu,
Katherine Liu, Hannah Abigail Loeb,
Matthew C. Lorenz, and Moxuan
(Cher) Lu.
M
Samuel L. Macaluso, Emily Claire
MacArthur, Henry Angus MacQueen,
Chikao Maeda, Chen Hao Mai, Kate
Maniere, Andrew James Manley,
Anika Maram, Maximilian Margiotta,
James Ryan Martinez, Javier Martinez, Christopher N. Matthews, Jeffrey Matthews, Stephen Evan McCarron, Connor McElligott, Matthew
Paul Meers, Janvi Mehta, Kimberly
Vega Merrill, Rebecca J. Merves,
Daniel Messina, Cara Anne Milione,
Allison Min, Tracy Mischell, Neeli
Mishra, Morgan Mitgang, Reetika
Mohanty, Alysha Marie Mooring,
Michael Mortel, Zachary D. Mozenter, and Eshwari Murty.
N
Kseniya Nadtochiy, Doron Nae,
Alex Ryan Nagler, Dharin L. Nanavati, Tara Nelson, Daniel M. Nesson,
Lesley Anne Norris, and Anastace
Novio.
O
Kezia Bethany Opie.
P
Matthew H. Padd, Sarita P.
Patankar, Hurshal S. Patel, Ishan
Patel, Ronak Parimal Patel, Ruchi
Patel, Sonal Patel, Daniela Pazmino,
Vincent Person, Sharang Shriram
Phadke, Gregory Piccirillo, Andrew
Alexander Pinelli, Jordan Pinnock,
Julian Edward Plester, Ricky Polfliet,
Neil Pothraj, Robert Alexander Prieto, and Allison Michaela Pungello.
R
Arvind Radhakrishnan, Sanjev
Rajaram, Umar Mohsin Rashid, Rohan Rath, Palash Rathor, Tanika
Raychaudhuri, Jonathan Redmond,
Matthew Redmond, Kaitlyn Remde,
Matthew Rhatigan, Julian Ulysses O.
Richardson, David Rimmer,
Jonathan Rivera, Nigel Rivera, Maxine Rivers, Gunjan Kaur Roda,
Thomas William Roder, Amanda Victoria Rodriguez, Juan V. Rodriguez,
Rudy Rodriguez, Alexis Rosado,
Emma M. Rosen, Claire-Marie
Rothea, Cornelius Rozario, and
Jared Rubenstein.
S
Praneeth R. Sadda, Mayank Saksena, Priya Saksena, Avinash K.
Salgam, Marina Alexandra Santana,
Krishnan Sarkar, Elyse Margaret
Sartor, Thomas Robert Savage, Armaan Saxena, Elan J. Schenker,
Daniel Harrison Schloss, Nicholas J.
Schmidt, Ciara Frances Schoenauer,
Johanna Rose Schutzer, Alexa
Schwartz, Brittany Lynn Schwing,
Ananya Shah, Mit C. Shah, Jennifer
Sharma, Abhishek M. Shevade,
Kevin Shi, Vanessa Caitlin Shields,
William Shin, Erica Simi, Tiffany Janice Simmons, Andrew Sivertsen,
Michael Skapyak, Adam Smith, Brian
J. Smith, Evan Smith, Gregory A.
Snyder, Nicholas Valentino Sosa,
Anthony Spence, Sarah E. Spence,
Vyas Kattiganehalli Srinivasan, Darren Stafford, Colina Ren Stanford,
Amanda Rose Stanton, Helene
Strange, Urjita Sudula, and Sarah
Copley Szostak.
T
Haruko Takeuchi, Edward Tanner, Brieanna Nicole Terppe, Sayli
Thube, Alexandra Thumm, Roshni
D. Tipnis, Casey P. Tosches, Brooke
Goodall Townsend, Philip D. Trachtenberg, Jeremy C. Tsu, Natalie
Tucker, and Phone Myint Tun.
U
Mene Oluwadurotimi Ukueberuwa
and Samuel Vincent Urso.
V
Avinash Vaswani, Subhashini
Venkatramani, Christopher Villamil,
Maria Elizabeth Vincent, Luca V. Vinci, Kathleen Voigtsberger, and
Demetri Vrahnos.
W
Rhea Wagh, Jeffrey Wai, Linda
Wang, Travis Z. Wang, Victoria Shan
Wang, Richard Steele Wehringer,
Christopher Weir,
Samuel Joshua Weiser,
Alexandra Werth, Maxence Wiemer, Kyra
Willans, Lea T. Williams,
Brynja Chen Winnan,
Charles C. Wong, Kachun Wong, Stephen M.
Woo, Cristine Michelle
Wu, and Jacob Stefan
Wydra.
X
Daniel Xia and Luke
Xu.
Ariel Eland, Danielle Erickson, Gabrielle Giambagno, and Rachel Goldberg.
Y
Moxuan Lu, Class Secretary.
Heetaek Yang, Mark
F. Yang, Stephanie
Yang, William Young,
En-Chiao Yu, and Ying
Ying Yu.
Z
Hadeeth Zaidi,
Jonathan A. Zelnick,
Jinya Zhao, and Raza
Ahmed Zia.
High School
North
Jake Hoyne and Zach Hundertmark.
Corinne Lewin, Katie Calder, Sara Lemley, and Jennifer Burek.
High School North,
Class of 2010, graduated
on Friday, June 18, at
Sun Bank Center in
Trenton. Members of the
class include:
A
Corey Patrick Abernathy, Salman Ahmed,
Parvez Ahmed Garcia,
Nabil Aowsaf Ali, Tara V.
Andrews, Kailee Elizabeth Andrucyk, Arpita
Aneja, Zeeshan H. Anwar, Anthony Edward
Arias, Rasheed Ariganjoye, Ujwala Arikatla, and Arda Aysu.
The South Pirates
B
The WW-P School District graduated 392
High School South seniors at Sun National
Bank Center in Trenton on Friday, June 18.
Above, Amanda Colonna, Corey Hillman,
Lena Feingold, Alexa Schwartz, and Natalie
Tucker.
At left are Aditi Gupta and Emily
MacArthur.
Allison Baidoo, Anjali Lakshmi
Baliga, Pooja Balwani, Emily Louise
Bamford, Alecia Bardachino, Miraj A.
Barodia, Ujaas Barvalia, Steven
Brett Bassin, Mrinalini Shreya Basu,
Colin Evan Beirne, Leonard A.
Bellezza III, Randy Joel Benitez Lomi, Alison L. Berg, Eliane Fleming
Berg, Caroline N. Bianchetti, Timothy
R. Biletta, Ryan James Billek, Nina
Boal, Ranajoy Bose, Caroline
Bourassa, Gwen Bowser, Killian
Brakel, Katherine Elisabeth Brase,
Michael P. Brienza, Alanna Logan
Briffa, Ashley Elizabeth Britton,
Lawrence Brodie, Rebecca A. Brodsky, Michael W. Brooks, Kathryn
Doss Broughton, Daniel M. Brzezynski, Joshua A. Bugge, Shane Bulk,
Maura E. Burns, and Sheridan Simone Butler.
C
Alex Cadar, Michaela A. Calotta,
Kevin Charles Campbell, Ryan Camuso, Timothy Chambers, Brian M.
Chan, Alexander Chang, Joanna
Lee Chapman, Taylor P. Chapman,
Simran Charan, Ravi Ryan Chelluri,
Alexander Chen, Christine E. Chen,
Katrina C. Chen, Jason Chin, Vivian
Mercedes Chiu, Yuji Choi, Farahin
Choudhury, Alyssa Marie Christie,
Austin Chung, Colin Clark, Patrick
Clewell, Megan Cloyes, Thomas
Cochrane, Dylan H. Cohen, Alyssa
D. Colon, George Andrew Connolly,
Sean Cooney-Olson, Kelly M. Covey, Caitlin Cowan, Ezequiel Cruz,
Graeme M.W. Cull, and Kelsey Curran.
Armaan Saxena and Chris Matthews.
Sara Burnosky, Sarah Szostak, and Melissa Hekl.
D
Nicole Dalaya, Graham Benjamin
Daniels, Kathryn Patricia Davis, Kelly
Davis, Andrew R. de Oliveira, Adit
Desai, Sara S. DeSimine, Joshua
Devasagayaraj, Peter Vincent DeVita, Gregory Diaz, Andrew DiOrio,
Dustin A. Docheff, Ryan M. Dolan,
Alekhya Dulur, Geirrlon Dunn,
James Dunn, Robert J. Dunne IV,
Julia M. Duprat, Pavan Duvvuri,
Alexandra Dworsky, and Karen A.
Dziekonska.
Emilsy Gonzalez, Jasmine Grant, Amber Green, Yurani Farfan.
Senior Class President
Mene Ukueberuwa.
E
Emiko Janice Edwards, Miles J.
Eisenman, Cameron Dean Erdogan,
Pegah Eshraghi, and Jake Everett.
F
Julia Fang, Tah Jong Feng, Carly
Gordon Feryus, Erika J. Fields, Jenna Elise Fields, Cynthia Fong,
Alexander Foo, Alexandra Forsell,
Sari R. Forshner, Brandon Justin
Andrew Manley and Ben Jankowski.
Rachel Goldberg and Sarita Patankar.
JUNE 25, 2010
Frank, Jonathan Frias, and
Nathan Tyler Frost.
G
Patrick Thomas Gallagher, Kristen Geevers,
Anant Gharpure, Amy GillMurphy, Gitanjali E.
Gnanadesikan, Neha Gona,
Andrew James Gordon,
Jenna Greenstein, Erica L.
Grenzig, Ankita Gumaste,
Fred Guo, Siyu Guo, and
Pawel Gut.
H
Keenu Eric Xavier Hale,
Brittany Hall, Cashmir Hardison, Orquid Hardison,
Matthew Whitney Harrington, Joshua Harrison,
Christopher Hase, Daniel G.
Hayduchok, Connor Joseph
Healey, Jordan Hemingway,
Kate Molly Henry, Brielle
Cortney Higgins, Trevor
Hirschen, Josh Holland,
Mary Lynn Hoogendoorn,
Imran Hossain, Timothy
John Howarth II, Elise Hu,
Richard T. Hua, Daniel Y.
Huang, Michelle Huang, Pei
Huang, Evan P. Hundley,
and Malik M. Hussein.
The Northern Knights
High School North held its graduation ceremony at Sun
National Bank Center. This year 414 seniors attended ceremonies on Friday, June 18. Pictured above are Alex
Dworsky, left, Lexie Forsell, Julia Fang, Erika Fields,
Carly Feryus, and Jenna Fields.
At right is Class Speaker Sophia Liu.
Photos by Brian McCarthy.
I
Rachel Issa.
J
Megan Cloyes and Michelle Lu.
Katrina Chen, Vivian Chiu, Jason Chiu, Kelly Covey, and Alex Chang.
Joshua Devasagayaraj, Geirrlon Dunn, Tah Jong Feng, and Malik Hussein.
Alyssa Colon and Ezequiel Cruz.
Martine Rose Jacobs,
Sruthi Janakiraman, Stacey
H. Janofsky, Christopher
Jin, Christina Nicole Johnson, Daya M. Johnson,
Stephanie R. Johnson,
Thomas J. Johnson, Melissa
M. Johnston, Alana Kelsey
Jorgensen, and Clarissa P.
Jugo.
K
Michael Ian Kaish, John
Nicholis Kalinowski,
Rachana Kamath, Aparna
Kannan, Arnold W. Kao,
Hillary Rose Katz, Ethan
Lewis Kaye, Matthew John
Kelly, Evamarie Kemp,
Drew William Kenavan,
Jacquelyn Beth Kercheval,
Sara Khan, Tiffany Connie
Kichline, Yuri Kim, Thomas
Stephen Klotz, Leonid Kogan, Stephen G. Kolber,
Tracie Yiqing Kong, Elyssa
Konowitz, Kevin C. Kostiw,
and Sai C. Kotikalapudi.
L
Matthew Johnathan Lagana, Andrew J. Lalli,
Zachary A. Larson, Paul A.
Lavadera, Kevin J.
Lawrence, Han Nguyen Le,
Michael E. Leahy, Brian K.
Lee, Caroline Lee, Kyung
Eun (Grace) Lee, Peter Lee,
Darryl Legair, Nicole Levine,
Amanda E. Lewis, Blake
Adam Lewis, Alan Liang,
Sara Jillian Lieber, Carolyn
Lipka, Sophia Liu, Michelle
Liu, Linda Z. Lobato, and
Marc Louis-Jacques.
Matthew Harrington.
TJ Johnson, Sara Lieber, Denise Pyfrom, and Jaclyn Silva.
Triplets Onaisa Rizki, Shiffa Rizki, and Humna Rizki.
Ryan Billek and Hannah Pellichero.
M
Liliana Esther Ma, Linda
Maa, Brandon Michael Madsen, Benmeet Mahal, Apurba Maiti, Poojitha
Mantha, Shivani Mantha, Kevin Marcoux, Samuel Marder, Christopher J.
Martinez, Nikhil Mashettiwar, Hamad
A. Masood, Ashleigh Jade Matthews,
Amy Y. Mazariegos, Kathleen
McEwen, Steven Cameron McSpiritt,
Veerja M. Mehta, Devin Mejias, Vincent
J. Mendola, Emily Meshumar, Jacquelyn Mihalyi, Loraine A. Miranda,
Aakash Modi, Solange I. Moran, Timothy J. Moran Jr., Sophia K. Mostowy,
Eric Moy, Melissa Lynn Murphy, and
Rachel Mynes.
N
John Walter Nabial Jr., Rajsekhar V.
Nalitham, Vidya Nandapurkar, Tanvi G.
Netravali, Kaitlyn Nicole Newman,
Daisy W. Ngige, Alexandra Niciforo,
Arielle Elizabeth Niecestro, and
Nicholas No.
Tiffany Kichline and Sean Yan.
Rachel Mynes, Melissa Murphy, and Amy Pacheco.
THE NEWS
19
O
Melissa A. Obleada, James Jeehoon Oh, Lindsey K. Olsson, Amal
Omar, and Ralph C. Otis V.
P
Amy Gabrielle Pacheco, Varun A.
Padmanabhan, Abishy Pandita, Jinho
Park, Jarna A. Patel, Natasha Bharat
Patel, Ananya Patnaik, Jordin H. Peiffer, Hannah A. Pellichero, Kelsey R.
Pellichero, Julia L. Perdigao, Marcus
Peterkin, Laura Jasmine Petri, Todd A.
Petrone, Evan Pettus, Rachel Petzinger, Ryan P. Phelan, Gabriela A.
Pikul, Christopher Raymond Pizzi, Ilya
Podkopaev, Cintia Prates, Alison Sara
Puzio, and Denise Nicole Pyfrom.
Q
Basma Qazi, Elise Marie Quigley,
and Joshua Evan Welsh Quijada.
R
Lekha Sravani Racharla, Prathima
Radhakrishnan, Kirtana Rajendran,
Praveen Raju, Irene Ramirez, Vikram
Ramkumar, Kruti Rao, Dharun Ravi,
Marc Raziano, Rohit Kyatham Reddy,
Kyle T. Reed, Sean R. Reed, Michael
Reef, Summaiya Rehman, Bridget A.
Riley, Humna Rizki, Onaisa M. Rizki,
Shiffa Rizki, Faiha F. Rizvi, Justin Scott
Robbins, Sergio Y. Rodas, Brandon
Michael Rodriguez, Cameron Dutton
Ross, Sarah A. Russell, Joshua Ethan
Rutstein, Raj Kishore Ryali, and
Matthew Ryklin.
S
Matthew Ross Safranek, Varun
Sahu, Daniel Salvato, Tejasvi Samala,
Akhil Sankar, Jonathan SanPedro,
Jake C. Saville, Damini Saxena, Eric J.
Scala, Rebecca Scheick, Emily Schuit,
Jessica Schultz, Emily A. Scott,
Aashika Shah, Taimur Shah, Aleesha
Shaik, Aparna Shankar, Megha Sharma, Satvik Sharma, Robert Shemitz,
Richard Shen, Nicole A. Sherman,
Nikhil H. Sheth, Kevin R. Shock, Allison
Shook, Tamarah Shpilberg, Stephanie
Siano, Dana Sievers, Jaclyn T. Silva,
Nassir Silwany, Samantha M. Simon,
Mohini Singal, Nandnalin Sirihorachai,
Jonathan Slawitsky, Gentley N. Smith,
Kayla C. Snyder, Grzegorz Solak, Ioan
Vlad Solomon, Dhivya Soundararajan,
Alexandra C. Spiegel, Jonathan P.
Squeri, Lwam Natna Stefanos, Emily
Ann Stern, Frances Alexandra Stern,
Jesse R. Stone, Elizabeth Ashley
Stowers, Makenzi D. Sumners, and
Srividya Suresh.
T
James Guy Tadie, Jason Tam,
Samantha L. Tatulli, Shivathmik Tejo,
Kianah Thomas, Paul Thompson,
Stephen Thompson, Peter Isaiah Thorpe, Christopher Tian, Priyanka Tilve,
Daniel Titen, Cristian Alexander Torres, Anh Thu Ngoc Tran, Daniel Trink,
and Tiffany Truglio.
V
Atharv Vaish, Kevin-Scott van Vlijmen, Andrew Vanisko, Savya
Venkatesh, Karl V. Vigilia, Brian Vignaoiano, Andrew Vogt, Michael T. Voltmer, Naeha Vora, and Lahari Vudayagiri.
W
Pamela Wagner, Christopher S.
Wainwright, Mark D. Warner, Mark
Ernest Wasco Jr., Andrew Washuta,
Alexandra Diane Waters, Emily
Watkins, Molly Wei, Evan Weinreb,
Melanie Weiskopf, Steve Weng,
Catherine Wherry, Collin Wiemer,
Marissa S. Wiener, Lara J. Wilder,
Ryan S. Williams, Andrew Wilson,
Kristie Wong, Brandon Worrall, Taylor
Wright, Katherine Wu, and Timothy Wu.
X
Changlan Lucy Xu and Scott Xu.
Y
Sean X. Yan, Gregory Yang, Katherine Huiwen Yang, Lawrence Yang,
Derek Ye, Daesun Yim, Louisa Ying,
and Garrett Yung.
Z
Tauhid Zaman, Alexandra Zatoren,
Matthew Zeissler, Kevin Zhang, Kevin
(Xiaotian) Zheng, Erica Leigh Zohn,
and Andrew Blake Zutty.
Need Photos? Please be patient. The News will make
all of its photographs from the awards ceremonies and
graduations available to family and friends of the recipients. Further details as well as pictures of award
winners will be featured in upcoming issues.
20
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
Green Resolution
Rite Aid Update
Continued from page 15
T
ing for the work through the state
Department of Community Affairs’ Office of Smart Growth’s
Smart Future grant program.
In August, 2008, the legislature
passed a law allowing local planning boards to include sustainability elements in their master plans,
which was not allowed at the time
West Windsor’s Plan was being
drafted.
“There’s nothing in either of
these resolutions that the township
hasn’t committed to previously,”
said Marty Rosen, a member of
both the Planning Board and Environmental Commission. Rather,
the resolutions formalize council’s
agreement as officials apply for
certification.
Councilwoman Diane Ciccone
said the resolutions would help the
township “continue to be leaders in
the state in sustainability.”
Cable TV Board To
Be Decommissioned
W
ith a depleting need for a Cable TV Advisory Board, the
Township Council is aiming at dissolving it in favor of a smaller staff
committee that would handle any
policy decisions.
Interest on part of the administration and the board members
themselves has been on the decline
as the issues needing discussion
has decreased, and the suggestion
at the June 14 council meeting was
to “de-emphasize” the board’s
role.
Councilman Charles Morgan
proposed ordinance revisions to
phase the board out of township
ownship officials have confirmed that the developer of
the future Rite Aid site has submitted engineer applications to
the township. Township officials
are currently reviewing that application and have already met
with the project architect.
According to Mayor Shing-Fu
Hsueh, the engineer applications
were submitted a couple of weeks
ago. “We would like to give them
the permits as soon as possible,”
Hsueh said.
Residents have been questioning officials about the plans for
the future Rite Aid site on the corner of Cranbury Road and Route
571, where vacant buildings recode, but council members and the
administration were reluctant to
spend money to make a substantial
ordinance change. Though, Morgan’s suggestion that a small committee consisting mostly of township staff should be appointed to
handle any policy issues that arise
seemed to gain support.
Morgan said there is reference
to the GCC — Government Cable
Committee — in the township’s
code, but language changes would
need to be made accordingly.
Council President George Borek
volunteered to work with Morgan
to revamp the ordinance to save
money, but Township Attorney
Michael Herbert offered to draft a
document for free.
The smaller committee will most
likely consist of the business administrator, the mayor, and the council
president, who will deal with policy
decisions. One example mentioned
during the discussion was the issue
of “politicking” on the township’s
main boarded up. Last year the
Township Council also sent a letter to the Dreher Group, which
owns the site, to request its demolition.
According to Business Administrator Robert Hary, township officials held a pre-construction meeting with the project architect on June 22. “Our construction official did encourage
them to demolish the existing
structures as soon as possible,
even though the actual construction of the new building may not
start until September,” said Hary.
The site plan calls for a 14,673
square foot Rite Aid, and an additional 6,000 feet of retail space
that could include a coffee shop
and a restaurant.
cable channel — which is prohibited — that was debated during the
last election season.
Council Advocates for Gulf
Coast. In other business during the
June 14 meeting, the council discussed whether to put a resolution
on the next agenda that would take
a position on a larger national issue
taking center stage — the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf
Coast.
Councilwoman Diane Ciccone
suggested the township pass the
resolution, as other towns like Edison have done already. The resolution would support the protection
of wetlands and support the call to
put the onus on BP to take responsibility for cleanup efforts.
Council members debated
whether they should take a position
on a national issue. Councilman
Charles Morgan said he would support the idea, although a few years
ago, when the Patriot Act was first
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• Friday, July 23, 9:00-3:00 or
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proposed, he asked the council to
consider passing a resolution in
support of the measure but was
shot down on the basis that it was
not township business.
Most of the draft language was
modeled after resolutions from
other towns, and township officials
would tweak it to make it broader
before bringing it back to council
on Monday, June 28.
Field Lighting
T
he Township Council has
awarded a $126,999 contract
for the installation of lighting at the
softball and baseball fields at Community Park.
The contract, awarded to Musco
Sports Lighting LLC, of Oskaloosa, IA, was the lowest of six
bids received in April. The funding
for the project comes from money
set aside in the 2009 budget.
According to Business Administrator Robert Hary, the township’s efforts to install field lighting began with the installation of
lighting at the Babe Ruth League
field years ago. “We did the
lacrosse fields last year, and now
we’re following up with the Little
League and softball field this
year,” he said.
Hary said the lights are expected
to be installed in late July or early
August.
Twin ‘W’ Squad
To Build Garage
T
he Twin “W” First Aid Squad
is looking to construct a freestanding garage for storage on its
2.5-acre property, and will be appearing before the township’s Site
Plan Review Advisory Board on
Monday, June 28.
According to Sam Surtees, the
township’s Division of Land Use
manager, the volunteer squad will
be using its own funding to construct the 1,230-square foot structure in the back of the existing facility on Everett Drive. The garage
will be used to store various pieces
of equipment that need to be stored
indoors.
The application for preliminary
and final major site plan approval
does not require any variances and
falls within the zoning regulations
for the property, Surtees said. The
2.5-acre site will provide “ample
room” for the structure, but the
squad will lose 13 of its current 52
parking spaces, which should be
adequate, he added.
The site plan application was required, even though the squad’s
proposal meets all requirements.
“The only thing that’s exempt from
site plan review is residential,” said
Surtees. “They’re coming in to
show they can comply with all the
requirements.”
After SPRAB, Surtees said officials are hoping to get the application to the Planning Board for a
hearing tentatively on Wednesday,
July 21.
WW Road Projects
S
ummer is in full swing, and
road construction projects are
moving forward.
Improvements to the Route 571
intersection with Cranbury and
Wallace roads as well as the
repaving of Washington Road between Route 1 and the Princeton
border has begun already, and
Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh says that
officials are anticipating beginning
work on the Alexander Road scurve later in the summer.
With the state Department of
Transportation working at the
Route 571 and Cranbury and Wallace roads, drivers in the area could
see construction crews measuring
the roads and digging on Wallace
Road.
The intersection has been redesigned with new pedestrianfriendly crossings, as part of an
agreement with the state, county,
and township. It also includes
crosswalks in every direction,
countdown timers on traffic lights,
and a dedicated left turn lane coming off of the bridge eastbound,
turning onto Cranbury Road.
The state has approved using the
eastbound side of the Route 571
bridge as a pedestrian crossing with
a sidewalk on the other side, leading to Station Drive and a crosswalk to get to the sidewalk on the
south side of Washington Road.
“At some point, there might be
some partial closings,” said Hsueh.
“We will definitely work to avoid
the traffic hours.” He said the
township has not yet received a
clear timeline from the DOT.
Work on the s-curve is scheduled to begin in the later part of the
summer, Hsueh said. Earlier this
month, the Township Council approved an amendment to the existing contract with the engineers for
the project. The council approved
an additional $5,125 to the township’s contract with Remington &
Vernick Engineers of Haddonfield,
which submitted a proposal last
month for additional professional
engineering services. The total revised contract, originally approved
in 2008, is worth $66,070.
The project at the time included
widening the road to 38 feet, with
one lane of travel and a five-foot
bike path in each direction. Features of the new road included elevation of the roadway to create a
banking effect, use of high friction
pavement, and improved striping
and signage. The estimated cost of
the project is about $500,000, with
$190,000 in funding from a DOT
grant.
Meet & Greet
S
enator Tom Goodwin will be
hosting a meet-and-greet at the
West Windsor Fire Company firehouse on South Mill Road on Saturday, June 26, at 10 a.m.
Goodwin, of Hamilton, was selected in March to fill the vacancy
left by former Senator Bill Baroni.
Goodwin is seeking re-election in
the November general election.
JUNE 25, 2010
THE NEWS
Settlement Reached in Procaccini Case
A
by Cara Latham
fter nearly eight months of
hearings and testimony, a
settlement was reached in
the termination case against
Plainsboro
Police
Corporal
Nicholas Procaccini, just before
Procaccini was scheduled to take
the stand.
The settlement, which allows
Procaccini to retire, was reached
just prior to a continuation of the
public hearing on June 22.
While the matter was pending,
“Procaccini became eligible for his
service time retirement in good
standing,” said Timothy Smith,
Procaccini’s lawyer, who said Procaccini will be retiring after 20
years on the job. “He’s submitted
an application for his retirement,
and that should be effected in the
near future. He will be leaving an
employee of the township and pursuing other career endeavors.”
Smith said the details of the settlement, however, are confidential.
“I am very happy to be away
from there,” said Procaccini in his
only comment to this newspaper.
Said Plainsboro Township Administrator Robert Sheehan: “I can
confirm that we’ve come to a settlement with Mr. Procaccini,” but
declined any further comment. The
police department’s attorney,
Arthur Thibault, was unavailable
for comment by press time.
The public hearing process began in October. The department
was pursuing Procaccini’s termination based on four charges: he
was late for duty; he did not follow
protocol when making motor vehicle stops; he violated procedure
dealing with sick leave; and he violated policy in using the department’s E-mail system.
Procaccini’s attorneys, however, characterized Procaccini, of
South Lane in West Windsor, as a
whistleblower. He alleges that the
charges are for behavior exhibited
by many officers in the department
and that his client is being targeted
as a result of defending another officer whom he says was terminated
for filing a sexual harassment complaint.
Fire Company
Seeks Equipment
I
n order to improve safety while
its members respond to calls, the
Plainsboro Fire Department is
looking to purchase equipment that
will allow crews to change traffic
signals at three key intersections
within the township.
The department is looking to
purchase a traffic pre-emptive control system known as the Opticom
Infrared System, which would also
improve response times.
According to Fire Chief Doug
Vorp, the system operates through
an infrared monitor that is mounted
to the emergency vehicles, which
sends out an infrared signal to a device mounted near the traffic light,
prior to the intersection.
“Based on the direction of travel, it turns three of the four directions of the intersection to red and
turns our direction that we’re traveling in to green so that we can arrive at the intersection and pass
through,” Vorp explained. “Our
primary focus is a safety perspective. It gives us a safer route of travel. These are large intersections
that we’ve had trouble with in the
past.”
Because of traffic or driver distractions, sometimes drivers cannot hear or see the emergency vehicles and they pass directly in front
of them, Vorp said. The device
does not automatically change the
lights from green to red. “It runs
the light through its normal cycle,
but it speeds up the process a bit.
The ones that are red already will
just hold red longer, and the other
side will go from yellow to red,”
Vorp added.
“This particular system is being
Plainsboro’s fire department hopes to purchase a ‘traffic preemptive control system’
that would improve response times.
encouraged by the fire company
and could also be used by the rescue squad or police department as
appropriate,” said Deputy Mayor
Neil Lewis.
There are three intersections officials are targeting for use of the
device: Dey and Scudders Mill
roads; Schalks Crossing and Scudders Mill roads; and the connector
road and Scudders Mill Road intersection, said Lewis.
Lewis said he has seen the devices used in Pennsylvania and has
experienced first-hand its effectiveness. “The light changed as the
vehicle approached the intersection,” said Lewis. “I saw the emergency vehicle, and it immediately
switched to red in my direction.”
“It puts everything on red so the
emergency vehicle has the right of
way,” said Lewis. “It does remove
the additional hazard of emergency
vehicles that are moving at a rapid
rate to try to get to a person who
needs them quickly.”
Vorp said the fire district would
purchase the equipment through its
operating budget. For three intersections, the equipment will cost
about $50,000, he said.
“We’re looking to hopefully
start moving and start the approval
process,” he said, adding that it will
probably start at the end of July or
beginning of August. “It will take a
couple of months to work its way
through the approval process.”
Taxi Ordinance
A
public hearing on an ordinance that tightens restrictions on taxi drivers picking up
passengers within Plainsboro is
scheduled for Wednesday, July 14.
The Plainsboro Township Committee introduced the ordinance at
its meeting on June 9, after its first
revision since 2001, said Plainsboro Lieutenant Troy Bell. The ordinance ensures “the cars are safe
and not in violation” by governing
both the inspection of taxis and the
documentation that must be provided by a driver.
Under the provisions of the new
ordinance, taxi companies who
pick up passengers in Plainsboro
would have to register with the
township. Registration will enter
the cab’s information into the police computer system with the taxi
license’s expiration date.
A taxi cannot be more than 84
months old and must be in safe
condition, under the ordinance.
Each driver must be at least 18
years old and hold a valid New Jersey, Pennsylvania, or New York
driver’s license. The ordinance also requires an investigation into a
driver’s background and driving
record.
“We did add a smoke-free environment, so that means the drivers
or passengers cannot be smoking
in there,” Bell explained. The new
requirements are now consistent
with the state smoking law that
went into effect a few years ago.
The township has also changed
the identification system. “We
used to issue stickers for the rear
bumper, which was cumbersome
because every year, they had to put
on a new sticker,” said Bell. “Now,
we put the expiration date into the
computer system. If an officer runs
the tags, it shows when the license
expires.”
The ordinance also requires taxi
drivers to keep their taxi licenses
inside the car so they can provide it
to officers during a stop. “The license is only required to pick up
fares in town,” said Bell. A cab driver who picks up a passenger elsewhere and drives into Plainsboro to
drop the person off is not required
to register with the township.
Bell said the township is expecting a large increase in the number
of cabs operating in Plainsboro because of the new hospital. A person
who is brought to the hospital in
Plainsboro but lives far away, for
example, many need to call a cab
when released from the hospital.
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21
22
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
Rosa Wins National Title
J
oe Rosa, impressive throughout his athletic career at North,
has achieved yet another milestone: a national title. He won the
boys’ two-mile championship in
record time at the New Balance
Outdoor National Track and Field
Championships at North Carolina
A&T.
The junior finished in a record
time of 8:44.06 at the event on June
18. Meanwhile, his twin brother,
Jim, finished second with a time of
8:51.46, his own personal best.
With the win, Joe Rosa is only
the fourth male Mercer County
high school star to win on the national level. The brothers were also
part of the North distance medley
relay team, which finished third at
the event in a time of 9:59.07.
The win adds to the Rosas’ already decorated career at North,
which began when they were freshmen. Just prior to the event, Jim
Rosa finished third, with a time of
4:07.70 at the Inaugural Jim Ryun
High School Dream Mile on June
12. Jim finished fifth, with a time
of 4:08.65.
This year Jim Rosa won the
1,600 in a meet-record of 4:07.89
at the Meet of Champions on June
3 at the Frank Jost Field in South
Plainfield, beating the old record of
4:08.11 set by Morris Hills’ Liam
Tansey in 2009. Joe finished second in the 3,200, with a time of
8:48.55. At the Group III championships in May, Joe picked up the
state title in the 3,200, finishing
with a time of 9:08.07.
During the fall season, they took
first and second place not only at
the state Meet of Champions, but
also at the Nike Northeast Region-
nathy also finished big: a ninth
place finish in the boys’ shot put
championship, with a 57-1/2, to
cap his high school career.
In WW-P track this past spring,
in North’s sectional championship
win over Ocean Township, 83-72,
on May 22, Joe Rosa broke records
in the 1,600-meter and 3,200-meter runs.
WW-P Hangs On
T
Joe Rosa won the twomile at the New Balance Outdoor National
Track and Field Championships.
al in November. Joe broke the
course record with a time of
14:55.52 when he claimed the title
at the Meet of Champions in November. Jim was second, also beating the previous record with a time
of 15:14.22. The previous record of
15:15.2 was set in 2006 by Craig
Forys of Colts Neck.
The first and second place finishes led the North boys’ cross
country team to a third-place finish
at the state meet, with an average
time of 16:15.6.
Joe Rosa also finished first at the
Nike Northeast Regionals with a
time of 16:01.3. Jim finished second with a time of 16:01.6.
At the most recent national
event, North senior Corey Aber-
he WW-P American Legion
team may not have had the best
luck after its opening week of the
season, but it staying alive, most
notably with its win over secondplace Bordentown Post 26 on June
21. It followed it up with a win over
Allentown on June 22 to improve
to 6-7, but lost to Lawrence on
June 23. The team is still fighting
for a spot in the playoffs.
WW-P has been so close for so
long: six of its eight losses come
from one-run games. Key for WWP in the team’s win over Bordentown was batting by Chet Otis,
who had three hits and Ryan Phelan, who finished with three RBIs.
Ryan DeMouth had a two-run
triple, and Evan Smith also had a
single in the win. Smith, Ralph Aurora, Phelan, and Jared Rubenstein
each had two hits. Neal DeVincenzo struck out five batters.
WW-PAmerican
Legion Baseball
WW-P (6-8): A loss to Lawrence,
5-3, on June 23. Even Smith, Chris
Hase, and Ryan DeMouth each had
hits. Ryan Phelan had a sacrifice fly.
A win against Allentown, 7-6, on
June 22. Otis: 4-0-1-0; Aurora: 1-1-10; Phelan: 3-1-1-2; Hase: 3-1-2-1;
DeMouth: 3-0-1-2; Rubenstein: 4-11-0; Donohue: 3-1-1-0; Balestrieri: 32-2-0. 2B: Rubenstein. 3B: Phelan,
Aurora, DeMouth. SF: Phelan. SB:
Hase.
A win against Bordentown, 9-5,
on June 21. Otis: 5-2-3-1; Aurora: 51-2-0; Phelan: 4-1-3-1; Hase: 2-0-12; DeMouth: 3-0-1-3; Rubenstein: 41-2-0; Weisbecker: 2-1-0-0; Smith:
3-2-2-0. 2B: Otis. 3B: DeMouth. SF:
Hase. SB: Rubenstein.
A loss to Robbinsville, 7-6, on
June 20, in the second game of a
doubleheader. 2B: Chet Otis, Evan
Smith; Ryan Phelan. RBIs: Ralph
Aurora: 2; Phelan: 2; Chris Hase;
Dan Block. Otis: 3-2-1-0; Aurora: 01-0-2; Phelan: 2-0-1-2; Hase: 3-0-11; Block: 3-0-2-1; Balestrieri: 4-0-1-0;
E. Smith: 4-1-2-0; Ruta: 2-1-0-0; DeMouth: 1-1-1-0.
A win against Robbinsville, 13-1,
on June 20. 2B: Ralph Aurora; Chris
Hase; Dan Block; Jared Rubenstein.
3B: Chet Otis; Greg Weisbecker.
RBI: Block: 3; Rubenstein: 3; Ryan
DeMouth: 2; Weisbecker: 2; Hase;
Otis. Otis: 4-2-2-1; Aurora: 2-2-2-0;
DeMouth: 3-2-1-2; Hase: 4-1-2-1;
Block: 2-2-2-3; Donohue: 2-2-1-0;
DeVincenzo: 1-0-1-0; Rubenstein: 42-2-3; Weisbecker: 3-0-1-2.
A loss to Lawrence, 5-4, on June
19. Otis: 3-1-1-0; Aurora: 4-0-1-0;
Phelan: 4-0-0-1; Hase: 3-1-1-0; DeMouth: 4-0-1-2. 2B: Otis, DeMouth.
HR: Weisbecker.
A loss to Hopewell, 6-3, on June
16. Aurora: 3-1-1-0; Phelan: 3-0-1-1;
Hase: 4-0-1-0; Block: 2-1-1-0; Donohue: 3-1-0-0; Voltmer: 3-0-2-2. 2B:
Donohue. 3B: Aurora, Block, Voltmer. SB: Donohue; Otis.
A win against Trenton, 13-3, on
June 15. Chet Otis: 4-0-2-5-; Ralph
Aurora: 4-1-1-1; Ryan Phelan: 3-1-11; Chris Hase: 4-1-2-1; Ryan DeMouth: 4-1-1-0; Zack Donohue: 2-20-0; Jared Rubenstein: 3-2-0-1; Ruta: 1-1-1-1; Dan Block: 4-2-2-0; Voltmer: 1-2-1-1. 2B: Voltmer. SF: Otis.
SB: Voltmer; Donohue; DeMouth;
Hase. Evan Smith struck out four
batters and allowed only three runs.
A loss to Hightstown, 2-1, on June
13. Otis: 3-0-2-0; DeMouth: 3-1-0-0;
Donohue: 3-0-1-0.
A win against North Trenton, 3-1,
on June 12. Dan Block hit a solo
home run and has two RBIs.
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A loss to Broad St. Park, 5-4, on
June 10. Rubenstein: 4-1-1-1; Aurora: 4-0-2-0; Hase: 4-0-0-1; Donohue:
3-1-1-0; Voltmer: 2-1-2-1; Block: 3-12-1. 2B: Voltmer: 2; Block: 2; Aurora.
SB: Voltmer. Voltmer hit an RBI double.
Boys’ Track
North: Jim Rosa finished third,
with a time of 4:07.70, and Joe Rosa
finished fifth, with a time of 4:08.65,
at the inaugural Jim Ryun High
School Dream Mile. The event was
held at Icahn Stadium in Randall’s Island, NY, on June 12, as part of the
Adidas Grand Prix.
Sports Briefs
West Windsor resident Matt
Davidson finished in a six-way tie for
seventh place in the Fort Smith Classic at the Hardscrabble Country Club
in Arkansas, where he shot 64-6970-66—269. He earned $14,744.
Michael Perl, a South graduate
and a junior coxswain on the Princeton University men’s rowing team,
helped lead the lightweight boat to
the Intercollegiate Rowing Association national championship in a time
of 5:36.07.
North’s Killian Brakel and
South’s David Calves were honored
at the Colonial Valley Conference
Sportsmanship Awards dinner at
Mercer Oaks Golf Club. North coach
Monica Biro and South’s Brian
Welsh were also honored.
North’s ice hockey players Dylan
Strober, Stephen Kolber, Andrew
Washuta, Mark Raziano, and
Casey Litwak are playing on Team
Paul in the first annual Paul Puchalik
Memorial Colonial Valley Conference All-Star game on June 25 at 7
p.m. at the Loucks Ice Rink at the
Lawrenceville School. South’s Joe
Cangelosi, Adam Rothman, Chris
So, and Darren Stafford are playing
for Team Puchalik. South’s Brian
McGurney serves on the coaching
staff for Team Puchalik.
Plainsboro resident Bo Wang
was fifth overall, with a time of
17:51.9, at the Hillsborough Hop 5K
this month in Hillsborough.
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JUNE 25, 2010
THE NEWS
23
DAY-BY-DAY IN WW-P
JUNE 25
Continued from page 1
Dancing
Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149. www.americanballroomco.com. $15. 8 to 11
p.m.
Ballroom Dance Social, G & J
Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14,
Hillsborough,
908-892-0344.
www.gandjstudios.com.
Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm.
Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to
11 p.m.
Karaoke Dance, American Legion Post 401, 148 Major Road,
Monmouth Junction, 732-3299861. Cake to celebrate birthdays.
Free. 8:30 p.m.
Classical Music
Barry Tuckwell Institute, College
of New Jersey, Mildred and
Ernest Mayo Concert Hall, Ewing,
609-771-2551.
www.tcnj.edu.
Recital by select participants with
Tomoko Kanamuru on piano.
Free. 7 p.m.
New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, Monroe Township Cultural
Arts
Commission,
Monroe
Township High School, 1629 Perrineville Road, 732-521-2111.
www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com. Classical and popular
music. $20. 8 p.m.
Good Causes
Benefit Day, PEAC Fitness, Trenton Thunder, Waterfront Park,
Trenton, 609-883-2000. www.peachealthfitness.com. $10 tickets to the game benefit American
Cancer Society. Brenda Watty, a
group exercise instructor at
PEAC, will sing the National Anthem prior to the game. Register.
7:05 p.m.
Comedy Clubs
Julian McCullough and Mark Riccodonna, Catch a Rising Star,
Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie
Center, West Windsor, 609-9878018. www.catcharisingstar.com.
McCullough was the house emcee
at Stress Factory while attending
Rutgers University. He has
opened for Lewis Black, Colin
Quinn, Brian Regan, and Kevin
James. Also Saturday, June 26.
Register. $17.50. 8 p.m.
Faith
Prayer: An Answer for the 21st
Century, Fellowship in Prayer,
Princeton University, 609-9246863. www.fellowshipinprayer.org. Most talks are in Richardson.
Through Sunday, June 27. 9:30
a.m.
Farmers’ Market
Farmers’ Market, Downtown
Hightstown, Memorial Park, Main
Street.
www.downtownhightstown.org. Produce, flowers, baked
goods, and area vendors. 4 to 8
p.m.
Health & Wellness
Meditation Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. www.mcl.org. Register.
2:30 p.m.
For Families
“The Muppet Movie” on the green.
6 to 11 p.m.
Lectures
Meeting, Toastmasters Club,
Mary Jacobs Library, 64 Washington Street, Rocky Hill, 609-3060515. http://ssu.freetoasthost.ws.
Build speaking, leadership, and
communication skills. Guests are
welcome. 7:30 p.m.
Live Music
Happy Hour, Hopewell Valley
Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com.
Wine available. 5 to 8 p.m.
Flashback Fridays, KatManDu,
50 Riverview Plaza, Waterfront
Park, Route 29, Trenton, 609-3937300.
www.katmandutrenton.com. Buffet from 5 to 8 p.m., $5.
DJs Bryan Basara and Davey
Gold with music from 1970s, 80s,
and 90s. 5 p.m.
Dick Gratton, Chambers Walk
Cafe, 2667 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-896-5995. Solo
jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m.
Lights on the River, Pasha Rugs,
15 Bridge Street, Lambertville,
609-397-5434. www.pasharugs.com. Fortune telling, Turkish music, and a raki tasting of the Turkish national drink. Sit on the large
handmade rug pillow, a gigantic
cushion made from more than 80
colorful vintage antique rugs to
watch the fireworks at 9:30 p.m. 6
to 9:30 p.m.
Broadside Electric, Grounds For
Sculpture, 18 Fairgrounds Road,
Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Eclectic
British Isles music. Rain or shine.
Register. $10. 7:30 p.m.
David Sancious, The Record Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-3240880. www.the-record-collector.com. From Bruce Springsteen’s E
Street Band. $25. 7:30 p.m.
Riverside Jam Traveling Band,
Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335
Princeton Hightstown Road, West
Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 8 p.m.
Connor Healey, It’s a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing
Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919.
www.itsagrind.com.
Acoustic
rock. 8 to 10 p.m.
Greg
Provo,
Pheasants Landing, 311 Amwell
Road,
Hillsborough,
908-2811288. Singer songwriter. 9 to 11 p.m.
Singles
Divorce Recovery
Program, Princeton Church of
Christ, 33 River
Road, Princeton,
609-581-3889.
www.princetonchurchofchrist.com.
Support
group for men and
women. Free. 7:30
p.m.
Drop In, Yardley Singles, Washington Crossing Inn, River Road,
PA, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Music and dancing.
Cash bar. 9 p.m.
Socials
Beginner’s
Drum
Circle,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920.
www.mcl.org.
Bring your own drum, shaker,
gong, bell, or other percussion.
Refreshments. Register. 4:30
p.m.
Saturday
June 26
Scrabble
Mercer County, Mercer County
Park, West Windsor, 609-4487107.
www.mercercounty.org.
Food, games, beer and wine gardens, craft vendors, tethered hotair balloon rides, water rides,
games, inflatable rides, and fireworks. Band performances by the
Sensational Soul Cruisers at 5:30
p.m., and the Amish Outlaws at
7:30 p.m., and the Dawgs after the
fireworks. Free admission. 3 to 11
p.m. See story.
Borders Books, 601 Nassau Park,
609-514-0040.
www.bordersgroupinc.com. Meet in the cafe. 5
p.m.
Classics Used and Rare Books,
117 South Warren Street, Trenton, 609-394-8400. All skill levels
welcome. 6:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Mercer County Widows and Widowers, Knights of Columbus,
1451 Klockner Road, Hamilton,
609-585-3453. Dance social $8.
7:30 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder Baseball, Waterfront Park, Route 29, Trenton,
609-394-8326.
www.trentonthunder.com. New Hampshire
Fisher Cats. $9 to $12. 7:05 p.m.
Joe Falcey Jazz Trio, BT Bistro,
3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor, 609-919-9403. www.btbistro.com. 8:30 p.m.
Hair Plus
Hair
Plus
TH E SALON
HAIR, NAIL & S KIN CARE
TH E SALON
WEST WINDSOR
HAIR, NAIL & S KIN CARE
609-897-0400
Southfield Center, Princeton-Hightstown Road
OPEN 7 DAYS
WEST WINDSOR
609-897-0400
COME VISIT US
Southfield Center, Princeton-Hightstown Road
OPEN 7 DAYS
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR MONTHLY SPECIALS ON:
HAIR:
cutting
& AIL
styling,
color, high- •& S
low-lighting,
H
AIRdesign
• SKIN
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PRODUCTS
ERVICES
custom waves; NAILS: manicures, pedicures, tips & wraps,
SKIN:
facial treatments;
& body waxing;
make-up
application
nail
art, paraffin
SKIN: facial
& body waxing;
make-up
application
& make-overs;
facials.
& make-overs;
facials.
First Time Clients Only. Mondays Only Facials:
Restore Your Youthful Appearance. Reg. $115 NOW $85
European Repair Facial
Reg. $85 NOW $55
Summer Reading Fair, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. Petting zoo with Whatt-Knott
Farms. 10 a.m. to noon.
First Time Clients Only:
$10 Off Any Hair Service
of $55 or More.
Summer Solstice Block Party,
JaZams, 25 Hulfish Street,
Palmer Square, 609-924-TOYS.
Crafts, games, food, face painting,
and balloon animals. Charlie
Hope, a children’s musician from
Canada, performs. Screening of
10% to 20% Off
Any Retail Item
Including:
Paul Mitchell,
Biolage, Loreal,
Kiwi, Redken, Aquage
Music at Halo Pub: Folk by Association duo Karen
Krajacic, left, and Jill Unge, perform at Halo Pub
in Trenton on Saturday, June 26, at 7 p.m.
Freedom Festival
Drama
The Heidi Chronicles, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater,
609-258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Wendy Wasserstein’s Pulitzer Prize winner. $16. 2 and 8
p.m.
Miss Connections, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Comedic mystery by Marvin
Harold Cheiten of Princeton.
$27.50 to $29.50. 7 p.m.
Playwright’s Lab, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and
Montgomery streets, Trenton,
609-392-0766.
www.passagetheatre.org. $15. 7 p.m.
The Wizard of Oz, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
dpacatoat.com. Family musical
classic. $10; $7 for children. Blankets, seat cushions, and insect repellent are recommended. Picnics
welcome before show. Food available. Parking fee of $5. 7:30 p.m.
Sordid Lives, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
609-570-3333. kelseytheatre.net.
Drama to benefit the James Tolin
memorial fund. $25. 8 p.m.
Continued on following page
24
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
JUNE 26
Continued from preceding page
The Threepenny Opera, Princeton Festival, 185 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-537-0071. www.princetonfestival.org. Musical featuring music of Kurt Weill and
lyrics by Bertolt Brecht. $40. 8
p.m.
Ragtime, Villagers Theater, 475
DeMott Lane, Somerset, 732-8732210. www.villagerstheatre.com.
Musical. $18. 8 p.m.
Film
tour lit by the full moon. Register.
$65 per couple. 7 p.m.
Dancing
World Music
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton,
609-924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Afternoon for
experienced dancers from 3 to
5:30 p.m. Potluck from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. Beginners introduction
at 7:30 p.m. Contra dance for all
begins at 8 p.m. $10, afternoon;
$15, evening; $22, all day. No
partner needed. Music by the
Moving Violations and Lisa Greenleaf calls. 3 to 11 p.m.
Miss Puerto Rico Cultural
Pageant, Puerto Rican Parade
of Trenton, NJ State Museum,
205 West State Street, Trenton,
609-802-5982.
www.trentonprparade.org. Candidates running in
four categories including Miss
Puerto Rico, ages 14 to 20; and
Miss Puerto Rico Infantile, ages 5
to 9. Contestants, each representing a town, present the town’s
unique characteristic during the
cultural costume portion, sing,
dance, or recite monologues from
famous Puerto Rican poets. $35. 2
p.m.
Acme Screening Room, Lambertville Public Library, 25
South Union Street, Lambertville,
609-397-0275. www.nickelodeonnights.org. Screening of “The Red
Baron.” $5. 7 and 8:50 p.m.
Ballroom Dance Social, G & J
Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14,
Hillsborough,
908-892-0344.
www.gandjstudios.com.
Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm.
Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to
11 p.m.
Art
Literati
Art Exhibits, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus,
609-258-3788.
http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. First
day for “Presence and Remembrance: The Art of Toshiko
Takaezu” focuses on the Remembrance bell on Princeton’s campus
in memory of the 13 alumni who
lose their lives on September 11.
On view to September 11. 10 a.m.
Artists Network, Lawrenceville
Main Street, 2683 Main Street,
Lawrenceville,
609-647-1815.
www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by
area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Summer Art Sale, Garden State
Watercolor Society, Princeton
Shopping Center, 301 Harrison
Street, Princeton, 609-394-4000.
www.gardenstatewatercolorsociety.org. Original art works in
watercolor, oil, pastel, and mixed
media; both framed and unframed. Fran Franklin demonstrates acrylic knife painting from
noon to 2 p.m. Noon to 5 p.m.
Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2
p.m.
Art Exhibit, Trenton Artists
Workshop Association, Ellarslie
Mansion, Trenton, 609-392-0766.
www.tawa-nj.org. “Art and Soul”
Art Moved by Spirit,” a juried exhibition of 22 artists who are members of the association, opens.
The exhibit features works of photography, painting, mixed media,
and sculpture. On view to July 25.
5 to 8 p.m.
Full Moon Tour and Picnic from
Peacock Cafe, Grounds For
Sculpture, 18 Fairgrounds Road,
Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Picnic
dinner for two followed by group
Henry of 101.5 FM radio. $25 to
$30. 7:30 p.m.
Workshop, Sharpening the Quill,
Princeton, 609-430-0321. www.laurenbdavis.com. Writing class
on varying subjects, lunch, networking, and critiquing. Presented
by Lauren B. Davis, author of “The
Radiant City.” Register. $85. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m.
Author Event, Classics Used and
Rare Books, 117 South Warren
Street, Trenton, 609-394-8400.
Sa-Mut, author of “Vibrant Lotus.”
2 to 4 p.m.
Classical Music
Barry Tuckwell Institute, College
of New Jersey, Mildred and
Ernest Mayo Concert Hall, Ewing,
609-771-2551.
www.tcnj.edu.
Master class with select participants of the institute. Free. 7 p.m.
Choral Concert, Princeton Festival, Princeton University Chapel,
609-537-0071. www.princetonfestival.org. Music of Brahms and
Mendelssohn
conducted
by
Robert Porco. $30 to $50. 8 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Summer Music Series, Palmer
Square, On the Green, 609-9212333. www.palmersquare.com.
Opera New Jersey. Free. 3 p.m.
Swing Sabroso, West Windsor
Arts Council, Nassau Park Pavilion, West Windsor, 609-919-1982.
www.westwindsorarts.org. Free
concert in “..and the beat goes on”
summer music series. Bring chairs
or blankets. Inside Panera if raining. 6 p.m.
Pop Music
Doo Wop Concert, Ocean Grove
Camp Meeting Association, 54
Pitman Avenue, 732-775-0035.
www.oceangrove.org. Jive Five,
the Duprees, the Chiffons, and the
Teenagers. Hosted by Big Joe
Summer Special
$99/Month
Includes Uniform
New Students Only
Kirtan, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive,
Suite 506, Skillman, 609-9247294. www.princetonyoga.com.
Sharon Silverstein presents a call
and response repeating of simple
mantras to experience freedom
from the daily chatter of the mind
and create a vibration meditation.
Joni Knapp on tabla, Marie Soffel
on djembe and ubang, and Darlene Popkey on flute and harmonium. $10. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Good Causes
Arts for NOLA, Lawrenceville
Main Street, 2683 Main Street,
Lawrenceville,
609-647-1815.
www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Benefit for Habitat for Humanity New Orleans. Wine, hors
d’oeuvres, music, and art. $20. 6
to 10 p.m.
Comedy Clubs
Julian McCullough and Mark Riccodonna, Catch a Rising Star,
Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie
Center, West Windsor, 609-9878018. www.catcharisingstar.com.
Register. $20. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Waste Disposal Day
Household Chemical and Electronics Waste Disposal Day,
Mercer County Improvement
Authority, John T. Dempster Fire
School, Bakers Basin Road,
Lawrence, 609-278-8067. www.mcia-nj.com.
Aerosol
cans,
household batteries, photographic
chemicals, used motor oil, lighter
fluid, propane gas tanks, pesticides/herbicides, pool chemicals,
car batteries, used oil filters, paint
thinner, oil based paint, stains,
varnishes, anti-freeze, driveway
sealer, gasoline, gas, oil, and insect repellents. Rain or shine. 8
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Used electronics for recycling include
computers,
monitors,
modems, printers, keyboards, fax
machines, copiers, circuit boards,
televisions,
monitors,
stereo
equipment, laptops and laptop peripheral
equipment,
camera
equipments, VCRs, microwave
ovens, electric wire, networking
equipment, and scanners.
Proof of Mercer County residency
is required (driver’s license). They
accept residential waste only. Do
not bring latex paint, infectious
waste, dioxin, heating oil, munitions, explosives, railroad ties, asbestos, agent orange, tires, metal
and wood fencing, fluorescent
light bulks, batteries, and air conditioners.
Faith
Prayer: An Answer for the 21st
Century, Fellowship in Prayer,
Princeton University, 609-9246863. www.fellowshipinprayer.org. Workshops throughout the
campus. Register. Through Sunday, June 27. 9 a.m.
Integral Nutrition, Integral Yoga
Institute Princeton, 122 Carter
Road, Princeton, 732-274-2410.
www.iyiprinceton.com. Manu Dawon presents a workshop. Register. $25. Note change in location.
11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Food & Dining
East Coast Food and Wine Festival, Slow Food and Wine Festival, Hopewell Valley Vineyards,
46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609890-8188.
www.slowfoodand-
Rock Icons for the Summer
O
nce again Grover’s Mill
Coffee House presents a
look at rock icons — this time it
is the folk rock supergroup Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young
(CSNY). The group’s more famous singles include “Teach
Your Children,” “Ohio,” “Just a
Song Before I Go,” and “This
Old House.”
No, CSNY wil not appear in
person, but area musicians will
pay a tribute to the band and its
songs on Saturday ,June 26, at
Grover’s Mill Coffee House in
West Windsor.
“We like to match the mood
of the season to the music we are
playing,” says Franc Gambatese,
the organizer of the event and the
owner of the coffee shop.
“CSNY is light summer music.”
The coffee house has already
presented tributes to icons Bruce
Springsteen, the Beatles, and
Bob Dylan. Upcoming events
planned will focus on the Grateful Dead and Simon and Garfunkel.
Musicians performing include West Windsor residents
Chris Jankoski and Gambatese;
Alex DeSimine, a student at
High School North; John
Masseo of Plainsboro; Greg
Nease of East Windsor; the
Riverside Jam Traveling Band;
and Rodney and Eva Hargis of
Hamilton Square.
The songlist will include:
“Helplessly Hoping,” “Suite
Judy Blue Eyes,” “Wooden
winefestival.com. Food and wine
seminars, cooking demonstrations, cookbook authors, and
farmers’ market. Sample dishes
prepared with the season’s locally
grown vegetables and chicken,
meats, and seafood prepared by
area chefs. Participants include
Brother’s Moon, Cherry Grove
Farm, High Street Grill, Matt’s Red
Rooster, Tre Piani, and Bent
Spoon. Wines from Hopewell Valley Vineyards, Alba Vineyard,
Unionville Vineyards, Cape May
Winery, and Laurita Vineyards.
$40; $60 for two days. Parking included. Also Sunday, June 27.
Speakers include “30-Minute
Wine Expert Wine Tasting” with
Gary Pavlis at 12:15 p.m.; wine
and chocolate pairing and tasting
at 1 p.m.; “Enjoying Wine” with
Mark Phillips at 2 p.m.; sparkling
wine seminar and tasting with Zita
Keelsey at 3 p.m.; and Wineries of
the East Coast” with Carlo DeVito
at 4 p.m. Noon to 5 p.m.
Farmers’ Market
West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market, Vaughn Drive Parking Lot, Princeton Junction Train
Station, 609-577-5113. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org.
Produce, bakery items, pizza, coffee, and other foods and flowers.
West Windsor Arts Council, West
Windsor Bike and Pedestrian Alliance, and Yes, We Can, a volun-
‘Woodstock,’ 2010:
A group of area musicians, including
Chris Jankoski,
above left, and Greg
Nease, will pay tribute to Crosby, Stills,
Nash, and Young at
Grover’s Mill Coffee
House on June 26.
Ships,” “Teach Your Children,”
“Love the One You’re With,”
“Ohio,” “Southern Cross,”
“Guinnevere,” “Almost Cut My
Hair,” “Our House,” “Find the
Cost of Freedom,” “Mr. Soul,”
“Simple Man,” “Right Between
the Eyes,” “Heart of Gold,”
“Man Needs a Maid,” “Cowgirl
In the Sand,” “Down By the River,” “Cinnamon Girl,” “Wrecking Ball,” “Change Your Mind,”
“Unknown Legend,” “For What
It’s Worth,” and “Needle and the
Damage Done.”
— Lynn Miller
Crosby, Still, Nash, and
Young Tribute, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor. Donations benefit Grounds
for Health, an organization that
supports women's health services focusing on cervical cancer prevention programs. Saturday, June 26, 8 p.m. Free. 609716-8771 or www.groversmillcoffee.com.
teer group that collects food for the
Crisis Ministry of Princeton and
Trenton. West Windsor Arts Council presents “Travel to Oceania” for
Australian rock painting. 9 a.m. to
1 p.m.
Trenton Fresh Farmers’ Market,
Crisis Ministry of Princeton and
Trenton, North Clinton and North
Olden avenues, Trenton, 609396-9355. www.thecrisisministry.org. Produce, health screenings,
cooking demonstrations, and
health and wellness programs.
Vendors will accept food stamps.
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Gardens
Garden Tour, Greening of West
Windsor, 609-989-5662. www.greeningwestwindsor.com. Visit
flower, vegetable, and container
gardens throughout the town. 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. See story page 35.
Health & Wellness
Ceremonos Group, Breast Cancer Resource Center, YWCA
Princeton, Bramwell House, 59
Paul Robeson Place, 609-4972100. www.ywcaprinceton.org. A
day of wellness for Latina breast
cancer patients. All activities will
be conducted in Spanish. Register
in Spanish at 908-658-5400. Free.
9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Nia Dance, Functional Fitness,
67 Harbourton Mt. Airy Road,
JUNE 25, 2010
Lambertville,
609-577-9407.
www.nianewjersey.com. Register. $17. 10 to 11 a.m.
ITunes. He recently appeared in a
short film, “Roger’s Number,” produced by Russ Terlecki. 9 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Outdoor Action
Chess Tournament, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. For 2nd to 5th graders. 9:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Field Trip, Washington Crossing
Audubon Society, Assunpink
Wildlife Management Area, Imlaystown, 609-737-0070. Search
for birds and butterflies. Register.
8 a.m.
Oldtime Baseball
Howell Living History Farm, Valley Road, off Route 29, Titusville,
609-737-3299. www.howellfarm.org. Howell Farm Hogs vs. the Jersey Bulls play according to the
rules that governed baseball when
bats were made of axe handles
and pitchers could be fined for delivering unhittable balls. Play or
watch. Rules will be presented to
prospective players at 11 a.m. An
1864 baseball games takes place
at noon between the Flemington
Neshanocks and the New York
Gothams with both teams in period attire. Brad Shaw presents the
history of the game and narrates
“Casey at the Bat.” 11 a.m. to 4
p.m.
Family Theater
Jack and the Beanstalk, Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, 355 Washington CrossingPennington Road, Titusville, 267885-9857. www.dpacatoat.com.
Parking, $5. Tickets, $5. 11 a.m.
Lectures
A Course in Miracles, Center for
Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com.
Valerie Meluskey presents an introduction into the ideas in the book.
Register. $30. 1 to 3 p.m.
Live Music
John Patrick Duo, Halo Pub, 5
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609921-1710. Rhythm and blues.
6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Folk by Association, Halo Pub,
4617 Nottingham Way, Trenton,
609-586-1811. Folk duet. 7 p.m.
Music Night, Hopewell Valley
Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com.
Wine available. 7 to 10 p.m.
Jamie and Lauren, Thomas
Sweet Ice Cream, 1330 Route
206, Skillman, 609-430-2828.
www.larrytritel.com. Acoustic guitar and vocals. 7 to 10 p.m.
Dukes of Destiny, The Record
Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth
Avenue, Bordentown, 609-3240880. www.the-record-collector.com. $15. 7:30 p.m.
John Henry Goldman, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.straightjazz.com. Jazz
with Jon Thompson on saxophone, Jason Fraticelli on bass,
Joe Falcey on drums, and John
Henry Goldman on trumpet. $15
minimum. 7:30 p.m.
BioBlitz, Duke Farms, 80 Route
206 South, Hillsborough, 908722-3700. www.dukefarms.org.
Experts present information with a
focus on birds, amphibians,
plants, mushrooms, fungi, pond
invertebrates, butterflies, and watershed. Beginner bird walk at
9:30 a.m. Exploration of Dragonfly
Pond at 11 a.m. Butterfly meadow
walk at 1:30 p.m. Fungus foray at
3 p.m. 9:30 a.m.
Whatever Floats Your Boat Geocaching, Stony Brook Millstone
Watershed, 31 Titus Mill Road,
Pennington,
609-737-7592.
www.thewatershed.org. Examine
the relationship between land and
water and launch small boats
down the Stony Brook. Register.
$5. 1:30 p.m.
Great American Backyard Campout, Delaware & Raritan Canal
State Park, 2185 Daniel Bray
Highway, Stockton, 609-9245705.
www.dandrcanal.com.
Camping clinic for families presented by Eastern Mountain
Sports. Outdoor presentation on
the bats of New Jersey presented
by Jacki Kasmer, director of Bat
Rehabilitation of New Jersey. The
park historian churns a batch of
hand-made ice cream at 5 p.m.
Picnic dinners invited. Childfriendly movie shown. Register.
Free. Call park office to register for
a campsite at 609-397-2949. 3
p.m.
Family Nature Programs, Plainsboro Preserve, 80 Scotts Corner
Road, Plainsboro, 609-897-9400.
www.njaudubon.org. “The Basics
of Birding.” Register. $5. 3:30 to 5
p.m.
Politics
Meet and Greet, Mercer County
Republican Club, West Windsor
Fire House, 153 South Mill Road,
West Windsor, 609-587-0111.
www.goodwinforsenate.com.
Meet Senator Tom Goodwin. Refreshments. Register at [email protected] or phone.
Free. 10 a.m.
Retail Therapy
Flea Market, American Legion
Post 401, 148 Major Road, Monmouth Junction, 732-821-6673.
Ladies auxiliary presents assorted
items for sale. Spaces available.
Benefit to provide needed items to
troops overseas. 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Book Sale, Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van Doren Street, 609275-2897. www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Hardbacks, $1; paperbacks,
50 cents; miscellaneous media
and art at bargain prices. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
Crosby, Still, Nash, and Young
Tribute, Grover’s Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com. 8 p.m. See story page 24.
Singles
CJ Barna, It’s a Grind Coffee
House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road,
Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic rhythm
and blues. 8 to 10 p.m.
Singles Travel Group, Singles
Get Togethers, Prime Time Comedy Club, 960 Route 9 South,
Cafe Improv, Arts Council of
Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8777. www.cafeimprov.com. Music, poetry, and
comedy. Register to perform. $2.
9 p.m.
Lofash, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1
South, West Windsor, 609-9199403. www.btbistro.com. Rock
band. 9 p.m.
Mike Matisa and Dino Colarocco,
Sotto 128 Restaurant and
Lounge, 128 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-921-7555. www.sotto128.com. Acoustic covers
and originals from past and present. Matisa’s new song, “Mazes,”
is available on Amazon and
Princeton Singles, Montgomery
Theater, Route 206, 908-3596076. Movies and optional dinner
for 55 plus. Register. 4 p.m.
THE NEWS
25
Get Your Fix of July 4th Oohs and Aahs
T
he celebration of Independence Day begins early in
Mercer County this year. Freedom Festival will be held at Mercer County Park in West Windsor, on Saturday, June 26, from 3
to 11 p.m. There will be food,
games, beer and wine gardens,
craft vendors, tethered hot-air
balloon rides, water rides, games,
inflatable rides, and fireworks.
Band performances feature the
Sensational Soul Cruisers at 5:30
p.m., the Amish Outlaws at 7:30
p.m., and the Dawgs after the fireworks. Admission is free.
Several towns will have concerts and fireworks leading up to
the July 4 holiday. The 78th
Army Band presents patriotic and
military tunes in Titusville on
Sunday, June 27, at 7:30 p.m. The
Spirit of Princeton presents fireworks at Princeton Stadium on
Thursday, July 1. Hamilton’s
Veterans Park shoots off fireworks on Friday, July 2, on the
same night as East Windsor
Township presents Jerry Rife’s
Rhythm Kings Dixieland Jazz
Band and the Trenton Brass
Quintet Plus One followed by
fireworks. Other fireworks in the
area are at Thompson Park in
Monroe on Sunday, July 4, and
Main Street in Cranbury on Monday, July 5.
New Hope and Lambertville
present fireworks every Friday
night this summer and Friday, July 2 is no exception. Stores are
open late, have happy hours,
sales, and food specials. Trenton
Thunder also has fireworks on a
regular basis and there will be
fireworks at the conclusion of the
Sunday, July 4, game against the
Harrisburg Senators.
To celebrate America’s Independence Day visit Princeton
Battlefield State Park, 500 Mercer Road, Princeton, on Sunday,
Sayreville, 732-605-0958. Register. $40. 7 p.m.
Wine and Dinner, Dinnermates,
Princeton Area, 732-759-2174.
www.dinnermates.com. Ages 30s
to early 50s. Call for reservation
and location. $20 plus dinner and
drinks. 7:30 p.m.
Knitting
Knit n Stitch, Cafe Ole, 126 South
Warren Street, Trenton, 877-4728817. All skill levels welcome.
Free. Noon to 2 p.m.
July 4, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Revolutionary War period soldiers and second Continental Artillery demonstrate drill, artillery,
and flintlock muskets. There are
period games for all ages and
tours of the Thomas Clarke
House and the Arms of the Revolution exhibit available. Picnic
lunches are invited.
Visitors are then welcome at
historic Morven Museum at 55
Stockton Street, Princeton, from
noon to 3 p.m. on the Fourth, for a
celebration at the home of
Richard Stockton, a signer of the
Declaration of Independence.
Participate in domestic colonial
life activities, and “sign” the Declaration of Independence.
Festivities taking place on the
Fourth include a portrayal of
Charles Willson Peale, Philadelphia’s famous portrait painter,
presented by Christian Johnson at
East Jersey Olde Towne Village,
1050 River Road, Piscataway, at
2 p.m. An old-fashioned celebration takes place at Fonthill Museum, East Court Street and Swamp
Bada Boom! Fireworks in the area
kick off early this
year, June 26, at the
Freedom Festival in
Mercer County Park.
Road, Doylestown, from noon to
5 p.m. The recreation of an early
20th century July Fourth celebration include a decorated bike parade, a town ball game (19th century baseball), a watermelon eating contest, antique bicycle display, old-time games, and live
music. Patriotic music by Sellersville Merry Makers, Del Val
Saxophone
Quartet,
Marti
Rogers, Bucks County Country
Gentleman. Storyteller and writer
Robin Moore performs in front of
his teepee at 1:30 and 3 p.m.
— Lynn Miller
For up-to-date event listings
visit www.wwpinfo.com. For
timely updates, follow wwpinfo at
Twitter and on Facebook.
com. Comedic mystery by Marvin
Harold Cheiten of Princeton.
$27.50 to $29.50. 1:30 p.m.
Sunday
June 27
Drama
Miss Connections, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.-
Sordid Lives, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Drama to benefit the
James Tolin memorial fund. $16. 2
p.m.
Continued on following page
Knitting Club, Borders Books,
601 Nassau Park, 609-514-0040.
www.bordersgroupinc.com. Meet
in the cafe. 7 p.m.
Recreation Sports
WW-P American Legion Baseball. At Hamilton Post 31 at Steinert High. 11 a.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder Baseball, Waterfront Park, Route 29, Trenton,
609-394-8326.
www.trentonthunder.com. New Hampshire
Fisher Cats. $9 to $12. 7:05 p.m.
Wills & Estate Planning
Mary Ann Pidgeon
Pidgeon & Pidgeon, PC
Attorney, LLM in Taxation
OPEN HOUSE
Saturday, July 24, 10am-1pm
609-588-4442
609-933-8806
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.quaker-bridge.com
Reservations Required
600 Alexander Road
Princeton
609-520-1010
www.pidgeonlaw.com
26
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
Classical Music
JUNE 27
Continued from preceding page
The Heidi Chronicles, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater,
609-258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Wendy Wasserstein’s Pulitzer Prize winner. $16. 2 p.m.
Summer Carillon Concert Series,
Princeton University, 88 College
Road West, Princeton, 609-2583654. www.princeton.edu. Ellen
Dickinson, Stamford, Connecticut
on the fifth largest carillon in the
country. Free. 1 p.m.
Ragtime, Villagers Theater, 475
DeMott Lane, Somerset, 732-8732210. www.villagerstheatre.com.
Musical. $18. 2 p.m.
Barry Tuckwell Institute, College
of New Jersey, Mildred and
Ernest Mayo Concert Hall, Ewing,
609-771-2551.
www.tcnj.edu.
Concert featuring horn ensembles
and the BTI Horn Choir. Free. 2
p.m.
Playwright’s Lab, Passage Theater, Mill Hill Playhouse, Front and
Montgomery streets, Trenton,
609-392-0766.
www.passagetheatre.org. $15. 3 p.m.
Ariodante, Princeton Festival,
McCarter Theater, Princeton, 609537-0071. www.princetonfestival.org. Handel’s opera. $30 to
$110. 3 p.m.
The Wizard of Oz, Washington
Crossing Open Air Theater, 355
Washington Crossing-Pennington
Road, Titusville, 267-885-9857.
www.dpacatoat.com. Family musical classic. $10; $7 for children.
Blankets, seat cushions, and insect repellent are recommended.
Picnics welcome before show.
Food available. Parking fee of $5.
7:30 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Film
Workshop, New Jersey International Film Festival, Loree Building, Douglass Campus, New
Brunswick, 732-932-8482. www.njfilmfest.com. “The Film Business: Basic Legal and Business
Aspects of Motion Picture Production and Distribution” presented by
Steven C. Schechter, Esq. Register. $100. Noon to 3 p.m.
Art
Artists Network, Lawrenceville
Main Street, 2683 Main Street,
Lawrenceville,
609-647-1815.
www.Lawrencevillemainstreet.com. Gallery features works by
area artists. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Concert and Fireworks, Hopewell Valley Veterans Association, Alliger Park, 203 Washington
Crossing Pennington Road, Titusville. www.hopewellvalleyveterans.org. Concert by the 78th
Army Band followed by fireworks
display. A variety of music including military songs and traditional
concert pieces. Alcohol is prohibited. Carpooling is recommended.
Free. Rain date is Wednesday,
June 30. 7:30 p.m.
Good Causes
One Simple Wish, Triumph Brewery, 138 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-883-8484. www.onesimplewish.org. Christian Lander, author
of “Stuff White People Like,” has
book signing and talk. Benefit for
non-profit organization that grants
simple wishes to foster children
and impoverished families in New
Jersey. Register. $20, or $35 includes an autographed book. 3 to
8:30 p.m.
Faith
Summer Art Sale, Garden State
Watercolor Society, Princeton
Shopping Center, 301 Harrison
Street, Princeton, 609-394-4000.
www.gardenstatewatercolorsociety.org. Original art works in
watercolor, oil, pastel, and mixed
media; both framed and unframed. Noon to 5 p.m.
Mastering the Game of Life Series, Integral Yoga Institute
Princeton, 122 Carter Road,
Princeton, 732-274-2410. www.iyiprinceton.com. “Moving Through
the Obstacles into Bliss” presented
by Reverend Jaganath Carrera.
Register. $20. 9:30 a.m. to 2:30
p.m.
Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2
p.m.
Prayer: An Answer for the 21st
Century, Fellowship in Prayer,
Princeton University, 609-9246863. www.fellowshipinprayer.org. Interfaith celebration of peace
in the chapel. Register. 10 a.m.
Dancing
Argentine Tango, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. All levels.
Intermediate lesson followed by
social dance. No partner needed.
Refreshments. $12. 6:45 p.m.
Shirdi Sai Baba’s Palki Yatra,
Radha Krishna Temple, 357
Lawrence Station Road, Lawrenceville, 609-802-8990. www.radhakrishnatemple.org. Celebration of the first anniversary of the
unveiling of a five-foot marble statue of Shirdi Sai Baba, an Indian
saint who lived in the early 20th
Rider Furniture
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• Dining Room
• Bedroom
• Occasional
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• Prints and Accessories
• Leather Furniture
• Antique Furniture
Repair & Refinishing
Anniversary Sale Continues thru July 5 (Closed July 4)
Rider Furniture
Where quality still matters.
4621 Route 27, Kingston, NJ
609-924-0147
Monday-Friday 10-6; Saturday 10-5; Sunday 12-5
Design Services Available. www.riderfurniture.com
WWP Dancers’ Big Debut in the Big Apple
M
ira Estaphanous of West
Windsor has her New York
City dance debut in Marie Alonzo’s “Passion and Fire” on Saturday, June 26, at 4:30 p.m. at
Dance New Amsterdam, 280
Broadway. Although she studied
ballet from ages five to 10, she did
not really dance for a number of
years. About 18 months ago she
began studying at HotSalsaHot
with Henri Velandia, also a West
Windsor resident, and “fell in
love” with salsa.
The piece is inspired by the
story of Verdi’s opera, “La Traviata,” based on Alexander Dumas’
“La dame aux carm‚liasm,” the
story of the doomed love affair
between a famous courtesan and
the writer. Alonzo, also a West
Windsor resident, conceived and
choreographed this work, which
explores the fusion of modern
dance and salsa, with collaborative assistance by Henri Velandia, also of West Windsor.
Other performers are Kelsey
Burns, Cathy Gonzales, Abdiel
Cedric Jacobsen, Rogerson St.
Jean, Danielle Mondi, Nancy
Musco of Plainsboro, and Kevin
Toft.
Alonzo is a dancer, choreographer, scholar, and educator,
whose works have been presented in New York, New Jersey,
throughout the United States, and
Canada. A founding member of
the West Windsor Arts Council,
in 2004 she co-founded the “I’ll
have what she’s having” Dance
Project, a dance cooperative of
women choreographers ages 40
and up. She is on the faculty at
Princeton Dance and Theater Studio in Plainsboro.
The Estaphanous family
moved to West Windsor just as
Mira was entering high school
and she graduated from West
Windsor-Plainsboro High School
century remembered for bringing
communal harmony between Hindu and Muslim communities. Folk
dances, food, and ethnic festivities. Free. 11 a.m.
Christian Science Lecture, First
Church of Christ, Princeton YWCA, 50 Paul Robeson Place,
Princeton,
609-924-0919.
christianscience.com.
“Beyond
the Sixth Sense” presented by
John Tyler. Free. 3 p.m.
Food & Dining
Cooking
Technique
Class,
Williams Sonoma, MarketFair,
West Windsor, 609-419-1300.
“Fresh to Frozen Summer Desserts.” Register. Free. 11 a.m.
East Coast Food and Wine Festival, Slow Food and Wine Festival, Hopewell Valley Vineyards,
46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609890-8188.
www.slowfoodandwinefestival.com. Food and wine
seminars, cooking demonstrations, cookbook authors, and
farmers’ market. Sample dishes
prepared with the season’s locally
grown vegetables and chicken,
meats, and seafood prepared by
area chefs. Participants include
Brother’s Moon, Cherry Grove
Farm, High Street Grill, Matt’s Red
Rooster, Tre Piani, and Bent
Spoon. Wines from Hopewell Valley Vineyards, Alba Vineyard,
Unionville Vineyards, Cape May
Winery, and Laurita Vineyards.
$40. Parking included.
Speakers include “30-Minute
Wine Expert Wine Tasting” with
Gary Pavlis at 12:15 p.m.; Phil
Ward of the International Riesling
Foundation at 1 p.m.; “Enjoying
Wine” with Mark Phillips at 2 p.m.;
and Maureen Petrosky of NBC Today Show at 3 p.m. Noon to 5
p.m.
in 1997. During high school she
was in the concert choir and performed in talent shows. Estaphanous graduated from Roger
Williams College with a degree in
psychology and business management and from Southern New
England Law School. She practices real estate and immigration.
Dancing seems to run in her
family as her mother, Karma, is a
belly dancer, and her father,
Boshra, likes ballroom dance.
Her parents have both been with
ReMax for close to 20 years.
The work is also the premiere
of Alonzo’s choreography as part
Farmers’ Market
Lawrenceville Main Street, 11
Gordon Avenue, Lawrenceville,
609-219-9300. www.LawrencevilleMainStreet.com. Vegetables,
fruits, flowers, herbs, meat, poultry, baked goods. Music, art, and
good causes. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Yoga for Stress Reduction,
Princeton Center for Yoga &
Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite
506, Skillman, 609-924-7294.
www.princetonyoga.com. Gentle
yoga asanas, pranayama, and
meditation. $17. 10:30 to 11:45
a.m.
Water Talks, Planet Apothecary,
Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 732406-6865.
www.planetapothecary.com. “Toxification and Detoxification” presented by Dr. Alan
Ritter focuses on philosophical
and mechanical basis of both.
Register. $15. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
History
Walking Tour, Historical Society
of Princeton, Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Two-hour walking tour
of downtown Princeton and
Princeton University includes stories about the early history of
Princeton, the founding of the University, and the American Revolution. $7; $4 for ages 6 to 12. 2 to 4
p.m.
For Families
Firefly Festival, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road, 609924-2310.
www.terhuneorchards.com. An evening of music, nature, and outdoor activities.
Miss Amy and her Big Kids Band
presents family show. Elaine
Madigan talks about fireflies, us-
New York, New York:
Nancy Musco
(Plainsboro), left,
Henri Velandia
(WW), Marie Alonzo
(WW), and Mira
Estaphanous (WW).
of the Works in Progress series
that gives audience members the
opportunity to give feedback to
each choreographer. The suggested donation is $10. For information call 212-227-9856.
ing hands on materials, crafts activities, and games. Food available. Free admission. 4 to 9 p.m.
Family Theater
Jack and the Beanstalk, Washington Crossing Open Air Theater, 355 Washington CrossingPennington Road, Titusville, 267885-9857. www.dpacatoat.com.
Parking, $5. Tickets, $5. 4 p.m.
Lectures
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. “Arm
Yourself with Computer Safety,” a
workshop presented by Robin
Kessler of R&D Internet Associates. She will guide newcomers
through the mazes of viruses, spyware, spam, Facebook, and
Craigslist with an emphasis on
how to protect your computer and
data. Free. 3 to 5 p.m.
Live Music
Larry Tritel and Guy DeRosa,
Thomas Sweet Ice Cream, 1330
Route 206, Skillman, 609-4302828. www.larrytritel.com. Guitar,
harmonica, and vocals. 1 to 3 p.m.
Opera New Jersey, Grounds For
Sculpture, 18 Fairgrounds Road,
Hamilton, 609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org.
Free
with admission. 2 p.m.
Trivia Night
BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1 South,
West Windsor, 609-919-9403.
www.btbistro.com. David and Nick
present. 7 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Compass Basics, Washington
Crossing State Park, Visitor Center, Titusville, 609-737-0609. For
ages 9 and up. Register. $5 per
car. 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
JUNE 25, 2010
Retail Therapy
Flea Market, Princeton Elks,
Route 518, Montgomery, 908359-5652. Table space, $10 to
$15. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Singles
Etz Chaim Sociable Single Seniors, Monroe Township Jewish
Center, 11 Cornell Avenue, 609655-5137. Discussions, socializing, and refreshments. For 50
plus. $5. 1 to 4 p.m.
Chess
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. For advanced adult players. 1 to 5 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder Baseball, Waterfront Park, Route 29, Trenton,
609-394-8326.
www.trentonthunder.com. New Hampshire
Fisher Cats. $9 to $12. 1:05 p.m.
Monday
June 28
Guided Meditation, Center for
Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. www.relaxationandhealing.com. Silent
and guided meditation practice.
No experience necessary. Register. $15. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Dancing
Holistic Weight Loss Seminar,
Harvest Moon, 206 Sandpiper
Court, Pennington, 609-4624717. Program focuses on cognitive, emotional, and behavioral aspects of overeating. Register. $40.
7 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
For Families
Kelly’s Kids for Babies, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. Learn new ways to interact
with your young child with music
and movement. For ages 1 month
to 24 months. 10:30 to 11 a.m.
Circle Time, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. www.mcl.org. Stories,
games, music, and crafts for ages
4 to 6. 6:30 p.m.
Singles
Municipal Meetings
Public Meeting, West Windsor
Township Council, Municipal
Building, 609-799-2400. www.westwindsornj.org. 7 p.m.
Literati
Plainsboro
Literary
Group,
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. Nibbles, conversation, and readings.
6:30 p.m.
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony
Chorus, Call for location, 732469-3983. www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony. New members
are welcome. 7:15 p.m.
World Music
Traditional Klezmer Music, Middlesex County Cultural Commission, Crossroads Theater, 7
Livingston
Avenue,
New
Brunswick, 732-745-4489. www.cultureheritage.org. Hester Street
Troupe presents Yiddish folk music. Register. Free. 8 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Summer Workout Series, Can Do
Fitness Club, 121 Main Street,
Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609514-0500.
www.candofitness.com. Sculpt outside. Register at
reception desk. Bring a towel and
water. Inside if it rains. Free. 10:15
a.m.
Spaghetti Night, Yardley Singles,
Vince’s, 25 South Main Street,
Yardley, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Register. 6 p.m.
Coffee and Conversation, Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335
Princeton Hightstown Road, West
Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com.
Coffee,
tea, soup, sandwich, or dessert.
Register at www.meetup.com/Princeton-Area-Singles-Network.
6:30 to 8 p.m.
For Seniors
Retirees Group, West Windsor
Senior Center, 609-799-9068.
“Environmental Issues” presented
by Melvin A. Bernarde, author of
numerous books, professor at
Temple, Drexel, and Rutgers universities; host of ABC televisions
“Environment and Health;” and a
West Windsor resident. 10 a.m.
Movie, West Windsor Senior
Center, 609-799-9068. Screening
of “Brothers.” 1 p.m.
Recreation Sports
WW-P American Legion Baseball. Princeton Post 218 at High
School South. 5:45 p.m.
Tuesday
June 29
Municipal Meetings
Meeting, WW-P Board of Education, Grover Middle School, 609716-5000. 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday Night Folk Dance
Group, Princeton, 609-655-0758.
www.princetonfolkdance.org. Instruction and dancing. No partner
needed. Call for location. $3. 7 to 9
p.m.
Carnegie Center Concert Series,
Greenway Amphitheater at 202
Carnegie Center, 609-452-1444.
Free. Noon to 1:30 p.m.
Pop Music
Barbershop Chorus, Princeton
Garden Statesmen, 300 Meadow
Lakes, East Windsor, 609-2514238.
www.princetongardenstatesmen.com. Men of all ages
and experience levels are invited
to sing in four-part harmony. The
non-profit organization presents at
numerous charities including the
Trenton Rescue Mission. 7:30 to
10 p.m.
Food & Dining
Princeton Eats: Cooking with Local Ingredients, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-9529. www.princetonlibrary.org. Chef Denis
Granarola of Witherspoon Bread
Company shares tips for creating
meals using fresh, local ingredients. Register. Free. 10 a.m.
Health & Wellness
Open House, Sunny Health Center, 16 Seminary Avenue,
Hopewell, 609-466-1227. Free
15-minute massage. Register. 10
a.m. to 8 p.m.
Caregiver
Support
Group,
Alzheimer’s Association, Clare
Bridge of Hamilton, 1645 Whitehorse-Mercerville Road, 800-8831180. www.alz.org. 10:30 a.m.
Beginners Yoga Class, Onsen
For All, 4451 Route 27, Princeton,
609-924-4800. www.onsenforall.com. Instruction for those new to
yoga. Props used, discussion of
the basic principles of alignment.
Register. $15. 6 to 7 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Read & Pick on the Farm, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil
Road, 609-924-2310. www.terhuneorchards.com. Story time,
THE NEWS
Teen Doings at the Library
T
eens in West Windsor will not have a
chance to be bored as
they are invited to West
Windsor Library for
dozens of events this
summer.
Carolyn
Aversano, the young
adult librarian, has
pulled together a calendar brimming with programs in support of
“Make Waves at Your
Don’t Try This at Home:
Library,” the New JerThe 'Poseidon Adventure’
sey Summer Reading
screens on Thursday, July 1.
Program.
Teen movie nights
take place every Thurs“Play-Writing” on Wednesday,
day at 6:30 p.m. “From vampires June 30, from 7 to 8:30 p.m., preto surfers to anime, there is sented by Michael Kerr, an area
something for everyone and playwright who has directed and
snacks will be provided,” says produced plays at the library
Aversano. The first film, “The since 2005. Kerr is also the head
Poseidon Adventure,” will be of reference at the library. Writscreened on Thursday, July 1, at ers will draft an original scene in
6:30 p.m.
small groups. Drafts will be ex“As for gaming, we’ve got a changed and the scenes will be
Wii and we’re not afraid to use acted out.
it,” she says. “There are board
All programs are free with
and card games and snacks to fill many sponsored by the Friends
the time between turns on the of the West Windsor Library and
Wii.” Crafts programs range the state reading program. Regfrom painting papier mache trin- ister at any time during the sixket boxes, to creating henna de- week program which concludes
signs, and making a locker caddy on Saturday, August 7, with a
from recycled jeans.
concert by the School of Rock.
The highlight of the calendar
— Lynn Miller
is Studio Scrawl, a series of six
West Windsor Library, 333
writing workshops led by professional writers. The first session is North Post Road. 609-799-0462.
www.mcl.org.
craft activity, and fruit or vegetable
picking. Register. $7. 9:30 and 11
a.m.
Teen Craft: Flip-flop Box, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. For ages 12 to 18. Register. 4
to 5 p.m.
For Families
Toddler Story and Craft, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. 10:30 a.m.
Douglas B. Weekes DVM
John Carlson, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. www.mcl.org. Magic
show for ages 3 and up. 4 p.m.
Business Meetings
JobSeekers, Parish Hall entrance,
Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street,
609-924-2277. trinityprinceton.org. Networking and support for
changing careers. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Continued on following page
Kerry Danielsen VMD
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27
609-443-1212
609-275-1212
28
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
JUNE29
Continued from preceding page
Live Music
Open Mic Night, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor,
609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 7 p.m.
Chris Harford and the Band of
Changes, BT Bistro, 3499 Route
1 South, West Windsor, 609-9199403. www.btbistro.com. Rock. 9
p.m.
Outdoor Action
Exploring the Night: Firefly Parade, Stony Brook Millstone
Watershed, 31 Titus Mill Road,
Pennington,
609-737-7592.
www.thewatershed.org. Learn the
secret lives of the lightning bug.
Register. $12. 8 p.m.
Singles
Pizza Night, Yardley Singles,
Vince’s, 25 South Main Street,
Yardley, 215-736-1288. www.yardleysingles.org. Register. 6
p.m.
Recreation Sports
WW-P American Legion Baseball. At North Trenton Post 458 at
TCA. 5:45 p.m.
Wednesday
June 30
Film
Justice: What Is the Right Thing
to Do?, South Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000.
www.sbpl.info. Film, discussion,
and refreshments to discuss ethical issues with a Harvard professor. Topics: “Free to Choose” and
“Who Owns Me?” Free. 1:30 to 3
p.m.
Dancing
Newcomers Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner
Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149.
www.americanballroomco.com.
$10. 7 to 9 p.m.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Instruction followed
by dance. $8. 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Classical Music
Summer Sings, Voices Chorale,
Anchor Presbyterian Church, 980
Durham Road, Wrightstown, PA,
609-637-9383.
www.voiceschorale.org. Choral music lovers
are invited to join for informal reading of Mendelssohn’s “Elijah.” Ice
cream social follows. $5. 7:30
p.m.
Food & Dining
Wine Tasting, Daryl Wine Bar,
302
George
Street,
New
Brunswick, 732-253-7780. www.darylwinebar.com. White wine
and light fare. Register. $35. 6 to 8
p.m.
Wine Regions of the World, Mercer College, West Windsor, 609570-3324. www.mccc.edu. “Wines
of Argentina” with Bruce Smith.
Register. $42. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Cooking Basics, West Windsor
Library, 333 North Post Road,
609-799-0462. “Life Beyond Ramen Noodles: A Cooking Primer
for the Total Beginner” presented
by Holly Slepman of West Windsor. Register. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Farmers’ Market
Wellness Wednesday, St. Francis Medical Center, Chambers
Street, Trenton, 609-599-6464.
www.stfrancismedical.com. Seasonal fruits and vegetables. 11
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Tour and Tea, Morven Museum,
55 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-924-8144. www.morven.org.
Tour the restored mansion, galleries, and gardens before or after
tea. Register. $15. 1 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Learn Hindi, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. www.mcl.org. Stories,
crafts, and music. Ages 5 and up.
In person registration required.
Noon to 12:30 p.m.
Kidcraft, West Windsor Library,
333 North Post Road, 609-7990462. www.mcl.org. Assemble
and paint a “rain shelter birdhouse.” In-person registration required. For ages 6 to 8. 4 to 4:45
p.m.
For Families
Toddler Story and Craft, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. 10:30 a.m.
For Teens
Studio Scrawl, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. www.mcl.org. “PlayWriting” for ages 12 to 18 presented by Michael Kerr, an area playwright who has directed and produced plays at the library since
2005. Writers will draft an original
scene in small groups. Drafts will
be exchanged and the scenes will
be acted out. Register. Free. 7 to
8:30 p.m.
Lectures
Multi-Level Yoga Class, Onsen
For All, 4451 Route 27, Princeton,
609-924-4800. onsenforall.com.
Explore the basic principles of alignment. Register. $15. 7 to 8 p.m.
Health Care Forum, Hamilton
Partnership, Hilton Garden Inn,
800 Route 130, Hamilton, 609581-6820. hamiltonpartnership.com. “The Impact of Health Care
Reform on Local Businesses” presented by Skip Cimino, CEO of
RWJ Hamilton; Nathan Bosk,
Capital Health; Jack Blair, Nottingham Insurance Company; and
Marguerite Mount, Mercadien
Group. Moderated by David Kostinas, owner of a consulting firm
serving New Jersey’s health care
industry. Register. $25. 8:30 to
10:30 a.m.
History
Live Music
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket
Foundation, 354 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-683-0057. www.drumthwacket.org. New Jersey
governor’s official residence. Register. $5 donation. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m.
John Henry Goldman, Labyrinth
Books, 122 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-497-1600. www.labyrinthbooks.com. Jazz. Refreshments. Free. 5 to 8 p.m.
Farmer’s Market, Bordentown
City, Farnsworth and Railroad avenues parking lot, 609-298-0604.
www.cityofbordentown.com. Produce, foods, plants, crafts, soaps,
cooking demonstrations, entertainment, and educational programming. 4 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Dramatic Thriller: Heather May is featured in the
'Turn of the Screw' opening at Princeton Summer
Theater on the Princeton University campus,
opening on Thursday, July 1.
Patty Cronheim, Mediterra, 29
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609252-9680. www.terramomo.com.
8 to 10 p.m.
Rich Cox, BT Bistro, 3499 Route 1
South, West Windsor, 609-9199403. www.btbistro.com. Acoustic
rock. 8:30 p.m.
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 10 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Summer Nature Programs, Mercer County Park Commission,
Baldpate Mountain, 609-9896540.
www.mercercounty.org.
Mountain hike and yoga. Bring yoga mat and water bottle. Register
by E-mail to [email protected] R$12. 9:45 to 11:30
a.m.
Retail Therapy
Wednesdays on Warren, Trenton
Downtown Association, South
Warren Street, Trenton, 609-3938998.
www.wednesdaysonwarren.com. Music, arts, and
food. 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Knitting
Knitting Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. www.mcl.org. For knitters
who already know the basics. Ann
Garwig is available to assist. Other
needle crafters are invited. Register. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Social
Women Rule, Hellenistic, 4095
Route 1 South, South Brunswick,
732-355-1030. Cocktail and dinner party for women only. Gentlemen admitted with a female escort. Register by E-mail to
[email protected]
8
p.m.
Thursday
July 1
Municipal Meetings
Reorganization Meeting, West
Windsor Township Council, Municipal Building, 609-799-2400.
www.westwindsornj.org. 7 p.m.
Drama
The Turn of the Screw, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater,
609-258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Henry James thriller. $16. 8
p.m.
Dancing
Argentine Tango, Black Cat Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center,
Monument Drive, 609-273-1378.
www.theblackcattango.com. Beginner and intermediate classes
followed by guided practice. No
partner necessary. $12. 8 p.m.
Classical Music
Ahn Trio, Princeton University
Summer Concerts, Richardson
Auditorium, 609-570-8404. www.pusummerchamberconcerts.org.
Free tickets available at the box office at 6:30 p.m. Doors open at
7:30 p.m. 8 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Carnegie Center Concert Series,
Patio at 502 Carnegie Center,
609-452-1444. Free. Noon to
1:30 p.m.
Summer Courtyard Concert Series, Arts Council of Princeton,
Princeton Shopping Center, 609924-8777.
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. The Blawenburg
Band performs. Free. 6 to 8:30
p.m.
Summer Park Series, Monroe
Township Cultural Arts Commission, Thompson Park, Monroe, 732-521-2111. www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com.
The
British Invasion Tribute features
music from the Beatles, Rolling
Stones, Monkees, and Beach
Boys. Weather-permitting. Free. 6
to 8 p.m.
JUNE 25, 2010
Pop Music
The Philadelphia Brass, Ocean
Grove Camp Meeting Association, 54 Pitman Avenue, 732-7750035. www.oceangrove.org. $13.
7:30 p.m.
Fireworks
Spirit of Princeton, Princeton Stadium,
609-683-4008.
www.spiritofprinceton.homestead.com.
Independence Day celebration.
Picnics welcome. Bring blankets
or chairs. 7 p.m.
Food & Dining
Happy Hour, Tre Bar, Tre Piani
Restaurant, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 609-452-1515. www.trepiani.com. Free hors d’oeuvres.
Drink specials. 4:30 to 7:30 p.m
Farmers’ Market
Princeton Farmers Market, Hinds
Plaza,
Witherspoon
Street,
Princeton, 609-655-8095. www.princetonfarmersmarket.com.
Produce, cheese, breads, baked
goods, flowers, chef cooking
demonstrations, books for sale,
family activities, and workshops.
Rain or shine. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Ashtanga
Primary
Series,
Princeton Center for Yoga &
Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite
506, Skillman, 609-924-7294.
www.princetonyoga.com. The series links the breath with a progressive series of postures designed to align and strengthen the
body and nervous system. $17.
9:30 to 11 a.m.
Caregiver
Support
Group,
Alzheimer’s Association, 196
Princeton Hightstown Road, West
Windsor, 800-883-1180. www.alz.org. 1 p.m.
Spinning, Can Do Fitness Club,
121 Main Street, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 609-514-0500. www.candofitness.com. Register at reception desk. Bring a towel and
water. Free. 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.
Prenatal Yoga, Princeton Center
for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland
Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Class is designed to help
mothers-to-be prepare body,
mind, and spirit for birth and motherhood. $25. 6 to 7:15 p.m.
History
Civil War Lecture, Camp Olden,
Hamilton Library, Justice Samuel
Alito Way, Hamilton, 609-5858900. www.campolden.org. “The
Lincoln-McClellan Relationship”
presented by James McPherson,
Pulitzer Prize winning author and
historian. Free. 7 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Kids’ Book Club, Borders Books,
601 Nassau Park, 609-514-0040.
www.bordersgroupinc.com. For
ages 8 to 12. 2 p.m.
For Families
Metal Elvis, The Record Collector Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue, Bordentown, 609-3240880. www.the-record-collector.com. $15. 7:30 p.m.
Singer Songwriter Showcase,
Triumph Brewing Company,
138 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-924-7855.
www.triumphbrew.com. Hosted by Frank
Thewes of West Windsor. 9 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Summer Nature Programs, Mercer County Park Commission,
Baldpate Mountain, 609-9896540.
www.mercercounty.org.
Hike. Wear sturdy hiking shoes
and bring a water bottle. For
adults. Free. 9 to 10:30 a.m.
Pontoon Boat Nature Tours, Mercer County Park Commission,
Mercer Lake, Marina, West Windsor, 609-989-6540. www.mercercounty.org. For all ages. Bring
binoculars. Weather-permitting.
$6. 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Singles
Divorced and Separated Support
Group, Hopewell Presbyterian
Church, Hopewell, 609-4660758.
www.hopewellpres.org.
Register. 7:30 p.m.
Recreation Sports
Wine Tasting, Rat’s Restaurant,
126 Sculptor’s Way, Hamilton,
609-586-0616. www.groundsforsculpture.org. Guest speaker and
wine tasting in Toad Hall, free.
Wines by the glass available. 4 to
6 p.m.
Farmers’ Market
Farmers’ Market, Downtown
Hightstown, Memorial Park, Main
Street.
www.downtownhightstown.org. Produce, flowers, baked
goods, and area vendors. 4 to 8
p.m.
Health & Wellness
Power Vinyasa, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman,
609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Class is focused on
deep, even breathing and learning
to relax, while fully inhabiting the
body and experiencing the postures. $17. 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Trenton Thunder Baseball, Waterfront Park, Route 29, Trenton,
609-394-8326.
www.trentonthunder.com. Harrisburg Senators. $9 to $12. 7:05 p.m.
Meditation Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. www.mcl.org. Register.
2:30 p.m.
Friday
July 2
Drama
The Tempest, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Shakespeare ‘70,
Mercer County’s classical repertory company, kicks off the college’s
Kelsey Theatre 2010 Summer
Festival. $14 for adults, $10 for
students and children. 8 p.m.
The Turn of the Screw, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater,
609-258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Henry James thriller. $16. 8
p.m.
Dancing
Ballroom Dance Social, G & J
Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14,
Hillsborough,
908-892-0344.
www.gandjstudios.com.
Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm.
Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to
11 p.m.
For Teens
Classical Music
Thursday Teen Movies, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. Screening of “The Poseidon
Adventure.” For ages 13 and up.
Snacks provided. Free. 6:30 p.m.
See story page 27.
American Boychoir, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, 609-924-8822. www.princetonlibrary.org. Concert is
the culminating performance of
the American Boychoir Experience, a weeklong camp for ages 9
to 12. Noon.
Gentle Jazz, Nick’s Cafe 72, 72
West Upper Ferry Road, West
Trenton, 609-882-0087. www.cafe72nj.com. Al Oliver, sax and
vocals; and Gerry Groves, flute.
BYOB. No cover. 7:30 to 9:30
p.m.
Food & Dining
Sports
All About Fireflies, Plainsboro
Recreation Park Ranger Division, Community Park, Plainsboro, 609-799-0909. www.plainsboronj.com. Catch some critters.
Register. Free. 8:30 p.m.
Edward Boutross, Santino’s Ristorante, 240 Route 130 South,
Robbinsville,
609-443-5600.
www.santinosristorante.com.
Jazz vocal standards. BYOB. 6:30
to 8 p.m.
Outdoor Shabbat, Har Sinai Temple, 2421 Pennington Road, Pennington, 609-730-8100. www.harsinai.org. Weather permitting,
Shabbat services will be held outdoors. 7 p.m.
Aqua Fitness for Athletes, Can
Do Fitness Club, 121 Main
Street, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609-514-0500. www.candofitness.com. Register. Free. 10:30
to 11:30 a.m.
WW-P American Legion Baseball. Ewing Post 314 at High
School South. 5:45 p.m.
English Country Dance, Lambertville Country Dancers,
American Legion Hall, 41 Linden
Avenue, Newtown, PA, 609-8827733. www.Lambertvillecountrydancers.org. No partner needed.
Beginners welcome. $10. 8 p.m.
Live Music
Faith
Fireworks
East Windsor Township. www.east-windsor.nj.us. Jerry Rife’s
Rhythm Kings Dixieland Jazz
Band and the Trenton Brass Quintet Plus One. Fireworks at 9:30
p.m. Raindate is Saturday, July 3.
7 p.m.
Fireworks, Hamilton Township,
Veterans Park, Hamilton, 609890-3684. www.hamiltonnj.com.
Fireworks at dusk. 7 p.m.
Hatha Yoga: Spanda, Princeton
Center for Yoga & Health, 50
Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman,
609-924-7294.
www.princetonyoga.com. Learn asanas
and pranayama in combination to
build overall strength, increase
flexibility, and aid in overall relaxation. $17. 6:30 to 7:45 p.m.
History
Museum Opens, Roebling Museum, 100 Second Avenue, Roebling,
609-599-7200.
www.roeblingmuseum.org. The museum opens with an introductory
video, a time line gallery, the Roebling family story, the company
history including wire rope for the
Golden Gate Bridge and Slinky
toys. Open Wednesdays to Sundays through October. 10 a.m. to
4 p.m.
THE NEWS
This Gallery Is Calling You
West Windsor Arts Council
seeks artwork for its inaugural
exhibit, “Community Collage:
West Windsor Then and Now...
and the Future,” at the grand celebration of the new center opening Saturday, September 25.
Two-dimensional
artwork
should be framed and ready to be
hung from wire. Up to five linear
foot in any direction and up to 50
pounds. Artists may submit up to
three works. No entry fee. Submit a CD with images of at least
300 dpi and four inches, contact
information, and a statement.
Artist will retain 100 percent of
sales. $5 per entry.
www.the-record-collector.com.
$18. Changed from Saturday,
June 19. 7:30 p.m.
Open Mic, Borders Books, 601
Nassau Park, 609-514-0040.
www.bordersgroupinc.com.
All
musicians welcome. 8 p.m.
Gerald Edwards, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor,
609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 8 p.m.
Tom Byrne, It’s a Grind Coffee
House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road,
Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic blend. 8
to 10 p.m.
Johnny Pompadour & the Full
Grown Men, Pete’s Steakhouse,
523 White Horse Avenue, Hamilton, 609-585-8008. Rock, jazz,
and blues. 10 p.m.
Singles
Divorce Recovery Program,
Princeton Church of Christ, 33
River Road, Princeton, 609-5813889.
www.princetonchurchofchrist.com. Support group for men
and women. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Socials
Luncheon, Rotary Club of the
Princeton Corridor, Hyatt Regency, Carnegie Center, 609-7990525.
www.princetoncorridorrotary.org. Register. Guests, $20.
12:15 p.m.
Scrabble
Classics Used and Rare Books,
117 South Warren Street, Tren-
Artwork is also called for
from young artists in the area for
the same exhibit. Two-dimensional artwork should be framed
and ready to be hung from wire.
Up to four linear foot in any direction and up to 30 pounds.
Artists may submit up to three
works. No entry fee. Submit a
CD with images of at least 300
dpi and four inches, contact information, and a statement.
Deadline for all ages is Friday,
July 30. Send to West Windsor
Arts Council, Box 952, West
Windsor 08550. For more information send E-mail to [email protected]
ton, 609-394-8400. All skill levels
welcome. 6:30 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder Baseball, Waterfront Park, Route 29, Trenton,
609-394-8326. www.trentonthunder.com. Harrisburg Senators. $9
to $12. 7:05 p.m.
Saturday
July 3
Drama
The Turn of the Screw, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater,
609-258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Thriller. $16. 2 and 8 p.m.
The Tempest, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road,
609-570-3333.
www.kelseytheatre.net. Shakespeare ‘70,
Mercer County’s classical repertory company, kicks off the college’s
Kelsey Theatre 2010 Summer
Festival. $14 for adults, $10 for
students and children. 8 p.m.
Art
Highlights Tour, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
campus, 609-258-3788. http://artmuseum.princeton.edu. Free. 2
p.m.
Continued on following page
Live Music
Happy Hour, Hopewell Valley
Vineyards, 46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465. www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com.
Wine available. 5 to 8 p.m.
Flashback Fridays, KatManDu,
50 Riverview Plaza, Waterfront
Park, Route 29, Trenton, 609-3937300.
www.katmandutrenton.com. Buffet from 5 to 8 p.m., $5.
DJs Bryan Basara and Davey
Gold with music from 1970s, 80s,
and 90s. 5 p.m.
330 COLD SOIL ROAD
PRINCETON, NJ 08540
TRENTON FARMERS MKT
SPRUCE STREET
Pick Your
Pick Your
OwnOwn
BLUEBERRIES &
RASPBERRIES
BLUEBERRIES
Dick Gratton, Chambers Walk
Cafe, 2667 Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-896-5995. Solo
jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m.
Lights on the River, Pasha Rugs,
15 Bridge Street, Lambertville,
609-397-5434. www.pasharugs.com. Fortune telling, Turkish music, and a raki tasting of the Turkish national drink. Sit on the large
handmade rug pillow, a gigantic
cushion made from more than 80
colorful vintage antique rugs to
watch the fireworks at 9:30 p.m. 6
to 9:30 p.m.
Rick Fiori Quartet, Salt Creek
Grille, One Rockingham Row,
Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609419-4200. www.saltcreekgrille.com. Jazz with Harry Allen on
tenor sax; Champion Fulton on piano; and Rick Fiori on drums; and
Dave Kings North on bass. 7 to 11
p.m.
Ellis Paul, The Record Collector
Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue,
Bordentown,
609-324-0880.
29
FARM FRESH
Fruit
Vegetables
Pies
Cider
Doughnuts
#L]Eri#E_aLe>S
Sunday, June 27, 4pm to 9pm
Read and Pick
BLUEBERRIES
Tuesday, June 29; 9:30 and 11am
Pre-registration required.
XXXUFSIVOFPSDIBSETDPNt0QFO%BJMZt
30
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
In Town
West Windsor Library seeks a
keyboard player for a children’s
musical, “Space Girls From
Galaxy X,” which will be performed from October 22 to 24.
Must be available for audition in
July and rehearsals in September
and October. Contact Michael Kerr
at 609-275-8901 or [email protected]
Kelsey Theater offers “Tomato
Patch” visual and performing arts
program from grades five to 12 on
the Mercer College campus in
West Windsor. Visit www.kelseyatmccc.org or call 609-570-3566
for information and openings.
Pierrot Productions seeks
statements of interest for a role in
“Chess.” Auditions will be scheduled by invitation. Send resume,
photo, and supporting materials to
[email protected]
. The Tim Rice musical originally
presented as a concept recording in
1985 and a stage version in 1986,
presents the game of chess in three
dimensions: the world championship match being played by the
competitors, the political game
waged by the CIA and KGB handlers of the American and Russian
champions, and the personal relationships between the players and
their women.
Theater To Go has auditions
for “Roebling: The Story of the
Brooklyn Bridge” Wednesday and
Thursday, July 14 and 15, at 7 p.m.
at Mercer County College, 1200
Old Trenton Road, West Windsor.
John Roebling set out to build the
Brooklyn Bridge but his daughterin-law finished the job. Readings
will be from the script. To schedule
an audition call Ruth Markoe at
609-915-6409 or E-mail [email protected] For full
synopsis, character breakdowns,
and to register online visit
www.roeblingplay.com.
New Jersey State Triathlon
seeks more than 700 volunteers to
help at Mercer County Park, West
JULY 3
Continued from preceding page
Dancing
No Name Dance California Mix,
Central Jersey Dance Society,
Universalist Congregation, 50
Cherry Hill Road, Princeton, 609945-1883.
www.centraljerseydance.org. Cha cha workshop,
$10. East coast swing lesson followed by open dancing, $12. No
partner needed. 6 p.m.
California Mix, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Universalist Congregation, 50 Cherry Hill Road,
Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Two Step
Opportunities
Windsor, from Friday to Sunday,
July 23 to 25. The event is expected
to have close to 3,000 competitors
and more than 6,000 spectators.
Donations for organizations include $250 for 10 volunteers, $500
for 20 volunteers, and $1,000 for
40 volunteers. E-mail Michele
Redrow at [email protected]
Auditions
Voices Chorale invites singers
interested in the upcoming season
to call Sandy Duffy at 609-799-221
to schedule an audition. Weekly rehearsals are Mondays, 7:30 to 9:45
p.m., in Hopewell, beginning September 13.
For the Young
Summer Arts and Drama
Camps, a 10-week camp for ages 4
to 16, held in Princeton and at
Princeton Junior School, 90 Fackler Road, Lawrence, is accepting
registration. Visit and register at
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org
or call 609-924-8777.
South Brunswick Library
seeks entries from ages 13 to 25 in
the second annual student film and
video festival. Categories of movie
shorts of 15 minutes or less include
music video, public service, commercial, feature, documentary,
comedy, animation, and experimental. Visit www.sbpl.info/teens
or call 732-329-4000, ext. 7634.
Mercer County Soil Conservation District seeks entries in the
NJ Conservation Poster contest denoting the theme of “Conservation
Habits = Healthy Habitats.” The
deadline is Friday, October 22.
Visit www.mercerscd.org for rules
and entry forms or call 609-5869603.
and hustle lessons followed by
open dancing, $12. No partner
needed. 7 p.m.
Ballroom Dance Social, G & J
Studios, 5 Jill Court, Building 14,
Hillsborough,
908-892-0344.
www.gandjstudios.com.
Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm.
Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to
11 p.m.
Literati
Author Event, Borders Books,
601 Nassau Park, 609-514-0040.
www.bordersgroupinc.com. Diane Currie, author of “Before My
Eyes,” the journey with her mother
through Alzheimer’s Disease. 11
a.m.
Jewish Heritage
Friendship Circle invites Jewish teens and adults with special
needs to receive free tickets to Jewish Heritage Night at Trenton
Thunder stadium, on Thursday, July 29, 7:05 p.m. Transportation is
available. E-mail [email protected] or call 609-683-7240.
Delaware Canal State Park offers Canal Camp on Monday to
Thursday, July 19 to 22, noon to 3
p.m. for children up to age 15. The
focus is on the history of the canal
and how a lock works. $40. Afton
Avenue Library, 46 West Afton
Avenue, Yardley, PA. Visit www.dcnr.state.pa.us/calendar.
Alexia’s Belly Dance & Beyond offers West African dance
classes with Audrey Davis on
Thursday, 8:15 to 9:3 p.m.
Lawrenceville. $70 for four classes. Visit www.drumdancecenter.com or call 609-324-7283.
Trenton Museum Society and
Passage Theater offer summer
and theater camp at Ellarslie Mansion. $250 for two weeks, Monday
to Friday, July 26 to August 6, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit www.ellarslie.org or call 609-989-1191 for application.
Mercer County offers the Medi-Cool program to qualified senior citizens and those with disabilities to receive a free air conditioner. Call Tinika Washington at 609394-8847, ext. 104; or Fran Angelone at 609-252-2362 for information on how to register.
Mercer County offers an opportunity for county residents with
an interest in horticulture and a desire to share their knowledge to enroll in the Master Gardener volunteer training program. The 21week program begins at the end of
September with more than 60
hours of instruction. $200 tuition.
Visit www.mgofmc.org or call
609-989-6830.
Passport Days
Health Training
Mercer County offers passport
days on Thursday, July 1, 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m., Hollowbrook Community Center, 320 Hollowbrook Drive,
Ewing; and Thursday, August 12,
11 a.m. to 3 p.m.at Lawrence Senior Center, 30 East Darrah Lane,
Lawrenceville. Register for passport photos at 609-989-6465. For
information about personal documents and charges visit www.mercercounty.org or call 609-9896473.
In Balance Center offers Thai
yoga bodywork training on Saturday and Sunday, July 10 and 11, 1
to 7 p.m., 230 South Branch Road,
Hillsborough. $189. Visit www.inbalancecenter.com or call 908369-4949.
Mercer County Bar Foundation is accepting applications from
individuals pursuing a legal education, who show financial need and
are involved in community organizations. Call 60-585-6200 or Email [email protected]
Deadline is Saturday, July 31.
4-H Fair
Mercer County invites entries
to the annual 4-H fair at Howell
Living History Farm on Saturday
and Sunday, July 31 and August 1.
Arts and crafts, photography,
foods, gardening, clothing, woodworking, or other creative projects
may be entered into the open division. Projects must be delivered on
Friday, July 30, from 4 to 8 p.m.
Contact Altaira Bejgrowicz at 609989-6833 or E-mail [email protected]
The Arts
Keep Cool
Good Causes
New Jersey Blood Services
seeks volunteers to work blood drives with registration, escorting and
canteen duties, and to watch for
post donation reactions. Contact
Jan Zepka at 732-616-8741 or Email [email protected]
Garden Training
The Healing Earth offers a
Body Mind Spirit retreat from
Thursday to Sunday, July 22 to 25.
$500 includes lodging, meals,
classes, and hiking. Call Pat Miller
908-281-9222 for information.
Computer Classes
Computer Learning Center
offers “Introduction to Computers” on Mondays, Wednesdays,
and Fridays, from noon to 2 p.m.,
from July 7 to 19. “Introduction to
Windows XP” is Mondays,
Wednesdays, and Fridays, 9:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Each course is
$20. There are two eBay courses in
July on Tuesdays and Thursdays,
9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Each course is
$10. Call 609-882-5086 to register.
www.ewingsnet.com. 999 Lower
Ferry Road, Ewing.
Summer Classes and Workshops for children, teens, and
adults are offered in visual, literary, and performing arts, at the
Paul Robeson Center for the Arts,
Princeton. Visit and register at
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org
or call 609-924-8777.
American Red Cross offers
blood donors from July 1 to September 12 a chance for a $250 gift
certificate valid at stores, hotels,
airlines, and theaters. Must be 17,
weigh at least 110 pounds, and be
in good health. Visit www.redcrossblood.org or call 800-7332767.
Classical Music
Pop Music
Health & Wellness
Concert Under the Stars, Riverside Symphonia, Tinicum Park,
Erwinna, PA, 609-397-7300.
www.riversidesymphonia.org.
Bring a picnic and celebrate the
holiday with a performance of light
classical, popular, and patriotic favorites. Gates open at 6 p.m. $22
in advance. $27 at the gate. $10
for children. 8 p.m.
Summer Band, Ocean Grove
Camp Meeting Association, 54
Pitman Avenue, 732-775-0035.
www.oceangrove.org.
“Happy
Birthday
America”
features
marches, show tunes, and patriotic fare. Harry D. Eichhorn conducts. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Yin Yoga, Princeton Center for
Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-9247294. www.princetonyoga.com.
Suitable for students of all levels of
experience. Poses are seated,
supine, or prone, and are held with
muscles relaxed for several minutes. $17. 8:30 to 10 a.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Jamesburg Revitalization Coalition, Jamesburg Presbyterian
Church, Gatzmer Avenue and
Church Street, 732-512-7417.
www.ilovejamesburg.com. Produce, non-profit organizations,
and specialty vendors. 9 a.m. to 2
p.m.
Summer Music Series, Palmer
Square, On the Green, 609-9212333. www.palmersquare.com.
Free. 2 to 4 p.m.
Farmers’ Market
West Windsor Community Farmers’ Market, Vaughn Drive Parking Lot, Princeton Junction Train
Station, 609-577-5113. www.westwindsorfarmersmarket.org.
Produce, bakery items, pizza, coffee, and other foods and flowers.
West Windsor Arts Council presents Paint Out so bring your
sketchpad, easel, tripod, paint,
brushes, and a folding chair. West
Windsor Bike and Pedestrian Alliance, and Yes, We Can, a volunteer group that collects food for the
Crisis Ministry of Princeton and
Trenton. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Trenton Fresh Farmers’ Market,
Crisis Ministry of Princeton and
Trenton, North Clinton and North
Olden avenues, Trenton, 609396-9355. www.thecrisisministry.org. Produce, health screenings,
cooking demonstrations, and
health and wellness programs.
Vendors will accept food stamps.
11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Body Attack Launch, Can Do Fitness Club, 121 Main Street, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609514-0500.
www.candofitness.com. Register. Free. 9:30 to 10
a.m.
Nia Dance, Functional Fitness,
67 Harbourton Mt. Airy Road,
Lambertville,
609-577-9407.
www.nianewjersey.com. Register. $17. 10 to 11 a.m.
For Families
Ice Cream Party, Howell Living
History Farm, Valley Road, off
Route 29, Titusville, 609-7373299. www.howellfarm.org. Music, wagon rides, games and contests, ice cream making and eating. Ice cream sodas and sundaes
available. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Live Music
John & Carm, Halo Pub, 5 Hulfish
Street, Princeton, 609-921-1710.
Rock, blues, and bluegrass. 6:30
to 9:30 p.m.
Allan Willinger and Cajun Spice,
Halo Pub, 4617 Nottingham Way,
Trenton, 609-586-1811. 7 p.m.
John Henry Goldman, Tre Piani,
120 Rockingham Row, Forrestal
Village, Plainsboro, 609-4521515. www.straightjazz.com. Jazz
with Jon Thompson on saxo-
JUNE 25, 2010
phone, Jason Fraticelli on bass,
Joe Falcey on drums, and John
Henry Goldman on trumpet. $15
minimum. 7:30 to 11 p.m.
Gary Taylor, Grover’s Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com. 8 p.m.
Amy Ward and Dave Schlossberg, It’s a Grind Coffee House,
7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Originals and jazz piano. 8 to 10 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Family Nature Programs, Plainsboro Preserve, 80 Scotts Corner
Road, Plainsboro, 609-897-9400.
www.njaudubon.org. “Dangerous
Animals and Poisonous Plants of
New Jersey.” Register. $5. 3:30 to
5 p.m.
Singles
Wine and Dinner, Dinnermates,
Princeton Area, 732-759-2174.
www.dinnermates.com. Ages 30s
to early 50s. Call for reservation
and location. $20 plus dinner and
drinks. 7:30 p.m.
Socials
Boomers & Seniors Saturday
Morning Wii Bowling League,
Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane
and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6922. www.mcl.org. Play
Wii to get some light exercise and
socialize with friends. Refreshments. Register. 10 a.m. to noon
Sports
Trenton Thunder Baseball, Waterfront Park, Route 29, Trenton,
609-394-8326.
www.trentonthunder.com. Harrisburg Senators. $9 to $12. 7:05 p.m.
Sunday
July 4
Independence Day.
Drama
The Turn of the Screw, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater,
609-258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Henry James thriller. $16. 2
p.m.
Classical Music
Summer Carillon Concert Series,
Princeton University, 88 College
Road West, Princeton, 609-2583654. www.princeton.edu. Gerard
de Waardt and Richard de Waart
on the fifth largest carillon in the
country. Free. 1 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Celebration, Monroe Township
Cultural Arts Commission,
Thompson Park, Monroe, 732521-2111. www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com. Fireworks at
dusk. Free. 5 p.m.
Farmers’ Market
Farmers Market, Lawrenceville
Main Street, 11 Gordon Avenue,
Lawrenceville,
609-219-9300.
www.LawrencevilleMainStreet.com. Vegetables, fruits, flowers,
herbs, meat, poultry, baked
goods. Music, art, and good causes. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Yoga for Stress Reduction,
Princeton Center for Yoga &
Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite
506, Skillman, 609-924-7294.
www.princetonyoga.com. Gentle
yoga asanas, pranayama, and
meditation. $17. 10:30 to 11:45
a.m. Also, Power Flow, a workshop in a heated room presented
by Valerie Skillman, from 2 to 4
p.m., $30.
History
Celebrating America’s Independence Day, Princeton Battlefield State Park, 500 Mercer
Road, Princeton, 609-921-0074.
www.saveprincetonbattlefield.org. Revolutionary War period soldiers and second Continental Artillery demonstrate drill, artillery,
and flintlock muskets. Period
games for all ages. Tour the
Thomas Clarke House and the
Arms of the Revolution exhibit.
Bring a picnic lunch, hike on the
trails. No barbecues or alcohol.
Free. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Independence Day Celebration,
Morven Museum, 55 Stockton
Street, Princeton, 609-924-8144.
www.morven.org. Celebration at
the home of Richard Stockton, a
signer of the Declaration of Independence. Participate in domestic
colonial life activities, “sign” the
Declaration of Independence. Bell
ringing ceremony. Refreshments.
Free. Noon to 3 p.m.
Historic Foodways, Washington
Crossing State Park, Johnson
Ferry House, 355 Washington
Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville, 609-737-2515. Early
American ice cream presented by
Susan McLellan Plaisted of Heart
to Hearth Cookery. Demonstration
and free samples. $5 parking fee.
1 to 5 p.m.
Walking Tour, Historical Society
of Princeton, Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-921-6748. www.princetonhistory.org. Two-hour walking tour
of downtown Princeton and
Princeton University includes stories about the early history of
Princeton, the founding of the University, and the American Revolution. $7; $4 for ages 6 to 12. 2 to 4
p.m.
Live Music
4th of July Indoor/Outdoor Summer Bash, Hamilton Manor, Cellar, 30 Route 156, Hamilton, 609581-6782. The Urban Guerrilla Orchestra and other live bands perform at the “Party Sunday, No
Work Monday” social mixer and
professional networking bash. 7
p.m.
Outdoor Action
Natural
Dyes,
Washington
Crossing State Park, Visitor Center, Titusville, 609-737-0609. Explore colors derived from wild
plants. $5 per car. 1:30 to 3:30
p.m.
Chess
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897.
www.lmxac.org/plainsboro. For
advanced adult players. 1 to 5
p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder Baseball, Waterfront Park, Route 29, Trenton,
609-394-8326.
www.trentonthunder.com. Harrisburg Senators. $9 to $12. Fireworks follow
the game. 7:05 p.m.
Monday
July 5
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Jersey Harmony
Chorus, Call for location, 732469-3983. www.harmonize.com/jerseyharmony. New members
are welcome. 7:15 p.m.
Blawenburg Band, Hopewell
Train Station, Railroad Place,
Hopewell, 609-924-2790. www.blawenburg.band.org.
Concert
featuring band music. Free. 7:30
p.m.
Concert and Fireworks, Cranbury, Main Street, 609-395-0900.
Concert and fireworks. Rain date
is Tuesday, July 6. 7 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Hot Power Yoga, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman,
609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com.
Vigorous
power
vinyasa flow class. Done in a heated room. $17. 5:45 to 7:15 a.m.
Mixed Level Hatha Yoga, Prince-
THE NEWS
31
ton Center for Yoga &
Health, 50 Vreeland Drive,
Suite 506, Skillman, 609-9247294. www.princetonyoga.com. Achieve balance from
within using breath, movement, and mindfulness. $17.
7:45 to 9 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Kids’ Book Club, Borders
Books, 601 Nassau Park,
609-514-0040. www.bordersgroupinc.com. For ages 8 to
12. 2 p.m.
Singles
Coffee and Conversation,
Grover’s Mill Coffee House,
335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. Coffee, tea,
soup, sandwich, or dessert. Register
at
www.meetup.com/Princeton-Area-Singles-Network.
6:30 to 8 p.m.
Tuesday
July 6
Film
Movie Series for Seniors, Princeton Senior Resource Center,
Spruce Circle, Princeton, 609924-7108. Screening of “Hopscotch.” Refreshments. Limited
parking. Register. Free. 1 p.m.
Dancing
Tuesday Night Folk Dance
Group, Princeton, 609-655-0758.
www.princetonfolkdance.org. Instruction and dancing. No partner
needed. Call for location. $3. 7 to 9
p.m.
Classical Music
Carillon Concert, Princeton University, 88 College Road West,
Princeton, 609-258-3654. www.princeton.edu. Concert on the fifth
largest carillon in the country.
Free. 6:30 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Carnegie Center Concert Series,
Greenway Amphitheater at 202
Carnegie Center, 609-452-1444.
Free. Noon to 1:30 p.m.
Concerts on the Landing, Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, 1 Memorial Drive, Trenton,
609-984-8400.
www.thewarmemorial.com. Roy Richardson
performs. Food available. Free.
Noon to 2 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Long, Slow, Deep Kripalu Flow,
Princeton Center for Yoga &
Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite
506, Skillman, 609-924-7294.
www.princetonyoga.com. Multilevel class. $17. 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Open House, Sunny Health Center, 16 Seminary Avenue,
Hopewell, 609-466-1227. Free
15-minute massage. Register. 10
a.m. to 8 p.m.
Caregiver
Support
Group,
Alzheimer’s Association, Clare
Bridge of Hamilton, 1645 Whitehorse-Mercerville Road, 800-8831180. www.alz.org. 10:30 a.m.
Spinning, Can Do Fitness Club,
121 Main Street, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 609-514-0500. www.candofitness.com. Register at reception desk. Bring a towel and
water. Free. 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.
Beginners Yoga Class, Onsen
For All, 4451 Route 27, Princeton,
609-924-4800. www.onsenforall.com. Basic instruction for those
who are new to yoga. Props used,
discussion of the basic principles
of alignment. Register. $15. 6 to 7
p.m.
Vinyasa Flow: Soma, Princeton
Center for Yoga & Health, 50
Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman,
609-924-7294.
www.princetonyoga.com. Focuses on
moving through the poses slowly
and gracefully, linking one pose to
another. $17. 6 to 7:15 p.m.
In the Galleries: A burst of color and creative experimentation by area artist Liz Adams is featured in
‘Orchids,’ a series of eight orchids and two trees,
against which country orchids might well be found
growing in the wild. On view at Plainsboro Library
through July 31.
For Families
Yoga and Creative Movement,
The Infinite U, Center for Relaxation and Healing, Plainsboro,
732-407-2847. www.theinfiniteu.com. For families touched by
autism. Register. $42 per family.
5:15 to 6 p.m.
For Teens
Studio Scrawl, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. www.mcl.org. “Character Development” for ages 12 to 18
presented by Kieran Scott, a
young adult author of “I Was a
Non-Blonde Cheerleader” and
“She’s So Dead to Us.” A New Jersey native she double-majored in
English and journalism at Rutgers
University. Register. Free. 1 to 2
p.m.
Lectures
Meeting, CUH2A Toastmasters
Club, HDR CUH2A, 1000 Lenox
Drive, Lawrenceville, 609-2529667. www.chu2a.freetoasthost.org. Practice public speaking and
leadership skills in an encouraging
atmosphere. Prospective members welcome. Noon.
Computer Tips and Tricks, Ewing SeniorNet Computer Literacy Center, 999 Lower Ferry Road,
609-882-5086. www.ewingsnet.com. Q&A session followed by
“Tips on Using a Digital Camera”
presented by Hy Gold. Free. 1:30
p.m.
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, 609-924-
8822. www.princetonlibrary.org.
Tech Talk, free. 7 p.m.
Socrates Cafe, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. Ask questions, listen,
discuss, raise challenges. Register. 7 p.m.
Business Meetings
JobSeekers, Parish Hall entrance,
Trinity Church, 33 Mercer Street,
609-924-2277. www.trinityprinceton.org. Networking and support
for changing careers. Free. 7:30
p.m.
Live Music
Open Mic Night, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor,
609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 7 p.m.
Open Mic Night, It’s a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing
Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919.
www.itsagrind.com. 7 to 8:30
p.m.
Sports for Causes
5K Run, Princeton Athletic Club,
Rosedale Park, 424 Federal City
Road,
Hopewell.
www.princetonac.org. Run on the trails
with the nonprofit community running club. Register. $12 to $15.
6:30 p.m.
Continued on following page
“We Only Sell What We Grow”
“We Only Sell What We Grow”
Pick Your Own & Farmstand
Blueberries &
Red Raspberries
Stults Farm, LLC
Coming Very Soon! Sweet Corn!
We only sell OUR OWN produce,
grown on OUR FARM!
For more information
and directions visit
www.StultsFarm.com or
609-799-2523
Visit Our Newly Designed
Website for All Information and
Sign Up for Email Produce Alerts!
32
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
cooking demonstrations, entertainment, and educational programming. 4 p.m.
Continued from preceding page
Wednesday
July 7
Film
Justice: What is the Right Thing
to Do?, South Brunswick Library, 110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth Junction, 732-329-4000.
www.sbpl.info. Film, discussion,
and refreshments to discuss ethical issues with a Harvard professor. Topics: “This Land is My
Land” and “Consenting Adults.”
Free. 1:30 to 3 p.m.
Dancing
Newcomers Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569 Klockner
Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149.
www.americanballroomco.com.
$10. 7 to 9 p.m.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, 609924-6763. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. Instruction followed
by dance. $8. 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Good Causes
Volunteer Orientation Meeting,
HomeFront, 1880 Princeton Avenue, Lawrenceville, 609-9899417. www.homefrontnj.org. Information about volunteer opportunities. Register. 6 p.m.
Comedy Clubs
Gallagher, The Record Collector
Store, 358 Farnsworth Avenue,
Bordentown,
609-324-0880.
www.the-record-collector.com.
$25. 7:30 p.m.
Food & Dining
Wine Regions of the World, Mercer College, West Windsor, 609570-3324. www.mccc.edu. “Summer Bubbles” with Bruce Smith.
Register. $42. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Discover Peace Within, Chicklet
Bookstore, Princeton Shopping
Center, 301 North Harrison Street.
Yoga in the Himalayan tradition
with Acharya Girish Jha. Register
at [email protected] First
class is free. 8:15 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Easy Flow, Princeton Center for
Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-9247294. www.princetonyoga.com. A
gentle workout for body, mind, and
spirit synchronizing breath with
movement through a flowing series of basic asanas and sequences. $17. 9:30 to 10:45 a.m.
Meditation Group, Mercer Free
School, Ewing Library, 609-4566821. Discussion and practice.
Free. 2 to 3 p.m.
Multi-Level Yoga Class, Onsen
For All, 4451 Route 27, Princeton,
609-924-4800. www.onsenforall.com. Explore the basic principles
of alignment. Register. $15. 7 to 8
p.m.
Intro to Martial Arts, Can Do Fitness Club, 121 Main Street, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609514-0500.
www.candofitness.com. Register. Free. 7:30 to 8:30
p.m.
Hot Yoga, Princeton Center for
Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609-9247294. www.princetonyoga.com.
Twenty-six seated postures practiced in a heated room. Increases
flexibility, improves circulation,
and reduces stress. $18. 7:30 to 9
p.m.
History
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket
Foundation, 354 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-683-0057. www.drumthwacket.org. New Jersey
governor’s official residence. Register. $5 donation. 10 a.m. to 2
p.m.
ham Way, Hamilton Square. Support in the job search process. Email [email protected] for
information. 7 to 9 p.m.
UFO Ghosts and Earth Mysteries, UFO and Paranormal Study
Group, Hamilton Township Library, Municipal Drive, 609-6318955. www.drufo.org. Discussion
about UFOs, ghosts, psychic phenomena, crop circles, poltergeists,
channeling, and government cover-ups facilitated by Pat Marcattilio. Free. 7:30 to 10 p.m.
Live Music
John Henry Goldman, Labyrinth
Books, 122 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-497-1600. www.labyrinthbooks.com. Jazz. Refreshments. Free. 5 to 8 p.m.
Darla Rich Quartet, Fedora Cafe,
2633 Main Street, Lawrenceville,
609-895-0844. www.darlarich.com. Jazz vocals. BYOB. 7 to 9
p.m.
Patty Cronheim, Mediterra, 29
Hulfish Street, Princeton, 609252-9680. www.terramomo.com.
8 to 10 p.m.
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. www.theaandb.com. 10 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Summer Nature Programs, Mercer County Park Commission,
Baldpate Mountain, 609-9896540.
www.mercercounty.org.
Mountain hike and yoga. Bring yoga mat and water bottle. Register
by E-mail to [email protected] $12. 9:45 to 11:30
a.m.
Socials
Knitting Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1,
Lawrence Township, 609-9896922. www.mcl.org. For knitters
who already know the basics. Ann
Garwig is available to assist. Other
needle crafters are invited. Register. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
Wines of Sonoma, One 53, 153
Washington Street, Rocky Hill,
609-921-0153. Wine tasting and
hors d’oeuvres. Register. $65.
6:30 p.m.
Tour and Tea, Morven Museum,
55 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-924-8144. www.morven.org.
Tour the restored mansion, galleries, and gardens before or after
tea. Register. $15. 1 p.m.
Meeting, Outer Circle Ski Club,
212-620-7479. www.outercircleskiclub.org. Call for location. 8
p.m.
Farmers’ Market
Kids Stuff
Wellness Wednesday, St. Francis Medical Center, Chambers
Street, Trenton, 609-599-6464.
www.stfrancismedical.com. Seasonal fruits and vegetables. 11
a.m. to 2 p.m.
Intro to Martial Arts, Can Do Fitness Club, 121 Main Street, Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609514-0500.
www.candofitness.com. Ages four and five. 5:15 to 6
p.m. for ages 6 to 11. Register.
Free. 4:30 p.m.
WW-P American Legion Baseball. Hightstown Post 148 at High
School South. 5:45 p.m.
Farmer’s Market, Bordentown
City, Farnsworth and Railroad avenues parking lot, 609-298-0604.
www.cityofbordentown.com. Produce, foods, plants, crafts, soaps,
Lectures
Networking Group, St. Gregory
the Great Church, 4620 Notting-
June 28 to July 30
• For ages 5 to 13
• Sports, games, swimming
every day
• Campers pick their own
activities
• Lunch provided
• Special fun days each week
• New CIT program
• Full days or half days
www.hunschool.org
(609) 921-7600
Call for a personal tour.
Recreation Sports
Shipwreck: Shakespeare’70 presents ‘The Tempest’
at Kelsey Theater’s Summer Festival opening Friday,
July 2. In rehearsal are first row, Heather Duncan,
left, and Ray Fallon; second row, Maddie Patrick,
left, and Dale Simon. A reception with cast and crew
follows the opening night performance.
Film
Pop Music
Foreign
Films,
Lawrence
Library, Darrah Lane and Route
1, Lawrence Township, 609-9896920. www.mcl.org. Screening of
“The Forest for the Trees,” 2003.
Refreshments served. Register.
Free. 6:30 p.m.
The Carnegie Ensemble, Ocean
Grove Camp Meeting Association, 54 Pitman Avenue, 732-7750035. www.oceangrove.org. The
11-piece string ensemble presents contemporary, pop, tango,
and jazz music featuring violinist
Byung-Kook Kwak. $13. 7:30 p.m.
Dancing
Argentine Tango, Black Cat Tango, Suzanne Patterson Center,
Monument Drive, 609-273-1378.
www.theblackcattango.com. Beginner and intermediate classes
followed by guided practice. No
partner necessary. $12. 8 p.m.
Outdoor Concerts
Thursday
July 8
Carnegie Center Concert Series,
Patio at 502 Carnegie Center,
609-452-1444. Free. Noon to
1:30 p.m.
Drama
Adelaide’s Ice Cream Dreams,
Arts Council of Princeton, 102
Witherspoon Street, 609-9248777.
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Drama written
and directed by Robert Cousins.
$15. 8 p.m.
The Turn of the Screw, Princeton
Summer Theater, Hamilton Murray
Theater,
609-258-7062.
www.princetonsummertheater.org. Henry James thriller. $16. 8
p.m.
Summer Courtyard Concert Series, Arts Council of Princeton,
Princeton Shopping Center, 609924-8777.
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Alex Mitnick and
the Kaleidoscope Band performs.
Free. 6 to 8:30 p.m.
Summer Park Series, Monroe
Township Cultural Arts Commission, Thompson Park, Monroe, 732-521-2111. www.monroetownshipculturalarts.com.
Neil
and the Diamonds present a tribute to Neil Diamond’s hits. Weather-permitting. Free. 6 to 8 p.m.
Food & Dining
Happy Hour, Tre Bar, Tre Piani
Restaurant, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 609-452-1515. www.trepiani.com. Free hors d’oeuvres.
Drink specials. 4:30 to 7:30 p.m
Farmers’ Market
Princeton Farmers Market, Hinds
Plaza,
Witherspoon
Street,
Princeton, 609-655-8095. www.princetonfarmersmarket.com.
Produce, cheese, breads, baked
goods, flowers, chef cooking
demonstrations, books for sale,
family activities, and workshops.
Rain or shine. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Ashtanga
Primary
Series,
Princeton Center for Yoga &
Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite
506, Skillman, 609-924-7294.
www.princetonyoga.com. The series links the breath with a progressive series of postures designed to align and strengthen the
body and nervous system. $17.
9:30 to 11 a.m.
NOW OPEN !
33 Princeton-Hightstown Road • Princeton Junction, NJ 08550
Also Serving Thai Food • Take-out & Delivery Specialists
609-799-9666 or 609-683-9666
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 10:30am - 10:30pm;
Fax: 609-799-9661
Fri.-Sat. 10:30am - 11pm ~ Sun. 11am-10pm
Order online at www.sultanwok.com
JUNE 25, 2010
Plainsboro
Fireworks Possession. Ahkeim
A. Brown, 25, of Allentown, PA
was charged June 22 with possession of fireworks. Officer Richard
S. Wolak said he stopped him for
delaying traffic on Route 1 South
— traveling 30 miles per hour in a
55 miles per hour zone — and
found the fireworks.
Simple Assault. A juvenile resident of Aspen Drive was the victim of simple assault on June 15.
Officer Mathieu Baumann said the
guardian of the victim reported that
the victim was involved in a physical altercation at Morris Davison
Park on June 15 between 8 and 9
p.m. The guardian said the fight involved several other female juveniles. The victim suffered minor injuries and did not require medical
attention. Police are investigating.
Car Accident. A driver accidentally accelerated over the concrete barrier and curb and crashed
into the brick wall of the CVS on
Schalks Crossing Road around
3:18 p.m. on June 12. Officer Martin McElrath said the driver was
trying to park her car in front of the
building when she hit the accelerator instead of the brake. No one was
injured, and the building inspector
determined that the damage to the
building was not hazardous to customers or anyone passing by. The
driver was issued a summons for
careless driving.
Shoplifting. John C. Burl, 30,
and Lillian A. Balaam, 45, both of
Somerset, were charged June 17
with shoplifting at Superfresh. Officers Joseph Breyta and Jason
Mandato said that store personnel
called them after they saw on the
store surveillance video that the
pair were concealing numerous
items. When the officers arrived,
they said they found Burl had concealed 18 items, worth a total
$372.67 inside his pant legs and
pockets and that Balaam had sixteen items, worth a total $296.16
inside her handbag. The entire
$668.83 worth of stolen goods was
recovered and returned to the store.
Burl was also charged with conspiracy and possession of drug
paraphernalia. Balaam was also
charged with conspiracy and hindering apprehension.
Fraud. A resident of Fox Run
Drive was the victim of identity
theft between the month of May
and June 19. Officer Kenneth Beatty said someone used the victim’s
identity to open various credit
cards and used fraudulent checks to
purchase items.
From The Police Blotter
A resident of Red Oak Drive
was the victim of fraud and credit
card theft between June 6 and 7.
Officer Tim McMahon said someone made 12 fraudulent purchases
over the Internet using the victim’s
Discover credit card. The sum of
the total purchases is unknown at
this time.
Hindering
Apprehension.
Mario Garcia, 29, of Princeton was
charged with hindering apprehension on June 14. Officer Joseph
Breyta said he stopped him on
Scotts Corner Road for having a
brake light out. He said Garcia
gave him a false name during the
stop. He was also charged with being an unlicensed driver, driving
while suspended, careless driving,
and maintenance of lamps.
Attempted Burglary. Charles
Sloan El Lancaster, 20, and Ahmed
Abdelbaky, 19, both of Quail
Ridge Drive, were charged with
criminal attempt and defiant trespass in connection with an attempted burglary that occurred on
Hampshire Drive in May. Detective Russell Finkelstein said South
Brunswick police called Plainsboro to report that Lancaster was in
possession of a stolen credit card
and tried to make purchases with it
earlier in the evening. Police spotted Lancaster driving in Plainsboro
and stopped him and found both
Lancaster and Abdelbaky, who
were suspects in the May burglary.
They were sent to the Middlesex
County jail in lieu of $10,000 bail.
Burglary/Theft. A High School
North student was the victim of
theft on June 21 around 1:45 p.m.
Officer Jason Mandato said someone stole the victim’s red, gold, and
white Nishiki Pueblo mountain
bike, worth $213.98, from the bike
rack at the front entrance of the
school.
A resident of Pheasant Hollow
Road was the victim of theft between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on June
16. Officer Joseph Diggs said her
son’s bicycle was stolen from the
breeze-way adjacent to her residence. The bicycle was blue and
worth $50.
A resident of Spencerport, NY
was the victim of theft at the Courtyard Marriott overnight between
June 11 and 12. Officer Joseph
Diggs said someone pried the key
lock on his parked car overnight
and stole the dealer stereo from the
center dashboard. The stereo is estimated to be worth $2,000.
A resident of Hamburg, NY was
the victim of theft in the parking lot
of Courtyard Marriott between
June 11 and 12. Officer Martin
McElrath said someone stole a Dell
laptop, book bag, seventh grade
school books, and a calculator from
the victim’s truck. The victim told
police he was unsure if he locked
the truck before he left it overnight
in the parking lot.
A resident of Deer Creek Drive
was the victim of burglary and theft
between June 11 and 13. Officer
Kenneth Beatty said someone entered the residence through an unlocked bedroom window and stole
a 32 gigabyte Apple iPad worth
$640.93.
Criminal Mischief. Someone
shattered the exterior glass of a
sliding glass door of an apartment
in Quail Ridge overnight between
June 12 and 13. Officer Martin
McElrath said the damage was approximately $160.
Someone tipped over a portable
toilet in the Market Street parking
lot between June 12 and 14. Officer
Kenneth Beatty said the incident
caused about $500 in damage to the
portable toilet, which belonged to
the Sharbell Development Corporation. An investigation into the
matter, as well as similar incidents
is ongoing.
Someone tipped over a portable
toilet in the parking lot behind 5
Schalks Crossing Road between
June 8 and 9. The cost to have it
turned upright and cleaned out is
about $50, said Officer Joseph
Breyta.The portable toilet belongs
to Sharbell Building Corporation.
Drug Arrests. James B. Nickson Jr., 25, of Pheasant Hollow
Drive, was charged June 9 with
possession of marijuana under 50
grams. Officer Kenneth Beatty said
he stopped him on Dey Road at
Pheasant Hollow Drive for having
a license plate light out and found a
burnt marijuana cigarette. He was
also charged with maintenance of
lamps and possession of a controlled dangerous substance in a
motor vehicle.
Daniel G. Ellenberg, 19, of Windridge Court in West Windsor was
charged June 10 with possession of
drug paraphernalia. Officer Joseph
Jankowski said he stopped him on
Plainsboro Road at George Davison Road for failing to dim his high
beams and making an improper
turn. He said he found rolling pa-
pers in the car. He was also charged
with improper use of multi-beam
headlights, improper turn, unclear
plates, maintenance of lamps, forward view obstruction, and a probationary driver violation.
DWI Arrests. Iesha Smith, 28,
of Hunters Glen Drive was charged
June 19 with driving while intoxicated. Officer Joseph Bolognese
said he stopped her on Scudders
Mill Road after she nearly collided
head-on with his patrol car. He said
he found she was intoxicated. She
was also charged with reckless driving, careless driving, and refusal
to submit to a breath test.
Meghna Balmuri, 28, of Fox
Run Drive, was charged June 12
with driving while intoxicated. Officer Mathieu Baumann said he
stopped her on Scudders Mill Road
for running a light at the intersection with Schalks Crossing Road
and found she was intoxicated. She
was also charged with reckless driving, failure to observe a signal,
having an open container of alcohol in the vehicle, and driving an
uninsured motor vehicle.
Ravi Ramaswamy, 53, of Pheasant Hollow Drive, was charged
June 12 with driving while intoxicated. Sergeant Scott Seitz said he
stopped him on Dey Road for failing to dim his headlights and found
he was intoxicated. He was also
charged with reckless driving and
failure to dim headlights.
Anne C. Meyer, 30, of Walker
Gordon Drive was charged May 23
with driving while intoxicated. Officer Tim McMahon said he
stopped her after he saw her fail to
stop at the intersection of
THE NEWS
Sycamore Drive and Walker Gordon Drive. He said he found she
was intoxicated. She was also
charged with reckless driving,
careless driving, and failure to
stop.
West Windsor
Theft. West Windsor Police are
looking for two female suspects
who allegedly stole credits cards
and currency from a wallet left in a
car parked at West Windsor Community Park near the indoor batting
cages on June 5. Officer Marl Lee
said the suspect used the victim’s
credit card to purchase gasoline at
Valero and then tried to purchase
lunch at Subway at 12:10 p.m. Police released photos from surveillance cameras that captured the
two suspects.
Drug Arrests. Michael E.
Williams, 20, of Dayton, was
charged June 10 with possession of
marijuana. Officer Christopher
Van Ness said he stopped him on
Route 1 north for equipment and
moving violations and found a bag
of marijuana and a smoking pipe
inside his car. He was also charged
with possession of drug paraphernalia.
Farid Abdul Farrow, 27, of
Princeton was charged June 12
with possession of marijuana. Officer William Jones said he stopped
him on Route 1 South near
Carnegie Center Boulevard for a
motor vehicle violation and found
marijuana inside the car.
DWI Arrests. Abhiram V. Gollapudi, 21, of Edison was charged
June 12 with driving while intoxicated. Officer Walter Silcox said
he stopped him on Route 571 at
Windsor Drive for motor vehicle
violations and found him to be intoxicated.
Mandarin ~ Cantonese ~ Szechuan
WE NOW DELIVER!
cC
Southfield Shopping Center
295 Princeton-Hightstown Rd. • West Windsor, NJ 08550
609-716-8323 • 609-716-8324 • Fax: 609-716-8325
Like eating at “Nonna’s” house!
Summer Workout Series, Can Do
Fitness Club, 121 Main Street,
Forrestal Village, Plainsboro, 609514-0500. Bollywood outside.
Register at reception desk. Bring a
towel and water. Inside if it rains.
Free. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Spinning, Can Do Fitness Club,
121 Main Street, Forrestal Village,
Plainsboro, 609-514-0500. Register at reception desk. Bring a towel
and water. Free. 4:30 to 5:15 p.m.
without drugs or drastic dieting.
Register. $20. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
For Families
Dusk Hike for Families, Plainsboro Recreation Park Ranger
Division, Plainsboro Preserve,
609-799-0909. www.plainsboronj.com. Explore nature. Register.
Free. 7:30 p.m.
For Teens
Prenatal Yoga, Princeton Center
for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland
Drive, Suite 506, Skillman, 609924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Class is designed to help
mothers-to-be prepare body,
mind, and spirit for birth and motherhood. $25. 6 to 7:15 p.m.
Thursday Teen Movies, West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. www.mcl.org. Screening of “Dogtown and ZBoys.” For ages 13 and up.
Snacks provided. Free. 6:30 p.m.
The Heart-Healthy Magic of Eating the Mediterranean Way,
Taste of Crete, 400 Route 206
South, Hillsborough, 908-6852035. Workshop led by Sandra
Hoedemaker, a holistic health
counselor and Plainsboro resident. Learn how to lower cholesterol and improve heart health
Free Legal Consultations, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and
Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6922. www.mcl.org. Attorneys from the Mercer County
Bar Association will be available
on a first-come, first-serve basis to
answer questions regarding family
law, wills and estates, bankruptcy,
Lectures
and other areas. Free 15-minute
consultations. 5:30 p.m.
Lawyers C.A.R.E., Mercer County Bar, Lawrence Library, Route 1
South, 609-585-6200. www.mercerbar.com. 15-minute consultations with a lawyer about legal issues of family law, real estate,
landlord and tenant law, personal
injury, criminal and municipal
court law, wills and estates, bankruptcy, and immigration. Free.
5:30 to 7 p.m.
New Chef from New York’s R
Mulberry Street in “Little Italy”
R
Science Lectures
Star Show, Raritan Valley College, Planetarium, College Center, North Branch, 908-526-1200.
www.raritanval.edu. Attack of the
Space Pirates. Register. $6. 2
p.m.
Star Show, Raritan Valley College, Planetarium, College Center, North Branch, 908-526-1200.
www.raritanval.edu. Laser Kids 2.
Register. $6. 3 p.m.
R Musicians
on Fridays & Saturdays R
Unwind at the End of the Week
R
Catering for All Occasions R
On or Off Premises
206 Farnsworth Avenue
Continued on following page
•
33
Bordentown
•
609-298-8360
www.ilovemarcellos.com
34
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
WW-P News Classifieds
HOW TO ORDER
CLEANING SERVICES
BUSINESS SERVICES
SUMMER CAMPS
INSTRUCTION
Mail your ad to the News at P.O. Box
580, West Windsor 08550. Fax it to 609243-9020, or use our e-mail address:
[email protected] Classifieds are
just 50 cents a word, with a $7.00 minimum. Repeats in succeeding issues are
just 40 cents per word, and if your ad runs
for 12 consecutive issues, it’s only 30
cents per word.
Window Washing: Lolio Window
Washing. Also gutter cleaning and power washing. 609-271-8860.
Debra @ 609-448-6005 or visit www.vyours.com.
June, July and Aug. Ages 6-10 and 1115. Farrington’s Music Princeton 609924-8282 West Windsor 609-897-0032
Hightstown 609-448-7170 Burlington
609-387-9631 Call today! www.farringtonsmusic.com
ton graduate with MA. Many WWP success stories. Call Kathy Doyle, 609-5321133, doyletutoring.com
OFFICE RENTALS
12 Roszel Rd, Princeton, NJ: Executive suites A-204. Vacant suite with access to internal common area available.
Internet Access. Call 609-720-0300 or
e-mail: [email protected]
Plainsboro - 700 SF to 3,000 SF Office Suites: in single story building in
well maintained office park off Plainsboro Road. Immediately available. Individual entrance and signage, separate
AC/Heat and electricity. Call 609-7992466 or E-mail [email protected]
HOUSING FOR RENT
Bordentown Historic: Renovated
first floor large bedroom, living room,
kitchen, dishwasher, W/D hook-up,
computer room, porch, yard. Convenient to Princeton, 295, train. No pets.
$950/month, includes utilities except
electric. 1.5 Month security. 609-5875191.
CONTRACTING
Handyman/Yardwork: Painting/Carpentry/Masonry/Hauling/All Yard Work
from top to bottom. Done by pros. Call
609-737-9259 or 609-273-5135.
CLASSIFIED BY EMAIL
[email protected]
HOME MAINTENANCE
Handyman: A small job or big job will
be accepted for any project around the
house that needs a handyman service
with free estimates. Please call my cell
phone 609-213-8271.
Reliable Lawn and Tree Service:
Lis# 2750131. Mowing. Fertilizing.
Mulching. Spring and Fall Clean Ups.
609-209-5764.
robthehandyman- licensed, insured,
all work guaranteed. Free Estimates.
We do it all - electric, plumbing, paint,
wallpaper, powerwashing, tile, see website for more: robthehandyman.vpweb.com
[email protected],
609-269-5919.
Yard Work: Mowing, cleanup, trimming, weeding, or mulching. Reasonable rates - Call today 609-722-1137.
DECKS REFINISHED
Cleaning/Stripping and Staining of
All Exterior Woods: Craftsmanship
quality work. Fully insured and licensed
with references. Windsor WoodCare.
609-799-6093.
www.windsorwoodcare.com.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Bookkeeper/Administrative Specialist: Versatile & experienced professional will gladly handle your bookkeeping and/or administrative needs. Many
services available. Reasonable rates.
Work done at your office or mine. Call
JULY 8
Continued from preceding page
Live Music
Edward Boutross, Santino’s Ristorante,
240 Route 130 South, Robbinsville, 609443-5600.
www.santinosristorante.com.
Jazz vocal standards. BYOB. 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Wenonah Brooks, Nick’s Cafe 72, 72 West
Upper Ferry Road, West Trenton, 609-8820087. www.cafe72nj.com. Jazz vocalist.
BYOB. No cover. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Singer Songwriter Showcase, Triumph
Brewing Company, 138 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-924-7855. www.triumphbrew.com. Hosted by Frank Thewes of
West Windsor. 9 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Summer Nature Programs, Mercer County Park Commission, Baldpate Mountain,
609-989-6540. www.mercercounty.org. Casual hike to spot birds. Bring binoculars.
Free. 1 to 3 p.m.
Socials
Happy Hour, New Jersey Young Professionals, Yankee Doodle Tap Room, Nassau Inn, 10 Palmer Square East, Princeton.
www.njyp.org. For ages 21 to 39. Register
online. 6 to 8 p.m.
Friday
July 9
Drama
Adelaide’s Ice Cream Dreams, Arts Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street,
609-924-8777.
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org. Drama written and directed
by Robert Cousins. $15. 2 and 8 p.m.
Cliffhanger, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5
South Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell, 609466-2766. www.off-broadstreet.com. Suspenseful drama. $27.50 to $29.50. 7 p.m.
Moon Over Buffalo, Washington Crossing
Open Air Theater, 355 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville, 267-8859857. www.dpacatoat.com. Backstage
farce. $10; $7 for children. Blankets, seat
cushions, and insect repellent are recom-
COMPUTER SERVICES
Computer repair, upgrade, data recovery, or maintenance. Free estimate. Call (cell) 609-213-8271.
TAX SERVICES
Tax Preparation and Accounting
Services: For individuals and small
businesses. Notary, computerized tax
preparation, paralegal services. Your
place or mine. Fast response, free consultation, reasonable costs. Gerald
Hecker, 609-448-4284.
PERSONAL SERVICES
Clutter Control: Professional organizer will help you create order in your
home/home
office.
Cyndi.
[email protected] or 609-933-1550.
Custom Sewing for the Home. Curtains, cushions, slipcovers and more.
For info call Heidi at 609-462-6734.
ADULT CARE
Companion - Retired RN. Will make
light meals, assist you with shower,
dressing, light housework, shopping,
etc. Competitive rates. Call 609-2355579.
SUMMER CAMPS
Summer Music Camp - Give your
child the music advantage! Recorder
playing, American Idol vocal fun, hand
percussion, Sax, guitar, or violin basics
and more. Half day 1-4pm, Mon-Fri,
mended. Picnics welcome before show.
Food available. Parking fee of $5. 7:30 p.m.
Into the Woods, Actors’ NET, 635 North
Delmorr Avenue, Morrisville, PA, 215-2953694. actorsnetbucks.org. Musical by
James Lapine and Stephen Sondheim.
Through July 25. $20. 8 p.m.
The Tempest, Kelsey Theater, Mercer
County Community College, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, 609-570-3333. Shakespeare ‘70, Mercer County’s classical repertory company, kicks off the college’s Kelsey
Theatre 2010 Summer Festival. $14 for
adults, $10 for students and children. 8 p.m.
The Turn of the Screw, Princeton Summer
Theater, Hamilton Murray Theater, 609258-7062. www.princetonsummertheater.org. Henry James thriller. $16. 8 p.m.
Art
Artists Network, Lawrenceville Main
Street, 2683 Main Street, Lawrenceville,
609-647-1815. Gallery features works by
area artists. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Gallery 14, 14 Mercer Street,
Hopewell, 609-333-8511. Opening reception for “The Best of Eight Years at Gallery
14,” a group show. 6 to 9 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Straube Center, Route 31 and
West Franklin Avenue, Buildings 100 and I108, Pennington, 609-737-3322. www.straubecenter.com. Opening reception for
“Omnifarious Art Show.” On view to August
20. 7 to 9 p.m.
Dancing
Outdoor Dancing, Central Jersey Dance
Society, Hinds Plaza, Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-945-1883. www.centraljerseydance.org. Salsa dance with DJ Carlos Xiloj. No partner needed. Bring water
and dance shoes that can hold up on cement surface. Free. 7 to 10 p.m.
INSTRUCTION
One Man Band: Keyboardist for your
party. Perfect entertainment. Great variety. Call Ed at 609-424-0660.
Lessons in Your Home: Music
lessons in your home. Piano, clarinet,
saxophone, flute and guitar. Call Jim
609-737-9259 or 609-273-5135.
MERCHANDISE MART
Music Lessons - Farrington’s Music: Piano, guitar, drum, sax, clarinet,
voice, flute, trumpet, violin. $28 half
hour. School of Rock. Join the band!
Princeton 609-924-8282. Princeton
Junction 609-897-0032. Hightstown
609-448-7170. www.farringtonsmusic.com.
Piano Lessons in your home, Vocal
Coaching and Audition Prep. Certified
music teacher. Ages 6 thru adult. Never
too late to start! Learning easy and fun!
Call Joe: 732-383-5630 or 732-6871033.
Prepare your child for success this
September with tutoring this summer:
biology, chemistry, physics, geometry,
algebra. Ivy League-educated. E-mail:
[email protected]
SAT and ACT Tutoring — Reading,
Writing, Math: Boost your scores with
outstanding private instruction by experienced college English professor and
high school math teacher. Let us help
you succeed! Reasonable fee. Many excellent WW-P references. 609-6586914.
Too busy for an SAT course? Private instruction to fit your child’s schedule. SAT, ACT, SSAT, or Writing. Prince-
Computer P4 with XP: In good condition $120. Cell phone (609)213-8271.
Have Car, Must Sell: 2004 Nissan
Sentra, 93,000 miles, 30 mpg, fun to drive, doesn’t break. Asking $4,850. 732429-8802 or [email protected]
WANTED TO BUY
Antique Military Items: And war
relics wanted from all wars and countries. Top prices paid. “Armies of the
Past LTD”. 2038 Greenwood Ave.,
Hamilton Twp., 609-890-0142. Our retail outlet is open Saturdays 10 to 4:00,
or by appointment.
HELP WANTED
Private school seeks bright, energetic person to teach English to accelerated elementary students. Contact [email protected]
Private school seeks microbiologist,
botanist or molecular biologist to teach
HS science. Contact [email protected]
CLASSIFIED BY PHONE
609-243-9119
Farmers’ Market
Live Music
Farmers’ Market, Downtown Hightstown,
Memorial Park, Main Street. www.downtownhightstown.org. Produce, flowers,
baked goods, and area vendors. 4 to 8 p.m.
Happy Hour, Hopewell Valley Vineyards,
46 Yard Road, Pennington, 609-737-4465.
www.hopewellvalleyvineyards.com. Wine
available. 5 to 8 p.m.
Health & Wellness
Flashback Fridays, KatManDu, 50
Riverview Plaza, Waterfront Park, Route
29, Trenton, 609-393-7300. www.katmandutrenton.com. Buffet from 5 to 8 p.m., $5.
DJs Bryan Basara and Davey Gold with music from 1970s, 80s, and 90s. 5 p.m.
Power Vinyasa, Princeton Center for Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite 506,
Skillman, 609-924-7294. Class is focused
on deep, even breathing and learning to relax, while fully inhabiting the body and experiencing the postures. $17. 9:30 to 11 a.m.
Educational Program, Alzheimer’s Association, Princeton Senior Resource Center,
45 Stockton Street, Princeton, 973-5864300. www.alz.org. “Know the 10 Signs:
Early Detection Matters” workshop for family caregivers. Register. Free. Noon.
Meditation Circle, Lawrence Library, Darrah Lane and Route 1, Lawrence Township,
609-989-6920. Register. 2:30 p.m.
Hatha Yoga: Spanda, Princeton Center for
Yoga & Health, 50 Vreeland Drive, Suite
506, Skillman, 609-924-7294. www.princetonyoga.com. Learn asanas and
pranayama in combination to build overall
strength, increase flexibility, and aid in overall relaxation. $17. 6:30 to 7:45 p.m.
Family Theater
Alice in Wonderland, Somerset Valley
Players, Amwell Road, Hillsborough, 908369-7469. www.svptheatre.org. Alice, the
White Rabbit, and the Mad Hatter on stage.
$10. 8 p.m.
Lectures
Dance Party, American Ballroom, 569
Klockner Road, Hamilton, 609-931-0149.
www.americanballroomco.com. $15. 8 to
11 p.m.
Brown Bag, Princeton Senior Resource
Center, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, 609-924-7108. “Memory,
Aging, and the Brain” presented by Barbara
DeAngelis, coordinator of education and
training for Alzheimer’s Association. Her focus is on the 10 signs and early detection.
Bring your own lunch. Beverages and
dessert provided. Register. Free. Noon.
Ballroom Dance Social, G & J Studios, 5
Jill Court, Building 14, Hillsborough, 908892-0344. www.gandjstudios.com. Standard, Latin, smooth, and rhythm. Refreshments. BYOB. $12. 8 to 11 p.m.
Meeting, Toastmasters Club, Mary Jacobs
Library, 64 Washington Street, Rocky Hill,
609-306-0515. Build speaking, leadership,
and communication skills. Guests are welcome. 7:30 p.m.
Faith
Meeting, Toastmasters Club, Mary Jacobs
Library, 64 Washington Street, Rocky Hill,
609-306-0515. http://ssu.freetoasthost.ws.
Build speaking, leadership, and communication skills. Guests are welcome. 7:30
p.m.
Outdoor Shabbat, Har Sinai Temple, 2421
Pennington Road, Pennington, 609-7308100. Weather permitting, Shabbat services will be held outdoors. 7 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
Trenton2Nite, Trenton Downtown, South
Warren and Lafayette streets, 609-3938998. www.trentondowntown.com. Music,
art, games, and activities. Visit website for
full list. Most are free. 5 p.m.
Dick Gratton, Chambers Walk Cafe, 2667
Main Street, Lawrenceville, 609-896-5995.
Solo jazz guitar. 6 to 9 p.m.
Lights on the River, Pasha Rugs, 15 Bridge
Street, Lambertville, 609-397-5434. Fortune telling, Turkish music, and a raki tasting
of the Turkish national drink. Sit on the large
handmade rug pillow, a gigantic cushion
made from more than 80 colorful vintage antique rugs to watch the fireworks at 9:30
p.m. 6 to 9:30 p.m.
Arturo Romay, Grounds For Sculpture, 18
Fairgrounds Road, Hamilton, 609-5860616. Rain or shine. $10. 7:30 p.m.
DJ Spoltore, Grover’s Mill Coffee House,
335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West
Windsor, 609-716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.com. 8 p.m.
Scott Langdon, It’s a Grind Coffee House,
7 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, 609275-2919. www.itsagrind.com. Acoustic
originals and covers. 8 to 10 p.m.
Singles
Divorce Recovery Program, Princeton
Church of Christ, 33 River Road, Princeton,
609-581-3889.
www.princetonchurchofchrist.com. Support group for men
and women. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Socials
Luncheon, Rotary Club of the Princeton
Corridor, Hyatt Regency, Carnegie Center,
609-799-0525.
www.princetoncorridorrotary.org. Register. Guests, $20. 12:15
p.m.
Recreation Sports
WW-P American Legion Baseball.
Hopewell Post 339 at High School South.
5:45 p.m.
JUNE 25, 2010
THE NEWS
35
Gardens As ‘Outdoor Rooms’ That Capture Nature’s Bounty
The Greening of West Windsor Garden
Tour Is Full of Inspiring ‘Green’ Ideas
F
or Mary Painter, there are no
limits — nor time constraints
— when it comes to maintaining a sense of creativity in her
garden. When she moved from
Seattle to her 18th century home on
Village Road East five years ago,
she brought with her a sense of
“slow” gardening that is uncommon on the East Coast. But she also transformed the previous owners’ garden into a serene backyard
retreat using nontraditional accents to add personal flavor to the
flowing displays of foliage.
The result is a garden with minimal lawn area, but with distinctive
sections, inviting movement from
one area to the next. That is what
visitors can expect to do on Saturday, June 26, during the first annual Greening of West Windsor garden tour. Painter is one of 16 homeowners putting her backyard designs on display for those on the
tour.
What has distinguished Painter’s garden from many others is her
and her husband’s approach, which
is to add a new section every year.
“We’ve been here five years, but
we do things just a little at a time,”
she says. “We don’t subscribe to
having the garden center to fill
everything up with nice, neat rows.
We concentrate on an area each
season.”
Painter grew up in San Francisco. Her mother was a teacher and a
bookkeeper for her father’s business. Her father owned and maintained apartment buildings. She
met her husband, Mike, who grew
up in Oklahoma, at work while living in San Francisco. The couple
eventually moved to Seattle,
where they lived for 14 years.
They moved to Washington,
D.C. when her husband, a doctor
involved in health policy, took a
fellowship position there. After a
year, they followed his work to
New Jersey. The couple have a
daughter who is a math teacher in
Brooklyn and a son who is in sixth
grade at Community Middle
School.
When they arrived in West
Windsor, they found a fenced-in
vegetable garden and a circle garden in the center of the yard that
served as an annual herb garden.
Painter said she expanded on the
work in the vegetable garden, moving the herbs to that area and making individual planting boxes. Now
the circle garden mostly contains
perennials, including roses, echinacea, and a few annuals. “That,
now, is more of a show garden than
an herb garden,” Painter says.
The couple also built a few patios around the garden from
scratch, with the goal of cutting out
the grass. “We made a big flagstone patio and a second smaller
one,” she says. “We don’t like a lot
of straight lines; we like things to
curve around.”
She also likes unconventional
accents. One of those accents is a
wooden chair, painted in a bright
green hue that perhaps once served
as part of a larger set. Now, with its
seat missing, the hole at the center
of the seat serves as a container for
a flower bed and is placed strategically within the garden. Near the
chair, a candelabra hangs from one
of the trees, surrounded by a variety of shade-loving plants, including hydrangeas, hostas, and ferns.
“In Seattle people are very into
cottage gardens and English gar-
by Cara Latham
dens, and a lot of whimsical things
in their gardens,” she says. “Somebody was throwing away this
brightly-painted green chair with
no seat. I also found a red wagon. I
brought it home and put that into a
second shade garden and filled it
with some ferns.”
It was in Seattle where Painter
says she became interested in creating “outdoor rooms” and distinctive sections of gardens. “We had a
lawn play area, we had a patio area,
and we had a small, shaded seating
area,” she says. “All of them were
separated by hedges and trees.”
Since the climate in Seattle is
different from that in New Jersey,
Painter had to make some alterations. “The summer days are long;
the sun is out at 4 a.m., and it sets
after 9 p.m. during the solstice,”
she says. “So you get a great growing season. The winters are not so
harsh, so things that don’t winter
over here, like adelias, winter over
there.
“We did have to alter placement
of plants because it’s so intensely
hot here during the summer,” she
says.
Painter says the couple has built
upon the garden each year. One
year, they installed the patio, and
another year, they worked on the
circle garden. Last year, they worked on the shade garden, and this
What distinguishes the
Painter family’s garden
from many others is
their strategy of adding
a new section every
year.
year, they cut out and expanded the
beds. “We have a lot of fountains in
there,” Painter says. “We like the
water effect — it’s very relaxing.”
Everything that the family has
done in the garden has been selftaught. Describing their method as
“slow gardeners,” Painter says the
family enjoys the gratification of
weeding a bed and looking back at
what they’ve planted, knowing that
they have designed it themselves.
“If we did it all at once, what would
we do next year?” she says. “In gardening, there is always room to
make changes. We still have lots of
spaces to rework every year.”
In addition to adding various elements to the garden on a yearly
and seasonal basis, Painter says she
spends about a half hour a day
walking through the garden to pull
weeds and perform routine maintenance.
The garden also features seating
areas with benches and chairs
throughout. “People have asked us
whether we really sit in all these areas,” she says. “We actually do. At
different times of the day, you have
shade and sun.”
The family believes in using as
few chemically altered products in
the garden as possible, although
they are not entirely “green.” However, the vegetable garden — with
basil, tomatoes, corn, lettuce, peppers, cucumbers, eggplant, peas,
broccoli, strawberries, and herbs
— is. “I rotate the crops in the vegetable garden, except for the corn
because I plan the three sisters
method with corn, squash, and
beans,” she says, explaining that
they help each other grow. “What
The Lure of the Green:
Mike Painter, above,
Mary Painter, the
vegetable garden,
‘chair’ planter, and the
Painters’ historic home.
one plant takes, the other puts
back.” Avoiding chemicals where
possible means that fewer products
will go into the ground water.
“I like the fact that they’re trying
to get rid of as much lawn as possible,” says Debra Wolosky, a
GroWW organizer. “It’s an utterly
charming property. There is a lot of
intelligence and planning that went
into the distinctive gardens they
created and continue to create.
“She makes really good use of
her shade and her sun, and she’s
just making the most out of the
property,” adds Wolosky.
The Painter family garden is just
one example of the varieties of gardening styles that residents who
take the tour can experience.
The tour, which will take place
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., will showcase private gardens as well as
some of the township’s public
open spaces. The garden tour is designed to highlight sustainable
practices as part of gardening, and
organizers are hoping that visitors
can gather information about native plants, organic gardening,
composting, rain barrels, and container gardening among others.
R
am Chandran Gopalakrisnan’s
garden on New Village Road
is another stop on the tour. He got
the idea for his garden — which uses common five-gallon buckets,
storage containers, and empty plastic two-liter bottles to create container gardens that water themselves from the ground up — when
he was living in an apartment with
limited outdoor space.
Last year, Gopalakrisnan harvested 28 pounds of sweet cherry
tomatoes from just three plants and
more than two pounds of basil from
a single bucket container. As part
of the tour, he will demonstrate
how to build a container using two
buckets, one lid, a plastic drinking
cup, a garbage bag, potting mix,
and organic fertilizer.
Also on Village Road East is the
garden belonging to the Szewczyk
family. Owners Renata Adamska
and Witek Szewczyk decided to
demolish a dilapidated barn/garage
in the middle of their backyard and
replace it with a new structure with
solar panels on the roof. In undertaking the project, the couple
opened up the yard.
With the help of landscape designer Ronnie Hock, they transformed the garden over the past
year and created an environmental-
ly-friendly place for both children
and adults. This included installing
a 1,600-gallon underground water
tank to store rain water from the
barn gutters, which will be linked
to an irrigation system for the lawn.
The organic vegetable garden is already in place, where the couple
grow tomatoes and cucumbers.
“It’s entirely self-guided,” says
Wolosky of the tour. “You can go
to whichever sites you want to at
any time between 10 a.m. and 2
p.m., with the exception of the
guided hikes.” She adds that the organizers “certainly do want to
showcase sustainable practices.”
The tour features sites on
Melville Road, Landing Lane,
Lancashire Drive, Scott Avenue,
Lillie Street, Alexander Road,
Clarksville Road, Village Road
West, Village Road, Village Road
East, South Mill Road, Kingsley
Court, Lakeshore Drive, Cardiff
Court, and Glacier Drive.
Along the way, however, visitors can also take tours of public
spaces. Those sites include the
Millstone River Preserve, Van
Nest Park, Rogers Preserve, Ron
Rogers Arboretum, West Windsor
Community Park, West Windsor
Community Garden and Senior
Center, Trolley Line Trail,
Conover Road Athletic Complex,
Mercer County Park, the Appelget
and Grover farms, Schenck Farmstead, and Zaitz Woods Nature
Preserve.
Docents from the Boy Scouts
will be at the Millstone River,
Zaitz, and Rogers preserves as well
as the Ron Rogers Arboretum. Led
by Tony Vinci, the scouts will be
distributing handouts to help people identify common trees in West
Windsor.
There will be 45-minute guided
nature hikes at the Millstone River
and Zaitz preserves and Ron
Rogers Arboretum. The Millstone
River Preserve hike begins at 10
a.m. and will be led by David
Siegel. The Ron Rogers Arboretum hike will begin at 11:30 a.m.
and will be led by Ron Slinn. Andrew Kulley will lead the hike at
the Zaitz Preserve at 1 p.m.
Tour maps will be available at
the West Windsor Farmer’s Market and at the West Windsor Library. Maps and more information
are also available at www.greeningwestwindsor.com. For questions, E-mail [email protected]
Garden Tour, Greening of
West Windsor, Visit flower, vegetable, and container gardens
throughout the town. Saturday, June
26, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 609-989-5662
or www.greeningwestwindsor.com.
36
THE NEWS
JUNE 25, 2010
West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South Post Prom 2010.
Celebrating Our 25th Year!
The West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South Post Prom 2010 Committee is grateful for the remarkable support we received
from many wonderful individuals and groups. The generosity of so many made this spectacular Post Prom event possible.
We are honored to include the following local businesses, community organizations, South parents, students, staff and friends as part of our Post Prom family.
Everyone who has donated time, talent, money, food and prizes to this important tradition of keeping our children safe on Prom night is truly appreciated.
Because of you, the students of the Class of 2010 and their guests enjoyed a fun and safe night filled with happy memories.
Thank you for caring!
Ashima Saksena and Carol Herts, Post Prom Co-Chairs
CORPORATE DONATIONS
Gold Patrons
WW-P High School South PTSA
WW-P Alliance for the Prevention of
Drug and Alcohol Abuse
The Boyle Family Foundation
Wal*Mart
Century 21 Abrams, Hutchinson
& Assoc.
Firmenich
Henderson Sotheby's Real Estate,
Cranbury
McCaffrey's Market
Nihaki Systems
Thomas Grover Middle School PTSA
Verizon
West Windsor P.B.A. 271
Pine Creek Golf
Positanos
Princeton Area Junior Woman's Club,
Kathy Lane
Princeton Garden Theatre
Princeton Record Exchange
Princeton University Store
Red Green Blue True Color Creations
Regal Entertainment Group-Movies
at Marketfair
Robert Wood Johnson Health
& Wellness Center
Romeo's Ristorante Italiano
& Pizzeria
Ruth's Chris Steak House
Salon Cache
Salon Cusato
Salon Facci
Salt Creek Grille
Sotto Ristorante
South Mill Design
Starbucks Coffee Company
Steppin Birkenstock Shoes
Terra Momo Restaurant Group Teresa Caffe
The Bent Spoon
The Ferry House
The Green Parrot Restaurant & Pub
The Papery
The Piccadilly
The Place to Bead
The Stress Factory Comedy Club
Thomas Sweet Ice Cream
Tre Piani Ristorante
Twist
Village Deli and Catering
West Windsor Plainsboro Education
Association
Westin
Witherspoon Grill
World Ticket Broker, Jon Hatcher
Zoe
Percis & Rakesh Bansal
Dee Dee Dodson & Donald Benjamin
Alina & Julius Bliach
Katy & Robert Bonazzi
Liz & Pat Boyle
Lisa & Peter Brown
Kathy Burek
Jane & Mark Campbell
Carol & Renato Carandang
Beth & Tom Carroll
Meenal & Sandeep Chavan
Anne Renee & M Bradford Clifton
Mona & David Cohen
Myra & Ken Colbert
Melisa Cooper & Mark Cornfeld
Lynn & David Cully
Jayna & Ajaykumar Desai
Archana & Pod Manoj Dhulekar
Lynn & Gene Dixon-Anderson
Martha & Kevin Donovan
Sara Earle
Josi & George Easter
Holly & Richard Eland
Liz & Jim Erickson
Amy & Mark Frankel
Margaret & Tod Fryer
Pam Garbini
Sulochana & Ravi Gavva
Mary Ann & Brian Giambagno
Mekhala & Ananth Girish
Karen & Robert Goldberg
Agnes & Josef Grossman
Shuzi Huan & Wayne Gu
Poonam & Pradeep Gupta
Suzanne & Steven Hagen
Karen Halperin
Jessica & Robert Harris
Feride & Cengiz Hatiboglu
Carol & Kenneth Herts
Doreen & Thomas Hinczynski
Lynn Hoff & Victor Ofman
Maria Pedro & Jimmy Hsu
Jennifer & Eddie Huie
Janet & Seth Hunter
Jeanne Itak
Frances Marchetta
& Michael Jankoski
Barbara Jetton
Yvonne Tang & En-Huei Joe
Sandra Johnson
Sarah Kardaras
Chris & Ken Kaufman
Janis & Tim Ketchmark
Meryl Anne Klein & Steven Wernick
Debra & Wayne Klieger
Uma & Ram Kolluri
Satyavathi & Murthy Koppolu
Kristen & Steven Krakower
Lisa & Jeffrey Krug
Paige & Tom Lanzetta
Ronda & David Lewinson
Xiao-Qin & Quiang Liu
Alison & Kevin Lorenz
Ginny & Mark Macaluso
Gay & Don MacQueen
Sohier Taha Hassan & Rory MacRory
Alice Maniere
Claire & Hector Mendez
Tamara Mihaelyan
Joyce & Paul Milione
Yvonne & Edwin Min
Susan & Bill Mischell
Sabita & Narendra Mishra
Myra Levine& Gerald Nagler
Linda & David Norris
Carol & Larry Padd
Sangita Patankar
Kirti & Pinakin Pathak
Cindy & Raymond Pinelli
Regina & Robert Prieto
Carol & Michael Pungello
Lakshmi & Puthenmadam
Radhakrishnan
Sri Sujanthy & Kandasamy Rajaram
Emmeline & Alan Remde
Leslie Richmand
Irene & German Rodriguez
Sudi Solomon & Marty Rosen
Karen & John Sabino
Suneetha & Venugopal Sadda
Ashima & Sandeep Saksena
Sikha & Siddhartha Sarkar
Cathy & Bob Savage
Cindy & Mickey Schoenauer
Wendy & Mike Schutzer
Carolyn & Martin Sellars
Madhu & Ashish Shah
Lynnie & Arvind Sharma
Donna & Philip Sher
Kim & John Skolka
Carol Tanner
Janine & Steven Thumm
Amy & Drew Trachtenberg
Lisa & Randall Tucker
Patti & Anthony Vinci
Theresa & Joseph Voigtsberger
Sharleen Lee & Weicheng Wang
Qin Shan & Weiye Wang
Hilary & John Ward
Ondria & Peter Wasem
Cheryl Wexler
Janet Chen & Nord Winnan
Gary Woodhull
Rhonda Schaffler & John Wydra
Kyesuk Jo & Yongtae Yu
Debbie & Jeffrey Ziment
Patti Baron
Leanne & Oliver Bell
Rachel Bernstein
Karen & Marlena Bhame
Rajni Bhargava
Indu Bhatia
Sarah Bhutta
Sangeeta Bohra
Erica Borsack
Patti Brand
Rebecca Braverman
Randie Brazel
Melody Bromberg
Kathy Burek
Lorraine, Allyson & Joe Camaratta
Dave Campbell
Gail Campbell
Tikva & Shawn Carrick
Jane Chan
Li Chen
Yi Chen
Neeru Chopra
Anne Cirafici
Ellen Clancey
Mona Cohen
MaryAnn & Vinny Colonna
Marisa Cree
Anna D'Anna
Jane Dennehy
Ajay Desai
Lynn Dixon-Anderson
Alice & Joe Donohue
Lisa Dunham
Randie Ehrlich
Michael Empson
Kai Fang
Susan Fernandez
Gina, Kristen & Rebecca Finnie
Margaret & Tod Fryer
Latha Galla
Pam Garbini
MaryAnn Giambagno
Dorca Gilbertson
Diane & Bob Grbic
Namrata Grover
Vikram Gulati
Poonam & Pradeep Gupta
Seema Gupta
Vaishali Gupta
Vandita Gupta
Karen Halperin
Chandrika Harathi
Jessica & Robert Harris
Lois Harrison
Kathy & Peter Hekl
Carol, James & Ken Herts
Maura & Corey Hillman
Jodi Hiscock
Anita Inaganti
Rob Jaff
Jasmine Jaywant
Payal & Riddhima Kapoor
Dana Karas
Priya Keshu
Sunil Khanna
Poonam Khurana
Uma Kolluri
Kristen & Steven Krakower
Miriam Ku
Pratima Lakhwani
Paige & Tom Lanzetta
Diane Lee
Susan Lee
Huey-Chih Lee
Kate Lerner
Diana Leventhal
Ronda & David Lewison
Lei, Angela & Albert Li
Carol Liu
Alison & Kevin Lorenz
Brenda Loury
Mary & Gordon MacArthur
Gina MacDougal
Carol & Alan Macknin
Nandini Mankar
Frances Marchetta
Julie Martin-Kolb
Donna Matthews
Nadia & Karl Matthews
Elaine McCarron
Kiran & Dhara Mehta
Sandi & Krista Merrill
Joyce & Paul Milione
Susan Mischell
Sabita Mishra
Kathy Modi
Sandhya Modi
Nandita Mohnot
Maggie Morales
Lori Mozenter
Mardana Naidu
Scott Nesson
Manisha Odak
Linette Oratel
Carol Padd
Sangita Patankar
Preeti Patel
Vinaya Phadke
Susan Philbin
Maria Piccirillo
Cindy & Ray Pinelli
Aruna Poddar
Laxmanji Pothuraj
Laura Poyd
Gina Prieto
Carol, Mike, Robert & Allie Pungello
Lisa Rhatigan
Irene Rodriguez
Sudi Solomon & Marty Rosen
Missi & Andy Rubenstein
Ashima & Sandeep Saksena
Shirisha & Sneha Salgam
Sikha Sarkar
Kay & Mark Sartor
Cathy & Bob Savage
Jyotsna Saxena
Rhonda Schaffler
Kathy & Nick Schmidt
Pamela Schnitter
Cindy, Ciara & Mickey Schoenauer
Natalie Schoepfer
Alka Shah
Madhu Shah
Lynnie & Jennifer Sharma
Poornima Shevade
Eileen & William Shields
Laura, Mario, Lisa & Allison Simi
Holly Singer-Eland
Patti & Brad Skapyak
Andrea Smith
Marie Snyder
Yiping Song
Jan L Sun
Pam Supinsky
Yvonne Tang
Joy Thaper
Janine Thumm
Carol Tosches
Amy & Drew Trachtenberg
Poonam Vaswani
Nandini Venkatramani
Patti Vinci
Kate Voigtsberger
Sharleen Wang
Victoria Wang & Mimi Fang
Ginette Winant
Janet Chen Winnan
Diane & Pat Young
Lisa Zhang
Thank
You
Very
Much!
Green Patrons
Allied Vision Services of Plainsboro
Allstate -Steven Lambusta Agency
Byrne Brothers Construction
Chamberlin Plumbing & Heating Co.
Cooper Pest Solutions
Corner-Copia
Dutch Neck School PTA
East Windsor Pediatric Group
Faridy Veisz Fraytak
Garvey Pest Control
Kevin T. Coyle DMD, PA
Maurice Hawk Elem. School PTA
Plainsboro Family Physicians
Princeton - 130 Supply
Princeton Driving School
Princeton Hypertension-Nephrology
Associates
Princeton Nassau Pediatrics
Princeton Orthopaedic Associates II
Princeton Shopping Center Merchants'
Association
R N R Services
Robert Goldstine DDS, PA & Ira
Goldstine DMD
Sovereign Bank
Town Center Elementary School PTA
UPS Store
Village Elementary School PTA
Wicoff Elementary School PTA
Wireless N You WW (Verizon)
WWP Wildcats Fastpitch Softball
Gifts and Services
A and G Italian Fine Foods
Alchemist and Barrister
Americana Diner
Amy Karyn
Avon/Alice Wright
Ayom Spa
Best Buy Princeton - Chris Cooper
and Jennifer Wolstromer
Blue Point Grill
Brunswick East Windsor Lanes
BT Bistro
Bucks County Dry Goods
Camillo's Café -Princeton
Shopping Center
Charmed by Claire
ChazMaTazz
Chez Alice
Cindy Schoenauer
Clarksville Café
Cold Stone Creamery
Conte's
Cranbury Golf Course
Creative Picture Frames
Dandelion
DeLiteful Foods
Di Lorenzo's Tomato Pies
Diana Leventhal
Diana's Hallmark
East Asian Fusion
Eastern Mountain Sports
Elements Asia
Eva's Spa
Forest Jewelers
Fotolux
Gina Finnie
Goldcore Jewelers
H and I Rib Company
Hamilton Jewelers
Hoagie Haven
Hot Wok Café
Hyatt Regency Princeton
In Jeanous
It's a Grind
J. Mc Laughlin
Jack 'n Jules Men's Clothing
Johnson and Johnson
Jordan's Stationary and Gift Shop
KC Prime
Kelsey Theatre
La Jolie
Lindt Chocolates
Lisa Jones
Lorraine Camarratta
Lotus Garden
Ma Cherie Boutique
Maggie Moo's Ice Cream and Treatery
Mastoris Diner
McCaffrey's Market
Meeta Aggarwal
Melissa Rubenstein Designs
Murali Harathi
Muscles in Motion
Mystique Hair and Skin Salon
New Balance of Princeton
Olive's Bakery and Gourmet
On The Border
P.J.'s Pancake House
Paige Lanzetta
Pak Mail
Perna's Plant and Flower Shop
PF Changs
Phoebe's Expertly Dressed
Pickwick Village Cards and Gifts
FOOD DONATIONS
130 Farmers Market
A/G Italian Food
AFI
Aljon Pizza, Plainsboro
Aljon Pizza, Princeton-Hightstown
Allstate
Americana Diner
Anthony & Sons
Applebee's Grill
Ashish Shah of Quikfoods, Inc.
Bagel Hole
Bagel Place
Bagel Street
Brothers Pizzeria
Business Bistro Catering
Cafe Capuano Italian Ristorante
Capuano Ristorante
Casa Rosario, Plainsboro
Chevy's
City Street & Grill
Coca Cola
Crown of India
Dunkin Donuts, East Windsor
Dunkin Donuts, Plainsboro
East Windsor Deli
First Wok
George's Roaster & Ribs
Grover Middle School Student
Council
Halo Farms
Hanami
Heavenly Ham
Hoagie Haven
Hooters of Princeton
Hot Breads
It's A Grind, Plainsboro
Jack & Jill
Kanoko Japanese
KFC
Lightning Lacrosse
Little Szechuan
Macaroni Grill
Magma Pizza
Mahzu
Masala Grill
McDonald's of East Windsor
Mercer Oaks
Olive Garden
Papa Johns
Penang
Rita's Ice
Romeo's Ristorante Italiano
& Pizzeria
Shoprite of East Windsor
Shubh Labh
Singas Pizza
Steak and Hoagie, Plainsboro
Subway, Plainsboro
Subzi Mandi
Sunny Garden
Super Star East Buffet
Sushi King
TGI Friday's, East Windsor
TGI Friday's, Princeton
Village Deli
Wegmans
West Windsor Plainsboro Education
Association
Westin
World Bagel Deli
PARENT DONATIONS
Sarah Bhutta & Afzaal Akhtar
Aissa Alexeeva & Delguir
Moukhleava
Regina & Steven Altamore
Elizabeth & Gary Altiero
Monica & Martin Armenta
Daljit & Ajit Bains
Linda Bandeh
VOLUNTEERS
Parents/Students/Friends
Aissa Alexeeva
Ana Alvarez
Girish Ananth
Carol Aurora
Elizabeth Autenried
Daljit Bains
SCHOOL DISTRICT PERSONNEL
Charles Rudnick
Sherri Bailey
Tracy Jones
All South custodial staff
Robert Banks
Diedre Bova
Mike Busco
Jean Costa
Eric Daniels
Mark Emery
Scott Gallagher
Donna Gilbert
Jeannette Hanos
Nancy Hoch
Don Hutchinson
Gerri Hutner
Jean Mauro
Randye McBride
Byron McKinnie
Fred Reigen
Marie Smith
Lynnie Stuart
Helen Van Horn
Roseann Zingaro
COMMUNITY SUPPORT
West Windsor Police Department
West Windsor Township Emergency Service
• Brian Magnin
* Matt Schmidt
POST PROM COMMITTEE
Co-Chairs: Carol Herts, Ashima Saksena
Treasurer and PTSA Liaison: Lynnie Sharma
Information and Volunteers: Gina Prieto
Decorating: Lorraine Camaratta,
Maura Hillman, Mary MacArthur,
Kathy Schmidt
Food: Poonam Gupta, Kathy Modi
Games: MaryAnn Colonna, Kate Lerner
Henna Painting: Kiran Mehta
Prizes: Ronda Lewinson, Kay Sartor
Publicity: Rhonda Schaffler
Tickets: Seema Gupta, Shirisha Salgam
Bake Sales: Poonam Vaswani
Battle of the Bands: Leanne Bell
Care Packages: Cindy Pinelli, Carol Tosches
Charmed by Clair: Melody Bromberg
ChazzMaTazz Tuxedo: Joyce Milione
Carol Pungello
Clothing Drives: Kristen Krakower
Corporate Donations: Ashima Saksena
Drug Alliance Liaison: Shirisha Salgam
Flea Market Food: Rajni Bhargava, Alka Shah
Gift Wrap, MarketFair: Joyce Milione,
Carol Pungello
Hand Gel/Luggage Tags: Payal Kapoor
Landau's: Mardana Naidu
McCaffrey's Receipts: Kate Lerner
Memory Quilts: Gina Finnie
Mendoker's Pastry: Paige Lanzetta,
Cindy Schoenauer
Parent Prom: Alice Donohue
Phubbies: Lynnie Sharma
Pickleball: Carol Liu
Prom Gowns: Karen Bhame, Cindy Pinelli
Restaurant Nights: Sarah Bhutta
Thank You Ad/Safety: Chandrika Harathi
Vendor Sale: Missi Rubenstein
Website: Chandrika Harathi, Gina Prieto
We regret if a name
has been omitted
or misspelled.
Please know that
we appreciate your efforts.
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