A fly in
the fruit
Dispelling
the myth
Spotted wing drosophila
arrives early » PG 3
Black earth doesn’t
mean warmer soil » PG 18
SERVING MANITOBA FARMERS SINCE 1925 | Vol. 73, No. 32 | $1.75
August 6, 2015
25 CWRS
varieties to
be dropped
manitobacooperator.ca
Tornado among several storm
events in the southwest
Includes formerly
popular varieties such
as Neepawa, Katepwa,
Harvest and Kane
Two rural properties took the brunt of Manitoba’s most
recent violent weather episode
Staff
T
he Canadian Grain Com­
mission has announced
that as of August 1, 2017,
29 varieties will no longer be
eligible for Canada Western
Red Spring (CWRS) and
Canada Prairie Spring Red
(CPSR) wheat classes. The list
(below) of 25 CWRS and four
CPSR varieties includes for­
merly popular varieties such
as Katepwa, Harvest and Kane
as well as Neepawa, which was
once the check variety for the
CWRS class.
“In an evaluation of variet­
ies against the revised quality
parameters for the CWRS and
CPSR classes, the Canadian
Grain Commission determined
these varieties do not meet the
quality characteristics of their
current designated class,” the
CGC said in a release.
It also said that it would start
a review of up to two years of
CWRS and CPSR varieties for
which more quality data is need­
ed before a decision about their
class designation. They will re­
main in their designated classes
unless the evaluation shows
they do not meet the revised
quality parameters. At least two
The Raynors’ farmland was completely dishevelled and a number of outbuildings were destroyed. Photo: Jennifer Paige
BY JENNIFER PAIGE
See VARIETIES on page 6 »
Co-operator staff / Tilston
Publication Mail Agreement 40069240
D
isplaced bales, crushed crops
and chunks of metal scatter
fields in the southwest as the
area recovers from one of Manitoba’s
largest tornadoes in recent years.
A low-pressure system that moved
in from Montana sparked the extreme
weather, which also doused the
Virden area with nearly 75 mm of rain.
Quarter-sized hail was also reported in
the Pierson region.
“Debris is being reported from
Tilston, all the way to V irden.
According to imagery and a number of
reports we received, the tornado was
on the ground for at least 2-1/2 hours,
maybe even three. This is extraordi­
nary,” said Natalie Hassel, warn­
ing preparedness meteorologist with
Environment Canada. “Tornadoes are
generally only on the ground for a few
minutes so this was quite the active
system.”
No recovery time
Area residents were still reeling from
the last bout of dramatic weather
when the twister ripped through the
area.
“We still have water in our base­
ment from the last storm we had so
we had to sit on the basement stairwell
when it started to look really bad,” said
Anne Raynor, owner of a farm that was
severely damaged in the storm. “You
see storms all the time in the paper or
on TV but you never think it’s going to
come right through your house.”
Raynor and her husband, Fred were
visibly distraught as they looked over
the devastated property they had built
over the past 50 years.
“You spend your whole life building
this and just that quickly it is all gone.
But then you remember that you could
be gone too,” said Anne. “We are very
lucky.”
Anne was born and raised on the
property, located just east of Tilston.
The couple has farmed on the prop­
erty for a number of years while rais­
ing their six children, 17 grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
These days the couple’s farming
consists of sheep, cattle and chick­
ens, while renting cropland to their
son-in-law.
“There is a strip about a quarter-mile
wide in my son-in-law’s cornfield that
looks as if someone cut it bare,” said
Anne. “I had 27 cattle in the corral and
after the storm the corral was com­
pletely gone. The cattle were all over
See EXTREME WEATHER on page 6 »
DONE DEAL: G3 is CWB’s new owner » PAGE 9
2
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
INSIDE
Did you know?
LIVESTOCK
Americans will buy imported
meat if assured of standards
The new world of
sustainable beef
The customers driving
today’s market
29
USDA should help consumers make more informed decisions
Journal of Retailing
release
W
CROPS
The ins and
outs of hemp
production
PCDF reports on
variety trials
17
FEATURE
Next stop on
the way north?
Evolution of the
soybean cyst nematode
19
CROSSROADS
Harvesting
the rain
Reducing run-off
and lowering costs
ith Congress currently debating the
repeal of mandatory
country-of-origin labelling
(COOL) for meat and poultry — federal law in the U.S.
since 2002 — new research
from the Sam W. Walton
College of Business at the
University of Arkansas shines
a spotlight on how COOL
labelling affects consumers’
purchase decisions.
In “A COOL Effect: The
Direct and Indirect Impact
of Country-of-Origin Dis­
closures on Purchase
Inten­t ions for Retail Food
Products,” appearing in the
September issue of the Journal
o f Re t a i l i n g , Ma r k e t i n g
Professors Elizabeth Howlett
a n d S c o t Bu r t o n , a l o n g
with doctoral candidates
Christopher Berry and Amar­
adri Mukherjeeshow, show
that consumers are more
likely to buy meat that is
identified as a U.S. product.
However, in experiments
tha t i d e n t i f i e d m e a t a s
Mexican in origin, study participants found COOL labelling more acceptable if they
were assured that standards
for handling meat in Mexico
She wouldn’t be so worried if she was assured the processing procedures
were the same as in the U.S. Photo: Thinkstock
are equivalent to those in the
U.S. According to Professor
Howlett, “Given consumers’ limited knowledge of
meat-processing procedures and systems, meat
products labelled as having been born, raised, and
slaughtered in the U.S. are
perceived to be safer, tastier,
and fresher than products
from Mexico.”
The authors suggest that
retailers could utilize this
information to design promotional programs, either to
boost sales of meat sourced
in the U.S. or to inform con-
sumers that another country’s
standards are equivalent to
those in the U.S.
They also point out that if
the goal of the COOL legislation is to benefit consumers, then it is only partially
meeting that objective: “If
the USDA is truly striving to
help consumers make more
informed decisions, it should
consider educating con sumers about the outcomes
of its international processing system audits,” either
through more information on
packaging or public service
announcements.
12
READER’S PHOTO
4
5
9
10
Editorials
Comments
What’s Up
Livestock Markets
Grain Markets
Weather Vane
Classifieds
Sudoku
11
16
22
26
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3
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
Spotted wing drosophila an unwelcome
visitor to fruit farms this summer
MAFRD began monitoring for SWD in 2013 and this is the worst year yet, says provincial fruit crops specialist
BY LORRAINE STEVENSON
Co-operator staff
A
ltona-area fruit grower
Waldo Thiessen knew
what was wrong immediately when his U-pick customers started calling back
a few hours after their first
day in his raspberry patch in
mid-July.
“They said they’d started to
make jam, and, well, there was
a lot of protein (in the raspberries),” he said.
It was larvae of spotted wing
drosophila, and an “uh-oh” discovery for the Thiessens, who
promptly shut down their raspberry U-pick.
This isn’t the first time they’ve
had this tiny fruit fly that lays
its eggs in mature, healthy fruit
crops show up, but it’s the earliest, said Thiessen, executive
director of the Prairie Fruit
Growers Association.
“We were not really looking
for it at the beginning of July,”
he said. “It kind of caught us flat
footed. We had a lot of damage.”
“We” isn’t just themselves
either. Growers across Mani­
toba have been reporting the
same unwelcome visitor.
Spotted wing drosophila
(SWD) is a vinegar (fruit) fly
of East Asian origin that can
damage many crops by piercing healthy fruit and laying its
eggs. Early detection is critical
because symptoms often do not
appear until after the fruit is
harvested.
Manitoba Agriculture, Food
and Rural Development fruit
crops specialist Anthony
Mintenko said this is the worst
year yet for SWD since MAFRD
started monitoring for it in 2013.
In 2013 and again last year it
showed up in early August after
most fruit crops were already
harvested. It was also reported
only in south-central Manitoba
in areas such as the Red River
Valley and the Pembina Valley.
This year SWD has been expanding northward and westward
since the second week of July.
“This year it’s everywhere and
it’s three to four weeks early,”
said Mintenko.
“We’ve just kept finding it.
Last week it started showing up in the Brandon area, as
far west as Elkhorn, far south
as Deloraine and all the way
through Glenboro. It’s shown up
this week in Grunthal,” he said
July 30.
“It hasn’t shown up north of
the city (Winnipeg) yet, but I
suspect it will be there soon.”
Unlike the common fruit fly which feeds on overripe or rotting fruit, SWD will attack unripe to ripe fruit. Photo: Bev Gerdeman, Washington State University
to ripe fruit, and most commonly
affects fruits with thin skins such
“We were not really
as raspberries, strawberries,
looking for it at the
blueberries, cherries and plums.
beginning of July. It
It was first identified in Manitoba
in commercial berry fields in
kind of caught us flat
early August 2013.
footed. We had a lot
MAFRD entomologist John
of damage.”
Gavloski said it’s not yet known
whether this year’s insect infestation arrived in Manitoba from
Waldo Thiessen
Spotted wing drosophila (SWD) is a
Prairie Fruit Growers
elsewhere or overwintered here.
Association
vinegar (fruit) fly of East Asian origin that
“We don’t know much about
can damage many crops by piercing
their overwintering biology,” he
healthy fruit and laying its eggs. Photo:
said. “In the past we’ve gone on
Bob Koch, Minnesota Department of Agriculture
Too late to spray
the assumption that they blew
It’s hurt fruit producers who, not in or moved in, and up until this
The larvae of SWD are very anticipating SWD would show year they’ve come in later. There’s
tiny so growers’ reports of up so early, didn’t detect it soon a possibility this is an overwinteractually seeing them inside enough to spray for it. Mintenko ing batch.”
fruits such as strawberries and said he estimates fruit crop losses
Fruit crops most at risk at this
raspberries was surprising, he from SWD could be anywhere point, and which may require
said.
control measures are late-season
from 25 to 50 per cent.
“It definitely tipped us off
Unlike the common fruit fly day-neutral strawberries and
that we had a very, very unusual which feeds on overripe or rot- late-summer-bearing raspber3592223 Star 101B
jy11.pdf;Customer
is responsible
accuracy
event happening.”
ries,
Mintenko said.
ting fruit,
SWD will attack
unripe for
But if your fruit crop harvest is near completion, or you
suspect what’s left is already
infested, Mintenko is not advising producers to spray at this
point in the year, he added.
The key is avoiding another
year like this one in 2016 and
that means being on watch
for it earlier next year, he said.
Growers can monitor for SWD
using simple cider vinegar
traps, and there are a number
of insecticide options for producers to use if they’re detected
next year.
MAFRD will continue its surveillance for SWD again next
year.
“From here on in it’s going
to be a matter of monitoring to
determine when people maybe
do need to start doing control
practices.”
[email protected]
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4
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
OPINION/EDITORIAL
We might need
100-bushel canola
T
he Canola 100 Agri-Prize for the first
to achieve 100-bushel canola (see last
week’s issue) makes for an interesting
challenge. Despite a favourable lingering
PR image as the “Cinderella crop,” a look
at the numbers suggests canola is showing signs of middle age. A few patches in a
good growing year might even approach 80
to 90 bushels now, but the Prairie five-year
average yield from 2010-14 was 34 bushJohn Morriss
els, up just 5.9 per cent from 2005-09. In
Editorial Director
contrast, yields for boring old spring wheat
were up 15.6 per cent over the same period.
Through the Canola Council, the industry has announced a
“Keep it coming” initiative — 26 million tonnes and 52 bushels
(1.18 tonnes) per acre by 2025. But to achieve that, there would
still need to be a one-in-three-year rotation in Western Canada,
contrary to the recommended maximum of one in four. At that
level, average yields would need to more than double to 70 bushels
by 2025. At the current rate of improvement, they’ll only be at 38
bushels.
So farmers and their agronomic partners need to get to work,
especially since canola might have problems finding a home on
even a quarter of Western Canada’s 65 million crop acres over the
next few years. Some of those same agronomic partners have other
ideas for those acres. In 2003 Monsanto announced a $100-million breeding program for corn in Western Canada, saying it
could occupy eight million to 10 million acres by 2025. And as we
reported last week, Pioneer has the same idea, and has launched
six new corn hybrids for the Prairies, of which three are ultra-early.
Both those companies are also looking to introduce soybean varieties across the Prairies.
Where are those acres going to come from? Clearly, many will —
and should — come from canola. In discussing the launch of the
new corn and soy varieties, DuPont Pioneer vice-president Neal
Gutterson noted that they will give growers the option of managing
canola rotations more sustainably.
And no matter the crop — or its management practices — the
word “rotation” is one that we hear more of these days. At one time
farmers only needed to rotate crops. Today the need to rotate herbicides, insecticides and fungicides has to be factored into the rotations. In part because crops are now so heavy and high yielding,
disease pressure is higher than ever, and new diseases are emerging — especially clubroot, which is a particular threat to canola.
It’s also becoming apparent that just rotating annual crops and
their inputs may not be enough to fend off herbicide resistance, so
winter cereals and even perennial forage may need to be brought
into rotations.
So there’s going to be lots of competition for acres, and canola
yields will need to get much higher in order to reach the Canola
Council’s ambitious goals. The council and others in the industry
have been providing some excellent agronomic support to growers,
but to meet those goals, they will need to provide a lot more.
Bad rap for
dairy farmers
T
he proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade agreement involves 12 countries representing about 40 per cent of
the world’s economy, but some of Canada’s national media
coverage would have had you believe that there is only one issue
holding it up — access to Canada’s dairy market.
The Globe and Mail was the worst offender — TPP negotiators
have done a pretty good job of keeping the talks secret, so in the
absence of details or whenever they were stuck for a column topic,
writers would fire off a piece on how Canada’s ‘overprotected’ and
‘politically powerful’ dairy farmers were the main sticking point for
the deal.
When the talks failed to meet a July 31 deadline last week, it
finally emerged that there were other issues at play, such as auto
parts and drug patents. The U.S. has done a masterful job of portraying Canadian dairy access as the main sticking point, but it
now turns out that virtually every other country opposed the U.S.
position on the length of time for drug patent protection. And
when it comes to protected agricultural markets, the granddaddy
of them all is U.S. sugar, and the U.S. was unwilling to budge on
Australian requests for more access.
Whether or not the TPP talks continue, there will be pressure
on supply management, especially for dairy. In the short term,
Dairy Farmers of Canada has been doing its best to fend off attacks
through advertisements and press releases. In the long term, one
of the best arguments is that when it comes to herd size, animal
welfare and government support, we don’t want the U.S. system.
Maintaining public support for supply management depends on
demonstrating that on all those points, our system is better.
[email protected]
GMO labelling may not
discourage consumers:
Vermont study
Study finds labelling actually increased
support in some demographic groups
University of Vermont release
A
new study reveals that GMO labelling would not act as warning labels
and scare consumers away from
buying products with GMO ingredients.
The five-year study of Vermont residents
focuses on the relationship between two
primary questions: whether Vermonters are
opposed to GMOs in commercially available food products; and if respondents
thought products containing GMOs should
be labelled.
Results showed no evidence that attitudes toward GMOs are strengthened in
either a positive or negative way due to
a desire for labels that indicate the product contains GM ingredients. On average
across all five years of the study, 60 per
cent of Vermonters reported being opposed
to the use of GMO technology in food production and 89 per cent desire labelling of
food products containing GMO ingredients.
Responses var ied slightly by demographic groups. For example, given a desire
for positive GMO labels, opposition to
GMO decreased in people with lower levels
of education, in single-parent households,
and those earning the highest incomes.
Opposition to GMO increases in men and
people in the middle-income category. No
changes were larger than three percentage
points.
“When you look at consumer opposition
to the use of GM technologies in food and
account for the label, we found that overall
the label has no direct impact on opposition. And it increased support for GM
in some demographic groups,” said Jane
Kolodinsky of the University of Vermont.
Proponents of the U.S. Senate-bound
bill, which if enacted would nullify
Vermont’s GMO labelling law that has yet
OUR HISTORY:
to take effect, argue that mandating labels
on foods containing GMOs is misleading, because it suggests to consumers that
GMOs are somehow risky to eat. Rep. Peter
Welch, D-Vt., co-sponsor of the Genetically
Engineered Food Right-to-Know Act, disagrees, saying, “the consumer can decide
whether he or she wants to purchase that
product. It’s the market that ultimately
decides.”
Paul Burns, executive director of the
Vermont Public Interest Research Group,
said the GMO labels were never intended
to be a warning, and that Kolodinsky’s
study demonstrates that they will not act
as such. “But they will provide important
information so that consumers who have
legitimate health or environmental concerns about GMOs can make informed purchasing decisions,” he added.
Kolodinsky said the findings provide evidence, that in Vermont, GMO food labels
would provide consumers with information
on which to base their purchasing decisions. Consumers who wish to avoid GMO
ingredients would do so, she added, and
those who either want GMO ingredients or
are indifferent can also make that choice.
“The label would not signal to consumers
that GMO ingredients are inferior to those
produced using other agricultural production methods,” she said.
“We need more evidence to determine
which position is correct,” Kolodinsky said.
“This study adds to the GM labelling evidence by showing that, in the only U.S.
state that has passed a mandatory positive
GM labelling law, the label will not act as
a ‘warning label.’ When only the label is
considered, it has no impact on consumer
opposition. And there is some evidence
that the label will increase consumer confidence in GM technology among certain
groups.”
August 1888
T
hese fine specimens of livestock were on offer in
the August 1888 issue of The Nor’-West Farmer
and Manitoba Miller . Among the topics in that
issue was a list of 27 hints for judges of livestock, such
as, “Make no scruples in discouraging a purposely
overburdened udder; remember you are appointed as
teachers,” and, “Discourage a wedgy muzzle and narrow nostrils anywhere.”
Another article suggested the use of Galloway cattle
hides as a replacement for buffalo robes, “which can
no more be got.”
According to an editorial reprinted from the Ottawa
Journal, Ontario Agriculture Minister Drury had delivered a speech in which he worried about the tendency
of “higher education” to encourage farmers’ sons to
stray off to the cities to earn their living. This was “simply one feature of the present age to materialism — to
the worship of money and self-indulgence. The rugged independence which is the glory of the farmer is
becoming less enviable to men than it used to be.”
The editorial writer took some exception, observing
that there was no reason that farmers could not live the
life of a gentleman. He suggested the problem was due
to the average farmer working harder than his hired
men, and suggested Mr. Drury encourage education
in management skills so farmers would realize “the full
value of the principle which successful businessmen
keep in view — the management for themselves, the
drudgery for others.”
The issue also reported the death at age 55 of John
Ogilvie, who had managed the branch of the family
milling company in Winnipeg.
5
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
COMMENT/FEEDBACK
Life wasn’t necessarily quite that bad
There were some better aspects of farming in earlier times, says John Beckham, who still farms near Baldur
By John Beckham
U
sually, when I read something
written by Cam Dahl, I have
a sense of irritation but his
offering in the July 30 (“Agriculture’s
best days are ahead, page 4) issue
irritated me to the point of a
response.
He starts by throwing all those
who have nostalgia for the past into
the discard. According to him, there
was nothing in farming worth mentioning prior to the advent of what
is obviously his god, namely science. I have news for him. Science
has always been part of farming, in
whatever stage it had reached in the
society of its time, sometimes good
science, and sometimes bad.
Science is merely any body of
knowledge systematized and hopefully, verified beyond mere hypothesis. Dahl makes the further outrageous statement that the farm
scene prior to his definition of science, “was filled with poverty, hardship, and reduced life expectancy.”
What absolute rubbish! My grandfather homesteaded in 1880, passed
through the experience of living in
a soddy, hauling wheat for 20 miles
with oxen, survived the ’30s and died
at age 86. And he was not unique.
After the searing experience of
the ’30s, many farmers by 1950 had
new cars and were beginning to
acquire tractors and even combines.
The early ’70s were more prosperous than any subsequent time. Dahl
writes the way many people nowadays seem to think. Anything prior to
the year 2000 is ancient history.
As one who was born at the very
dawn of the ’30s, actually put my
backside day after day on the hard
seat of a two-bottom mouldboard
plow at the age of 17, and with nothing but the nodding rumps of five
horses for my horizon and plowed
all fall, I think I am qualified to comment on the farm community of the
time, and I assure you, it was nothing
like Dahl says it was. Was there a lot
of hard, physical work? You bet there
was, and at 85, I still have the muscles to prove it. Dahl makes much
of modern farming practices, such
as zero till. Certainly, there are some
good things to say about such methods. But it cannot be classified as
being problem free.
A s I d r i v e by f i e l d s b e i n g
farmed zero till, I see large areas
“What the farm
community of my youth
was full of was people.”
taken over by foxtail barley. Zero-till
farming depends heavily on the use
of glyphosate, and it is far too soon
to classify it as being totally benign.
Indeed it, and a whole honey bucket
of other chemicals keep most farmers in a frenzy of spraying from the
time they stop seeding until they
start combining.
Finally, to the social side of Dahl’s
brave new world. I reject his assessment of the state of society, and
life, prior to the advent of “science,”
whenever he thinks that was. What
the farm community of my youth
was full of was people. In the part
of the country in which my early
years were spent, I would guess there
were two farmsteads on every section. Many could not be described as
anything but prosperous, according
to the meaning of the word in the
era it refers to. It is true, there were
no 20,000-bushel bins, no gigantic
machine sheds, no mountainous
tractors or combines, no 100-foot
sprayers or air seeders.
But there were handsome barns,
beautiful horses and lots of good
neighbours. Town, on Saturday
night, was the weekly gathering of
the community. Those little towns
are now becoming ghost towns.
Many have neither a store or a filling
station. The countryside is empty.
Many former farmsteads have been
obliterated. That the farmers left
have become paper millionaires, in
no way lessens the frantic treadmill
they occupy, to maintain the cash
flow that is required to function in
Cam Dahl’s utopia. It is interesting that he nowhere refers to some
happy representative farmer. Most of
his references are to corporations of
various kinds. The truth is, farmers
have become little more than conduits of wealth, retaining only a very
small percentage of the wealth they
produce. And I won’t even start on
the topic of the ridiculous run-up
in farmland prices, and what those
prices mean for any young person of
limited means, hoping to farm.
Chinese slowdown could affect grain demand
After several years of stratospheric growth, China’s economy has hit a rough spot
AgResource Company
CHINA’S PORK PRODUCTION
I
t’s a n i s s u e o b s e r v e r s h a v e
talked about for years. But in
recent weeks it seems to have
re a c h e d a t i p p i n g p o i n t — a t
least according to general consensus from a cacophony of
commentators.
China is slowing down. Its stock
market has fallen sharply since
mid-June and the government is
panicking, leaping into action with
a host of supportive measures like
closing some share trading for
upwards of six months.
A government halting trading is
unprecedented, and would never
occur in a more free market-oriented economy. Moreover, China
has lowered its lending rate four
times since the start of the year
and cut its reserve requirements
in an effort to boost the economy.
Despite all the drama, the actual
drop in the Shanghai compos ite does not have a significant
wealth impact on all of China.
Nevertheless, our concern is that
near-emergency measures offered
by the Chinese government may be
seen as a signal that it is no longer
able to manage GDP growth. The
concern is Chinese debt has risen
to unsustainable levels, offering
new risk to China, which has been
trying to shift its economy from
one based on exports to one led by
consumption.
China has roughly had 1.3 billion
people since it installed the “onechild policy” in the early 1970s.
The world agricultural community has been counting on China’s
huge population to be the saviour
of agriculture. But it was not until
the early 2000s that China became
a WTO member and a significant
importer of a host of commodities. This growth in Chinese import
demand correlates with China’s
rapid increase in GDP rates beginning in 2001-02. When China’s GDP
rates went from $1,000 per person to nearly $8,000 today, China’s
demand for soybeans and a host of
other commodities exploded.
The question is whether China’s
soaring per-person GDP rates can
be sustained for the next five years.
This is the issue everyone involved
with global commodity markets
should be looking at very closely.
The IMF, in its latest outlook,
projects a decline in the rate of
growth of China’s total GDP and
in per capita GDP in the coming
years. Per capita GDP is projected
to increase 7.5 per cent in 2015
and just over six per cent in 2016.
Growth will still occur, but this is
notable change from annual boosts
in income of 10-30 per cent seen
since the early 2000s.
Declining marginal economic
growth, coupled with farm policies that encourage production —
but also imports — has triggered
a huge surplus of commodities
in China, most notably in wheat
and feed grains. Chinese corn and
soymeal futures — solid agricultural indicators — have been in
retreat in recent months, with corn
having plunged some 20 per cent
since early May.
China’s growing appetite for meat
during its unprecedented rise has
been a boon to global grain and
o i l s e e d m a rk e t s, m o s t n o t a b l y
soybeans. In recent years, strong
Chinese import demand for soy has
been the only thing supporting and
driving prices higher. But discouraging signals are starting to appear.
According to the Chinese National
Bureau of Statistics, pork production in the country fell by five per
cent in the first six months of 2015.
The classic assertion that as per
capita income continues to grow
(albeit at a slower pace) and more
people come to urban areas, meat
consumption will increase likely
still holds true in the case of China.
T h e f i v e p e r c e n t d e c re a s e i n
pork production perhaps clouds
the larger picture, as some of the
decrease can be attributed to natural losses in the pork sector and
e v e n a g ov e r n m e n t - l e d c ra c k down on the Chinese tradition of
wasteful overconsumption at banquets. Pork prices have recovered
recently, and we very well may see
a recovery in pork production and
consumption over the next six to 18
months.
Still, the unsustainable growth of
recent years, along with simply too
much supply, has triggered questions surrounding China’s demand
for raw materials over the next one
to two years.
AgResource Company’s thesis
since 2012 has been that adverse
weather or much-improved Chinese
demand is needed to sustain any
lasting agricultural commodity rally.
Weather, of course, is unknown. But
increasingly it looks like China will
not be a driving factor in 2015 or
2016.
6
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
FROM PAGE ONE
EXTREME WEATHER
Continued from page 1
VARIEITIES
Continued from page 1
the yard. There is one calf that
seems to be limping slightly
but other than that they are all
accounted for.”
A f e w s h e e p w e re a l s o
injured but the biggest loss
was the coop that housed 300
chickens.
“There were a bunch of dead
chickens laying all over the
ground. The kids did pick up
about 40 that were half-alive
and I have about 15 that are
living, but I am not sure if they
will survive,” said Anne.
years’ notice will be given before
any of these varieties are designated to another class, the CGC
said.
The changes are part of a “Canadian wheat class modernization” consultation started by the
CGC last February. During the
consultation, the Prairie Recommending Committee for Wheat,
Rye and Triticale, at its annual
meeting, changed the check varieties for Canada Western Red
Spring wheat and Canada Prairie Spring Red wheat. Changes
came into effect on Feb. 26,
2015.
CWRS check varieties now,
depending on region, include
Glenn, Carberry, Splendour, BW
965, PT 472 and PT 772. CPSR
checks are Glenn, AAC Foray,
HY537 and 5700 PR.
The CGC earlier announced
creation of an interim wheat
class for Faller, Prosper and Elgin ND wheat varieties, effective
Aug. 1, 2015. The CGC said it will
consult with stakeholders before deciding whether the class
is permanent.
A high-end EF-2
Environment Canada crews
were on the ground early on
Tuesday to begin surveying the
tornado’s path to determine
the severity of the storm.
“ We do know that a lot
of farm buildings have been
damaged on the path between
Tilston and north of Virden.
We have also seen some pavement that has been ripped up
in that same area but I don’t
have more details on that right
now but those are the things
we are looking to investigate,”
said Hassel.
Since that time Environment
Canada rated the twister a
high-end EF-2, on the EF-1 to
EF-5 scale. Winds were measured between 180 and 220 km
an hour and damage was considerable, including torn-off
roofs, snapped trees and damaged cropland.
No i n j u r i e s h a v e b e e n
reported and most damage
was contained to the Raynor
property as well as a neighbouring resident.
“It picked the big shed right
up and took it off the top of
the machinery and dropped
it again. It is wild what these
storms can do,” said Fred.
“The bright side is that nobody
got hurt. But, it is just weird
how things can just disappear.
I have never seen anything like
this.”
More than a dozen large
trees were brought down at
the Raynor residence, with six
landing on the couple’s home.
“Some of the tin on the siding has bent and we will have
to check to make sure none
of the framing is cracked. A
few people have said that
the weight and the shelter of
the trees really protected the
house,” Anne said.
A lack of power
A number of communities
within the southwest were
without power as the storm
removed miles of hydro cables
and toppled a number of
poles.
“Manitoba Hydro has done
an amazing job in getting here
and trying to get power back to
us as quickly as possible,” Fred
said. “It has put in two miles of
powerline just near us.”
He added that community
support has been a saving
grace, as more than 45 people
showed up the morning after
the storm to help take down
trees and begin the process of
rebuilding.
“Everybody has been unbelievable in offering support.
We have had people stop in
from all over. The response
has been amazing. Things like
that mean a lot and make this
whole thing more bearable,”
said Fred.
Crops throughout the Tilston, Reston and Virden areas were visibly damaged following the July 27 tornado. Photos: Jennifer Paige
wheat classes
CWRS varieties to be dropped
Aug. 1, 2017
AC Abbey
AC Cora
AC Eatonia
AC Majestic
AC Michael
AC Minto
Alvena
Alikat
CDC Makwa
CDC Osler
Columbus
Conway
Harvest
Fred and Anne Raynor’s children and grandchildren worked to clean up after the storm on Wednesday afternoon.
Kane
Katepwa
Leader
Lillian
McKenzie
Neepawa
Park
Pasqua
Pembina
Thatcher
Unity
5603HR
CPSR varieties to be dropped
Aug. 1, 2017
AC Formost
AC Taber
Conquer
Oslo
“You spend your
whole life building
this and just that
quickly it is all
gone. But then you
remember that you
could be gone too.”
Anne Raynor
Isolated events
Keystone Agriculture Producers’
District 1 representative, Bill
Campbell said that recent
extreme weather events seem
to be fairly isolated with damage varying pretty dramatically
from field to field.
“We managed to miss the
storm on Monday night but we
did get one through our area on
Sunday night,” said Campbell,
who farms near Minto. “Around
here there have been some
buildings lifted and bins
knocked over, roofs off of cattle sheds and things like that.
These storms have been pretty
spotty and even the rains have
been spotty.”
Campbell says most of the
damage in his area has been
caused by hail.
“I know my wheat and barley have some damage and the
oats will have some damage as
well. But, the canola seems to
The tornado chewed up pavement along the edge of a bridge on Highway 256,
east of Tilston.
have handled it a little bit better
and as far as the soybeans, we
have lost a few leaves but I am
hopeful they will rebound pretty
well.”
Manitoba Agricultural Ser­
vices Corp. said July 30 there
had been 380 claims across all
weather events since July 27,
with most being related to rain
or hail damage.
So far, MASC has received
1,500 claims this year, slightly
below average.
[email protected]
file photo
7
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
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8
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
COLUMN
Corn market plummets after rallying to a one-year high
Faced with the realization that a weather market can end as quickly as it began,
farmers have the daunting task of figuring out when to sell
David Drozd
Market Outlook
I
t took the cor n market
three weeks to rally 75
cents per bushel and only
two weeks to plummet just as
far. When markets go down
faster than they go up, farmers may have a difficult time
taking advantage of a steep
market rally like this.
Farmers get busy and may
not have got around to checking the markets. After all, the
news was bullish, grain prices
were rising and the crop was
not in the bin, so marketing
may not have been foremost
on their minds.
However, the market does
not wait for anyone. An
opportunity to sell can come
and go at the blink of an eye,
so having a disciplined marketing plan is essential. I realize it may not be easy selling
something you don’t have,
but this is when opportunities
arise. The fact crop conditions
were deteriorating was the
reason for the weather rally.
Once the weather outlook turned more favourable
and crop conditions began
to improve, the speculative
longs in the market began
liquidating their positions.
At first they sell to take profit
and preserve capital, and as
the market falls further they
sell to limit their losses. In
this environment the market
nosedives regardless of the
news.
So faced with the realization
that a weather market can end
as quickly as it began, farmers have the daunting task of
figuring out when to sell their
grain. Far mers faced with
less-than-average production will have a much higher
break-even price per bushel,
so innately they are reluctant
to sell if the market price is
below their cost of production. However, the market
doesn’t always provide them
with the price they need to be
profitable.
In this situation emotions
run high and it becomes difficult to make a sound marketing decision. However, by
taking a disciplined approach,
which involves setting realistic
price objectives, farmers can
make the most of a difficult
situation.
Fibonacci retracement,
used in charting and technical
analysis, is an invaluable tool
for setting reasonable price
objectives.
Fibonacci retracement
Fibonacci retracement is a
method of technical analysis
for determining support and
resistance levels. It is based
on the idea that markets will
retrace a predictable portion
of a move, after which they
will continue to move in the
original direction.
After a decline, fibonacci
ratios define retracement levels, which forecast the extent
of a counter-trend bounce.
To calculate the fibonacci
retracement levels, start by
finding a significant high to
a significant low, which I’ve
CORN DECEMBER 2015
Chart as of July 29, 2015
illustrated as point A and B in
the accompanying chart. From
there, prices often retrace the
distance by a ratio of 23.6 per
cent, 38.2 per cent, 50.0 per
cent, 61.8 per cent, or the 76.4
per cent retracement. I tend to
focus on the 38.2 per cent, 50.0
per cent, and the 61.8 per cent
retracement.
In a declining market, the
61.8 per cent retracement is
often the most a market will
rebound before resuming the
downtrend. This area of resistance can be a good place to
make a sale.
I ’v e o b s e r v e d ov e r t h e
years these retracement levels often correspond with pre-
I M P O R T A N T N O T I C E
vious areas of support and
resistance. The 38.2 per cent
retracement level ($4.18), coincides with a previous area of
resistance at point C.
The 50 per cent retracement
level ($4.34), corresponds with
a rally high (D). The 61.8 per
cent retracement level ($4.51),
was once an area of support
(E). It is important to note that
old levels of support, once
breached, tend to become
resistance on future rallies.
This is exemplified with the
recent rally in corn.
Fa r m e r s w h o i d e n t i f i e d
the 61.8 per cent fibonacci
retracement level as an area
of resistance, took advan-
tage of the opportunity to sell
corn before the market turned
down.
Send your questions or comments about this article and
chart to [email protected]
David Drozd is president and senior
market analyst for Winnipeg-based
Ag-Chieve Corporation. The opinions
expressed are those of the writer
and are solely intended to assist
readers with a better understanding
of technical analysis. Visit Ag-Chieve
online at www.ag-chieve.ca for
information about our grain-marketing
advisory service and to see our latest
grain market analysis. You can call us
toll free at 1-888-274-3138 for a free
consultation.
FESTIVALS
Contact us with your event, dates, location and contact info at
[email protected]
Grainproducers:doyougrow
thesevarietiesofflaxseed?
The variety registration for the following Canada Western flaxseed
varieties will be cancelled by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency:
• CDCArras on August 1, 2017
• Flanders on August 1, 2017
• Somme on August 1, 2017
As of August 1, 2017, the flaxseed varieties listed above will be removed
from the Canadian Grain Commission’s variety designation list.
Aug. 7: Whoop and Hollar Folk
Aug. 15: Kelwood Agricultural
Festival, Cottonwood Acres, PR 331,
southeast of Portage la Prairie. Visit
PortageFolk.com.
Society Fair and Horse Show,
Kelwood. Call 204-967-2830 or visit
kelwoodagsociety.webs.com.
Aug. 7-9: Gladstone Fair. For info call
204-870-9524 or email [email protected]
net.
Aug. 21-23: Morden Corn and Apple
Aug. 7-9: Roblin Ag Society Fair.
For info call 204-937-3152 or email
[email protected]
Aug. 22-23: McCreary Fair. For info
Aug. 7-9: Rosenort Summer Festival,
Westfield Community Park, Rosenort.
Visit rosenortfestival.com.
Aug. 28-30: Matlock Festival of
Music, Art and Nature, Ash Avenue,
Matlock. Visit www.matlock
festival.ca.
Aug. 7-9: Winkler Harvest Festival
and Exhibition, 600 Park St., Winkler.
Call 204-362-8444 or visit www.
winklerharvestfestival.com.
Aug. 11-13: St. Vital Agricultural
1-800-853-6705 or 204-984-0506
TTY: 1-866-317-4289
www.grainscanada.gc.ca
Festival. Call 204-823-2676 or visit
cornandapple.com.
call 204-835-2022 or email [email protected]
mts.net.
Sept. 11-13: Double B Agricultural
Festival, Beausejour. For info call 204205-0723 or email [email protected]
highspeedcrow.ca.
Society Fair and Display, St. Vital
Centennial Arena, Winnipeg. Call 204256-6332 or visit www.svas.ca.
Sept. 18-20: Harvest Moon
Aug. 13-16: Hanover Ag Fair,
Sept. 26: Opasquia Fall Fair and
Southwood Street and Albert Avenue,
Grunthal. Call 204-371-2950 or visit
www.hanoverag.com.
Culture Days, The Pas. Call 204-6236771 or email [email protected]
outlook.com.
Aug. 14-16: Quarry Days,
Sept. 26: Pumpkinfest, Teulon.
Stonewall. For more info visit www.
stonewallquarrydays.ca.
Aug. 14-16: Rainbow Trout
Call 204-467-9064 or visit www.
teulonfarmersmarket.com/
pumpkinfest.html.
Music Festival, Oroseau
Campground, St. Malo. Visit www.
rainbowtroutmusicfestival.com.
Oct. 3: Roland Pumpkin Fair. For info
call 204-343-2314 or email [email protected]
gmail.com.
Festival, Clearwater. Visit www.
harvestmoonsociety.org/festival/.
9
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
VIDO-InterVac
to develop
vaccines
against TB
and Johne’s
Researchers
plan release
within two years
of the project’s
completion
VIDO-InterVac release
The Vaccine and Infectious
Disease Organization
International Vaccine Centre
(VIDO-InterVac) at the University
of Saskatchewan has received
$2.9 million from Genome
Canada to develop vaccines
against bovine TB and Johne’s
disease.
Bovine tuberculosis affects
the lungs of cattle and bison,
and wild species such as deer
and elk. It also can be transmitted to humans. Johne’s disease,
caused by a related species
of bacteria, results in chronic
inflammation of the intestinal
tract in cattle. It is a particular
problem for dairy herds, causing
the animals to sicken and sometimes die.
VIDO-InterVac researchers
and their collaborators in Canada
and Ireland aim to deliver two
new vaccines for these costly
mycobacterial diseases. The
funding, awarded through
Genome Canada’s Genomics and
Feeding the Future program, is
part of a $7.4-million project over
four years.
The researchers plan to develop and bring to market vaccines
for these costly diseases within
two years of the project’s end.
WHAT’S UP
Please forward your agricultural
events to [email protected]
com or call 204-944-5762.
Aug. 11-14: Canadian Cattlemen’s
Association semi-annual meeting and convention, Holiday Inn
Winnipeg Airport Polo Park, 1740
Ellice Ave., Winnipeg. For more
info visit www.cattle.ca or call
403-275-8558.
G3 Global Grain Group
officially completes CWB deal
CWB name is retired as its assets are combined with those of Bunge Canada
BY ROD NICKEL
Reuters
G
3 Global Grain Group
said July 31 it has closed
its investment in CWB,
becoming its majority investor,
and has renamed the company
G3 Canada Ltd.
The move clears the way for
G3 Global, a joint venture of
U.S.-based Bunge Ltd. and
Saudi Agricultural and Livestock
Investment Co., to build new
grain-handling facilities at Port
Metro Vancouver on Canada’s
Pacific Coast and on the
Canadian Prairies.
G3 Canada combines the
assets of CWB, including a
few country elevators, eastern
Canadian grain-handling facilities and rail cars, with Bunge’s
Canadian grain assets.
“There’s not a lot of overl a p ,” s a i d G 3 C E O K a r l
Gerrand. “It’s actually very
complementary.”
The company is also developing plans to build a port
terminal at Hamilton, Ontario
with storage capacity for
50,000 to 60,000 tonnes of
grain, he said.
G3 Global’s C$250 million
($192.65 million) purchase of
a 50.1 per cent stake in CWB,
announced in April, removes
a name that long dominated
t h e w o r l d g r a i n i n d u s t r y.
CWB, or the Canadian Wheat
Board, for decades held gove r n m e n t - s a n c t i o n e d m a rk e t i n g c o n t ro l o f We s t e r n
Canada’s milling wheat and
barley.
Ia n W h i t e, f o r m e r C W B
c h i e f e x e c u t i v e, h a s n ow
retired.
The CWB will be coming down from the former Canadian
Wheat Board building in Winnipeg. File Photo
$500!
Aug. 17: University of Manitoba
Natural Systems Agriculture
organic and non-GMO soybean
variety field walk, St. Pierre
Jolys. For more info visit www.
umanitoba.ca/outreach/
naturalagriculture/news.html.
Oct. 29: Keystone Agricultural
Producers fall general council
meeting, PCU Centre, 245 Royal Rd.
S., Portage la Prairie. For more info
call 204-697-1140.
Nov. 17-19: Canadian Forage and
Grassland Association conference
and AGM, Sheraton Cavalier, 612
Spadina Cres. E., Saskatoon. For
more info visit www.canadianfga.
ca/events/current-events/.
AG EQUIPMENT
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retail contract and warranty registration to Corporate Office before the end of the day August 30, 2015. Valid in
the United States and Canada only. No changes or substitutes. See your local Farm King dealer for details. Farm
King and the Farm King logo are registered trademarks of Buhler Industries Inc. ©2015 Buhler Industries Inc.
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10
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
LIVESTOCK MARKETS
(Friday to Thursday)
Winnipeg
Slaughter Cattle
Steers
—
Heifers
—
Next
D1, 2 Cows
—
Sale
D3 Cows
—31
July
Bulls
—
Feeder Cattle (Price ranges for feeders refer to top-quality animals only)
Steers
(901+ lbs.)
—
(801-900 lbs.)
—
(701-800 lbs.)
—
(601-700 lbs.)
—
(501-600 lbs.)
—
(401-500 lbs.)
—
Heifers
(901+ lbs.)
—
(801-900 lbs.)
—
(701-800 lbs.)
—
(601-700 lbs.)
—
(501-600 lbs.)
—
(401-500 lbs.)
—
Heifers
Alberta South
$
—
—
132.00 - 146.00
118.00 - 135.00
—
$ 228.00 - 248.00
245.00 - 265.00
260.00 - 295.00
275.00 - 322.00
300.00 - 335.00
315.00 - 362.00
$
—
235.00 - 248.00
245.00 - 263.00
266.00 - 292.00
280.00 - 308.00
287.00 - 322.00
($/cwt)
(1,000+ lbs.)
(850+ lbs.)
(901+ lbs.)
(801-900 lbs.)
(701-800 lbs.)
(601-700 lbs.)
(501-600 lbs.)
(401-500 lbs.)
(901+ lbs.)
(801-900 lbs.)
(701-800 lbs.)
(601-700 lbs.)
(501-600 lbs.)
(401-500 lbs.)
Futures (July 31, 2015) in U.S.
Fed Cattle
Close
August 2015
145.23
October 2015
146.45
December 2015
148.13
February 2016
148.25
April 2016
147.18
June 2016
140.25
Change
1.88
1.80
0.65
0.25
-0.30
0.57
Feeder Cattle
August 2015
September 2015
October 2015
November 2015
January 2016
March 2016
Cattle Slaughter
Canada
East
West
Manitoba
U.S.
July 31, 2015
Previous
Year­
50,087
10,583
39,504
N/A
572,000
DAVE SIMS
CNSC
Close
211.23
208.60
206.60
205.13
199.75
198.18
Change
1.45
0.97
0.88
1.10
2.03
2.13
Previous
Year
518
22,101
20,024
1,015
1,085
6,568
257
Hog Prices
(Friday to Thursday) ($/100 kg)
Source: Manitoba Agriculture
E - Estimation
MB. ($/hog)
MB (All wts.) (Fri-Thurs.)
MB (Index 100) (Fri-Thurs.)
ON (Index 100) (Mon.-Thurs.)
PQ (Index 100) (Mon.-Fri.)
Current Week
194 E
179 E
184.29
187.82
Futures (July 31, 2015) in U.S.
Hogs
August 2015
October 2015
December 2015
February 2016
April 2016
Last Week
192.74
178.93
186.30
190.74
Close
79.68
65.70
61.95
67.68
71.90
Last Year (Index 100)
256.42
236.30
251.94
257.29
Change
1.40
1.00
0.20
-0.33
-0.52
Other Market Prices
Sheep and Lambs
$/cwt
Ewes
Lambs
Winnipeg
Wooled Fats
Choice
(110+ lb.)
(95 - 109 lb.)
(80 - 94 lb.)
(Under 80 lb.)
(New crop)
Next
Sale
August 5th
Chickens
Minimum broiler prices as of April 13, 2010
Under 1.2 kg..................................................$1.5130
1.2 - 1.65 kg....................................................$1.3230
1.65 - 2.1 kg....................................................$1.3830
2.1 - 2.6 kg.....................................................$1.3230
Turkeys
Minimum prices as of August 9, 2015
Broiler Turkeys
(6.2 kg or under, live weight truck load average)
Grade A ................................................$1.940
Undergrade ....................................... $1.850
Hen Turkeys
(between 6.2 and 8.5 kg liveweight truck load average)
Grade A ................................................$1.925
Undergrade ........................................$1.825
Light Tom/Heavy Hen Turkeys
(between 8.5 and 10.8 kg liveweight truck load average)
Grade A ................................................$1.925
Undergrade ........................................$1.825
Tom Turkeys
(10.8 and 13.3 kg, live weight truck load average)
Grade A..................................................$1.885
Undergrade......................................... $1.800
Prices are quoted f.o.b. producers premise.
Toronto
127.40 - 149.60
186.29 - 198.64
192.70 - 210.92
195.10 - 228.06
212.56 - 291.44
—
SunGold
Specialty Meats
—
Minimum prices to producers for ungraded
eggs, f.o.b. egg grading station, set by the
Manitoba Egg Producers Marketing Board
effective November 10, 2013.
New
Previous
A Extra Large
$2.00
$2.05
A Large
2.00
2.05
A Medium
1.82
1.87
A Small
1.40
1.45
A Pee Wee
0.3775
0.3775
Nest Run 24 +
1.8910
1.9390
B
0.45
0.45
C
0.15
0.15
Goats
Winnipeg
(Hd Fats)
Next
Sale
August 5th
Toronto
($/cwt)
130.83 - 308.85
—
114.38 - 260.31
Horses
<1,000 lbs.
1,000 lbs.+
Ashern Closed until mid-August
Gladstone I
t was another quiet time for cattle sales
across Manitoba during the week ended
July 31. Three auction marts were open
for buyers, that saw just 736 head make their
way through the rings. Participants said recent
rains over the western portion of the province
helped improved pasture conditions and may
also have convinced ranchers they didn’t need
to bring their animals to auction quite yet.
Prices were fully steady, though, for the cattle that did make their way to market, according to Robin Hill of Heartland Livestock at
Virden.
“Butchers were a little stronger (due to) the
Canadian dollar being under 78 U.S. cents.
With small volumes, they probably shouldn’t
be as high as they are. But because of the dollar, Americans are putting really nice trade on
the feeder cattle,” he said.
A lot of the plainer bulls showed up last
week, according to one of the managers, who
noted the majority of the animals sold briskly.
He also said butcher cows traded $4-$5 higher
per hundredweight compared to the previous week. A lower-quality offering of Holstein
steers also drew heavy interest.
Right now, Hill said, very few producers still
have yearlings, due to strong prices offered
this spring.
“I think we’re still a month away from volumes increasing. I feel that August is going
to be very quiet with the moisture situation
pretty good in most spots.”
Virden, he noted, received in excess of three
inches of rain after a violent thunderstorm,
including a tornado, earlier in the week. Some
grain farmers reported losing barns due to
extreme winds, but Hill said most cattle producers came through OK.
“There were definitely some bins and openfront cattle sheds that were in the wrong spot.”
U.S. expansions
A market watcher said he believes the moisture Manitoba has received should allow
ranchers to hang on to their animals slightly
longer than their western counterparts will.
Tuesdays
Closed for summer
Grunthal
Tuesdays, closed Aug. 4
Killarney Closed until Aug. 31
Ste. Rose Reopens Aug. 20 (tentative)
Virden Wednesdays
Winnipeg Fridays
“I think things are a lot more active farther
west than they typically would be, because of
the drought and the pasture conditions,” said
Tyler Fulton, director of risk management for
[email protected] Marketing and owner of a cattle operation near Birtle.
Fulton said he sees the path of the Canadian
dollar as the biggest short-term factor influencing cattle prices.
“What could affect even a five to seven per
cent decline in Canadian cattle prices is if we
saw the Canadian dollar pop back up to 82 or 83
U.S. cents,” he explained.
While the U.S. industry continues to forge
ahead with expansion efforts, Canadian producers are simply trying to make sure they don’t run
out of pasture.
“The biggest margin is on those younger
calves, as opposed to the grassing sector. So the
first thing that will hit the market is those yearlings, and I think we’ve definitely seen that,” he
said.
Until that happens, he said, North American
supplies will stay tight, which will keep prices
strong.
“I remain optimistic for another six months —
it may be closer to a year — after which I think
we may see some weakness.”
Longer-term pressure will come from heavier
supplies in the U.S. as animal numbers grow,
but he estimated that could take as much as two
years to really shape the market.
“I’m not convinced we’re seeing a significant
shrinking of the Canadian herd just yet,” he
concluded.
Dave Sims writes for Commodity News Service Canada, a
Winnipeg company specializing in grain and commodity
market reporting.
New Zealand firms linked
to price-fixing scheme
Culprits allegedly used the national ID scheme
Eggs
Kids
Billys
Mature
Auction Mart Sales Schedule
Brandon Auction Ontario
$ 181.07 - 194.85
173.88 - 197.55
99.12 - 132.10
99.12 - 132.10
143.86 - 173.67
$ 223.01 - 250.02
234.00 - 281.06
196.02 - 286.44
225.73 - 326.35
222.48 - 348.06
304.13 - 366.94
$ 198.37 - 226.80
219.07 - 243.61
213.18 - 267.20
230.07 - 301.58
256.86 - 311.69
262.43 - 320.96
Week Ending
July 25, 2015
569
24,332
16,559
858
1,130
5,893
298
Prime
AAA
AA
A
B
D
E
Improving pastures may
limit cattle marketings
U.S. herd expansions may add longer-term pressure
Cattle Grades (Canada)
Week Ending
July 25, 2015
49,931
10,161
39,770
N/A
539,000
$1 Cdn: $0.7665 U.S.
$1 U.S: $1.3047 Cdn.
column
Cattle Prices
Slaughter Cattle
Grade A Steers
Grade A Heifers
D1, 2 Cows
D3 Cows
Bulls
Steers
EXCHANGES:
July 31, 2015
Winnipeg
($/cwt)
—
—
Toronto
($/cwt)
27.00 - 46.00
36.00 - 65.00
Wellington / Reuters
N
ew Zealand’s competition regulator
said Aug. 4 it had started legal action
against two livestock companies
and five individuals for price fixing over the
introduction of a national animal identity
tracing scheme three years ago.
The Commerce Commission said it was
alleging that PGG Wrightson Ltd., the local
unit of Australia’s Elders Ltd., and five current
or former employees of the companies, agreed
to fix prices to tag animals and raise associated
fees when the scheme was introduced.
PGG Wrightson and Elders were not
immediately available for comment.
PGG Wrightson said last month it was facing a possible fine which would be “significant but not materially price sensitive.”
PGG Wrightson, half owned by China’s
Agria, is New Zealand’s largest listed agribusiness company and has forecast a rise in
operating earnings for the year to June 30.
A mandator y animal identification
scheme was set up in 2012 to track electronically all cattle and deer from farm to
processing plant for animal health and food
safety reasons.
Looking for results? Check out the market reports
from livestock auctions around the province. » PaGe 34
11
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
GRAIN MARKETS
column
Manitoba Elevator Prices
Canola advances ahead of
expected market weakness
Average quotes as of August 3, 2015 ($/tonne)
Prairie farmer selling is expected to add pressure
Terryn Shiells
CNSC
T
he last week of July, and of the 201415 crop year, was a volatile one for
the canola market, with prices dropping sharply on Monday and recovering
later in the week.
The week started with an $18-per-tonne
drop on Monday, followed by modest gains on
Tuesday, a mixed market on Wednesday and
advances on Thursday and Friday.
Monday’s move brought prices below the key
$500-per-tonne level, and the market struggled
to move back above it on Thursday, but staged
a late-day rally ahead of the long weekend
on Friday, bringing the two nearby contracts
slightly above $500 per tonne. Canadian markets closed for Terry Fox Day on Aug. 3 while
U.S. markets remained open.
There is potential for the canola market to
see some further weakness going forward, as
heavy farmer selling is expected at harvest
time.
With wheat prices so weak, and canola prices still in the more attractive $10- to
$11-per-bushel range, canola will be the “cash
crop” this fall, as farmers will sell canola to
make enough profit to cover their fall and winter expenses.
The long-term market outlook could also be
depressed by weakness in the global vegetable
oil sector.
In the shorter term, values could spike if the
Chicago soy market moves higher. Funds may
also start to cover their recently built large
short position after the market managed to
break and settle above key support on Friday.
Weather leading up to, and during, harvest
across Western Canada will be important for
the Canadian market, and help determine
price direction in late summer and early fall.
U.S. traders will also be watching U.S.
Midwest weather, which has seen some
improvements over the past week or two. The
return of beneficial warm, dry weather pushed
values lower during the week ended July 31.
Soybeans dropped 10 to 25 U.S. cents per
bushel, while corn was down 13 to 22 U.S.
cents.
Wheat values were also down about 12 to 22
U.S. cents, as the good weather was helping
harvest move along for winter wheat, and yield
prospects for spring wheat are nearly record
large, according to findings from a northern
U.S. crop tour.
Export demand news was also important for
all three U.S. commodities during the week.
The weekly export sales report from the U.S.
Department of Agriculture showed strong
demand for corn, wheat and soybeans.
On Friday, a fresh export sale of U.S. wheat
was announced by the USDA for an unspecified destination, which prevented further
losses in the market.
But China cancelled an order of U.S. soybeans on Friday, USDA said, which was behind
some of the week’s total losses in the soy
complex.
Going forward, the focus will remain on
weather in the U.S., with export demand,
domestic demand and weekly crop condition
reports also important for market movement.
Economic news will also be watched,
as problems in China could lead to softening demand from the country. Furthermore,
a strong U.S. dollar would make U.S. commodities more expensive on the global export
market.
Terryn Shiells writes for Commodity News Service Canada,
a Winnipeg company specializing in grain and commodity
market reporting.
For three-times-daily market reports and more from
Commodity News Service Canada, visit the Markets section at
www.manitobacooperator.ca.
Future
Basis
Net
Weekly Change
Red spring wheat
190.26
26.60
216.87
-7.42
Red winter wheat
180.30
-0.01
180.29
-2.04
Prairie spring wheat
180.32
-16.06
164.26
-4.87
Canola
502.32
-23.89
478.43
4.21
Port Prices
As of Friday, July 31, 2015 ($/tonne)
Last Week
Weekly Change
U.S. hard red winter 12% Houston
176.00
-6.70
U.S. spring wheat 14% Portland
223.03
-10.47
Canola Thunder Bay
513.70
-17.70
Canola Vancouver
528.70
-17.70
Closing Futures Prices
As of Thursday, July 30, 2015 ($/tonne)
Last Week
Weekly Change
498.70
-17.70
ICE milling wheat
217.00
-9.00
ICE barley
208.10
-9.30
Mpls. HRS wheat
193.55
-9.55
Chicago SRW wheat
182.43
-9.19
Kansas City HRW wheat
180.41
-9.55
Corn
146.94
-11.81
Oats
152.38
-0.97
Soybeans
354.40
-7.99
ICE canola
Soymeal
377.66
-5.95
Soyoil
670.32
-19.18
Cash Prices Winnipeg
As of Thursday, July 30, 2015 ($/tonne)
Last Week
Weekly Change
Feed wheat
181.86
-10.29
Feed barley
162.13
-13.32
n/a
n/a
532.26
4.72
Rye
Flaxseed
Feed peas
n/a
n/a
Oats
182.85
-4.54
Soybeans
355.31
-17.27
Sunflower (NuSun) Fargo, ND ($U.S./CWT)
18.95
unch
Ask
Ask
Sunflower (Confection) Fargo, ND ($U.S./CWT)
Western CWRS cash bids soften
U.S. futures markets have been trending down
BY TERRYN SHIELLS,
COMMODITY NEWS SERVICE CANADA
C
anada Wester n Red Spr ing
(CWRS) wheat cash bids
across Western Canada were
we a k e r d u r i n g t h e we e k e n d e d
July 31, as the U.S. futures markets
plunged once again.
Av e ra g e Ca n a d a We s t e r n Re d
Spring wheat prices were down by
$7 to $26 per tonne over the week,
with bids ranging from about $203
per tonne in the Peace Region of
Alber ta, to as high as $217 per
tonne in Manitoba, according to
price quotes from a cross-section
of delivery points across Western
Canada.
Quoted basis levels varied from
location to location, but generally
held steady, to average about $21
above the futures when using the
grain company methodology of
quoting the basis as the difference
between the U.S. dollar denominated futures and the Canadian dollar cash bids.
When accounting for the currency exchange rates by adjusting
the Canadian prices to U.S. dollars ($1=US$0.7645 as of July 31)
CWRS bids ranged from US$155 to
US$166 per tonne. That would put
the currency adjusted basis levels
at about US$25 to US$35 below the
futures.
Looking at it the other way
around, if the Minneapolis futures
are converted to Canadian dollars,
CWRS basis levels across Western
Canada range from $33 to $46 below
the futures.
Av e r a g e C a n a d a P r a i r i e R e d
Spring (CPRS) bids were weaker as
well, with bids $4 to $7 per tonne
weaker. CPRS prices came in at
about $164 per tonne in Man­i toba,
$174 to $175 per tonne in Saskatch­
ewan, and $182 to $187 per tonne in
Alberta.
Winter wheat prices were mixed.
Values were up $2 to $6 per tonne
to $178 to $180 in Manitoba and
southern Saskatchewan, as basis levels improved enough to move prices
higher. Weakness in U.S. futures
weighed on values in other parts of
Western Canada, which were down
by $1 to $3 per tonne to $174 to $187
per tonne.
The September spring wheat contract in Minneapolis, which most
CWRS contracts in Canada are based
off of, was quoted at US$5.2350 per
bushel on July 31, down 21.50 cents
from the week prior.
The Kansas City hard red winter
wheat futures, which are now traded
in Chicago, are more closely linked
to CPRS in Canada. The September
Kansas City wheat contract was
quoted at US$4.9225 per bushel
on July 31, down 15 cents from last
week.
The Canadian dollar closed at
76.45 U.S. cents on July 31, which
was down about a third of a cent relative to its U.S. counterpart.
12
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
COUNTRY CROSSROADS
CON N EC T I NG RU R A L FA M I L I E S
Rain garden makes wiser use of
run-off, beautifies urban areas
Rainwater capture takes the load off the drainage system, and provides lower-cost water for gardens
BY LORRAINE STEVENSON
Co-operator staff / Morden
A
s trip of newly planted
trees and shrubs on the
east side of the recreation centre in Morden might look
merely like landscaping. Wait until
it starts to rain.
Then it’s an example of how
towns and cities can also help
overland flooding and nutrient
run-off.
The site at the east side of the
Morden Access Event Centre is
the city’s first official rain garden,
installed this spring in a partnership with the Pembina Valley
Conservation District.
A rain garden is a perennial
planted area specially designed to
harvest or capture and use rainwater that otherwise runs off and
can contribute to local flooding.
At the end of Morden’s rain garden
is a 2,500-gallon (11,365-litre) tank
to serve as a gigantic rain barrel.
Over a season of summer rains,
city officials have calculated it
will collect roughly 27,000 litres
of rainwater, to be used by public
works to water all the flowers and
other trees and shrubbery around
Morden.
That’s water that doesn’t need
to come from the tap, said Cliff
Greenfield, PVCD manager.
“This is captured rainwater
they’ll be using, instead of expensive high-quality potable water,”
he said.
The other benefits of the rain
garden include groundwater
recharge, improving water quality
and increasing biodiversity and
carbon storage. It looks far better than a barren arena wall and
parking lot.
They’re one more way we can
begin to drought-proof our communities, says Greenfield, adding
it’s hoped the project will inspire
homeowners and business owners too.
Wider adoption of rain capture and rain garden projects also
means urban areas are contributing to water-management solutions rather than to the problem.
Capturing rainwater is a conservation activity urbanites can become involved with, says Pembina Valley Conservation District manager Cliff Greenfield. PHOTO: LORRAINE STEVENSON
No infiltration
through concrete
Whether they realize it or not, cities and towns play a role in both
run-off and surface water contamination, with their built-up
hard-surface areas and general
compaction that leave nowhere
for rainwater to infiltrate. Instead
it’s being sent downstream to
overload storm sewers, drainage
ditches and streams. That run-off
carries its own share of nutrients
and sediments, not to mention,
oil, gas, and heavy metals.
Adoption of ways to capture
and infiltrate water — and use it
more wisely — is a way to help
prepare for a more sustainable
future in drought-prone areas,
said Greenfield.
PHOTO: SUPPLIED
Morden was part of a Pembina
Valley-wide initiative three years
ago, when the Blue Water of 2012
looked at long-term prospects for
water demand and supply in the
region.
The three-year study of water
use and supply in municipalities in the PVCD concluded that
even though residents use significantly less water than the average
Manitoban, their frugality alone
won’t prevent a regional water
shortage by 2040. (Area residents
use about 30 per cent less water
compared to other Manitobans, or
160 litres of water a day compared
to a provincial average of 227 litres
and the Canadian average of 339.)
But if the region keeps relying
on various lakes and reservoirs,
groundwater wells and aquifers
and while increasing population,
it will run short. And prospects
of finding new water sources are
remote given the potential for a
drier century ahead, the study
said.
Morden’s rain garden is one
of a series of conservation practices the study recommended, as
well as stopping water leakage in
homes and industry, introducing
efficient appliances and changing public behaviour and practices
around water use.
Water conservation also means
a longer infrastructure lifespan
and lower costs of providing water.
In 2010 the Public Utilities
Board mandated municipalities to charge a fee on their utility bills for wear and tear on
infrastructure, and earmark the
cash in a reserve fund for future
repairs.
A practice like a rain garden
would have made perfect sense
to a previous generation whose
use of a cistern to capture water
was commonplace, say other
PVCD officials.
“Our grandparents understood
the value of water and trying to
use what resources they had to
the utmost and best use. That’s
why they had cisterns to capture
rainwater,” PVCD chairman and
Darlingford-area farmer Murray
Seymour said in a news release.
“This rain capture and rain
garden project is something we
are already doing in rural areas
with small- to medium-size
dams that hold water back and
reduce downstream flooding,
and improve water quality downstream as well,” he added.
Morden’s rain garden is
not unique, and elsewhere in
Manitoba municipalities offer
rain garden programs with
rebates to those constructing
them.
These kinds of demonstration
projects are a way conservation
districts can work with urbanites
to involve them in water management too, Greenfield said.
[email protected]
13
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
COUNTRY CROSSROADS
Prairie fare
Try a new sandwich during August
which is ‘Sandwich Month’
julie gardenrobinson
Food and Nutrition Specialist
NDSU Extension Service
A
s I was eating a “fancy” grilled cheese
sandwich the other day at a hotel restaurant, I thought of the grilled cheese
sandwiches of my childhood. The hotel sandwich had some kind of cream sauce, about
five kinds of cheese and sliced tomatoes
inside. I paid way too much for it.
Although I usually eat almost anything,
I scraped the cream sauce to the side
because it was kind of a strange addition
that made the bread mushy. The tomatoes were a nice addition, although I would
have preferred them in soup.
When I was a kid, my favourite grilled
cheese sandwiches were made with homemade bread cut fairly thin and buttered on
the outside. We called them “toasted cheese
sandwiches,” which is common in older
cookbooks.
We cut slices of cheese from a threepound block of cheese and cooked them in
a 1950s-style electric frying pan until the
bread was crispy and light brown on the
outside. When I cut the sandwich in half
to form two triangles, the warm, melted
cheese formed long strings that stretched
from the plate all the way to my mouth.
Along with our sandwiches, we always
had tomato soup, home-canned peach
sauce and cups of homemade cocoa with
little marshmallows. We drank the steaming cocoa from special brown mugs. I guess
the cocoa was my mom’s special touch on a
simple menu.
What’s your favourite sandwich? August
is National Sandwich Month and an excellent time to try some different sandwiches.
Sandwiches have been around for centuries. Most people give John Montagu, the
fourth Earl of Sandwich, credit for naming
our popular menu item in 1765, according
to food history information at http://www.
foodtimeline.org. This busy man wanted an
easy way to eat at his desk.
By the early 1900s, sliced bread was available in American bakeries, and this made
sandwiches a portable meal.
I always thought my mother invented the
menu of grilled cheese sandwiches paired
with tomato soup. Turns out, this sandwich
combination became popular post-Second
World War in school cafeterias because the
tomato soup was the source of vitamin
C on the menu. Tomato soup and cheese
sandwiches also are easy to prepare and
the flavours work well together.
PHOTOs: THINKSTOCK
Some people like hot sandwiches and others prefer cold. Maybe you enjoy peanut butter and jelly, grilled cheese, a pita stuffed
with tuna salad, a bacon, lettuce and tomato
(BLT), a “Po Boy,” a French dip or a veggie and
cheese panini pressed in a grill. The options are
endless.
Sandwiches usually consist of bread with fillings, but some people use lettuce as the outer
layer. Save some money by bringing a sandwich to work instead of going out to eat.
Here’s how to create a sandwich with healthful ingredients:
• Begin with a whole grain base, such as whole
wheat bread, tortillas, pita bread or buns.
Whole grains provide fibre, vitamins and minerals. Try to make at least half of your grain
choices whole grains.
• Add a spread to your bread if you like. Try
some mustard, hummus, guacamole or light
mayonnaise. Go easy on the butter or regular
mayonnaise because these ingredients add
calories without much nutritional value.
• Add your favourite fillings. How about some
chicken salad made with leftover grilled
chicken? Choose lean proteins, and compare
the sodium values of deli meats using the
Nutrition Facts labels.
• Pile on the veggies and/or fruits. Add some
spinach, cucumber and tomato slices,
chopped onion or grated carrots. Try sliced
bananas on a peanut butter sandwich. Add
some dried cranberries to a chicken salad
sandwich.
• Want more inspiration? Visit https://www.
ag.ndsu.edu/food and type “7 Steps to
Creating a Sandwich” in the search box.
Check out our other resources, such as the
free online newsletter at our Nourishing
Boomers and Beyond website (https://www.
ndsu.edu/boomers).
If you regularly have sandwiches for lunch
or dinner, you can save time later by freezing
some sandwiches. However, some popular
sandwich ingredients (eggs, jelly, tomatoes,
pickles, onions, mayonnaise) do not freeze
well. Sandwiches made with peanut butter,
cooked meats (chicken, roast beef, turkey),
shredded hard cheese (cheddar, Swiss) and
canned meats (tuna, salmon) freeze well.
Add fresh veggies and toppings right before
eating.
You can prepare the sandwiches and place
them in zip-top freezer bags. Be sure to label
the bags with the contents and date. Next,
freeze the sandwiches in a single layer on a
tray. When solidly frozen, place the individual
bags in a larger freezer bag and freeze. Thaw
the sandwiches in your refrigerator and enjoy.
Here’s a tasty sandwich my students tried in
our food lab. They were a hit, and you can use
fresh local produce from farmers’ markets or
your own garden.
Thai Chicken Wraps
4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts
4 oz. Thai peanut sauce
8 whole wheat tortillas
4 c. lettuce, shredded
2 large carrots, cut into thin strips or julienne
1 cucumber, seeds scraped out, cut into strips
4 tbsp. cilantro leaves
4 to 8 tbsp. peanuts, chopped
Salt and pepper, to taste
Pound the chicken, until flat, in a
zip-top bag or between two pieces
of plastic wrap. Season chicken
with salt and pepper, then grill
or sauté until done. Slice into
thin strips. Lay a whole wheat
tortilla on a cutting board. Add
lettuce, chicken pieces, carrot
and cucumber strips and cilantro
leaves. Drizzle on a good amount
of peanut sauce, then sprinkle on
some peanuts. Season with salt
and pepper to your liking. Roll up
the tortilla tightly, slice in half and
serve.
Makes eight servings. Each serving
has 280 calories, 8 grams (g) fat,
19 g protein, 30 g carbohydrate, 4
g fibre and 530 milligrams sodium.
14
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
COUNTRY CROSSROADS
Combating garden pests — Part 2
Home remedies to aid in the fight
By Albert Parsons
Stran Dunham credits his parents
for his love of the sport
Freelance contributor
B
esides good cultural
practices, gardeners can combat pests
in the garden without using
synthetic chemicals by creating some homemade remedies. These concoctions are
effective; they just take a bit
of time and effort to make.
They are, however, pesticides
— albeit natural ones — and
will kill beneficial insects as
well as pests, so they should
be used judiciously and only
on the plants suffering an
infestation.
Many gardeners use commercially produced insecticidal soap and many home
remedies are similar in that
they contain a natural insecticide, water, and either mineral oil and/or dishwashing
soap as the ingredient that
allows the remedy to stick
to the insects and kill them
by smothering. The simplest
recipe is: add 1-1/2 teaspoon
of liquid dish soap to 2 litres
of water; mix well and spray
on intended targets. Most of
these natural remedies are
contact insecticides and the
liquid must come into direct
contact with the insect to kill
it.
A pyrethrum-based remedy can be made by soaking
some crushed, dried pyrethrum flowers in water and
using the resulting liquid as
a spray.
Another effective insecticide uses garlic. Combine 2
tablespoons of finely crushed
garlic with 2 teaspoons of
mineral oil, 1/4 teaspoon of
liquid dish soap and 1/2 litre
of water. Strain and store in
a tight-lid container. Use 4
tablespoons of the concoction in 1 litre of water to create an effective spray.
Ni c o t i n e - b ased insecticides also work well. Soak 1/4
cup of tobacco (tobacco from
old cigarette butts works
fine) in 1 litre of water; add
a couple of drops of liquid
dish soap and strain. Use the
Manitoba student
enjoying rodeo
By Darrell Nesbitt
Freelance contributor
S
Artemisia is one plant from which a homemade insecticide can be
produced. PHOTO: ALBERT PARSONS
Remember —
prevention and
early intervention
are key to
controlling insects
in the garden.
mixture as a soil drench to
combat slugs, root maggots
and fungus gnats or spray on
the foliage of infested plants.
The spray should not be used
on the edible parts of plants.
The tomato is a member of
the nightshade family, whose
members are often poisonous. Make a spray to combat
aphids by soaking 1 cup of
crushed tomato leaves in 1
cup of water. Strain the mixture and add another 1/4 cup
of water and use as a spray.
A mixture of 2-1/2 cups of
strong coffee with 1 cup of
liquid derived from soaking 1
cup of crushed yarrow leaves
in 1 cup of water will produce
another home remedy. A few
drops of dish soap added
to the strained mixture will
allow the liquid to adhere to
the insects.
READER’S PHOTOS
Summer sights and sounds. PHOTOS: LILLIAN DEEDMAN
Old coffee grounds scattered on the carrot row will
deter carrot fly.
For waging war against
slugs: soak 1 cup of crushed
artemisia (silver mound will
do) in 1 litre of water for a day
or so. Add 1 tablespoon of liquid dish soap and strain. Use
1 part concentrate and 4 parts
water and spray it on the soil.
Do not spray plants with this
as it may damage them.
In the fight against insect
pests, keep in mind that close
observation and diligence
will go a long way in preventing serious infestations. If
lily leaf beetles or Colorado
potato beetles are found in
the garden, hand-picking the
adults and leaves that have
eggs on their undersides will
effectively control the invasion. An infestation of aphids
can often be terminated by
spraying the affected plants
with a strong jet of water
from the garden hose. Handpicking slugs in early morning and placing traps or
boards under which they will
gather will assist you in controlling these awful pests.
Remember — prevention and
early intervention are key
to controlling insects in the
garden.
Albert Parsons writes from Minnedosa,
Manitoba
tran Dunham — a rookie
in the Junior High division of the Manitoba
High School Rodeo Association
(MHSRA), had his excitement
for ropes and rodeo carved
into him, thanks to his parents,
Sheena and Kevin Dunham of
Souris.
His mom was among the
first high school rodeo competitors from Manitoba to
cross over into Saskatchewan
in the early 1990s, and made
the team going to Oklahoma
City to compete in the
National High School Rodeo
Finals.
“I’m very proud of my mom
and dad, as they both have
competed at high school, amateur and professional rodeos
in their events of barrel racing,
tie-down roping and team roping,” said Dunham. “Thanks
to them rodeo is a blessing in
which I have grown up around
and now, as a Grade 7 student
at Hartney, am able to compete
in a number of boy’s events.”
Those events don’t only
require a lariat (breakaway
roping, ribbon roping and
team roping), but also quick
hands with goat tying being his
favourite.
Stran Dunham has a passion for goat tying.
“At this level, striving to do
my personal best, I find goat
tying to be a lot of fun,” said
Dunham. “Rodeo allows me
the chance to hook up and
compete with friends my own
age.
“I h a v e t w o f a v o u r i t e
competitors — my dad, a
p a s t C a n a d i a n C ow b oy s
Association champion and
Tuf Cooper, a world champion tie-down roper,” said
Dunham.
By watching his parents
cherish the sport of rodeo,
Dunham has come to realize that rodeo is more than
an athletic event. It’s a show
that allows camaraderie to
be developed between participants, personal goals to be
made and met, and a lifestyle
that highlights an impression
of the western heritage.
Education on roping and
riding has come through his
parents, but other points
in life’s lessons and sports
involvement come from
teachers and coaches.
Dunham is an all-around
athlete, involved in hockey,
baseball and badminton.
He is also an avid outdoor
sportsman, involved in hunting, trapping, and fishing.
Darrell Nesbitt writes from Shoal Lake,
Manitoba
PHOTO: DARRELL NESBITT
Fa
Dec
15
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
COUNTRY CROSSROADS
Stylish, affordable entertaining
Decorating for a special event doesn’t have to be expensive
CONNIE OLIVER
Around the House
M
y husband and I recently celebrated our 25th wedding anniversary, and our decorating
ideas were stylish and affordable that
could be used for any special event.
Invitations
I didn’t want to invite guests by
email or text to this event. At the dollar store I found a wedding invitation
set embossed with a silver design. It
included invitations with silver-lined
envelopes, programs, and place cards
on good-quality paper for $3. I printed
on the invitations on my computer in
a light-grey (silvery) font, and used the
programs to print photos of us over the
years, which went on each dinner table.
If you don’t find what you’re looking for
at the dollar store check out a local thrift
store. There are often unopened packages of party invites for various events.
People often buy more than they need
and end up donating new packages to
the thrift store. You can also purchase
decorative printer paper and use your
computer to create a great invitation.
Tables
If you are using a large rented room
you’ll want the tables to be dressed in
a similar fashion. I used round plastic
tablecloths from the dollar store — not
very heavy — but once all of the tables
were draped they did the trick. If you’re
entertaining a smaller affair at home, use
linen cloths if you have them and they fit
the event. Even items like inexpensive
white shower curtain liners could work.
You’d have to trim off the top grommets/
holes and put the curtains briefly in the
dryer to get out the fold marks.
Centrepieces were created from items from the
thrift store and silver lids from take-out food
containers.
Centrepieces
For centrepieces I collected 25th anniversary dishes from the thrift store
for a few months prior to the party
and put a tea light inside each one. I
placed these centrepieces on a silver
disc, which were actually takeout food
lids! (Anything silver was fair game.)
Around some of the centrepieces I
draped vintage silver necklaces, which
I also found at the thrift store for a few
dollars. Any decorative items you have
on hand could work, such as old jewelry, Christmas decorations (silver balls
and bells for a 25th celebration), small
game pieces or children’s toys for a baby
shower.
For a wedding or baby shower use
vintage matching teacups and saucers
in a mix of patterns and styles, place a
fresh flower or tea light in each, and set
on a paper doily.
I happened to find a few bags of silver,
star-shaped confetti at the thrift store,
which I also put around some of the
centrepieces for our anniversary.
Another fun idea is to use large mason
jars filled with water and pussy willow
branches. Mason jars can be found in
Plastic tablecloths were purchased from the dollar store as well as the cards on the table. PHOTOS: CONNIE OLIVER
I might have spent $30 to
$40 on all of these items, and
I donated the dishes back
to the thrift store once the
party was over.
abundance at the thrift store and you
don’t have to worry about needing lids.
Use food colouring in the water if you
have a specific colour scheme in mind.
Guest book table
For our party I bought a leftover roll of
silver foil wrap at the thrift store and
used it to drape the guest book table. In
the centre of this table I placed a large
ceramic Hershey Kiss-shaped dish that
I bought at a second-hand shop for 10
bucks and filled it with silver Hershey
Kisses. The dish sat on a silver tray that
I got — you guessed it — at the thrift
store.
We had a light lunch including punch
served in a punch bowl from the thrift
store. At the dollar store I purchased a
plastic, silver ladle to serve the punch. I
found silver-accented paper plates, cups
and napkins at the dollar store that went
with the theme. We had coffee and tea
and I just happened to find a creamer,
sugar bowl and tray set with a 25th anniversary on it at the thrift store. Sugar
cubes with silver tongs from the dollar
store finished the look.
At the thrift store I also bought 25th
anniversary silver balloons and a new
seven-foot silver anniversary banner to
help with the decorations.
I might have spent $30 to $40 on all
of these items, and I donated the dishes
back to the thrift store once the party
was over.
Entertaining friends and family can be
an enjoyable endeavour. Plan ahead and
start gathering items. You’d be surprised
what you can find once you have an idea
in mind, and I proved that it doesn’t have
to be expensive.
Connie Oliver is an interior designer from Gimli,
Manitoba
Co-operator barn
series revival
Do you know this barn?
I
f you do, a Manitoba historian wants to hear from you. In early
1981 the Co-operator worked with provincial Manitoba Historic
Resources Branch staff to photograph and publish a series on rural
buildings in Manitoba. Each week a photo and a story were published
about why each of the buildings were rare or unusual.
Now Gordon Goldsborough, webmaster and journal editor with the
Manitoba Historical Society (MHS) is looking for Co-operator readers’
help to relocate these barns. He has looked for them during road trips
in rural Manitoba, but because the site’s location details are scant, he
has been unable to find them. He wants to include the buildings, with
their GPS co-ordinates on a map of historic sites being prepared for the
MHS.
This photograph was taken by now-retired Co-operator editor Bob
Hainstock who took the photo in the 1980s for the earlier project. Many
of the photos were eventually included in Hainstock’s 1986 book Barns
of Western Canada: An Illustrated Century.
We are including the original “caption” that ran with his photo, hoping a reader can answer these questions:
1. Does the building still stand?
2. If so, where is it?
3. What are its GPS co-ordinates?
4. What other information can you provide on its state of preservation
or other details about its history since the original story in the 1980s?
Please send your responses to Gordon Goldsborough at:
email: [email protected]
Telephone: (204) 474-7469
Mail: 2021 Loudoun Rd. Winnipeg, Man. R3S 1A3.
Like either barns or people of a similar vintage, this structure starts to show its age by changing colour “up top.” In this case, the
telltale rusting of shingles has become fairly general after 65 years of rapidly changing climate and dry-set conditions. Built by David
McNaughton in 1916, the 80x54-foot barn carries enormous storage capacity for livestock feed. McNaughton came to the district
in 1889 and took over property from a mortgage company. He later became a substantial farmer in the district, with the village of
Brookdale built on former McNaughton land. The large loft area could hold sufficient feed to winter 100 head of cattle. The cathedrallike upper level shows the strong 8x8-inch beams which frame the barn and were railed to the area from Fraser Valley, B.C. According
to original records, the estimated cost of the barn in 1916 was about $3,000. John D. Ramsay currently owns this farm which is little
more than a cream can’s throw north of the village. 16
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
WEATHER VANE
“Everyone talks about the weather, but no one does anything about it.” Mark Twain, 1897
General weather pattern remains the same
Issued: Monday, August 3, 2015 · Covering: August 5 – August 12, 2015
Daniel Bezte
Weather Vane
W
hile this summer’s
weather hasn’t been
the easiest to figure
out, the weather models have
been doing a pretty good job
of getting the big picture right.
This was the case once again
for last week’s forecast as the
upper low stalled out over
Hudson Bay as expected, and
brought cooler air and afternoon clouds to at least eastern
regions over the weekend.
This forecast looks to continue with the slightly coolerthan-average temperatures, as
the general upper-level flow
remains out of the northwest. Weak high pressure will
be in place to start this forecast period, bringing plenty of
sunshine along with daytime
highs in the low 20s. As this
high slides off to the east we’ll
see a bit of a rebound in the
upper-level ridge on Thursday
and Friday that should allow
warmer air to move in. An area
of low pressure is also forecast
to overtop this ridge, bringing increasing clouds along
with some showers and thun-
dershowers. The best chances
for measurable rain look to be
late Friday and into Saturday
morning.
Surface high pressure
will build in later in the day
on Saturday, bringing clearing skies. These clear skies
should stick around on
Sunday and Monday, with
daytime highs expected to
be in the mid- to upper 20s.
A t r o u g h o f l ow p re s s u re
is expected to develop to
our west on Monday, which
should result in increasing
southerly winds along with a
return to more humid values.
This trough is then forecast
to push through on Tuesday,
bringing the chance of more
thunderstorms.
Looking further ahead, there
are some signs of the western upper ridge building and
pushing eastward, bringing a
return to above-average temperatures late next week.
Usual temperature range for
this period: Highs, 20 to 30 C;
lows, 8 to 15 C.
Daniel Bezte is a teacher by profession
with a BA (Hon.) in geography,
specializing in climatology, from the
U of W. He operates a computerized
weather station near Birds Hill Park.
Contact him with your questions and
comments at [email protected]
WEATHER MAP - WESTERN CANADA
1 Month (30 Days) Percent of Average Precipitation (Prairie Region)
July 1, 2015 to July 30, 2015
< 40%
40 - 60%
60 - 85%
85 - 115%
115 - 150%
150 - 200%
> 200%
Extent of Agricultural Land
Lakes and Rivers
Produced using near real-time data that has
undergone initial quality control. The map
may not be accurate for all regions due to data
availability and data errors.
Copyright © 2015 Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada
Prepared by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s National Agroclimate Information Service (NAIS). Data provided through partnership with
Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and many Provincial agencies.
Created: 07/31/15
www.agr.gc.ca/drought
This issue’s map shows the total amount of precipitation that fell across the Prairies during July as a percentage of the long-term average.
Thanks to several strong rounds of thunderstorms late in the month, a large part of agricultural Manitoba and Saskatchewan ended up seeing
above-average amounts of rain with a large area reporting more than double the average amount (dark blue). The only really dry area during July
was in far-northwestern parts of Alberta, where less than 40 per cent of average rainfall was reported.
July continues an above-average trend
Let’s expect that persistent western ridge and eastern trough to stick around
Who called it?
By daniel bezte
Co-operator contributor
A
nother month has
come and gone, so that
means it’s time to do
our monthly look back, then
look ahead to see what might
be in store for us in August.
As I pointed out at the end
of June, during the summer
months — or more specifically, our main growing season — a number of us are
interested in what’s going on
weather-wise right across the
Prairies. So, once again, I’ll
do a summary of the weather
across the Prairies, beginning
in Alberta and moving eastward, then we’ll look ahead
to see what August might
have in store for us here in
Manitoba.
The Calgary region reported
a mean monthly July temperature of 18.1 C, about 1.5
C above average. Rainfall in
this region was around 55 mm,
slightly below average. Farther
north, in the Edmonton
region, the average monthly
temperature was 17.2 C, 1.0
C above average. Rainfall was
right around average, with
about 95 mm falling during
the month.
Over in Saskatchewan it was
also a warmer-than-average
The Winnipeg region experienced aboveaverage temperatures in July and had the
highest mean monthly temperature of all of
the Prairies’ stations.
July, with Regina reporting a
mean monthly temperature
of 19.3 C, about 0.5 C above
average. In the Saskatoon
re g i o n t e m p e ra t u re s we re
about the same, with a mean
monthly reading of 19.4 C,
almost a full degree above
its average. Rainfall amounts
were fairly generous thanks
to heavy thunderstorms late
in the month. Saskatoon had
about 84 mm, around 25 mm
above average, while Regina
reported 129 mm, more than
60 mm above its long-term
average.
Now on to Manitoba where,
d e p e n d i n g o n w h e re y o u
lived, July was either perfect,
a little dry or way too wet,
thanks to several rounds of
thunderstorms. Some areas
got just the right amount of
rain from these storms and
some missed out on pretty
much every storm, while
other areas either saw way
too much from one storm or
experienced several strong
storms.
St a r t i n g i n t h e Da u p h i n
re g i o n , t h e a v e ra g e m e a n
m o n t h l y t e m p e ra t u re w a s
19.8 C, a good 1.1 C above
average. Rainfall was also
above average, with 94.9 mm
reported during the month,
about 20 mm above average. Heading down to the
Brandon region, it reported a
mean monthly temperature
of 19.2 C, about 0.7 C above
average. Rainfall was right
around average, with about 65
mm recorded. The Winnipeg
region also experienced
above-average temperatures
in July and had the highest
mean monthly temperature of
all of the Prairies’ stations at
20.2 C, about 0.5 C above the
long-term average. Like the
Brandon region, rainfall was
around average, with 65 mm
reported.
How did the different longterm forecasts measure up to
the real thing? Looking back,
it appears that it’s a pretty
close call between all the forecasts. All of the long-range
forecasts called for aboveaverage temperatures, with
only Environment Canada’s
call for near-average temperatures across extreme southern Manitoba being a little
off. Looking at rainfall, the
Old Farmer’s Almanac predicted above-average rainfall,
while the Canadian Farmers’
Almanac and Environment
Canada called for near-average amounts. My precipitation forecast called for neart o s l i g h t l y b e l ow - a v e r a g e
a m o u n t s. W h o s h o u l d b e
declared the winner? I’ll leave
it up to you to decide.
Now, on to the August forecast to see if anything has
changed from the last time
we looked at it. According to
the Old Farmer’s Almanac, our
warmer-than-average weather
will continue, but we’ll see
drier weather move in with
below-average rainfall. The
Canadian Farmers’ Almanac
calls for a warm start to the
month, with average temperatures during the second half
— which means overall it will
be near to slightly above aver-
age. Precipitation will also
be near average during the
month. Environment Canada
calls for near-average temperatures over western and central regions, with below-average readings in far-eastern
regions of Manitoba. As for
precipitation, it’s being safe
and calling for near-average
amounts.
Finally, here at the Co-oper­
ator, I am still sticking with
the prediction that the overall
pattern in which we’ve been
stuck for several months now
will continue, with a persistent western ridge and eastern trough. This means we
should continue to see the
same type of weather, with
p e r i o d s o f a b ov e - a v e r a g e
temperatures broken up by
periods of below-average conditions. The big question is
whether the warm weather
will occur more often than
the cool weather. I think we’ll
end up seeing slightly aboveaverage temperatures overall.
Precipitation, as you probably
know by now, is the hardest
part of the forecast. I’m going
to roll the dice and go with
near- to slightly below-average amounts of rain.
As usual, no matter what
ends up happening weatherwise, I hope your weather is
exactly what you need!
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
17
Trim: 10.25”
CROPS
Potential growers get a look
at the ins and outs of growing hemp
The PCDF has been testing 10 varieties and four sites in Manitoba and two in Saskatchewan
BY JENNIFER PAIGE
Co-operator staff / Melita
A
Variety trials
PCDF grew hemp variety trials
at four locations in Manitoba in
2014, including Arborg, Carberry,
Melita and Roblin as well as two
locations in Saskatchewan.
Ten varieties were grown at
each test site, including Canda,
CFX-1, CFX-2, CRS-1, Debbie,
Delores, Finola, Joey, Silesia and
X59.
“CRS is a Genetics International
variety. It probably has the most
acres in Manitoba right now,” said
Jeffery Kostuik, diversification specialist with Parkland Crop Diversification Foundation, shed some light on industrial hemp production at
the Westman Agriculture Diversification Organization field day in Melita on July 22. Photo: Jennifer Paige
“Growth on the
marketing side is
anywhere from 20 to
40 per cent, mostly into
the American market.”
Jeffery Kostuik
PCDF
Kostuik. “Canda is a variety out of
Ontario and probably a little bit
more suited for Ontario conditions. We have had it in plots a few
years back and we just got it back
in this year as they have shown
some interest in us growing it.”
Kostuik says while there is no
official data on the X59 variety,
it has a really tight head and the
bract hangs on to the seed well,
which is good in windy regions
but is more difficult to harvest
than comparable varieties.
The Joey variety has been noted
as the highest-yielding variety in
all locations and Finola was consistently the lowest yielding.
Unleash the
power of T Series
Seeding and harvest
“Hemp would rather be seeded
late into warm soils, around 10
C. The end of May is when we are
recommending seeding,” Kostuik
said. “Hemp doesn’t like its feet
wet when it is young but once it
gets established, it is a beast and
will take a lot of moisture.”
Seeding is recommended at
half an inch and 25 pounds per
acre. Hemp is nutrient hungry
and flourishes in well-manured
fields.
There are currently no pesticides registered for hemp and in
recent years PCDF noted susceptibility to sclerotinia.
“In Roblin we are doing a seeding date trial and we found that
the later we went into the year in
seeding we were actually able to
have less incidence of sclerotinia
and they still matured at approximately the same time,” Kostuik
said.
Producers should aim to harvest hemp while the plant contains a bit of moisture, as it will
m ov e t h r o u g h t h e c o m b i n e
easier.
2475 heat units
Introducing the next generation of soybeans. Pioneer brand
T Series soybeans feature high performing varieties that are
designed to deliver a great harvest in Manitoba. Ask your
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T Series soybeans for your acres.
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“We are recommending starting harvesting around 17 to 18
per cent. Nine to 10 per cent
moisture is considered dry.
Fire during harvest is a concern due to the dust off the
combine.
Re m a i n i n g s t u b b l e c a n b e
taken care of with the use of a
land roller, and heavy harrowing
into windrows. The remainder
will need to be burned off.
“Heavy harrowing does take
c a re o f i t , b u t I w o u l d s u ggest waiting into mid- to late
October, as the stalk really dries
d ow n a n d c o m e s o u t o f t h e
ground quite easily or breaks.”
Currently there are two marketers in Manitoba, which
have both undergone extensive
expansion in the past two years
— Hemp Genetics in Ste. Agathe
and Manitoba Har vest out of
Winnipeg.
“Growth on the marketing side
is anywhere from 20 to 40 per
cent, mostly into the American
market,” Kostuik said.
[email protected]
2475 heat units
Trim: 15.5”
rapidly growing market
and attractive payoffs have
some producers considering diversifying into industrial
hemp production.
“Right now hemp is trading at
about 85 to 95 cents per pound.
Last year, I think the provincial
average on yield was around 1,100
to 1,200 pounds. It makes it to be
a fairly attractive crop to grow and
thus we do have more acres this
year,” said Jeffery Kostuik, diversification specialist with Parkland
Crop Diversification Foundation
(PCDF), which has been working on hemp agronomy since its
legalization in 1998.
Canada exports $40 million in
hemp products annually. They
include the grain, exterior fibre
a n d t h e i n t e r i o r by p ro d u c t ,
most commonly used for animal
bedding.
“Currently there is no real fibre
processing in Canada, so most of
the focus on hemp has been for
grain and grain has carried the
industry to what it is today. Crop
insurance has about 84 per cent
insured acres keyed in and we are
at about 20,000 acres in Manitoba
right now,” Kostuik said.
A licence from Health Canada is
required to grow industrial hemp
and testing for the narcotic compound THC may be required on
some varieties.
In 2014, there were 292 industrial hemp commercial licences
issued in Manitoba and 1,135
across Canada. Just over 27,000
acres were cultivated in Manitoba
in 2014, with the CRS-1 variety the
most commonly grown.
Always follow grain marketing, stewardship practices and pesticide label directions. Varieties that are glyphosate tolerant (including those designated by the letter “R” in the product
number) contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate herbicides. Glyphosate herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Individual product responses are variable
and subject to a variety of environmental, disease and pest pressures. Refer to www.pioneer.com/products or contact your local Pioneer Hi-Bred Sales Representative for the latest
and most complete listing of traits and scores for each Pioneer brand product and for product placement and management suggestions specific to your operation and local conditions.
Varieties with the Genuity® Roundup Ready 2 Yield® (RR2Y) trait contain genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup® brand agricultural herbicides.
Roundup® brand agricultural herbicides will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Genuity®, Roundup®, Roundup Ready® and Roundup Ready 2 Yield® are registered trademarks
of Monsanto Technology LLC used under license. ®, SM, TM Trademarks and service marks of DuPont Pioneer or their respective owners. © 2015, PHII.
h u s b a n d r y — t h e s c i e n c e , S K I L L O R ART O F F AR M IN G
18
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
Black earth doesn’t mean warmer soil
Spaces went fast for this year’s Manitoba Pulse & Soybean Growers SMART Day
BY SHANNON VANRAES
Co-operator staff / Carman
W
agons were filled to
c a p a city and then
some at the Ian N.
Morrison research farm near
Carman late last month, as
the Manitoba Pulse & Soybean
Growers held its annual SMART
Day for soybean producers and
agronomists.
“Programs like this are hugely
beneficial, especially for guys
like myself, who are just realizing that I know enough to
know that I don’t know anything,” said Rauri Qually, who is
preparing to take on his family
farm and is new to soybeans.
“Free days like this are hugely
beneficial,” he added. “I’ve
learned more here than probably what I learned in a month
at university.”
Participants were able to take
in sessions on soybean grading, weed management, iron
deficiency chlorosis, crop residue management and other
topics. They could also speak
directly with researchers and
tour test plots to see results for
themselves.
Greg Bartley takes producers through his research plots. Photos: Shannon VanRaes
University of Manitoba graduate student Greg Bartley shared
his research on the effects of soil
preparation on yield.
“It turns out black earth doesn’t
really have much of an effect,” he
said, explaining that soil temperatures with other tillage methods,
such as strip till, or planting into
short or tall stubble, or even a
cover crop of fall rye, all result in
similar spring soil temperatures.
They also result in similar
yields, with strip till showing a
slight lead, he said.
Gil Martel farms near St. Leon
and said that information could
change the way he plants his soybeans next spring.
“It’s helpful to know that, it
certainly opens up new ideas,”
said Martel. He added the crop
to his rotation two years ago. This
season he’s got about 1,500 acres
and if things go well he may plant
more in 2016.
“The most surprising information so far today was the difference in soil temperature, that it
was the same for black soil as the
others, that was pretty surprising,” he said.
Producers observe aggregate stability during a soil demonstration at the
Manitoba Pulse & Soybean Growers annual SMART Day for soybean producers and
agronomists.
The idea of strip tillage also
caught the interest of Tim Johnson,
who at 13 might have been the
youngest SMART participant.
“Me and my dad were actually
talking about that with my uncle,”
he said. “We took some pictures of
the strip till today and I think we’ll
be talking about it some more.”
Johnson said he’s wanted to follow in his dad’s farming footsteps
as long as he can remember, and
asked to tag along on his first field
day a couple of years ago. This
summer he’s also working on the
family farm.”
“He’s the future,” said his father,
James Johnson.
Organizers were pleased
with the turnout, and thanked
producers for taking time out
of their busy schedules to take
part.
“We know that you have a lot
of field days to choose from,”
Manitoba Pulse & Soybean
Grow­ers production specialist
Kristen Podolsky told producers.
“So we’re glad you’ve chosen this
one.”
[email protected]
Higher seeding rate needed for organic soybeans
Transitioning to organic soybeans is possible with strategic planning
BY SHANNON VANRAES
Co-operator staff / Carman
I
t’s a simple question, one
that Martin Entz hopes
producers will seriously
consider.
“Why not grow organic soybeans?” he asked producers
gathered at the Ian N. Morrison
research farm near Carman late
last month for the Manitoba
Pulse & Soybean Growers’
annual SMART Day.
“So m e t h i n g f a r m e r s a re
always looking for is on-farm
diversification, so we’ve been
working with farmers to help
them shift part of their farm
operation to certified organic as
a form of diversification,” said
the University of Manitoba plant
science professor. “Doing this is
possible; it works.”
Research on organic soybean
production has been ongoing
at the site for about a decade,
and over the last eight years
the average yield has been 28.7
bushels an acre using OAC
Prudence, Entz said.
And while those yields are
lower than conventional soybeans, he added that the premiums for organic beans make the
venture worthwhile.
“The price for organic soy-
Trait Stewardship Responsibilities Notice to Farmers
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accordance with ETS Product Launch Stewardship Guidance, and in compliance with Monsanto’s Policy for Commercialization
of Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity Crops. Commercialized products have been approved for import into key
export markets with functioning regulatory systems. Any crop or material produced from this product can only be exported to,
or used, processed or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory approvals have been granted. It is a violation of national
and international law to move material containing biotech traits across boundaries into nations where import is not permitted.
Growers should talk to their grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their buying position for this product. Excellence
Through Stewardship® is a registered trademark of Excellence Through Stewardship.
ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL DIRECTIONS. Roundup Ready® crops contain genes that confer tolerance
to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup® brand agricultural herbicides. Roundup® brand agricultural herbicides will
kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate. Acceleron® seed treatment technology for canola contains the active ingredients
difenoconazole, metalaxyl (M and S isomers), fludioxonil and thiamethoxam. Acceleron® seed treatment technology for
canola plus Vibrance® is a combination of two separate individually-registered products, which together contain the active
ingredients difenoconazole, metalaxyl (M and S isomers), fludioxonil, thiamethoxam, and sedaxane. Acceleron® seed treatment
technology for corn (fungicides and insecticide) is a combination of four separate individually-registered products, which
together contain the active ingredients metalaxyl, trifloxystrobin, ipconazole, and clothianidin. Acceleron® seed treatment
technology for corn (fungicides only) is a combination of three separate individually-registered products, which together contain
the active ingredients metalaxyl, trifloxystrobin and ipconazole. Acceleron® seed treatment technology for corn with Poncho®/
VoTivo™ (fungicides, insecticide and nematicide) is a combination of five separate individually-registered products, which
together contain the active ingredients metalaxyl, trifloxystrobin, ipconazole, clothianidin and Bacillus firmus strain I-1582.
Acceleron® seed treatment technology for soybeans (fungicides and insecticide) is a combination of four separate individually
registered products, which together contain the active ingredients fluxapyroxad, pyraclostrobin, metalaxyl and imidacloprid.
Acceleron® seed treatment technology for soybeans (fungicides only) is a combination of three separate individually registered
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registered trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC, Used under license. Vibrance® and Fortenza® are registered trademarks of
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is a registered trademark of Dow AgroSciences LLC. Used under license. Poncho® and Votivo™ are trademarks of Bayer. Used
under license. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
beans right now… is about $26
to $30 a bushel, depending on if
it’s food grade or feed,” he said,
adding that demand is also high.
An ongoing project backed
by the university, the Western
Grains Research Foundation
and the pulse growers’ association assists interested farmers in
transitioning a portion of their
farm to organic by providing
guidance and individual, oneon-one farm plans.
“Soybeans are our most consistent organic crop, so there
is potential here,” he said. But
he added that success requires
management practices that
might be new to producers,
such as in-row flame weeding.
Inter-row tillage is also effective
for managing weeds in organic
soybeans, he said.
“If you’re not using herbicides, the danger of wide-row
soybeans doesn’t apply,” he
explained, referring to the
development of resistant weeds
in conventional row crops. “If
you’re growing them organically,
you should use inter-row cultivation, so space them as close as
you can, while still allowing for
that cultivation.”
Effective crop rotation also
plays a crucial role in organic
soybean management, Entz
said. And while some might
think corn isn’t an option in
organic rotations, Entz told producers to think again.
Holding up a lengthy corn
plant, he said, “some of you who
grow soybeans are also interested in growing corn, and there
are corn alternatives as well.
This is actually an open-pollinated food-grade corn.”
Variety selection
Choosing the right soybean variety is also important. Student
researcher Michelle Carkner is
working to identify which varieties are best suited to Manitoba,
Martin Entz speaks about organic
soybeans near Carman. Photos: Shannon VanRaes
“And because the
price of organic
soybeans is so high,
growers can get their
money back when
they increase seeding
rates.”
Michelle Carkner
using plots at the research farm
as well as at producer sites.
“We’re still learning things
about growing soybeans conventionally, we’re learning even
more about growing organic
soybeans,” said Carkner.
Trials have looked at the effectiveness of OAC Petrel, Toma,
Tundra, Krios, Jari, Auriga,
Savannah and SK0007 plus new
and unregistered varieties in the
hopes of finding the right fit for
organics in Manitoba’s shorter
growing season.
Michelle Carkner is looking at
varieties and seeding rates for
organic soybeans.
One thing that’s become
apparent is that higher seeding rates increase yields and
decrease weed pressure in
organic beans.
“And because the price of
organic soybeans is so high,
growers can get their money
back when they increase seeding rates,” she said.
Some producers at the demonstration were concerned
about the 36-months transition
to organic, a period when crops
must be produced organically,
but can’t be sold for a premium.
Entz said that by doing a farm
plan, and looking at transition
strategies that could be managed, and Carkner agreed.
“That’s why people might
want to look at starting with
part of their farm, maybe
putting it into a green manure
first, there are ways,” she said,
adding some buyers will also
offer premiums during the 36
months to bring more organic
production online.
[email protected]
19
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
Soybean cyst nematode co-evolved with crop
They are tiny world travellers and Manitoba’s Red River Valley could be
the next stop on the soybean cyst nematode’s global tour
By Shannon VanRaes
CO-OPERATOR STAFF / Carman
I
n the middle of the Ian N.
Morrison research farm near
Carman, an unlikely scene is
unfolding as farmers and agronomists crowd around what looks
like an old jam jar.
“Careful, we don’t want this to
break,” Mario Tenuta stresses,
with a bit of a chuckle.
But what’s inside the tightly
sealed jar is no laughing matter.
Hidden in a tangle of soybean
roots is a tiny organism that has
the potential to become soybean
growers’ next nemesis should it
be unleashed in Manitoba.
To date, no cases of soybean
cyst nematode have been identified in the province, but the
University of Manitoba soil ecologist said it’s only a matter of
time before it arrives.
“My take-home message
is that soybean cyst nematode is geared biologically to
be with soybean and wherever
we move soybean around the
world, guess what… soybean
cyst nematode will eventually
follow, and that’s where we are
today in Manitoba,” Tenuta told
producers during Manitoba
Pulse & Soybean Growers’
annual SMART Day late last
month.
As soybeans developed in
ancient China, so too did the
nematode, he explained. And
as soybeans moved beyond the
Asian continent, the tiny pest
went with it.
“They have co-evolved, folks,
co-evolved to the point where
the soybean cyst nematode really
needs soybeans to survive,” the
soil ecologist said.
On the move since 1954
First introduced to North
America in the 1760s, soybeans
were largely considered a forage
crop until the time of the Great
Depression when other uses
were explored and promoted.
The search for better production
methods led to the importation
of soil inoculum in the 1940s and
’50s, a move that likely stamped
the nematode’s passport, ushering it onto North American soil.
It was first officially identified in
the Carolinas in 1954.
Today, soybean cyst nematode is present across the U.S.,
including in North Dakota. It’s
also found across Ontario and in
some areas of Quebec.
It can travel in soil, with birds,
on plant material and in flood
waters, making the Red River
Valley a likely place for the soybean cyst nematode to appear,
he said.
“It has been moving northward up the Red River Valley, and
it’s really well documented. In
North Dakota, they’ve followed
the progression closely, and
in the last 15 years it’s worked
its way basically into all the
soybean-growing areas,” said
Tenuta. “Canada customs are
tough to get through — they
ask about liquor and they take
my venison sausage… they do
a really good job. But they really
suck when it comes to keeping
nematodes and other pathogens
out of Canada, so the nematode
will come over.”
Rauri Qually, who farms near
Dacotah, said he’s “deeply” concerned about a possible incursion of nematodes following the
presentation.
Mario Tenuta holds up a jar containing soybean roots with nematodes for
inspection at the Ian N. Morrison research farm near Carman. Photo: Shannon VanRaes
“It doesn’t sound like we have
much of a defence against these
things,” he said, but added
that he’s still meticulous about
biosecurity, washing all equipment before it moves to a new
location.
Tenuta said that’s the right
attitude, adding that producers should keep up biosecurity,
making sure equipment coming
onto and off the fields is free of
soil, especially if it’s travelling
between farms or across borders.
As for what the soybean cyst
nematode actually does, Tenuta
said it essentially hijacks the
plant to create its own food
factory.
“The nematode life cycle goes
as follows: the female has died
and she’s packed with eggs inside
her, as that soybean root comes
up close to that dead female,
and she’s called a cyst at this
point, the eggs are stimulated
to hatch… then they migrate
towards the root,” Tenuta said.
“They poke a hole into the roots,
gain entry into that root, and
they just stick their head into the
root and just start feeding.”
Presence of the nematode can
reduce yields by as much as 20 to
30 per cent, and is often difficult
to diagnose.
Rotation and resistant
varieties
However, it can be managed
by crop rotation and resistant
varieties.
“And no, snow doesn’t count
as crop rotation,” said Dennis
Lange, a crop specialist with
Manitoba Agriculture, Food and
Rural Development.
He added that other edible
beans and some weeds can also
play host to the soybean cyst
nematode.
Gil Martel of St. Leon has only
grown soybean for a couple of
years, but said the information
was helpful, adding he’s going to
take another look at his rotation
schedule.
“It certainly gives you something to think about,” he said.
Producers will also have much
to consider when it comes to
variety selection, as even resistant varieties break down over
time, losing their effectiveness.
“I encourage growers to use
them, but it is a cat-and-mouse
game,” Tenuta said. “Because if
the soybean has restart genes,
guess what? The nematode
evolves.”
[email protected]
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PRODUCTION
2015-06-19 1:37 PM
20
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
Harvest begins amid storms and spotty showers
Manitoba Agriculture, Food and Rural Development crop report for Aug. 4, 2015
Weekly Provincial
Summary
Winter wheat and fall rye harvest is underway in Manitoba.
Preliminary reports indicate
winter wheat yields range from
60 to 85 bu./acre, with low levels of fusarium-damaged kernels in harvested samples.
There are also a few fields of
spring wheat, barley and field
peas harvested last week.
Sw a t h i n g o r p re h a r v e s t
applications in the earliestseeded spring cereal fields has
started.
The majority of springseeded crops is either grain
filling or podding, with some
of the later-seeded crops finishing up flowering.
Southwest Region
A large storm system that
moved from Pierson to
Hamiota on July 27, resulted in
varying amounts of precipitation; rainfall amounts ranged
from 25 to 125 mm across
the region. The storm system
also resulted in an EF-2 tornado that tracked from south
of Tilston to north of Virden,
spending approximately three
hours on the ground. Crops
such as corn, sunflower and
oats were severely lodged
in the path of the tornado,
whereas areas farther from the
path location also sustained
heavy crop lodging. Some hail
damage in Souris, Wawanesa
and Minto areas was reported
as well.
Most winter cereals are close
to physiological maturity. Low
fusarium head blight levels in
winter wheat and low ergot
levels in fall rye continue to be
reported. Initial winter wheat
h a r ve s t h a s b e g u n i n t h e
Brandon and eastern areas of
the region, with average yields
reported.
The earliest canola fields
are at the pod-filling stage
of development. Some earlyseeded barley, wheat and oats
are also nearing maturity,
whereas late-seeded cereals
are still in hard-dough stage.
Flax fields are coming out
of flower and are experiencing some lodging due to the
recent heavy thundershowers.
Some pea harvest has begun
in the Rivers area with average to slightly above-average
yields reported. Increased levels of mycosphaerella are being
reported in later-seeded field
peas as a result of the cooler
and wetter conditions.
Lygus bugs are affecting
some sunflower stands.
Hay and pasture conditions
across the Southwest Region
continue to be variable.
First-cut hay is complete and
native hay is being harvested.
Generally, yields are 50 to 75
per cent of average.
Northwest Region
A major weather system
moving through most of the
Northwest Region over the
past week resulted in 38 to 51
mm of rain reported for most
of the area, and 101 to 152 mm
reported in the McCreary and
Ste. Amelie areas.
Cro p s i n t h e No r t h we s t
Region are reported to range
from good to poor condition.
Some of the heavier crops
lodged as a result of the heavy
rains and winds experienced
last week, particularly canola.
Approximately 10 per cent of
the winter wheat crop is in the
dough stage of development
and 90 per cent is mature.
About 10 per cent of the spring
wheat crop is at the milk stage
of growth with the remaining
90 per cent in the dough stage.
Some rye and barley has been
har vested in the southern
part of the region. Preharvest
glyphosate applications have
begun.
Canola improved significantly over the week as the
crop continues to develop
rapidly.
Crop insect pest activity
throughout the region has
been low, and producers continue to monitor crops closely
for any signs of insect pest
activity.
It is estimated that 75 per
cent of first-cut hay is comp l e t e w i t h b e l ow - a v e r a g e
yields in most parts of the
Northwest Region. Cutting of
native hay has begun.
Central Region
War m and humid weather
conditions continued in the
early week. Most areas have
adequate moisture and heavy
morning dews are common.
Unsettled conditions remain
and showers and thundershowers continue. Rainfall
amounts varied from a few
millimetres to as much as 35
mm.
Cereal crops throughout the
region look good and some
of the lodged cereal fields
have recovered to a certain
degree. However, harvest will
be a challenge in many spring
wheat fields and yield loss
of some degree is expected.
Fusarium head blight levels
appear to be much lower than
last year in both winter and
spring wheat.
Harvest of winter wheat and
fall rye has begun. Early yields
of winter wheat are reported in
the 60 to 85 bu./ac. range. Some
spring wheat is harvested.
There is a wide range in
canola development due
to the varied seeding dates.
Some canola fields have been
opened up with a swathed
round or two; the odd field has
been swathed. Many fields are
lodged due to heavy winds.
Sunflowers are flowering.
Mo n i t o r i n g c o n t i n u e s f o r
insects, and staging is being
done for fungicide application.
Sunflower beetle numbers are
low. Corn is growing rapidly.
Fields are silking with cobs
starting to form.
Soybeans continue to flower
and form pods. Some fields
are showing increasing damage due to excess moisture and
subsequent root rots.
Edible beans are flowering, and fungicide applications continue. Environmental
conditions are conducive for
white mould. Bacterial blight
is reported in cranberry and
kidney types; other varieties
can also be affected.
Di a m o n d b a c k m o t h a n d
bertha army worm trap counts
are average to low for the season. Lygus bugs are found in
canola fields, but numbers are
below threshold levels. Wild
oat plants are emerging above
the crops in patches, as are
other later-emerging weeds in
thinner areas of fields. Weed
growth is noticeable in lodged
cereal fields.
Hay harvest continues in the
Central Region but has been
difficult with the high humidity and recent rains. Greenfeed
is being cut for forage.
Eastern Region
The weather was highly variable. Cool temperatures with
drizzle alternated with sunny
weather or significant rainfall
that sometimes included isolated severe weather events.
Rainfall accumulations
ranged from trace amounts to
over 30 mm. Some isolated,
severe hailstorms occurred
in southern districts. Across
the Easter n Region, fields
continue to show evidence
of standing water and areas
where crop is drowned out and
is more prevalent in central
and southern districts.
Winter wheat is mature and
some harvesting and swathing started over the weekend.
Canola is pod filling. Soybeans
range from R3 to R5.
Across the region, the majority of hay and pasture lands
are in good condition. Haying
was back to full swing with
30 to 50 per cent of the feed
being put up. Quality is rated
as good.
Interlake Region
Precipitation and cooler temperatures were experienced
in the Interlake Region last
week. Rainfall amounts varied throughout the region.
Moosehorn received the most
precipitation with just over 40
mm. Cool temperatures moved
in with daytime highs between
20 to 25 C and nighttime temperatures dipping below 10 C.
Harvesting of winter wheat
and barley has begun. Winter
wheat crops are coming in with
reports of yields in the 65 to 70
bu./ac. range with little to no
fusarium-damaged kernels in
samples. Barley yields are ranging from 70 to 80 bu./ac. with
good quality.
Canola fields are nearly finished flowering with some
early-seeded fields starting
to show coloured seeds in the
bottom pods. Lygus bugs in
canola are being monitored as
populations are approaching
thresholds. Some spraying is
occurring in alfalfa seed fields
for weevils and lygus bugs.
Clearer weather allowed
some much-needed progress
with haying.
Promoting conservation
agriculture in Africa
CFGB will receive federal funds to scale
up smallholder adoption
Staff
August 13 • 10:00am -2:00pm
Morrison Sports Park, Oakville MB
It’s been an amazing ten years with amazing
results for soybean and corn farmers!
Quarry Seed invites past, current, and potential
growers to the 10th Annual Valley Soybean Expo!
Enjoy a home-style lunch… take in educational
tours… check out equipment displays! You’ll also
have a chance to catch up on the latest research
and forecasts to give you a profitable edge come
harvest time. Thursday, August 13th from
10am to 2pm, at Oakville Morrison Sport Park.
For details call Quarry Seed, 1-888-274-9243.
Where farmers and Research meet
C
a n a d i a n Fo o d g r a i n s
Bank (CFGB) has
re c e i ve d $ 1 4 m i l l i o n
from the federal government
to scale up conservation agriculture programs in three
African countries.
The funding provided on a
three-to-one matching basis,
will enable the organization
to assist 50,000 farmers in
Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania,
up from 5,000 farmers it is
currently assisting, it says in a
release.
CFGB member agencies will
be able to provide training,
technical assistance and support for farmers who want to
learn how to use conservation
agriculture to increase the
productivity of their farms.
The total budget for the
program is $18.67 million:
$ 1 4 m i l l i o n f r o m Fo re i g n
Affairs, Trade and Develop­
ment Canada and $4.67 million from Canadian Food­
grains Bank.
Conser vation agriculture
is characterized by the three
linked principles of minimizing soil disturbance, permanently covering the soil, and
including crop rotations and
associations. It has proven
e f f e c t i v e a t re s t o r i n g s o i l
health and fertility, improving the capture and use of
rainfall, and increasing crop
yields and farm profitability.
In addition to directly
a s s i s t i n g f a r m e r s t h ro u g h
training, CFGB will also work
with farmer groups, non-governmental organizations, government and the private sector to promote conservation
agriculture systems for smallholder farmers more broadly
in East Africa, and work to
i m p r ov e t h e q u a l i t y a n d
implementation of national
and regional agricultural policies and programs supporting conservation agriculture
in the region.
Canadian Foodgrains Bank
is a partnership of 15 churches
and church agencies working
together to end global hunger.
In the 2014-15 budget year,
CFGB provided $41.6 million
of assistance for 1.1 million
people in 39 countries.
21
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
Prairie towns lack settlement services for immigrants
Rural Development Institute study surveyed 29 towns across Prairies and B.C.
Growing trend
BY LORRAINE STEVENSON
Co-operator staff
R
ural towns exist because
of immigration, but they
aren’t easy places for
immigrants to move into nowadays. Lack of employment or
foreign credentials going unrecognized are only part of the
problem, according to a new
report released by the Brandonbased Rural Development Insti­
tute. Newcomers go wherever
language training, affordable
housing, child care, public
transportation, and other social
supports are available, and
these are generally lacking in
smaller centres.
The study focused on 29 communities across Manitoba, Sask­
atch­ewan, Alberta and B.C., asking
questions of settlement service
agencies about what language
and other services they could offer
to help immigrants integrate.
Neepawa, Arborg, Brandon,
Virden, Thompson and Dauphin
A group of Filipinos who arrived to work at the Springhill Farms hog-processing
plant in Neepawa last January. Immigrants now make up almost a quarter of
Neepawa’s population. Photo: Adette Tripon/Neepawa Press
were selected in Manitoba, with
participants from all six communities reporting they have “mixed
perceptions” of how easy it was to
settle and find work.
The report says that more could
be done even in Neepawa, where
nearly one in four (23.6 per cent)
residents is a recent newcomer
and where a wide range of settlement services is now offered.
Language skills, credential recognition and understanding
Canadian workplace culture were
cited as key to people finding
work in Neepawa.
The report defines “newcomers” as those who’ve been given
permanent resident status but
are not yet citizens, refugees
or refugee claimants, temporary foreign workers, naturalized citizens and international
students.
More immigrants are choosing to reside in rural communities and 94 per cent of the
participants reported seeing
more newcomers living in their
communities. The report says
employment is the major reason people move there, but
presence of family or ethno­
cultural community and the
lifestyle of smaller centres are
others. This work has attempted
to create an inventory of services for immigrations, with a
look where improvements can
be made, said RDI executive
director Bill Ashton.
“Despite the increase of newcomers choosing to reside in
rural areas, there is no welldocumented evidence of the
availability and types of settlement and integration services
offered to them. This research
sheds some light on the situation newcomers face when
trying to settle in rural areas,”
Ashton said.
The study included four provincial reports summarizing
findings from all communities
sampled.
Just over 37,000 new residents
made their homes between
2009 and 2013 in the 29 communities studied.
The repor t recommends
expanding settlement services
across Western Canada, and
making more people eligible for
them.
A strong settlement sector
especially in small rural communities is a key asset for the
community to attract, welcome, and retain newcomers,
and more core funding to support it is needed, the report
said.
[email protected]
Scholarship
available
for CTEAM
program
Two-year program
enhances
farm business
management skills
Farm Management
Canada release
The second annual Robert (Bob)
L. Ross scholarship program is
open for applications until Sept.
15. The scholarship is offered
by Agri-Food Management
Excellence (AME) in collaboration with Farm Management
Canada, Family Farms Group
and the Ross Family.
The successful recipient
will receive free tuition to
the CTEAM (Canadian Total
Excellence in Agricultural
Management) program (valued at $7,500) as well as up to
$4,000 towards travel expenses. New this year, the recipient
will also receive an extra $2,500
towards an additional farm team
member’s tuition to CTEAM or
other AME educational seminars, thanks to support from
Family Farms Group.
CTEAM provides farmers and
ranchers with the opportunity
to enhance their farm business
management skills and practices. Over two years in four
sessions, participants work with
their own farm data to develop a
strategic business plan for their
operation.
The scholarship was formed
last year in memory of Bob Ross,
a dairy farmer and passionate
farm business consultant from
St. Marys, Ontario, who lost his
courageous battle with cancer
in March 2014. Bob was instrumental in the creation of the
CTEAM program.
Last year’s scholarship was
awarded to Roger Lepp of
Riverdale Grain in Rivers, Man.
For more information visit
www.agrifoodtraining.com.
In farming today, there’s an emerging list of management decisions
that need to be made during the growing season. Challenges such as
pests and disease can emerge before you know it.
To stay on top of crop developments in Manitoba this year, join the
conversation at Crop Chatter. It’s where you’ll find the latest unbiased
information from a network of MAFRD staff, private agronomists and
fellow farmers.
> Ask a question and receive an
answer from an agronomist in
two working days
> See regular MAFRD crop, pest
and disease reports, updated
as necessary through the week
> Post photos for pest or
disease identification
> Report weather events
> Just let fellow farmers know
how your crop is doing
Join the conversation at CropChatter.com
today, and be part of the conversation
22
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
FARMER'S
MARKETPLACE
selling?
Call to place your classified ad in the next issue: 1-800-782-0794
FAX your classified ads to: 204-954-1422 · Or eMAiL your classified ads to: [email protected]
Classification
Index
Tributes/Memoriams
Announcements
Airplanes
Alarms & Security Systems
AntiqUes
– Antiques For Sale
– Antique Equipment
– Antique Vehicles
– Antiques Wanted
Your guide to the Classification
Categories and sub-listings
within this section.
BUiLding &
renovAtions
– Building Supplies
– Concrete Repair
– Doors & Windows
– Electrical & Plumbing
– Insulation
– Lumber
– Roofing
Buildings
Business Machines
Business Opportunities
Arenas
AUCtion sALes
– MB Auction Parkland
– MB Auction Westman
– MB Auction Interlake
– MB Auction Red River
– SK Auction
– AB Auction Peace
– AB Auction North
– AB Auction Central
– AB Auction South
– BC Auction
– Auction Various
– U.S. Auctions
BUsiness serviCes
– Crop Consulting
– Financial & Legal
– Insurance/Investments
Butchers Supply
Chemicals
Clothing/Work wear
Clothing/Western
/Specialty wear
Collectibles
Compressors
Computers
Auction Schools
AUto & trAnsport
– Auto Service & Repairs
– Auto & Truck Parts
– Autos
– Trucks
– Semi Trucks & Trailers
– Sport Utilities
– Vans
– Vehicles Various
– Vehicles Wanted
BeeKeeping
– Honey Bees
– Cutter Bees
– Bee Equipment
ContrACting
– Custom Baling
– Custom Feeding
– Custom Harvesting
– Custom Seeding
– Custom Silage
– Custom Spraying
– Custom Trucking
– Custom Tub Grinding
– Custom Work
Construction Equipment
Crop Inputs
Dairy Equipment
Electrical
Engines
Entertainment
FArM MAChinerY
– Aeration
– Conveyors
– Equipment Monitors
Belting
Biodiesel Equipment
Books & Magazines
tiLLAge & seeding
– Air Drills
– Air Seeders
– Harrows & Packers
– Seeding Various
– Tillage Equipment
– Tillage Various
trACtors
– Agco
– Allis/Deutz
– Belarus
– Case/IH
– Caterpillar
– Ford
– John Deere
– Kubota
– Massey Ferguson
– New Holland
– Steiger
– Universal
– Versatile
– White
– Zetor
– 2-Wheel Drive
– 4-Wheel Drive
– Various
– Fertilizer Equipment
– Grain Augers
– Grain Bins
– Grain Carts
– Grain Cleaners
– Grain Dryers
– Grain Elevators
– Grain Handling
– Grain Testers
– Grain Vacuums
– Hydraulics
– Irrigation Equipment
– Loaders & Dozers
– Parts & Accessories
– Potato & Row Crop
Equipment
– Repairs
– Rockpickers
– Salvage
– Silage Equipment
– Snowblowers/Plows
– Specialty Equipment
– Machinery Miscellaneous
– Machinery Wanted
Fencing
Firewood
Fish Farm
Forestry/Logging
Fork Lifts/Pallet Trucks
Fur Farming
Generators
GPS
Health Care
Heat & Air Conditioning
Hides/Furs/Leathers
Hobby & Handicrafts
Household Items
Iron & Steel
hAYing & hArvesting
– Baling Equipment
– Mower Conditioners
– Swathers
– Swather Accessories
– Various
CoMBines
– Belarus
– Case/IH
– Cl
– Caterpillar Lexion
– Deutz
– Ford/NH
– Gleaner
– John Deere
– Massey Ferguson
– Versatile
– White
– Combines - Various
– Accessories
LAndsCAping
– Greenhouses
– Lawn & Garden
LivestoCK
Cattle
– Cattle Auctions
– Angus
– Black Angus
– Red Angus
– Aryshire
– Belgian Blue
– Blonde d’Aquitaine
– Brahman
sprAYing eqUipMent
– Sprayers
– Various
– Brangus
– Braunvieh
– BueLingo
– Charolais
– Dairy
– Dexter
– Excellerator
– Galloway
– Gelbvieh
– Guernsey
– Hereford
– Highland
– Holstein
– Jersey
– Limousin
– Lowline
– Luing
– Maine-Anjou
– Miniature
– Murray Grey
– Piedmontese
– Pinzgauer
– Red Poll
– Salers
– Santa Gertrudis
– Shaver Beefblend
– Shorthorn
– Simmental
– South Devon
– Speckle Park
– Tarentaise
– Texas Longhorn
– Wagyu
– Welsh Black
– Cattle Composite
– Cattle Various
– Cattle Wanted
Horses
– Horse Auctions
– American Saddlebred
– Appaloosa
– Arabian
– Belgian
– Canadian
– Clydesdale
– Draft
– Donkeys
– Haflinger
– Miniature
– Morgan
– Mules
– Norwegian Ford
– Paint
– Palomino
– Percheron
– Peruvian
– Pinto
– Ponies
– Quarter Horse
– Shetland
– Sport Horses
– Standardbred
– Tennessee Walker
– Thoroughbred
– Warmblood
– Welsh
– Horses For Sale
– Horses Wanted
poultry
– Poultry For Sale
– Poultry Wanted
Sheep
– Sheep Auction
– Arcott
– Columbia
– Dorper
– Dorset
– Katahdin
– Lincoln
– Suffolk
– Texel Sheep
– Sheep For Sale
– Sheep Wanted
Swine
– Swine Auction
– Swine For Sale
– Swine Wanted
Speciality
– Alpacas
– Bison (Buffalo)
– Deer
– Elk
– Goats
– Llama
– Rabbits
– Emu/Ostrich/Rhea
– Yaks
– Various
Livestock Equipment
Livestock Services
& Vet Supplies
Misc. Articles For Sale
Misc. Articles Wanted
Musical
Notices
On-Line Services
orgAniC
– Organic Certified
– Organic Food
– Organic Grains
Outfitters
Personal
Pest Control
Pets & Supplies
Photography
Propane
Pumps
Radio, TV & Satellite
reAL estAte
– Commercial Buildings
– Condos
– Cottages & Lots
– Houses & Lots
– Land For Rent
– Land For Sale
– Mobile Homes
– Motels & Hotels
– Resorts
– Vacation Property
– farms & Ranches
– Acreages/Hobby Farms
– Manitoba
– Saskatchewan
– Alberta
– British Columbia
– Pastureland
– Farms/Ranches Wanted
reCreAtionAL
vehiCLes
– All Terrain Vehicles
– Boats & Water
– Campers & Trailers
– Golf Carts
– Motor Homes
– Motorcycles
– Snowmobiles
Recycling
Refrigeration
Restaurant Supplies
Sausage Equipment
Sawmills
Scales
CertiFied seed
– Cereal Seeds
– Forage Seeds
– Oilseeds
– Pulse Crops
– Specialty Crops
CoMMon seed
– Cereal Seeds
– Forage Seeds
– Grass Seeds
– Oilseeds
– Pulse Crops
– Common Seed Various
seed/Feed/grAin
– Feed Grain
– Hay & Straw
– Feed Wanted
– Grain Wanted
– Hay & Feed Wanted
– Seed Wanted
Sewing Machines
Sharpening Services
Silos
Sporting Goods
Stamps & Coins
Swap
Tanks
Tarpaulins
Tenders
Tickets
Tires
Tools
trAiLers
– Grain Trailers
– Livestock Trailers
– Trailers Miscellaneous
Travel
Water Pumps
Water Treatment
Welding
Well Drilling
Well & Cistern
Winches
CAreers
– Career Training
– Child Care
– Construction
– Domestic Services
– Farm/Ranch
– Forestry/Log
– Health Care
– Help Wanted
– Management
– Mining
– Oil Field
– Professional
– Resume Services
– Sales/Marketing
– Trades/Tech
– Truck Drivers
– Employment Wanted
✁
Classified Ad Order Form
MAiL TO:
Manitoba Co-operator,
Box 9800, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3K7
FAX to:
204-954-1422
Name: __________________________________________________________
phone in: TOLL
FREE IN CANADA:
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pLeAse print YoUr Ad BeLoW:
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TOTAL: ______________________
Published by
Farm Business Communications,
1666 Dublin Avenue,
Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1
WINNIPEG OFFICE
Manitoba Co-operator
1666 Dublin Avenue,
Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1
Toll-Free in Canada 1-800-782-0794
Phone 204-954-1415 in Winnipeg
FAX 204-954-1422 Mailing Address:
Box 9800, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 3K7
AGREEMENT
The publisher reserves the right to refuse any or all advertising for any reason
stated or unstated.
Advertisers requesting publication of either display or classified advertisements
agree that should the advertisement be omitted from the issue ordered for
whatever reason, the Manitoba Co-operator shall not be held liable. It is also
agreed that in the event of an error appearing in the published advertisement,
the Manitoba Co-operator accepts no liability beyond the amount paid for that
portion of the advertisement in which the error appears or affects. Claims for
adjustment are limited to errors appearing in the first insertion only.
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possible, we accept no liability in respect to loss or damage alleged to a rise
through either failure or delay in forwarding such replies, however caused,
whether by negligence or otherwise.
(unless otherwise stated)
Advertising rAtes &
inForMAtion
REgulAR ClASSIfIED
pLeAse note: Even if you do not want your name & address to appear in your ad, we need the information for our files.
No. of words _________________ x $0.45 x
NOON on THURSDAYS
Or (204) 954-1415 in Winnipeg
Address: ___________________________________________ Town: _____________________________________________
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ADVERTiSiNG DEADLiNE:
CAUTION
The Manitoba Co-operator, while assuming no responsibility for
advertisements appearing in its columns, exercises the greatest care in
an endeavor to restrict advertising to wholly reliable firms or individuals.
However, please do not send money to a Manitoba Co-operator box
number. Buyers are advised to request shipment C.O.D. when ordering
from an unknown advertiser, thus minimizing the chance of fraud and
eliminating the necessity of a refund where the goods have already
been sold.
At Farm Business Communications we have a firm commitment to protecting your privacy and security as our customer. Farm Business Communications will only collect personal information if it is required for the proper
functioning of our business. As part of our commitment to enhance customer service, we may share this personal information with other strategic
business partners. For more information regarding our Customer Informa-
tion Privacy Policy, write to: Information Protection Officer, Farm Business
Communications, 1666 Dublin Ave., Winnipeg, MB R3H 0H1.
Occasionally we make our list of subscribers available to other reputable
firms whose products and services might be of interest to you. If you would
prefer not to receive such offers, please contact us at the address in the
preceding paragraph, or call 1-800-782-0794.
The editors and journalists who write, contribute and provide opinions to
Manitoba Co-operator and Farm Business Communications attempt to
provide accurate and useful opinions, information and analysis. However,
the editors, journalists and Manitoba Co-operator and Farm Business
Communications, cannot and do not guarantee the accuracy of the information contained in this publication and the editors as well as Manitoba
Co-operator and Farm Business Communication assume no responsibility
for any actions or decisions taken by any reader for this publication based
on any and all information provided.
• Minimum charge — $11.25 per week for first 25 words
or less and an additional 45 cents per word for every word
over 25. Additional bolding 75 cents per word. GST is extra.
• 10% discount for prepaid ads. If phoning in your ad you
must pay with VISA or MasterCard to qualify for discount.
• Prepayment Bonus: Prepay for 3 weeks & get a bonus
of 2 weeks; bonus weeks run consecutively & cannot
be used separately from original ad; additions & changes
accepted only during first 3 weeks.
• Ask about our Priority Placement.
• If you wish to have replies sent to a confidential box number,
please add $5.00 per week to your total. Count eight words
for your address. Example: Ad XXXX, Manitoba Co-operator,
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• Your complete name and address must be submitted to
our office before publication. (This information will be kept
confidential and will not appear in the ad unless requested.)
DISplAy ClASSIfIED
• Advertising copy deviating in any way from the regular
classified style will be considered display and charged at
the display rate of $32.20 per column inch ($2.30 per
agate line).
• Minimum charge $32.20 per week + $5.00
for online per week.
• Illustrations and logos are allowed with full border.
• Spot color: 25% of ad cost, with a
minimum charge of $15.00.
• Advertising rates are flat with no discount for
frequency of insertion or volume of space used.
• Telephone orders accepted
• Price quoted does not include GST.
All classified ads are non-commissionable.
23
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
AUCTION SALES
AUCTION SALES
BUILDING & RENOVATIONS
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Parkland
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Parkland
BUILDING & RENOVATIONS
Roofing
PRICE TO CLEAR!!
McSherry Auction Service Ltd
75 truckloads 29 gauge full hard
100,000PSI high tensile roofing &
siding. 16 colours to choose from.
TRACTOR PLUS AUCTION SALE
Hazel Anderson (Late George)
Ask about our blowout colours...65¢/ft.2
Also in stock low rib white 29 ga. ideal for
archrib buildings
BEAT THE PRICE
INCREASES CALL NOW
The Pas
Swan River
Minitonas
Durban
Ashern
Parkland
Riverton
Eriksdale
McCreary
Interlake
Erickson
Langruth
Minnedosa
Neepawa
Hamiota
Gladstone
Rapid City
1
Stonewall, MB., at 10:00 AM
Arborg
Lundar
Gimli
Shoal Lake
Brandon
Carberry
Treherne
Killarney
Pilot Mound
Elm Creek
Sanford
Ste. Anne
Carman
Mariapolis
Crystal City
Lac du Bonnet
Beausejour
Winnipeg
Austin
Souris
Boissevain
Stonewall
Selkirk
Portage
Westman
Waskada
Dowler Auct
ion
rt &
o
p
Sat., aug. 15, 2015
Fisher Branch
Ste. Rose du Lac
Melita
ST. LAZARE, MB.
1-800-510-3303
BUILDINGS
AUCTION SALES
U.S. Auctions
AUCTION SALES
U.S. Auctions
DEALS ON THE GO!
SCAN TO DOWNLOAD
THE APP »»
AUCTION SALES
U.S. Auctions
St. Pierre
242
Morris
Winkler
Morden
Altona
Steinbach
1
Red River
Today’s top ag
news, delivered.
Sign up for daily enews at
manitobacooperator.ca
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Westman
ESTATE OF PATRICK WAITE Machinist Tools &
Household Auction Sale Sat., Aug. 15th 10:00AM
Oak Lake, MB on site at 110 North Railway St.
Complete Machinist Shop set-up of excellent quality
tools. Forklift mounted on rear of Cockshutt Tractor;
Small Shop Built Forklift on rear of Garden Tractor;
New Electric Cordless Lawnmower; 2 Large Milling/
Drilling Machines; 2 Large Metal Lathes; 2 Metal
Band Saws; 1-Ton Electric Crane on Castered A
Frame; 1-Ton Hoist Stand on A-Frame; Large 2 cyl
Compressor & 2 smaller Compressors; Large Hyd
Electric Shop Press; Parts Washer; Industrial Hack
Saw; Floor & Bench Drill Presses; Floor & Bench
Grinders; Side, Angle & Die Grinders; Air Tools include Impacts, Rachets (1/4-in., 3/8-in., 1/2-in.) 3/4in. Impact; Nibblers; Sand Blaster Cabin; 225 AC
Sizzler Welder; Spot Welder; Welding Tools & Accessories; 4 or 5 Large Tool Boxes filled w/Wrenches, Sockets, Fittings & Numerous Tools; Reamers,
Testers, Calipers; Threaders, Puller Sets; Vices;
Saws; Sanders; Taps & Dies; Concrete Tool; Metal
Lathe Cutters; Milling Machine Drill Bits; Various
size Chucks; Metal Work Benches; Amaco Kiln;
Ladder; 2 Gun Cabinets; Organizers; Oil Filters,
Seals & Bearings; Jacks; A very large Quantity of
Hand & Shop Tools & Supplies; Furniture, Appliances & Household includes 2 Bedroom Suites; 2
Small Sanyo & GE Fridges; Wood Table & Chairs
Set; Matching Loveseat & Recliner; Chesterfield;
China Cabinet; 2 Curio Cabinets; Panasonic 50-in.
Flat Screen TV; Yamaha Surround Sound; VCR’s;
Kodak Copier/ Scanner/ Printer; 2 Guitars w/Cases;
Amplifier; Music Stand & Stool; Dehumidifier; Bedding; Manual Grain Mill; Usual Small Appliances &
Household. See sale bills or website listed below
for detailed listing & photos. Hudson Auction Ser-vice
Hamiota, MB (204)764-2447 cells (204)764-0288 or
(204)764-0173 Website: www.globalauctionguide.com
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Interlake
Directions: From Stonewall, Manitoba on #67 HWY,
west 1.5 miles to lane marker #4067E on south side.
Watch for signs. Contact: Nancy Jo at 204-476-0419
TRACTORS: 2008 Case IH Maxxum 110, w/L740
FEL, 3PH, 3023 hrs, good rubber, premium unit • JD
2350, 3PH, 2870 hrs • JD 4240, w/ 148 FEL, power
shift, duals, 9239 hrs • IH TD6 Crawler, w/ blade • JD
L100, riding mower, 5 spd, 42” deck, 17 HP B&S motor
• AUTOS: 2009 Chevy Silverado, 2500HD, 4x4, auto,
6.0 L Vortec V8, gas, long box, ext cab, 145,000 KM,
excellent rubber • 2005 Ford F250, 6L Powerstroke DSL,
4x4, auto, needs engine work • 1989 Caprice Classic car
• 1984 S2500 International semi, 977,000 km showing,
Cummins engine RECREATION: 2011 Polaris Ranger
6x6, 800 EFI, Sage Green, 342 original hrs, purchased
new • EQUIPMENT: JD 503, 3PH mower • 2007 triaxle
flat deck trailer, 30’, beavertail w/ ramps, purchased new
• round bale trailer, 35’, 17 round bale capacity • Case
IH, 562 round baler, good cond • Hesston 1160 haybine
• Vicon 9 wheel hay rake • 2) NH 9’ trailing mowers • JD
10’ tandem disc • Westfield 8”x51’, PTO, grain auger •
Front end loader blade w/ brackets • snow bucket • Blue
Hills, 24’, livestock trailer • bale processor • IH antique
plow • Hi Qual squeeze chute • SHOP & MISC: welder
• hand tools • tools • battery charger • meat bandsaw •
shelving • vice • power tools • 2) piles of round bales •
metal culvert • HOUSEHOLD: glassware • fridge & stove
• furniture • housewares
Auctioneer’s note: Mostly large pieces of
excellent farm and cattle-related equipment
to sell so please attend on time.
www.lamportanddowler.com
FOR PHOTOS AND FULL LISTING
www.lamportanddowler.com
John Lamport 204-476-2067
Tim Dowler 204-803-6915
AUTO & TRANSPORT
AUTO & TRANSPORT
Semi Trucks & Trailers
2005 9900I IHC SEMI-TRACTOR, C-15 CAT engine, set at 575-hp, 13spd, 4-way diff. locks, 72-in
stand-up sleeper, with a 2004 advance Super B
grain
trailer.
$60,000.
Macgregor,
MB.
Ph:(204)871-0925.
AG
DEALS
TO GO!
AUGUST
Dauphin
Gilbert Plains
Reston
BUSINESS SERVICES
for BOX T RANCH LTD
Grandview
Virden
Download the app at
agreader.ca/mbc
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Interlake
Nancy and the late Hugh Crockatt
Winnipegosis
Roblin
Birtle
Ultra-portable version available.
AG EQUIPMENT
Farm auction
Birch River
Russell
FOUILLARD STEEL
SUPPLIES LTD.
Svc
Parkland – North of Hwy 1; west of PR 242,
following the west shore of Lake Manitoba
and east shore of Lake Winnipegosis.
Westman – South of Hwy 1; west of PR 242.
Interlake – North of Hwy 1; east of PR 242,
following the west shore of Lake Manitoba
and east shore of Lake Winnipegosis.
Red River – South ofHwy 1; east of PR 242.
Lam
AUCTION DISTRICTS
CONCRETE FLATWORK: Specializing in place &
finish of concrete floors. Can accommodate any
floor design. References available. Alexander, MB.
204-752-2069.
Multi-coloured millends.........49¢/ft.2
Grandview, MB
Hwy #5 & #366 Jct North 1/2 mile on #366 (Lane before Bridge)
Contact: (204) 546-2698
Stuart McSherry (204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027 www.mcsherryauction.com
AFAB INDUSTRIES IS YOUR SUPERIOR post
frame building company. For estimates and information
call
1-888-816-AFAB(2322).
Website:
www.postframebuilding.com
B-Gr. coloured......................70¢/ft.2
Saturday, August 8 @ 10:00 am
Vehicles, Vintage & Modern: 00 Ford F150 Lariat 4x4 Ext Cab, 26,000 miles, Sft * 91 Mercury
Grand Marquis * 60 Stude Baker Convertible 2D, Kept Indoors * 68 Cadila Fleetwood 4D Hard
Top * 64 Jeep J200 4x4 * 62 Chev Biscayne Wagon * 50 Chev 2 Ton Deluxe Cab w/ 14' B&H * 6
More Tractors: JD A * AR Oliver: 770 * 70 Cockshutt: 70 AC: WD45 * MH: Pony * 3) 101 * 2)
44 * 55 MM: RTS *U INT: A * 3) W30 Case: LA Equip: Rome 12' Breaking Disc * Wilrich 4153
26' Air Seeder * 2) Melcam Rock Picker * Morris CP725 Cult * Case 28' Cult * Cockshut 246 12'
Chisel Plow * Westfield 7" 36' Auger * Swather Carrier Yard & Recreation: Husqvarna Z4824
R Mower * Merry Roto Tiller * 78 AC Trail Cat * MF Ski Whiz * 70's Yamaha 350 Street Bike *
Outboard * Viking Al 12' Boat * Cedar 14' Boat * Fishing & Camping Items * Coleman Stove
Lantern Antique Equip: MM 570 Costimatic Combine * 2) AC Balers * MM 10' One Way * Wood
Cook Stove * More Farm Antiques * Tools & Farm Misc * Air Comp * Welders * Fuel Slip Tanks *
Partial List – Go to the Website for Listing & Pictures!!
BUILDINGS
OPENS: Wednesday, Aug. 5 / CLOSES: Wednesday, Aug. 12
TIMED ONLINE
Brought to you by SteffesGroup.com
TRACTORS
Case-IH 4690, 4 hyd., 1000 PTO,
w/duals, 5,500 hrs.
2002 Case-IH MX220, MFWD, 6,664
hrs., S/NX2204C4JA0116694
2007 Case-IH Puma 180, MFWD,
LX770 all hyd. quick tach loader, dirt
bucket w/grapple, joystick controls,
2,634 hrs., S/NZ7BH01089-312795
2010 Case-IH 305 Magnum, MFWD,
1,170 hrs., S/NZ9RZ02504
1964 JD 4020, wide front, diesel, cab,
JD 158 loader w/6’ bucket
Case 1570 Agri King, CAH
Zetor 5211, open station, 1 hyd., 3 pt.
IHC M, straight hood & grill, 12v
MM G705, Wheatland diesel
IHC Super C, narrow front
SKID STEER LOADERS & ATTACH.
2010 NH C185 track skid steer
loader, CAH, 2 spd., aux. flow, hyd.
quick tach, no bucket, w/1 year
warranty, S/NNGM440575
Bobcat 763 skid steer loader, ROPS,
aux. hyd., grapple bucket, 60%, 2,024
hrs., S/N512265369
Prime Attachments, skid steer land
leveler, New
Prime Attachments, skid steer tree
puller, New
Prime Attachments, skid steer root
grapple, New
Prime Attachments, skid steer root
grapple, 74”, New
Virnig snow bucket, 101” wide
GPS EQUIPMENT
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Interlake
McSherry Auction Service Ltd
EQUIPMENT PLUS
CONSIGNMENT SALE
Sunday, August 16 @ 10:00 am
Stonewall, MB - #12 Patterson Drive
Equipment: Case 1070 6500 Hrs * Case IH 8480 Rd Baler * New Idea 484 Rd Baler * 18' Tandem
Disc * Int 1100 9' Sickle Mower * 2013 Rowse 9' Trailer Sickle Mower * Trailer Post Pounder * Dozer/
Skidsteer Blade * 3PH Bale Forks * 3PH Blade * BH 20' Triple Axle Trailer Ramps * WW 16' BH Stock
Trailer * 2 Horse Trailers Yard & Recreation: Polaris 700cc 3 Seater Jet Ski * Wrought Iron Driveway
Gate * 82" HD Rotary Tiller Buildings: 30' x 85' Storage Bldg * 20' x 30' Storage Bldg * 10' x 20'
Commercial Pop Up Tent * 16' x 22' Event Tent * 20' x 40' Party Tent Tools & Misc: New- Tire
Changer * Wheel Balancer * JD 6000 Watt Generator * New-HD Work/Tool Bench * Air Hyd Jack *
50 Ton Hyd Jack * Pallet Jack * Power Pack * Wood Pellet Heater * Honda Water Pump Close Out of
Hardware Store Inventory: New Hardware * Automotive* Oils * Lubes * Tools
Stuart McSherry (204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027 www.mcsherryauction.com
EZ-Guide Plus 50, light bar only, New
JD Starfire globe, SF1 & SF2
JD Starfire globe, SF1 & SF2, no TCM
2012 JD StarFire 3000 receiver
globe, SF1, S/NPCGT3TA388753
2012 JD GS3 2630 display, SF1
COMBINE
2009 Case-IH 7088, axial flow, AFS,
2WD, Field Tracker, Pro 600 monitor,
162 receiver, S/NY9G001111
HEADS
JD 635F flex head, 35’, hyd. fore/aft
JD 930F flex head, full finger auger
JD 925F flex head, 25’, full finger
auger, Crary air reel, shedded
2009 Case-IH 2020 flex head, 30’
2009 JD 608SM chopping corn head,
8x30”, Case-IH adapter plate
JD 914 pickup head, 7-belt JD pickup
JD 912 pickup head, 6 belt, big wheels
JD 212 pickup head, 6 belt, shaft drive
NH 971 pickup head w/Melroe 378
6-belt pickup
MF 1859 rigid head, 20’, bat reel
JD 653A all crop head, 6x30”
NH3 TANKS
(2) 1,450 gal. NH3 tanks on running
gears
(2) 1,000 gal. NH3 tanks on running
gears, adj. axle spacing, 12.5L15 tires
Logan 90 Series potato box, 22’
Lockwood potato box, 14’
Mayo grading chain, 30” wide
HAY & LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT
Quick attach potato bucket, 80” wide Hesston 5800 round baler
1985 Mack large square bale
SWATHERS
SUGARBEET, BEAN
stacker, 9 spd., self-contained hyd.
Premier pull-type swather, 21’
& ROW CROP EQUIPMENT
Bale spear, 3 pt.
JD 590 pull-type swather, 21’
2009 Alloway folding defoliator,
Henke 370 feed wagon
12x22”, steel front, (2) rubber drums, Lick tank
FIELD CULTIVATORS
scalpers
Wil-Rich 17FCW field cultivator, 45’,
(2) Cattle scratchers
Alloway defoliator, 6x22”
7” spacing, 9” sweeps
Alloway defoliator, 8x30”, steel fronts GRAVITY BOXES
JD 1000 field cultivator, 42’
2012 EZ-Trail 510 grain cart
Pickett One Step, 6x30” or 8x22”
IHC 4700 field cultivator, 34’
EZ-Flow 220 gravity wagon
Alloway 2130 row crop cultivator,
Wil-Rich 2500 field cultivator, 36’
Gravity box, approx. 275 bu.
22” rows, 3 rank S-tine, cutaways
Wil-Rich field cultivator, 28’
French gravity box, single phase
Sunflower field cultivator, 27’, 3-fold TRUCKS
Gravity box, 14’, 4-wheel trailer
1986 Peterbilt 359, flat top removable Grain Belt Supply S weigh buggy
OTHER TILLAGE EQUIPMENT
sleeper,
3406
Cat,
13
spd.,
air
ride,
air
2007 Summers Super Chisel chisel
Allied Industries weigh buggy
dump, 5th wheel slide, diff lock, 222”
plow, 32’, tandems across
GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT
WB, shows 1,000,000 miles
Melroe 505 chisel plow, 27’
Super B Energy Miser SE375V
1986 Mack Midliner MS200 single
Sunflower 4211 coulter disc chisel
axle, 6 cyl. Mack, 5 spd., spring susp., continuous flow dryer, LP
Calkins disc chisel, 17’
Farm Fans grain cleaner w/electric
air brakes
JD 510 disc ripper, 7 shank
motor, S/N3707
1974 IHC 1800 cab & chassis,
JD 512 disc ripper, 5 shank
Kwik Kleen grain cleaner, 7 tube
478, Allison automatic, shows
IHC 770 plow, 6x16”, w/trip beams
Neuero grain vac
064,871 miles
IHC 770 auto reset plow, 5x16”
REM 2100 grain vac, 1000 PTO
1968 IHC 2000D, tandem axle, 671
Wil-Rich 8CRW chisel plow, 14’
Sorenson belt conveyor, 90’x20”
Detroit, 13 spd., 18’ box, roll tarp,
POTATO & ROW CROP EQUIPMENT shows 1,000,000 miles
2011 Brandt 1545 belt conveyor
2005 Lockwood 474 harvester, 4 row,
2013 Westfield auger, 114’x13”
SERVICE TRUCK & PICKUP
200 gal. water tank w/hyd. pump
Bergen auger, 100’x16”
2009 Chevrolet Kodiak C4500, reg.
Double L 850 potato harvester,
Westfield WR8061 auger, 61’x8”
cab, 6.6 liter Duramax diesel, Allison Hutchinson auger, 30’x6”, 9 hp.
2 row, star table, no chopper
automatic, power windows, locks, &
Lockwood L-6030-4640 potato
Westfield endgate auger w/spout
mirrors, D hooks, dual tanks, flatbed Trough auger
harvester, hyd. shaker, full width
w/5th wheel ball & rear receiver, steel
1993 Artsway potato harvester,
FORKLIFTS & ATTACHMENT
diamond plate, 217,948 miles
2 row, w/chopper, roller table
Lockwood 8100 pull-type potato
1997 Chevrolet, ext. cab, A/C, 5.7 liter, Caterpillar V40C forklift, LP
Forklift work basket, 4x4’
pole planter, 8x38”, markers
4WD, 6’ box, needs repair
Gehl Dynalift telescoping forklift
Lockwood potato planter, 6 row rear
TRAILERS
lift assist, 3 pt., ext. hitch
TRENCHING & TILING EQUIPMENT
2009
Timpte
hopper
bottom,
Lilliston potato cultivator, 6x36”
1999 Ditch Witch 5110DD trencher
40’x96”x72”, ag hopper, air ride
Harriston potato cultivator 6x36”
Johnston tandem axle potato trailer, Wayne Crary Tile Pro 712 mounted
Better Built seed cutter, 33”
tile plow, custom ordered
42’, Shur-Lok tarp
Bauman power hiller, 6x38”
Groundhog trencher, 5.5 hp. Honda
2004 Great Dane drop frame van,
Struik power hiller, 6x38”
48’x102”x12’6”, air ride
CONCRETE EQUIPMENT
Mayo planter filler boom, 18”
Stow power screed, 5 hp. Honda
Mayo telescoping belt conveyor, 30” Elite 5th wheel stock trailer, 8’x26’
Header
trailer,
flex
head
bar,
2-wheel
Whiteman power trowel, 36”, 5 hp.
Spudnik side-shift unloading
YMS
header
trailer,
4-wheel,
gooseneck
Concrete bull float w/(4) handles
conveyor, 36”, dual stinger, 3 phase
Shop-built
tandem
axle
trailer,
Small cement mixer w/motor
1982 Tri-Steel EL-3 bulk loading
15’x96”, 7.14-5 tires, parts only
Concrete float, 36”
conveyor, 3 stage, side conveyor
Shop-built trailer, 15’, 7’ wide
Mayo belted conveyor, 35’x36”
OTHER EQUIPMENT
1977
Starcraft
WS2100
travel
trailer,
Mayo 220 telescoping conveyor
17’, gas/electric fridge, gas stove &
SHOP EQUIPMENT
Harriston 200 clod hopper
furnace, gas hot water, sleeps (6)
Harriston 200 clod hopper
TANKS & PUMPS
Portable fuel station, 1,900 gal.
Lockwood bin piler, 40’, 18” boom
TIRES & RIMS
Harriston 200 clod hopper, star table SPRAYER & FERTILIZER EQUIP.
PARTS
French grader, 28”, single phase
1979 Spra-Coupe 115, 50’ boom
French train car loader, single phase TeeJet 844 sprayer control, 5-section FARM SUPPORT & MISC. ITEMS
For consignor information & location, complete terms, lot listing & photos visit SteffesGroup.com
Auctioneers & Clerk: Steffes Group, Inc.
West Fargo, ND Grand Forks, ND
701.237.9173
701.203.8400
Ames, IA
Sioux Falls, SD
515.432.6000 605.271.7730
Litchfield, MN
320.693.9371
Mt. Pleasant, IA
319.385.2000
SteffesGroup.com
24
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Red River
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Red River
EVENING AUCTION
FOR HARRY AND
ANNE NEUFELD
WINKLER, MB
LOCATION: #28 HOCHFELD ST.
NOTE: HOCHFELD IS 7 MILES SOUTH OF
WINKLER ON HIGHWAY #32
WATCH FOR SIGNS AUCTION DAY
Tractors
• 1979 John Deere 2130, 3pth, good rubber,
JD 146 Loader, 7 ft bucket serial #210331.
One owner tractor
• 1953 John Deere model 50 wide front Rock shaft,
pto, nice running tractor #5014221
• 1959 Ford 871, Select-O-Speed transmission,
Project tractor engine seized
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Red River
McSherry Auction Service Ltd
AUCTION SALE
Estate of Ronald Reimer
Saturday, August 15 @ 10:00 am
WaTRoUs, sK.
Fax: 306-946-2444
NEW & USED TRACTOR PARTS
NEW COMBINE PARTS
BUSINESS SERVICES
Crop Consulting
We also specialize in: agricultural complaints
of any nature; Crop ins. appeals; Spray drift;
Chemical failure; Residual herbicide;
Custom operator issues; Equip. malfunctions.
Licensed Agrologist on Staff.
For assistance and compensation call
Back-Track InvesTIgaTIons
1-866-882-4779. www.backtrackcanada.com
AUCTION NOTE: 7 of 11 Vehicles Shedded w Low Mileage in Original Cond.,
Exc Cond. Collectors don’t miss this one! More Treasures will be found by sale date!
Contact: (204) 866-4605 or (204) 750-1304
CLOTHING
Work Wear
Vehicles Modern & Vintage: 97 Dodge Dakota Ext Cab 43,731 Km Sft * 76 Ford Courier 26,031
Miles * 77 Plymouth Volare 79,745 * 73 Dodge Dart Sport 2 D 60,053 * 72 Toyota Carolla 84,343
Miles * 68 Dodge 100 Custom 49,293 * 63 Studebaker Vanity 54,424 Miles * 62 Dodge Seneca
2 Dr NR * 60’s Dodge 100 w Stepside Box * 49 Chev Mdl. 1433 1 Ton Dually * Yard: Yard King
18HP 38” R Mower * 3) Snowblowers * Push Mowers * Roto Tiller * Grass Sweep * Yard Trailer
* Tools: Port air Comp * Drill Press * New Mig Welder * Wood Lathe * Band Saw * Table Saw *
Stihl 038 Chainsaw * Power Tools * Hand Tools * Shop Supply * Building & Misc: 12’ x 18’ x 8’
Storage Shed on Skids * Gas Powered Saw Mandrel * 500 Gal Water Tank Trailer * 300 Gal Poly
Tank * Utility Trailer * Cement Mixer * Wood Heater * Al Ladder * 5 Guns * Antique Furniture:
2 Oak Buffet * 3) China Cabinets * Pantry 2 D * 6) Dressers 1) Oak Highboy w Mirror * Open
Book Shelf * 3) Oak Wash Stands * 3) Parlor Table * Fireplace Mantle * Stand * Painted Bench
* Wood Chairs * Farm Antiques: Case DC4 Tractor * Int 11’ Cult * Chain Saws * Reel Mower
* Studebaker Parts * Vintage Auto Parts * License Plates * Steel Wheels * Tire Ashtray * Oil
Cans * Whiterose Insect Sprayer * Cream Cans * Tools * Horse Shoes * Household Antiques:
Eastlake Door * Wood Annex Heater * Cast Bathtub * Cast Grates * Metal Ceiling Tile * Trunks
* Flour Bins * Painting * Lamps * Straight Blades * Household Tins * Royal Typewriter * Record
Player * Crocks * Granite Bread Bowl * China * Glassware * Ornaments * Jadite * Costume
Jewellery* Antique Toy & Advertisment: Metal Black Cat Sign * Porc Insurance Sign * Robin
Hood Sign * Orange Crush Sign * Railway Stop Sign * Calendars * Lumar Scraper * Pressed
Metal Trucks- Lincolns * Die Cast Cars * Vehicle Banks * Die Cast Tractors * JD P Type Combine *
Stationary Engine * Metal Wind Ups * Cap Guns *Rod Hockey Games* Music: 2) Accoustic Guitar
* Mandolin * Banjo * Violin * Garnet Amplifier * Household: Various Household *
Stuart McSherry (204) 467-1858 or (204) 886-7027 www.mcsherryauction.com
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Red River
ANNUAL AUGUST
EQUIPMENT AUCTION
SATURDAY, AUGUST 22nd 10:00 AM
Live Internet Bidding
Location: 218 Brandt St. Steinbach, MB
VEHICLES & TRAILERS
• 2003 Dodge Ram 3500
Dually, Quad Cab, Long Box,
4X4, Safetied, 5.9L Cummins
Diesel, 380K
• 2003 Volkswagen Passat,
TDI, Leather, Safetied, 300K
• 2005 Volkswagen Jetta
TDI, Wagon, 395K, Leather,
Safetied, 1.9L Diesel
• 1961 Plymouth Belvedere
Sedan, restored
• 1996 GMC Sonoma Ext Cab,
350cu in V8, Auto, Custom
Paint & Rims
• 2001 GMC Safari, 8 pass,
Safetied, Good Shape
• 18ft Tandem Axle Car Hauler
• 20ft Tandem Axle Trailer,
Pintle Hitch, Checker
Plated Floor
• 16ft Triple Axle HD Pintle
Hitch Trailer w/ Ramps
• Sokal 30ft Triple Axle Fifth
Wheel Livestock Trailer w/ Air
Brakes, Safety Certified, New
Floor, 5K in Recent Upgrades
EQUIPMENT
• 20ft Alloway Rau Flail
Mower/Stock Chopper
• 3 PTH Cultivator
• 40ft Culti Harrow
• 5 Wheel Hay Rake
• 80in HD 3 PTH Rotary Tiller w/
overrunning clutch
• Buhler/Farm King 30
3 PTH Blade
• Leon 50 3 PTH Blade
• Melroe 6 Bottom Plow
• New Holland 273 Square Baler
• John Deere 336 Square Baler
• New Holland 461 Mower
Conditioner
• QTY Tractor Tires Various Sizes
NEW SKID STEER
ATTACHMENTS
• 84in Hyd Skid Steer Snow
Plow Dozer
• 48in Pallet Forks
• Stout Brush Bucket Grapple
HD72-8
• Stout Brush Grapple XHD84-6
• Stout Rock/Brush Combo
Bucket Grapple HD72-3
• Stout Tree & Post Puller
• Stout Walk Thru Forks 48in
BUILDINGS &
TENTS
• 10ftX20ft Commercial Instant
Popup Tent
• 16ftX22ft Marquee Event Tent
SHOP TOOLS &
YARD EQUIPMENT
• (2) 2000W Inverter Generators
• 20 Gal Gas Powered Air
Compressor w/ GX Honda
Engine 13.7 [email protected] PSI
• 8 Gal Twin Tank Air
Compressor w/ GX Honda
Engine 13.7 [email protected] PSI
• 3000 PSI 2.5 GPM Electric
Pressure Washer w/ CAT
4DNX Pump 230V
• 4000W Gas Powered Generator
• Electric Plasma Cutter (Cuts
3/4in Mild Steel, 1/2in
Stainless Steel, 3/8in Alum)
• New Monarch Deep Well
Pumps
• Submersible Electric Sewage
Pumps
• Coats 40-40 SA Tire Machine
• Solar Power Auto Darken
Welding Helmet
• 72in Aluminum Checker
Plated Toolboxes
• 3 PC Jobsite Tool Box Sets
• HD Commercial Warhouse
Racking NEW (6 Sections)
• 10ftX10ftX6ft Dog Kennel
LIVESTOCK
EQUIPMENT
• Large Selection Of Corral Panels
& Gates Heavy & Light Duty
• 7ft Sheep Panels w/ Pin
System
• Rugged Ranch Squeeze Chute
• 1047/6 Farm Fence 330ft Rolls
• (27)Rolls Hot Dipped
Galvanized Barbed Wire
CALL TODAY TO CONSIGN!! 204-326-3061
Full Listing At www.pennerauctions.com
PENNER AUCTION SALES LTD.
218 Brandt Street Steinbach, MB Ph: 204.326.3061 Fax: 204.326.7529
Toll Free: 1-866-512-8992
www.pennerauctions.com
Sale Conducted by:
PENNER AUCTION SALES LTD.
Large Inventory of
new and remanufactured parts
FARM CHEMICAL / SEED COMPLAINTS
Sperling, MB - #15 Charles St.
• 1995 Case IH 5230, MFWD,
Cab, 3 pth, Quicke Loader,
2700 hrs
• 2510 John Deere Diesel, Loader
• John Deere Model A
• Massey Harris 44 Hydra
• Massey Harris 44 w/ Blade
• Minneapolis Moline 445
• VAC Case Tractor
• 8640 John Deere 4WD Diesel
• 2140 John Deere Diesel,
3 PTH, 146 JD Loader
• 7810 John Deere w/ 740 JD
Loader & Grapple, joystick,
3 PTH, 5700 hrs
IH 5000 24.5-FT SWATHER, rebuilt dsl, new knife,
pick-up reel, Keer shear, $4,250 OBO; 700 Vers.
4-whl drive, 8.3L Cummins, 6,600 original hrs, new
clutch, 3-hyd, $10,300 OBO. Phone:(204)635-2600.
Stead, MB.
WATROUS SALVAGE
BILL KLASSEN AUCTIONEERS
TRACTORS
“For All Your Farm Parts”
The Real Used FaRm PaRTs
sUPeRsToRe
Over 2700 Units for Salvage
• TRACTORS • COMBINES
• SWATHERS • DISCERS
Call Joe, leN oR daRWIN
(306) 946-2222
monday-Friday - 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
See our website: www.billklassen.com for complete listing or call 204-325-4433 cell 6230
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Red River
FYFE PARTS
GRAVITY WAGONS NEW 400-BU, $7400; 600-bu,
$12,500; 750-bu, $18,250, Tarps Avail. Large selection of used wagons, $2,000 & Up; 550-bu. year
round $5,500; Parker 500-bu., $6,000; Parker 450bu., $5,000; Discs Krause 30-ft. Rock Cushion,
$9,500; Wishek 30-ft. 742, $32,000; Fertilizer
Spreaders 4-8 Ton, $3,000 & Up; Valmar 1620,
$2,500; 3255, $3,500. (204)857-8403
www.fyfeparts.com
The Neufelds are selling their smaller farm and
moving to the city. Harry and Anne are good
caretakers, this auction has smaller machinery
and some interesting collector items.
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Red River
FARM MACHINERY
Machinery Miscellaneous
1-800-667-9871 •• Regina
1-800-667-9871
Regina
1-800-667-3095 •• Saskatoon
1-800-667-3095
Saskatoon
1-800-387-2768 • Winnipeg
1-800-667-3095
Manitoba
1-800-222-6594 •• Edmonton
THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 5 PM
Winkler, MB • 1-204-325-4433
FARM MACHINERY
Parts & Accessories
SEWING ALTERATIONS, ZIPPERS REPLACED,
upholstery for furniture, boats & automobiles.
Phone (204)727-2694
Toll-Free 1-800-881-7727
Fax (204) 326-5878
Web site: farmparts.ca
E-mail: [email protected]
FARM MACHINERY
Salvage
78 MF 760 for parts, motor good & many new parts,
open to offers. Phone (204)770-0040.
IS ENOUGH OF
A GAMBLE...
Stretch your
ADVERTISING DOLLAR!
CONTRACTING
CONTRACTING
Custom Har vesting
CUSTOM COMBINING: 460 CAT, W PU, $150/hr;
30-ft flex-head, $18/hr; 6 row allcrop header 30-in
spacing, $22/hr. Carman MB & surrounding areas.
Mike Maddison (204)750-1030.
WILL DO CUSTOM HARVESTING: Peas, cereals,
canola, & soybeans. Flex heads, straight heads &
PU headers. Professional operation fully insured.
Phone:(204)391-5491 or (204)371-9435.
CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT
2003 HIAB MODEL# XS122B-2CL picker, VGC,
$12,000 OBO; Magnum headache rack w/Canstar
storage boxes, $1200 OBO. Ph (204)745-7445.
6 QUICK ATTACH EXCAVATOR buckets, some
trenching & clean-up buckets, plus 6 excavator rippers, some Cat’s & WBM’s. (204)871-0925, MacGregor MB.
FARM MACHINERY
FARM MACHINERY
Grain Bins
(3) MERIDIAN STORE KING grain bins, 1,700-bu.
hopper bottom, $10,000/each. (1) Meridian 4,154bu hopper bottom bin w/aeration, $20,000.
(2) 4,100-bu hopper bottom bins, w/5-hp aeration
fans, $20,000/each. 3,000-bu Balan hopper bottom
bin, $10,000. Macgregor, MB. Ph:(204)871-0925.
CUSTOM BIN MOVING Book now! Fert Tanks.
Hopper Bins/flat. Buy/Sell. Call Tim (204)362-7103
or E-mail Requests [email protected]
FARM MACHINERY
Grain Carts
FOR SALE: BRENT 874 grain cart, hyd or PTO
drive, 30.5x32 rubber, roll tarp, shedded, $24,000
OBO. Phone (204)546-2021 or (204)638-2513.
FARM MACHINERY
Grain Dryers
WESTERN GRAIN DRYER, manufactures advanced screenless grain dryers, integrated w/PLC,
HMI technology for automatic moisture & drying
system controls. Update for Vertec, Ibec & other
screenless dryers such as enclosed roof, drying
tiers, & burners etc. are available. 1-888-288-6857.
www.westerngraindryer.com
FARM MACHINERY
Grain Elevators
80-FT. BUCKET ELEVATING LEG w/3 phase
10-HP electric motor. Phone (204)886-3304.
FARM MACHINERY
Grain Vacuums
CURT’S GRAIN VAC SERVICES, parts & repair for
all makes & models. Craik SK, (306)734-2228.
JD 7700 COMBINE; MF 760; Also white & parting
out remains of Case 1030 & 930. Some trucks &
cars for sale. Pasture & hayland for rent. Standing
poplar, plus much more. Phone:(204)268-1888.
ROTARY MOWERS WOODS 7-FT. PT, $3,000;
15-ft., $6,000; JD 15-ft., $6,000; 20-ft., $11,000; NH
9-ft. sickle mower, $20200; JD 450, $2,000; IH 7-ft.,
$850; 6-ft. Finishing mower, $1,000; Hay conditioners $200 & up; Manure spreaders, JD 785,
$11,000; Gehl 1410, $8,000; H&S 400-bu. $2,500;
V Pitchers, $1,500 & up; NH 216 hyd rake, $7,500;
Vermeer hyd rake, $7,500; Gehl 2270 haybine,
$3,500; NH 116, $3,000. (204)857-8403
WESTFIELD GRAIN AUGER TR100-71 c/w swing
auger, good condition, $2,000; Packer bar 26-ft.
plus 2, 6-ft. packers, $750; Farm King diamond harrows 17 sections, $500; Herman tine harrows 50-ft.,
$750. Jim Abbott (204)745-3884 or (204)750-1157,
Carman.
HAYING & HARVESTING
STEINBACH, MB.
Ph. 326-2443
FARMING
1-800-782-0794
JD 530 ROUND BALER, 1986, $5000; JD 6620
combine, 3500-hrs; JD 3020, DSL, tractor, 1965,
8000-hrs, $5000; JD AR tractor, 1953, $1200.
Phone (204)685-3024.
Advertise in the
Manitoba Co-operator
Classifieds, it’s a Sure Thing!
1-800-782-0794
FARM MACHINERY
Machinery Miscellaneous
1984 4400 22-FT VERSATILE swather w/cab,
good condition, big rubber, asking $3,000;
1984 400 20-ft Versatile swather, good condition,
asking $1,400; 1983 400 20-ft Versatile swather, double
swath, asking $900 OBO; Haullin 53-ft ex-tendable rafter trailer, all hydraulic, asking $3,500. (204)728-1861.
1994 WESTWARD PT swather c/w MacDon PU
reel, excellent canvasses & knife, always shedded,
$4,500; 1991 WESTFIELD grain auger 60-ft.x8-in.
c/w swing hopper, good condition, $2,000; 1999
REM grain vac, Model 1826B, excellent condition,
always shedded, $5,000. (204)537-2455
875 VERS tractor; 40-FT Bourgault cultivator; 22-ft
Bourgault cultivator both w/anhydrous hitch; 44 JD
w/720 loader, 7,160-hrs; 22-ft JD cultivator; Swath
roller; JD 21-ft 2320 swather; 21-ft CCIL swather;
JD 7700 combine, 1950-hrs, shedded; 1975 Chev
& 1997 Int. 3-tonne; 10x61 Westfield auger in new
condition; 8x51 Westfield auger; 7x41 Westfield;
7x51 Sakundiak; 63-ft Harrow packer bar, Rite-Way w/
new tines; 56 Morris w/new tines; 4) 30-ft 6-bar standing panels; 2 Elk fences, 1 standing. (204)546-2562.
DISCS WISHEK 14-FT., 16-FT. 30-ft. Sunflower
30-ft. Rock cushion, $20,000; Breaking discs Kewanee 15-16-ft., Towner 18-in. JD 12-ft., $4,500;
Hesston 40-ft. #2410 disc Rippers DMI 5 shank,
$8,900; 7 Shank $10,900; Row Crop cultivators
4-12P JD 535 baler, $5,000; JD 336 Baler grain
screeners, dual stage rotary, $200 up; Kwik Kleen 5
tube, $5,000; 7 tube, $6,500; Used fertilizer spreaders 4-8Ton. (204)857-8403
FORAGE HARVESTER NH 890, $2,500; IH 761,
$2,500; JD 3970, $6,000; Hi-Dumps Jiffy, $3,000;
Richardton 14-ft., Richardton 750, $17,500; Rex
tandem forage wagon, $3,000; Flex heads JD 924,
925, 930; Case IH 1020 25-30-ft. 820 20-ft. Rigid Case
IH 25-30-ft., $2,500 Up; JD 930 $2,500; De-gelman 14ft. Rock Rake, $9,000; 570 Rock pick-ers, $2,500 Up;
Big Mac Prong Picker, $4,000. (204)857-8403
FOR SALE: IH 7-FT. sickle mower w/hyd lift & cyl,
good shape, $750. Phone (204)633-3205, Wpg
GRAIN CARTS LARGE SELECTION used carts
Brent 610, 672, 674, 770, 772, 774, 874, 974 Univerferth 7000, 8000, 9250; VFT 750, 760 hyd dr.
Fickln 650-bu. $13,500; Grain Vacs REM 1026, 44,500;
Brand $4,000-8,000; REM 2500 HD, $9,500; Westfield
10x70 auger, $2,000; 8x46 Scoop-a-Second $1,000;
JD 510 Baler, $1,500; JD 535, $5,000; JD 336, $3,000;
Sudenga Weigh Wag-on, $3,500. (204)857-8403.
USED CULVERTS: 2,12-FT.X36-IN.; 3, 16-ft.x16-in.; 2,
12-ft.x24-in.; 1, 8-ft.x18-in. (204)825-8354(204)825-2784
HAYING & HARVESTING
Baling Equipment
2004 CIH RBX562 ROUND baler, hyd PU, gauge
wheels, mega wide PU, bale command, always
shedded, field ready, 8,000 bales, $12,500 OBO.
(204)733-2446
FOR SALE: JD 567 round baler, 2004, 1 owner,
megawide PU, kicker, shedded, excellent condition,
asking $17,000 OBO. Call (204)535-2593, Baldur.
HAYING & HARVESTING
Swathers
1998 220 MASSEY SWATHER 1,400-hrs, stored
inside, new Schumacher knife system w/rotary end
shear, UII PU reel 22-ft., perfect condition; IHC
1682 combine, header reverser, factory tarp, chaff
spreader, very low acs, new PU belts.
(204)845-2278
1998 8820 CASE 25-FT. double swath, 4 cyl DSL.
Phone (204)239-7758 or (204)872-1713
CASE IH 8825 HP swather. 8820 table, UII pick-up
reel & hyd. roller. Table 25-ft double swath.
1,200-hrs, VGC. Transport can be arranged.
Phone:(204)248-2327.
IHC 4000 SP SWATHER, 24.5-ft, U2 reel, no cab,
two knives, one new. Shedded, very low hours,
$4,200; Swath roller, 6-ft tapered, used very little,
shedded, $400. (204)824-2528
Why wait for
your ag news?
Sign up for daily enews at
manitobacooperator.ca
HAYING & HARVESTING
Various
1998 994 HONEYBEE 30-FT draper header w/TR
or TX adapter, UII pick-up reel, cross auger, new
canvasses
&
bearings.
$15,500
OBO.
Phone:(204)632-4390 or Cell:(204)797-4821.
2001 JD 930R STRAIGHT cut header, PU reel,
fore & aft controls, excellent shape, price $10,000.
Phone (204)522-5708.
2005 NH 94C 30-FT draper header w/UII pick-up
reel, TR/TX adapter, canvasses, canvass rollers &
bearings
replaced.
$23,500
OBO.
Phone:
(204)632-4390 or Cell:(204)797-4821.
2015 Hay Trailer Hauls 17-22 Rd Bales, 5th Wheel
Style Steering, Turns on a Dime, 11x22.5 dual tires,
Heavy Build Trailer, 9’ 9"x36’ Steel Deck, $6,400
Delivery Available in MB (204)362-7480
46-FT.
20
SOFT
CORE
(204)239-7758 or (204)872-1713
Phone
FOR SALE: VERMEER 605 round baler good 7-in.
belts, bottom belt almost new, PU is good, Old IHC
rakes, some rubber tires, some steel wheels, working;
Lewis
cattle
oiler.
(204)825-8354
(204)825-2784
HYLINE 1400 BALE PICKER, terrys 14 5x6 round
bales, tilled ready, asking $17,000 OBO. Phone
(204)425-3884
PULL-TYPE SWATHER, WESTWARD 3000, 21-ft,
PU reel, Keer-shear, auto-fold, asking $3000; MF
860 Combine, 6-cyl standard, w/PU & 9022 22-ft
straight cut header, bat reel, asking $6500.
(204)638-7511, (204)638-1095, Dauphin.
Do you want to target Manitoba farmers? Place your
ad in the Manitoba Co-operator. Manitoba’s best-read
farm publication.
looking for equipment?
TRY
FARM MACHINERY
Parts & Accessories
GOODS USED TRACTOR PARTS: (204)564-2528
or 1-877-564-8734, Roblin, MB.
MURPHY SALVAGE New & used parts for tractors,
combines, swathers, square & round balers, tillage,
press drills & other misc machinery. MURPHY SALVAGE (204)858-2727 or toll free 1-877-858-2728.
bales.
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25
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Westman
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Westman
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Westman
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Westman
AUCTION SALES
Manitoba Auctions – Westman
PRE-HARVEST CONSIGNMENT SALE
at FRASER AUCTION BARN
BRANDON, MB. • SATURDAY, AUGUST 22ND, • 9:00 AM
DIRECTIONS: DIRECTIONS: Sale will be held at Fraser Auction Service Ltd. Sales yard 1/4 mile north of the junction of highways #1 & #10 on 25 Wheatbelt Road. Brandon, MB.
NOTE: Deadline for item to be consigned and in yard is AUGUST 14th, 2015
THIS SALE WILL FEATURE: Farm & Industrial Equipment *Trucks *Trailers *Livestock Handling Equipment *Vehicles *Lawn & Leisure *Shop Equipment & Tools,
3PT Hitch & Acreage Equipment *Government Surplus *Large Selection of Toy Tractors, etc. Misc. Pallet Lots & More.
TRACTORS: *2005 NH TS125A MFWD Tractor w/ NH 62LB Loader, Approx 5800 Hrs Showing *1968 JD 3020 w/ Front End Loader *1966 Case 930 Comfort King Tractor, w/ farm hall loader (Bent), Snow
Blade, Bale Horn, Bucket, 6’ Forks, 8’ Fork Bucket, 2 Spare Tires *1963 MF Super 90 DSL Tractor, like new rear tires, dual hydraulic, always shedded, VG operating condition HARVEST EQUIPMENT: *1976
Gleanor L SP Combine, Field Ready, 2911 Hrs showing *1982 JD 8820 Combine, 3 New Pickup Belts, Fresh Oil Change, Eng, Hydraulic, Trans & Brakes in excellent Shape, 4339 Hrs Showing *Massey
850 Combine *JD 7700 SP Combine, Runs, Good Eng & Trans, No Pick-up, Bearings going on Thrasher, Needs work or for Parts, 5289 Hrs Showing *25’ Case 1010 Header *25’ JD 925 Str Cut Header,
Pickup Reel, Lifter Guards *22’ MF 2381 Header w/ Transport *13’ Case IH 1015 Header w/ Pickup *21’ NH 1090 Swather, NO Hr Meter *8200 SP Swather, DSL, 97?, Approx 2400 Hrs Showing w/ 21’
Grain Header *14’ Hay Header * Straw Chopperw/brackets & Belt - Fits 9600 or 9610, *International 8230 PT Swather, Batt Reel. Always Shedded *8 Belt Westward 397 Pick-Up *12’ Melroe 388 Pickup
*JD Pick-Up - fits JD 9500 *10’ Swath roller *(4) Swath Rollers *6’ Swath Roller *8’ Swath Roller *NEW Case Concrete Eagle *Wisconsin VG4D Air Cooled Engine, *(4) Loader Mounting Kits NH Tractors
*Willmar Foam Marker Kit *NH Fore-Aft Reel Kit for Header *30’ MacDon Pick-Up Reel, NEEDS WORK *Swather Carrier *30’ Swather Transport SEED & TILLAGE: *1998 Rogator 854-80, 80’ Boom, 800
Gal Tank, Trimble GPS System, 380 Dual Rear Tires, 4342 Hrs Showing *1993 JD 1060 41’ Air Seeder, Dbl Chute, JD 787 Tank, Monitor *45’ Flexi Coil 800 Cultivator *41’ Friggstad Deep Tillage *36’
Bourgault (Vibra Master) Cultivator, Liq Kit, Air Kit, New Trip Pins, 1981 *Fertilizer Band Wagon, 1500 US Gal Tank, John Blue Pump *Prasco 125 Air Seeder *18’ Sunflower Disc 78G3-18 *100’ 800 Gal
Flexi Coil System 65 Sprayer, Monitor *Spra Coupe 210 Sprayer, 54’ Boom, 473 Litres, No Meter, NEEDS HEAD GASKET *Setter Mfg 3PH Sprayer w/500 Gal Poly Tank & Hyd Pump *30’ International
Tandem Disc, notched Blades *21’ JD 9350 Hoe Drill, Self Transport, Type 9000 *1999 40’ Flexi Coil Zero Till Drill, 10” Spacing, Dbl Shoot *15’ IH Deep Tiller, VG Condition *18.5 IH Vibra-Shank, 6” Spacing
w/ Harrows, VG Condition *JD 9350 Press Drill *Chisel Plow *16’ Krause Heavy Offset Disc *JD Corn Planter *G5 Seed Treater *16’ JD Disc, 1000 Series *10’ Roll Harrow *5 Bottom IHT Plow *20’ Drag
Harrows *20’ Sprayer Unit *50’ Packers - 10” Spacing *Manifold - fits a 50’ or 60’, 10” Spacing *Fertilizer Kit - Coulters - fits a 50’ or 60’, 10” Spacing *Velmar 240 Applicator - fits Harrow or Cultivator
HAYING EQUIPMENT: *1999 Hesston 514 Rd Baler, Soft Core, 1000 PTO, Electric Tie *Hesston 5540 Rd Baler, 1981, Monitor, PTO *Case Ih 8465 Rd Baler *NH 275 Sq Baler *1975 NH 1034 Bale Wagon
*9’ IHT Sickle Mower *16’ IHT Bale Carrier (Trailer) Hyd Drive and Chains *10’ Older Hay Rake w/ Large Steel Wheels GRAIN HANDLING EQUIPMENT: *Haul All Seed Tender, Approx 100 Bus - Front, 150
Bus – Back *MK100 x 71 Westfield Swing Auger, PTO *10” x 60’ Farm King Swing Auger, PTO *10 x 50 Farm King Swing Auger *10 x 70 Farm King Swing Auger, PTO *8 x 46 Westfield Auger w/B&S
16HP Motor *HD 7-1400 Sakundiak Grain Auger, 18HP Briggs *7 x 46 Farm King auger *7 x 41 Sakundiak Auger, w/ 13HP Honda Motor *HD8-1200 Sakundiak Auger, w/ 20 HP Honda *Westeel Auger
w/ Motor *Buhler/Farm King Transfer Auger *Rear Grain Box Auger *Portable Grain Ring *Gold’n Air Aeration Fan & Duct Work, 230 Volts, 3HP, Single Phase *Gold’n Air Aeration Fan & Duct Work, 230 Volts, 5HP, Single Phase *Caldwell Aeration Fan & Duct Work, 230 Volts, 3HP, Single Phase
*Pallet of Extra Duct Work *(3) Bin Doors VEHICLES: *2003 Pontiac Montana Ext Passenger Van, White, 6 Cyl, VIN#1GMDX03E03D123066, 368,754 Kms showing, (Proceeds from the sale of this vehicle will go to the TEEN CHALLENGE OF CENTRAL CANADA INC) (Runs but is not in driving
order) *2003 Ford Windstar Sport Passenger Van, 6 Cyl, Gray, VIN# 2FMZA57483BB80594, 252,666 Kms Showing, (Proceeds from the sale of this vehicle will go to the TEEN CHALLENGE OF CENTRAL CANADA INC) *2002 Ford Explorer Sport Trac, Crew Cab, 6 Cyl, Black, 4 WH Drive,
VIN# 1FMZU77E92UB75568, 311,074 Kms Showing, SAFETIED *2002 Ford Explorer XLS Sport Utility, 4 Door, 6 Cyl, Brown, VIN# 1FMZU72E42ZB50006, Set of Tires, NOT RUNNING, (Proceeds from the sale of this vehicle will go to the TEEN CHALLENGE OF CENTRAL CANADA INC) *2001
Pontiac Grand AM SE, 4 Door, 6 Cyl, White, VIN# 1G2NF52E61M656065, 231,860 Kms Showing, (Proceeds from the sale of this vehicle will go to the TEEN CHALLENGE OF CENTRAL CANADA INC) *2000 Dodge Grand Caravan Passenger Van, 6 Cyl, Green, VIN# 2B4GP24G7YR807577,
207,042 Kms Showing, (Proceeds from the sale of this vehicle will go to the TEEN CHALLENGE OF CENTRAL CANADA INC) *1999 Ford Windstar LX Passenger Van, 6 Cyl, Red, VIN# 2FMZA5143XBB51289, 127,741 Kms Showing, NOT RUNNING, (Proceeds from the sale of this vehicle
will go to the TEEN CHALLENGE OF CENTRAL CANADA INC) TRUCKS *1999 Ford F450 Service Truck White, SAFETIED, VIN# 1FDXF47F3XEC85591, 298,066 Kms Showing, More Info to follow *1996 International 4900, 530 International Motor 1700 hrs on complete overhaul, Allison 5
Speed Auto 1500 Hrs Factory Rebuild, 18’ Cancade Box - refurbished and painted, New Mich. Tarp, New Rear Brakes & Shocks, New PTO Hydraulic System, Complete to the control, cylinder rebuilt, VIN#1HTSHADR3TH362865, 491,785 Kms Showing, SAFETIED *International 4300
DT466 Chassis-Cab, VIN# 1HTMMAAM05H137254 *1999 Sterling Dump White, VIN# 2FWYJSEB5XAA53297, 995,066 Kms Showing *2003 Dodge Ram 3500 Laramie Quad Cab, 5.9l DSL Eng w/ auto trans, 4x4, Dual Rear Wheels, VIN# 3D7MU48C53G818003, 271,291 Kms Showing
*2003 International Yellow School Bus, 8 Cyl, VIN# 1HVBBABP93H569173, 250,507 Kms Showing *2002 International Yellow School Bus, 8 Cyl, VIN# 1HVBBABP93H521395, 211,372 Kms Showing *2002 Dodge Ram 1500 Laramie SLT Quad Extended Cab, 8 Cyl, Gray, VIN#
1D7HU18N62S692081, 387,620 Kms Showing *2000 Ford F350 SD XL Supercab, 8 Cyl, Green, VIN# 1FTWX32F9YEC78340, 253,921 Kms Showing *1998 Dodge 1500, 5.9, 4x4 *1995 Thomas Bus, Black, VIN# 1T7CR2B25S1126917, 258,589 Miles Showing *1998 Ford F150 Supercab,
Ext Cab, 6 Cyl, White, VIN# 1FTZX1722WKA35040, 164,502 Kms Showing, (Proceeds from the sale of this vehicle will go to the TEEN CHALLENGE OF CENTRAL CANADA INC) *1997 Dodge Ram 2500 Light Pickup, 8 Cyl, white, VIN# 1B7KF26Z9VJ600817, 211, 141 Kms Showing, NOT
RUNNING *1994 Chevrolet Extended Cab, 8 Cyl, Red, VIN# 1GCEK19S9RE202328, 474,087 Kms Showing *60 Series Detroit Engine, 1997 TRAILERS *2001 Other Canuck Semi-Trailer, Gray, VIN# 2C9ED24281S166309 *1998 Midland Semi-Trailer, White, VIN# 1M9B2R5C3WR018515
*1990 Other Homemade 25’ Gooseneck Trailer, Black, VIN# 1171111AZ *1972 34’ Feather Light 4 Horse, 8.2’ Height, side Load with ramp, Nose Cone Space with Rear Tack. Hauls 4 Facing each other or makes 2 Box Stalls, 5th Whhel, 2 - 7000 lb Axles, newer floor and rubber matts
*Grain Trailer w/ Dolly, 3 compartments, Roll Tarp (Custom Tarps & Filters), FARM USE ONLY - NO TOD *Westeel Dump Box N Hoist 3PT EQUIPMENT & ATTACHMENTS: *NEW 6’ Kodiak MD 3PT Mower *NEW 5’ Kodiak SD 3PT Mower *NEW 102” Buhler Allied Bucket *NEW Buhler Allied
Bale Spear *NEW HLA Pallet Fork Frame *NEW 82” HD Rotary Tiller c/w: Gear Drive, 3PT, PTO Shaft w/overrunning clutch *7’ Sovema 305 Hitch Mower, PTO *3PT Hitch Forks Bales *Pallet Forks *Belt Pulley Drive attachment - for Massey 90 Tractor *8’ Front Mount Dozer Blade, swiveled
or Str push, VG Condition *Rock Digger, 3PT LIVESTOCK RELATED EQUIPMENT: *(48) NEW Hot Dipped Galvanized Barbed Wire (820ft per roll) *Harsh 400 Feed Wagon *De Horner *(2) Clippers *Medicated Cross Bow *Burdizzer *Pail - Tag Pliers etc. *(4) Electric Fencer INDUSTRIAL:
*2003 Bobcat S250 Skid Steer, 6’ Bucket. Hand Controls & Foot Controls, 3229 Hrs Showing *Hyster Fork Lift, Model E30BS, 0280 Hrs Showing *NEW Lowe Hyd Auger 1650ch w/ 9in & 12in & 18in w/ skid steer quick attach, designed for 14-25 GPM/2,000-3,300 PSI and uses augers
up to 36” in diameter, solid unit structure, heat-treated alloy shaft, HD reduction drive, 9”, 12” & 18” hex bit, Universal Quick attach plate *NEW Lowe Hyd Auger 750ch w/ 9in, 12in & 15” w/ skid steer quick attach, designed for 7-20 GPM/2,000-3,300 PSI and uses augers up to 18” in
diameter, solid unit structure, heat-treated alloy shaft, HD reduction drive, 9”, 12” & 15” hex bit, Universal Quick attach plate *NEW Stout Brush Grapple XHD84 w/ skid steer quick attach, High strength ½” steel, Universal Quick attach plate, 84” x 38” x 30”, 6 7/8 Tine Spacing, Grapple
opening 32”, 3034 PSI hydraulic lines, NPT ½” hydraulic flat-faced couplers, cylinder guards *NEW Stout Brush Grapple HD72” w/ skid steer quick attach, High strength 3/8” steel, Universal Quick attach plate, 72” x 35” x 30”, 8 ¼” Tine Spacing, Grapple opening 32”, 3034 PSI lines
WITH ½” cap *NEW Stout Skid Steer Flat Bottom Grapple Bucket HD72, High Strength Steel 3/8” sides, ¼” Bucket, Universal Quick Attach Plate, 72”x41”x30”, 3045 PSI lines with ½” cap, Grapple Opening 32” *NEW Stout Skid Steer Rock Bucket Grapple HD72, 72”, High Strength 3/8”
Steel, Universal Quick Attach Plate, 72” x 41” x 30”, 3” Tine Spacing, Grapple Opening 39”, 3045 PSI Hydraulic Line, NPT ½” Hydraulic flat-faced couplers, cylinder guards *NEW Stout Skid Steer Rock Bucket/Brush Grapple Combo HD72, Open-End w/ Skid Steer Quick Attach, 72”, High
Strength 3/8” Steel, Universal Quick Attach Plate, 72” x 41” x 30”, 3” Tine Spacing, Grapple Opening 39”, 3045 PSI Hydraulic Line, NPT ½” Hydraulic flat-faced couplers, cylinder guards *NEW Stout Tree & Post Puller, High Strength Steel – ½” & 3/8”, ½” teeth, Strong 3”x3” tube frame,
48” x 28” x 21”, 24” Jaw Length, Jaw Opening 12”, 3045 PSI lines, NPT ½” Hydraulic flat-faced couplers, universal quick attach plate *NEW Stout Full-Back Pallet Forks 48 in w/ skid steer quick attach, 3-position pin adjustment, 4000 lbs fork rating, High strength steel, Universal quick
attach plate, see through spill guard w/walk-through step, frame 51” x 57.5” *NEW Stout Walk-Through Pallet Forks 48” w/skid steer quick attach, 3-position pin adjustment, 4000 lbs fork rating, High Strength Steel, Universal Quick Attach Plate, see through spill guard w/walk-through
step, Frame 51”x57.5” *NEW Pallet Forks 48” w/skid steer quick attach, 3-position pin adjustment, 4000 lbs fork rating, High Strength Steel, Universal Quick Attach Plate, Frame 35”x45” *NEW Stout Receiver Hitch Plate, high strength 3/8” steel, Universal quick attach plate, 2” receiver
tube *NEW Stout Regular Weld-On Skid Steer Plate, High Strength 3/8” Steel, Universal Quick Attach Plate, Half-Back *NEW Stout Solid Weld-on Skid Steer Plate, High strength ¼” steel, Universal Quick Attach Plate, Full-back *(4) New 12 x 16.5 E Forerunner SKS – 1 Skid Steer Tires,
12 Ply with Rim Guard, Super Traction, High Stability *(2) NEW 10FT 20 DRAWER HEAVY DUTY WORK BENCH WITH HANGING WALL c/w 40’’ high hanging wall, stainless steel drawer panel, metal handles *NEW 11’ Modular Work Station System c/w 128” x 80”, Base Cabinet, Tool Drawer,
Locker Cabinet, Work Cabinet, Stainless Steel Drawer Panel, Metal Handles *NEW 12’ HD Landleveller w/ Tilt *NEW 12’ Landleveller *NEW 10’ Landleveller *(4) NEW 12 x 16.5 Tires *(4) NEW 10 x 16.5 Tires *(4) NEW 11L x 15 Implement Tires *(5) NEW 86’’ Hydraulic Skid Steer Loader
Dozer Blade/snow pusher *NEW Container loading ramp size: 86’’ x 48’’ ( W x L) *NEW 84” NH Skid Steer Bucket (Used) *Peloquin Bucket/Grapple - fits NH TV140-145 Tractor *Grapple - Skid Steer *Bunble Bee Scraper Cart by CAT New Hydraulic, Newer Tires *Hydrauclid Lift *Hoist
ANTIQUE EQUIPMENT: *Antique Cat/Grader SHOP TOOLS & EQUIPMENT: *(2) NEW 2014 Easy Kleen Magnum Plus, 4000 PSI Hot Water Pressure Washer C/W 15 HP Gas, Electric Start *(8) NEW 2014 Easy Kleen Magnum Gold, 4000 PSI 12V Hot Water Pressure Washer, C/W 15 HP Gas,
Totally Self Contained *(2) NEW 2014 Easy Kleen Magnum 4000 Ultra, 4000 PSI Hot Water Pressure Washer c/w 15HP Gas *Karcher NEW Pressure Washer *(2) NEW Heavy Duty Tire Changer, c/w: 110v 60 hz *NEW Heavy Duty Wheel Balancer c/w: 110v 60 hz *(10) NEW Battery Load
Tester *(2) NEW 14’’ Metal Cut Off Saw *(2) NEW 20 ton Air Hydraulic Jack *(2) NEW 50 ton Hydraulic Bottle Jack *(2) NEW 10 Ton Hydraulic Porta Power Kit *(4) NEW Welding Helmet Solar Power *(2) NEW 1” Dr. Air Impact Wrench Kit *NEW Ratchet Binder and Chain Puller *(10) NEW
27” Water Filled Road Barrier *(2) NEW 12 Ton Pipe Bender *(32) NEW 2” x 27’ Ratchet Tie Down *(12) NEW 20’ Round Sling *NEW 50 Ton Shop Press *NEW ½” x 23’ Chain Sling *BACE Analyzer (Basic Automotive Computer Equipment) *The Driver Line Wood Lathe & Some Accessories
*Wrenches *Tool Box *(2) Socket Sets *Battery Charger *Lincoln 115 Volt Portable Mig Wire Welder *Oxy/Acet Cutting Torch Kit with Cart *20 Ton Cap Hydraulic Bottle Jack *Craftsman Impact Wrench *Portable Welder *Champion Generator *Miller Trail Blazer 302 Welder, AS IS, NOT
RUNNING *Power Fist Generator, AS IS *Speed Clean Pressure Washer, 20009 PSI, B&S 3.75HP, AS IS *HD Loading Ramps TENTS & GATES: *NEW 30FT X 85FT X 15FT Peak Ceiling Double Door Storage Building C/W: commercial fabric, waterproof, UV and Fire Resistant, 12’ x 12’ drive
through doors at two ends *NEW 20FT X 30FT X 12FT Peak Ceiling Storage Shelter C/W: Commercial fabric, roll up door *(3) NEW 10 ft x 20 ft Commercial Instant Pop Up Tent *(2) NEW 16 ft x 22 ft Marquee Event Tent, C/W: 320 sq.ft, one zipper door, 7 windows, heavy duty frames and
fabrics *NEW 20 ft x 40 ft Full Closed Party Tent, C/W: 800 sq.ft, doors, windows, 4 side walls included *NEW 20FT Heavy Duty Bi-Parting Wrought Iron Driveway Gate TIRES: *(2) Michelin 11R22.5 *(2) Pro Comp 305/55/20 Light Truck Grip Tires *(2) Pirelli 275/55/20 Light Truck Tires
*14.9 x 24 Tractor Tire (Traction) with Tube *(4) 710-38 Tires *(2) 380-90R 46 Tires & Rims *(2) 230/85R38 Tires & Rims *(2) NEW 23/R26 Tires & Rims *(4) NEW 230/95R32 Tires & Rims *(2) 500/85R24 Tires & Rims *(2) 20.8 x 38 Tires *(4) 18.4 x 38 Tires *(2) 18.4 x 34 Tires *(2) 18.4
x 30 Tires *(2) P275/60R20 Good Year Wrangle SRA (M+S) *(2) 30.5-32 Titan *18.4-38 Good Year *(3) 20.8R42 Firestone *Tube - fits 10.8R42 *(3) 38x15.50R20LT Mickey Thompson (M+S) *(3) 35x12.50R20LT M/T Open Country (M+S) *(6) Tires & Rims 10 x 20 *(3) P275/65R18 Good
Year Wranglers *(2) 14.9 x 24 Firestone Tires *(2) 18.4 x 38 Tires BUILDING MATERIAL: *Assortment of Lumber – Treated & NON Treated *Assortment of Steel Cladding – Various Sizes *(11) Pallets - Shingles *(16) Pallets – Shingles *Pallet – Vintage Slate Decra Shingle *(5) Pallets – Roof
Shake 40 Dual Black Shingles *Pallet (10 Bundles) Dual Grey Cambridge Shingles *Pallet (9 Bundles) Harvard Slate Cambridge Shingles *(18) Rafters - 1 bundle *2x2 Lumber - 1 Bundle *(24) Lights *(22) Hydro Poles *(4) Pallets Slate Blue 40x60x24’ Ribbed metal *(7) Sheets of 4x8
Melamine *(28) Bundles - 356 Knotty pine casing @140LF each + 1 @90LF *769LF Maple 356 Casing *25 Bundles – 3140 Knotty Pine Casing @ 160LF Each + [email protected] 60LF *1 Box -356 Stained Oak Casing – [email protected]’ each *850LF Aspen 6” Baseboard LAWN & GARDEN, LEISURE
*1997 Arctic Cat Cougar 550 Fastrack Snowmobile, Runs - needs some work, New Track, 8673 Miles Showing, Black *1986 Polaris 250R/ES 2 x 4 *1980 Kawasaki 550 Motor Cycle, 35,463 Kms Showing, Runs *16’ Kennedy Boat w/ 85HP Envinrude, Spare Prop, Newer Seals & Water
Pump, Always Shedded, Manual, 1971 Explorer Roller Bunk Utility Trailer, White, VIN# 7585V14010 *14’ Tuffy Rampage Boat & Trailer, NO Motor *Harley Golf Cart, 3 Wheeler *JD Push Mower, Self Propelled, 14SB TREES & SHRUBS, ETC TANKS: *(2) 1250 Imp Gal Water Tank *Westeel
Fuel Tank *Slip Tank w/ 12 Volt Electric Fuel Pump *L Shape Fuel Tank w/ Pump MISC: *(6) Pallets of Misc New Parts *Pallet - Vacuum Hose, Hospital Scale Etc. *Powerfist 15HP horizontal shaft gas engine *Screen-o-matic Tractor Radiator Pre-Cleaner *(2) Hydraulic Cylinders with Hoses
*Metal Car Ramps – Pair *External Rearview Mirrors - 2 Sets *100’ Triplex Electrical Yard Wire *Extension Cords *(4) JD Tandem Disks *(4) Pails - JD Tandem Disk Parts *Cat Engine *(20) Older Steel Panels - Various Lengths *NEW PTO Shaft, 540/1000 - off Sakundiak Auger *90’ Hose
*barbed wire *Fuel Filters & Hoses *small Assortment of electrical *20’ Culvert *Bin Door *4x8 Fronts of Semi - NEW
CALL OUR OFFICE NOW TO CONSIGN TO THIS VERY WELL ATTENDED CONSIGNMENT AUCTION. 1-800-483-5856 OR E-MAIL [email protected]
FARM LAND AUCTION
10 QUARTER SECTIONS RM of HAMIOTA BURRLAND FARMS
HAMIOTA, MB. • WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 26th • 12:00 NOON
SELLERS: Allan James Burr – Cheryl Ann Burr – Michael Stephen Burr PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: All parcels located in The RM of Hamiota (Newdale Clay Loam B6 classified land.)
Complete listings and pictures at www.fraserauctions.com
Parcel #1 – SW25-15-24W Title #2074838 approx 160 acres with yard site
and home plus multiple out buildings and bins
Parcel #2 – NW25-15-24W Title #2074845 approx 160 acres with yard site
and home plus out buildings and bins
Parcel #3 – DES SE34-15-24W Title #2426265 approx 158.08 acres
Parcel #6 – NE26-15-24W Title #2074847 approx 160 acres
Parcel #4 – SW34-15-24W Title #2074851 and NW34-15-24W Title #2426226
approx 320 acres
Parcel #7 – SE25-15-24W Title #2074838 approx 160 acres
Parcel #5 – SE28-15-24W Title #2074849 approx 160 acres
Parcel #9 – NE24-15-24W Title #2074850 approx 160 acres
Parcel #8 – NE25-15-24W Title #2074845 approx 160 acres
COMPLETE BIDDING PACKAGES AND MORE INFORMATION WILL BE MADE AVAILABLE FOR PICK-UP
FRASER AUCTION SERVICE LTD.
BRANDON, MANITOBA Licensed and bonded. P.L. License #918093. Member of M.A.A., S.A.A., A.A.A., A.A.C.
PHONE: (204) 727-2001 FAX: (204) 729-9912 www.fraserauction.com EMAIL: [email protected] Auctioneer: Scott Campbell
Not responsible for errors in description. Subject to additions and or deletions. Property owners and Fraser Auction Service not responsible for any accidents. GST & PST where applicable. TERMS: Cash or cheque.
NOTE: cheques of $50,000 or more must be accompanied by bank letter of credit. Sale conducted by FRASER AUCTION SERVICE 1-800-483-5856 www.fraserauction.com
Advertise your unwanted equipment in the Classifieds. Call our toll-free number and place your ad with our friendly staff,
and don’t forget to ask about our prepayment bonus. Prepay for 3 weeks and get 2 weeks free! 1-800-782-0794.
26
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
Crosswor
ossword
Cr
osswor
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This Little Piggy
...
Piggy...
by Adrian Powell
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Skittish
Emulate Gregory Hines
Kiefer, to Donald
Draws to a close
___ Perignon
Wet mascara worry
Wheelchair aid
Shows subservience, in a way
Ox harness, in Cape Town
Carpenter, often
Like an old woman
Mid-afternoon prayers
Ten cees
Behind schedule
Ding Dong alternative
Amorous archer
Western Scottish isle
Gomez Addam's fair cousin
School of thought, slangily
SOLUTION TO PUZZLE
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1 "Nifty!"
2 "And one more thing..."
3 Unidentified lump
4 Halloween charity
5 McCartney's "___ Love You"
6 19th cent. exile isle off the
Tuscan coast
7 Blunder
8 Instigate
9 Utility bill encl.
10 Hostess offerings
11 Decorate
12 Bogged down
13 Gumby's pony sidekick
18 Starkers, to a Brit
19 1925 musical "___ Nanette"
24 Highlander of yore
26 There are 168 in a wk.
27 Where parking meters usually
stand
28 Black, to Braque
29 The skinny
30 Maiden name preceder
31 "The Crucible," e.g.
35 Quilt filling
36 Ziploc competitor
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Vote into office
Allows
Ship-to-ship yell
Change back to 000
Give the impression
Schnozzola
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P O R K
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Payment Enclosed
❑ Cheque
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❑ 1 Year: $150.00
(US Funds)
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ACROSS
1 Noted killer whale of filmdom
5 Cribbage requirements
9 Rapscallion
14 Display of flamboyance
15 Casino machine
16 Sound signal
17 Winnipeg rec. area where you
can walk the hog?
20 Noted Puccini opera
21 Hendrix' hair style
22 James Bay native
23 Treadmill test tracing, for short
25 Manually inept
27 Apt description for a mediaeval feast of wild boar?
32 The age of many stars
33 A buck or two
34 Bulrush, e.g.
38 Breach
40 Landlord's contract
43 Realtor's favourite sign
44 Wide
46 Western Belgian city
48 Shake a tail
49 80's sitcom featuring
a real swine?
53 Sleep inducer of song
56 Ottawa iceman, briefly
57 Scarce Celebes ox
58 Dinner or lunch
61 Campfire leftovers
65 Arrival spot for chops
flown in daily?
Your expiry
date is located
on your
publication's
mailing label.
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TAKE FIVE
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q I’m farming or ranching
q I own a farm or ranch but i'm
not involved in it's operations or
management
My Main crops are: No. of acres
10. Lentils
___________
11. Dry Beans
___________
12. Hay
___________
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___________
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___________
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Livestock Enterpise No. of head
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Puzzle by websudoku.com
3
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Puzzle by websudoku.com
Here’s How It Works:
✁
My Main crops are: No. of acres
1. Wheat
____________
2. Barley
____________
3. Oats
____________
4. Canola
____________
5. Flax
____________
6. Durum
____________
7. Rye
____________
8. Peas
____________
9. Chick Peas
____________
Livestock Enterpise No. of head
1. Registered Beef ____________
2. Commercial Cow ____________
3. Fed Cattle (sold yearly) ____________
4. Hog Weaners (sold yearly) __________
Last week's answer
Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers
1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You
can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes.
The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle!
27
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
HAYING & HARVESTING
Various
Rebuilt Concaves
Rebuild combine table augers
Rebuild hydraulic cylinders
Roller mills regrooved
MFWD housings rebuilt
Steel and aluminum welding
Machine Shop Service
Line boreing and welding
Penno’s Machining & Mfg. Ltd.
Eden, MB 204-966-3221
Fax: 204-966-3248
Check out A & I online parts store
www.pennosmachining.com
Combines
COMBINES
Accessories
LIVESTOCK
LIVESTOCK
Cattle Auctions
AGCO MF CAT FLEX Platforms: In Stock Models,
500 Gleaner 25-ft & 30-ft, Model 8000 30-ft & 8200
35-ft MF. Cat FD30 flex-FD 40 Flex. Reconditioned,
ready to go. Delivery in Sask., MB., & Alberta. Reimer
Farm Equipment, Hwy #12 N, Steinbach, MB. www.reimerfarmequipment.com Gary Reimer (204)326-7000.
CIH FLEX PLATFORMS: Models 1020 25-ft & 30-ft
w/wo air reel; 2020 30-ft & 35-ft; 2020 30-ft w/air
reel- 2011 3020 35-ft. Can install new AWS Air Bar
for additional $11,500.00. Delivery in SK., MB., &
Alberta. Reimer Farm Equipment, Hwy #12 N,
Steinbach,
MB.
www.reimerfarmequipment.com
Gary Reimer (204)326-7000.
Hwy #205, Grunthal • (204) 434-6519
GRUNTHAL, MB.
AGENT FOR T.E.A.M. MARKETING
REGULAR
CATTLE SALES
NEW HOLLAND FLEX PLATFORMS: In Stock
Models 973 both 25-ft-30-ft-74C 30-ft w/air reel-88C
36-ft flex draper-94C 25-ft rigid draper w/trailer. Delivery in SK., MB., & Alberta. Reimer Farm Equipment, Hwy #12 N, Steinbach, MB. Gary Reimer
(204)326-7000. www.reimerfarmequipment.com
1994 CASE IH 1688, 2,823-hrs, always shedded.
Also, 25-ft Rigid 1010 straight-cut header. $40,000
for both. Phone:(204)445-2285.
30-ft IHC MACDON FLEX DRAPER HEADER
w/gauge reels, 2 section pick-up reel, $35,000.
Ph:(204)871-0925. Macgregor, MB.
Harold Unrau (Manager) Cell 871 0250
Auction Mart (204) 434-6519
COMBINES
Ford/New Holland
Tillage & Seeding
FOR SALE: TX66 1995 shedded 1905T, 2503E,
newer concave, rub bars, feeder chain, elevator
chain, chopper knives, PU belts, excellent condition, field ready, asking $30,000 OBO. Phone
(204)535-2593, Baldur.
TILLAGE & SEEDING
Seeding Various
42-FT. CASE IH 7200 hoe drill, $3,000 OBO;
(204)745-7445.
COMBINES
John Deere
TILLAGE & SEEDING
Tillage Equipment
1986 JD 7720 TITAN 2 combine, good shape, field
ready, chaff spreader, 2-spd cylinder, $14,000.
Phone (204)568-4604
Hutch Master Tandem Disc
FOR SALE: 1969 JD 105 combine, low hours, new
concave, sieves & rasp bars. Like new, original
tires, always been shedded, never seen the stars.
Highly maintained, c/w PU head & 22-ft head
w/sunflower pans. Ideal for smaller or Organic farm.
(701)593-6168, (701)331-1344.
JD 8820 COMBINE W/PU, chaff saver & 224
straight cut header, runs well, many new parts.
Phone (204)838-2028 or (204)748-5840.
COMBINES
Massey Ferguson
1983 850 MF COMBINE, 354 Perkins engine, Melroe PU,
has new sieves, hopper bottom. Phone (204)242-4411
1988 MF COMBINE 8560 25-ft. JD flex header 5.9
Cummins, new PU belts, hyd driven rotor chopper.
Phone (204)239-7758 or (204)872-1713.
COMBINES
White
1980, 5542 WHITE COMBINE, in excellent condition. Asking $6,700. Phone (204)848-2254, Onanole MB.
COMBINES
Accessories
2012 CIH 3020 Flex Platform, PU Reel, Poly Skids,
F/A Reel, F/F Auger, Field Ready, $34,900. Reimer
Farm Equipment, Hwy #12 N, Steinbach, MB.
www.reimerfarmequipment.com
Gary
Reimer
(204)326-7000.
JOHN DEERE FLEX PLATFORMS: 922-925-930
several newer one w/full finger augers & air reels630-635 w/wo air bars. Delivery SK., MB.,& Alberta.
Reimer Farm Equipment, Hwy #12 N, Steinbach,
MB. www.reimerfarmequipment.com Gary Reimer
(204)326-7000.
CLOSED August 2 - 8, 2015
For on farm appraisal of livestock
or for marketing information please call
MB. Livestock Dealer #1111
TRACTORS
2-Wheel Drive
STEVE’S TRACTOR REBUILDER specializing in
JD tractors in need of repair or burnt, or will buy for
parts. JD parts available. Phone: 204-466-2927 or
cell: 204-871-5170, Austin.
1-800-782-0794
Stretch your ADVERTISING DOLLAR!
HEAT & AIR CONDITIONING
The Icynene Insulation
System®
Hutch Master 10-ft. off-set tandem disc
excellent condition, located near Glenella, MB $3,950
Call or text (204)619-0676
• Sprayed foam insulation
• Ideal for shops, barns or homes
• Healthier, Quieter, More
Energy Efficient®
TRACTORS
Case/ IH
1984 IHC 5288 TRACTOR, 162 PTO HP, Cab, Air,
Duals 20.8R38, 11.00x16 Front, Dual Hyd, 1000
PTO, 9,769-hrs, Consignment. Reimer Farm Equipment, Hwy #12 N, Steinbach, MB. Gary Reimer
(204)326-7000 www.reimerfarmequipment.com
IHC FARMALL H wide front, good tires, hyds,
painted, $1,500; IHC Super Cub, hyds, completely original, excellent condition, $2,000. Phone (204)854-2587
TRACTORS
Ford
8670 FORD TRACTOR FWA, approx 4,500-hrs,
sure grip TD8 rice tires almost new, FEL 9-ft. bucket, $65,000 OBO. Phone (204)268-4591
TRACTORS
Versatile
875 VERS. W/ATOM JET & good tires. Nice shape.
Ph:(204)325-2416.
WWW.GRUNTHALLIVESTOCK.COM
LIVESTOCK
Cattle – Black Angus
3 YEARLING BLACK ANGUS bulls, $2,900 each,
Sire still on farm, Lorette area. Call Bill
(204)770-4706.
FOR SALE: BLACK ANGUS bulls & a few Galloway bulls. Never fed grain, smaller frame bulls,
bred for grass finishing market, asking $3,500/each.
Phone:(204)758-3374.
FOR SALE: REGISTERED BLACK Angus cows.
Bred to RB Tour of Duty. To calve Feb 6- Apr 10.
Predominate/ Density/ Final Answer bloodlines,
Ph:(780)921-2180.
LIVESTOCK
Cattle – Red Angus
WILKINRIDGE STOCK FARM still have a number
of yearling Red Angus bulls who are still at the
farm. Contact Sid Wilkinson (204)373-2631.
LIVESTOCK
Cattle – Maine-Anjou
WILKINRIDGE STOCK FARM still have a number
of Red & Black yearling Maine-Anjou bulls who are
still at the farm. Contact Sid Wilkinson
(204)373-2631.
TracTors
www.penta.ca
1-800-587-4711
IRON & STEEL
FREE STANDING CORRAL PANELS, Feeders &
Alley ways, 30ft or order to size. Oil Field Pipe: 1.3,
1.6, 1.9, 1 7/8, 2-in, 2 3/8, 2 7/8, 3 1/2. Sucker Rod:
3/4, 7/8, 1. Casing Pipes: 4-9inch. Sold by the piece
or semi load lots. For special pricing call Art
(204)685-2628 or cell (204)856-3440.
LANDSCAPING
LANDSCAPING
Lawn & Garden
TORO 455 DSL 4X4 finishing mower, 10-ft front
mount deck w/wings, very nice shape, $10,000. Ph
(204)871-0925, MacGregor MB.
Watch your
profits grow!
Prepayment Bonus
Prepay your regular word classified ad for
3 weeks and your ad will run an additional
2 consecutive weeks for free!
Call Our Customer Service Representatives
To Place Your Ad Today!
Outside Winnipeg: 1-800-782-0794
Winnipeg: 954-1415
LIVESTOCK
Cattle – Shorthorn
IF YOU ARE LOOKING to buy or sell Shorthorn
bulls or females, contact one of the MB Shorthorn
Association fieldmen and they can help you out.
Call Monty Thomson at (204)870-0089, or Tom
Walls at (204)895-8191. Website: www.manitobashorthorns.com
LIVESTOCK
Cattle Various
7 COW CALF PAIRS Char X & Black Angus, 1 bull.
Phone (204)712-0889.
LIVESTOCK
Horse Auctions
ROCKING W HORSE SALES 2015 fall Horse Sale,
Sat., Sept 5th, 12:00 noon, Keystone Centre, Brandon, MB. Phone (204)325-7237 www.rockingw.com
LIVESTOCK
Sheep For Sale
Manitoba Sheep
Association Show & Sale
August 28th
and 29th, 2015
CARBERRY AG GROUNDS,
CARBERRY, MANITOBA
PUREBRED RAMS AND EWES
AVAILABLE ALSO PENS OF
COMMERCIAL EWES.
SALE SATURDAY
STARTING AT 2PM
Stock dog show Saturday
M.S.A is also hosting a shearing
school August 26th-29th for more
info on ALL events go to
www.mbsheep.com
LIVESTOCK
Swine Wanted
Manitoba’s best-read farm publication
1-800-782-0794
FOR SALE: HI-HOG & Cattle handling facility.
Crowding tub, 3S adjustable ally section, w/gates &
walkways & Hi-hog squeeze chute. Bought new in
2014, barely used, not fully assembled. No reasonable offer refused. Phone:(204)734-4739.
KELLN SOLAR SUMMER/WINTER WATERING
System, provides water in remote areas, improves
water quality, increases pasture productivity, extends
dugout
life.
St.
Claude/Portage,
204-379-2763.
Sheep and Goat with
Small Animals & Holstein Calves
HEADER TRAILERS & ACCESSORIES.
Arc-Fab Industries. 204-355-9595
[email protected] www.arcfab.ca
AN ASSORTMENT OF CREEP feeders & self
feeders on wheels & skids. All Cypress Industries.
(204)325-2416.
FOR SALE: SCALECO ELECTRIC cattle scale
w/10,000-lb 8x10-ft pen. 22-ft heavy duty cattle
loading chute w/spring door & catwalk. Phone
(204)759-2220
Monday, August 31st at Noon
1986 CASE-IH COMBINE 1680, chaff spreader,
rice tires, excellent condition, $25,000 OBO;
Phone:(204)824-2196 or (204)573-6723.
ALTERNATIVE POWER BY SUNDOG SOLAR,
portable/remote solar water pumping for winter/summer. Call for pricing on solar systems, wind
generators, aeration. Service & repair on all
makes/models. Carl Driedger, (204)556-2346 or
(204)851-0145, Virden.
every TUESDAY at 9 am
August 11th, 18th
& 25th
COMBINES
Case/IH
LIVESTOCK EQUIPMENT
WANTED:
BUTCHER
HOGS
SOWS AND BOARS
FOR EXPORT
P. QUINTAINE & SON LTD.
728-7549
Licence No. 1123
MUSICAL
CDS: GOSPEL, COUNTRY, FIDDLING; Trombone
$299; Alto Sax $500; Flute, $250; Clarinet $250;
Florentine Mandolin $299; Lapsteel $229; 76 Note
Keyboard $299; Acoustic Electric Guitar $169.95;
Violin Set $125; Electric Autoharp $400; Drums
$400; 500 Watt Base Amp, $349; 250 Watt guitar
Amp $329; 10 Channel 1600 Watt Mixer, $600;
Hildebrand Music, Portage la Prairie Mall,
Ph:(204)857-3172.
ORGANIC
ORGANIC
Organic – Certified
WANT THE ORGANIC ADVANTAGE? Contact an
organic Agrologist at Pro-Cert for information on organic farming: prospects, transition, barriers, benefits, certification & marketing. Call:(306)382-1299,
Saskatoon, SK or at [email protected]
PERSONAL
A LASTING RELATIONSHIP.... Share your life as
it’s meant to be. CANDLELIGHT MATCHMAKERS
is here to help you. Confidential, Rural, Photos and
Profiles to selected matches, Affordable, Local.
Serving MB, SK, NW-Ontario. Call/Write for info:
Box 212, Roland, MB, R0G 1T0, (204)343-2475.
www.candlelightmatchmakers.ca
REAL ESTATE
REAL ESTATE
Houses & Lots
READY TO MOVE HOMES: For Sale Beautiful
RTM home w/front covered deck & roof dormers.
Vaulted ceilings, kitchen w/island, 3 bdrm. Master
has ensuite bath & walkin closet. Main floor laundry. Call: (204)326-1493 or (204)355-8484. Marvin
Vogt, Marvin Homes Inc. www.marvinhomes.ca
REAL ESTATE
Land For Sale
14 LOTS FOR SALE in
(204)638-6661 or (204)638-8415
Dauphin.
Phone
FOR SALE BY TENDER- RM of Gilbert Plains,
319-acs of mostly Clay Loam soil being the East
Half of 24-27-22W, having approx 170-acs cultivated. The land may be viewed at any time, w/tender
forms avail upon application from Century 21 Westman.com, 244 10th St, Brandon, MB, Tel:
(204)725-0555. Closing date for submission of
tenders, Aug. 27th 2015.
The following PRIVATE LAND is being offered for
sale: SE 28-24-14W; SW 32-24-14W; NE
33-24-14W; SE 33-24-14W; SE 8-25-15W; NE
32-24-14W; NW 32-24-14W; NE 8-25-15W; NW
35-24-14W; SW 36-24-14W; NE 35-24-14W. The
following CROWN LANDS have been approved by
Manitoba Agriculture, Food & Rural Development
for transfer to the purchaser of the private lands listed as these lands are part of the farm unit held by
Brian Flower of Ste Rose du Lac, MB: NE
02-25-14W; NW 02-25-14W; NE 03-25-14W; NW
03-25-14W; NE 09-25-14W; E1/2 SE 09-25-14W;
SW 09-25-14W; NE 10-25-14W; NW 10-25-14W;
SE 10-25-14W; SW 10-25-14W; NE 11-25-14W;
NW 11-25-14W; SE 11-25-14W; SW 11-25-14W;
NE 14-25-14W; NW 14-25-14W; SE 14-25-14W;
SW 14-25-14W; NE 15-25-14W; SE 15-25-14W;
SW 15-25-14W; NE 22-25-14W; SE 22-25-14W;
NE 23-25-14W; NW 23-25-14W; SE 23-25-14W;
SW 23-25-14W. If you wish to purchase the private
land & apply for the Unit Transfer contact the Brian
Flower at Box 183, Ste Rose du Lac, MB R0L 1S0.
If you wish to comment on or object to the eligibility
of this purchaser please write to: Director, MAFRD,
Agricultural Crown Lands, PO Box 1286, Minnedosa, MB R0J 1E0 or Fax (204)867-6578.
The Following Private Land is being offered for
sale: SE 06-25-12W, SE 07-25-12W, NE
07-25-12W. The following Crown lands have been
approved by Manitoba Agriculture, Food & Rural
Development for transfer to the purchaser of the
private lands listed as these lands are part of the
ranch unit held by Alfred Klein of Ste. Rose du Lac,
MB. NE 32-24-12W, NW 32-24-12W, NE
05-25-12W, NW 05-25-12W, SE 05-25-12W, SE
19-24-13W, SW 20-24-13W, NE 03-25-13W, NW
03-25-13W, SE 03-25-13W, SW 03-25-13W, NE
04-25-13W, NW 04-25-13W, SE 04-25-13W, SW
04-25-13W, SE 10-25-13W, SW 10-25-13W. If you
wish to purchase the private land and apply for the
Unit Transfer contact the Lessee Alfred Klein at PO
Box 681, Ste. Rose du Lac, MB R0L 1S0. If you
wish to comment on or object to the eligibility of this
Unit Transfer write the Director, MAFRD, Agricultural Crown Lands, PO Box 1286, Minnedosa MB
R0J 1E0; or fax (204)867-6578.
FARM FOR SALE BY TENDER
SW 21-9-2W 9135 PTH2W.
RM of McDonald Exclusive Listing.
Tenders will be accepted until 12:00pm (noon)
on Aug., 31st, 2015. Total Acres 141.85;
Cultivated acres 123.5 Includes: 1990-sq.ft house
(1976) plus sunroom, out buildings and grain
storage. Land rented for 2015 crop year.
For details, tender application, or viewing call
Chris at (204)745-7493 or go to
www.remaxadvantage.ca RE/MAX Advantage
REAL ESTATE
Farms & Ranches – Manitoba
ROSA MANITOBA, BEEF CATTLE, Horse or
Sheep farm. 80-acs, 65 cultivated, 4-bdrm house,
30x40-ft barn, 30x60-ft machine shed. campground
or Bed & Breakfast potential. $260,000 OBO. Call
Mel (204)427-3341.
SEED / FEED / GRAIN
REAL ESTATE
Farms & Ranches – Manitoba
SEED/ FEED/GRAIN
Feed Grain
FARMLAND FOR SALE BY TENDER, RM of Cartier
Sealed bids for the purchase of the following parcels of land, located
in the RM of Cartier, Manitoba will be received up to 5:00 pm on
August 24th, 2015 at the offices of
CanadianFarmRealty.com
Attention: Dolf Feddes:
Box 2046, Carman, MB, R0G 0J0
W 1/2 of NE 32-11-3W, 76.23 acres
E 1/2 of NE 32-11-3W, 72.23 acres
NW 32-11-3W, 153.78 acres
Approximately 280 acres workable
Specializing in:
•Corn,wheat,sunflower,canola,
soymeal,soybeans,soyoil,barley, rye,flax,oats(feed&milling)
•AgentsoftheCWB
•Licensed&bonded
5 LOCATIONS to serve you!
CONDiTiONS OF TENDER:
1. Interested parties must rely on their own inspection and knowledge of the
property.
2. Tenders must be accompanied by a deposit in the form of a certified cheque or
bank draft of 5% of the amount offered, payable to Royal LePage Riverbend
Realty in Trust. Deposit cheques accompanying unaccepted bids will be
returned.
3. Possession date of the land will be February 17, 2016; adjustment date for
property taxes will be January 1, 2016.
4. Highest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
5. The purchaser(s) shall be responsible for payment of GST or shall self-assess
for GST.
6. Successful bidders will be asked to enter into a formal Purchase agreement
covering the terms and conditions of sale.
7. Tenders will be held in confidence and not be released to the public.
Any questions regarding these parcels or this tender, can be directed to:
Dolf Feddes, REALTOR CanadianFarmRealty.com
204-828-3371 (office) or 204-745-0451 (cell) or look for more information
on www.canadianfarmrealty.com | Royal LePage Riverbend Realty
REAL ESTATE
Farms & Ranches – Wanted
FARMS WANTED! Considering selling your farm?
Not sure what your farm is worth? Not sure where
to start? Call me to discuss all options. All calls are
confidential & dealt with in a professional manner.
Currently there is strong demand for Grain & Livestock Farms from both domestic & overseas buyers. Rick Taylor, Sales Associate, HomeLife Home
Professional
Realty
Inc.
Ph:204-867-7551.
[email protected], www.homelifepro.com
AG
DEALS
TO GO!
RECYCLING
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class, improved winter hardiness,
excellent yields!
Call or Visit Zeghers Seed Inc.
Zeghers Seed Inc. is also a exporter of special crops.
Dealing in Flax, Mustard, Rye, Triticale, Spelt, Peas,
Canary, Damaged Canola, Millets, and others. Give
us a call for marketing opportunities!
Services includes the
use of the Optical Sorter
LOCATION:
OAKVILLE, MANITOBA
• Custom cleaning winter wheat and fall rye
• Ergot removal
• Gluten product removal from oats
• Grain upgrading, including FHB removal
• Sunflower upgrading
For more information contact Don Campbell:
SAVE on CLASSIFIEDS!
Call today to find out about our pre-pay bonus.
Pay for 3 weeks - get 2 free. Call for details.
1-800-782-0794
LARGE ROUND BALES OF wheat & oat straw;
Large round bales of hay. (204)325-2416.
The Manitoba Co-operator. Manitoba’s best-read
farm publication.
Round up the cash! Advertise your unwanted equipment in the Manitoba Co-operator classifieds.
BUYING:
HEATED CANOLA
& FLAX
• Competitive Prices
• Prompt Movement
• Spring Thrashed
“ON FARM PICK UP”
1-877-250-5252
For Pricing ~ 204-325-9555
Licensed and Bonded Grain Brokers
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Oil Sunflowers,
Brown & Yellow Flax
and Red & White Millet
Edible Beans
Andy Vanderveen · Brett Vanderveen
Jesse Vanderveen
Licensed & Bonded
Winkler, MB.
MALT BARLEY
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thing. 1-800-782-0794.
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MB. R0G 1C0
204-737-2000
Phone
204-737-2000
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Malt
Contracts Available
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Phone
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intelseed.ca
204-267-7389 • [email protected] • Oakville, Manitoba
HAY WANTED: standing or baled. Call or text
(204)730-3139.
WE BUY OATS
Call us today for pricing
Box 424, Emerson, MB R0A 0L0
204-373-2328
SEED/FEED/GRAIN
Grain Wanted
Custom Cleaning
HAY FOR SALE, GOOD quality round bales.
Phone (807)709-0771.
SEED/ FEED/GRAIN
Grain Wanted
Phone: 204-526-2145 | www.zeghersseed.com
Email: [email protected]
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110
REAL ESTATE
Farms & Ranches – Manitoba
COME SEE US AT AG DAYS IN
THE CONVENTION HALL
BOOTH 1309
atteries
t Oil Containers
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
2013 Malt Contracts Available
Box 238 Letellier, MB. R0G 1C0
Phone 204-737-2000
Toll-Free 1-800-258-7434
Agent: M & J Weber-Arcola, SK.
Phone 306-455-2509
SED OIL
EPOT
28
to help. 1-800-782-0794.
FARMERS, RANCHERS,
SEED PROCESSORS
BUYING ALL FEED GRAINS
Heated/Spring Threshed
Lightweight/Green/Tough,
Mixed Grain - Barley, Oats, Rye,
Flax, Wheat, Durum, Lentils, Peas,
Canola, Chickpeas, Triticale,
Sunflowers, Screenings, Organics
and By-Products
√ ON-FARM PICKUP
√ PROMPT PAYMENT
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LETHBRIDGE, VANCOUVER,
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1-204-724-6741
Contact Sharon
Email: [email protected]
Get more info
online
37 4th Ave. NE Carman, MB R0G 0J0
Ph. (204) 745-6444
Email: [email protected]
A Season to Grow… Only Days to Pay!
TRAILERS
TRAILERS
Livestock Trailers
1993 INDUSTRIES GOOSENECK LIVESTOCK
trailer. 7-ft x 18-ft, good condition, $2,000. Haywood, MB. Ph: (204)379-2613 or Cell: (204)745-8775.
2015 EXISS ALUMINUM LIVESTOCK Trailer 7-ft x
24-ft GN; 2015 EXISS Horse Trailer 2 Horse Slantload. 10-yr Warranty SOKAL INDUSTRIES LTD.
Phone (204)334-6596. Email: [email protected]
FOR SALE: 28-FT. SOCO livestock in VGC, heavy
wheels & axles, $7,000. Phone (204)373-2631
TRAILERS
Trailers Miscellaneous
FOR SALE: 1985 MANAC hay trailer 53-ft. w/bale
extensions. Phone (204)585-5370, Sandy Lake, MB.
Stretch your advertising dollars! Place an ad in the
classifieds. Our friendly staff is waiting for your call.
1-800-782-0794.
CAREERS
CAREERS
Help Wanted
MUST HAVE FARM EXPERIENCE, mechanically
inclined, be able to do any structural repairs to
buildings, must be able to run combine, swather,
tractor, balers, haybines, farm equipment. Mixed
farm. Wages are negotiable depending on experience, potential to make $50,000 plus per year, for
the right individual. (204)738-2716.
SEASONAL FARM WORKERS SOUGHT for potato harvest season. Position will be seasonal full
time, 40+ hrs per week. Wage $10.70 per hour. Period of employment anticipated to be from Aug until
Sept 30th, 2015. Job description will include all potato harvesting duties such as grading, picking dirt,
etc. Must be willing to work long hours & do repetitive tasks as well as be able to work in a variety of
conditions in outdoor environment. Education requirements not applicable; experience an asset. Location of work is MacGregor & area, MB. Please
apply in writing to Northern Potato Co. Ltd., Box 33,
Bagot, MB R0H 0E0.
SILVER WEANLINGS INC. is looking for fulltime
Hog Barn Workers. Job duties include daily chores,
assisting sows at farrowing, A.I Breeding, some minor record keeping & etc. We have two locations in
Interlake, Manitoba; one is located 7-miles south west of Arborg, MB and the other at 9-miles southwest of Fisher Branch, MB. Weekend work required. Experience an asset but not required. Starting wage $11-14 per hour plus benefits. Please forward all resumes to [email protected] or mail to
Box 1320 Arborg, MB R0C 0A0.
We are looking for a reliable, detail-oriented person
who is familiar w/dairy cattle & their care, including
feeding, bedding, treating, calving, etc. If interested,
please send your resume to [email protected] or
call (204)745-7864. Haywood, MB.
Read digital editions, search archives
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www.manitobacooperator.ca
29
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
LIVESTOCK
Ag news that clicks.
www.manitobacooperator.ca
Your online source for the latest in ag news and information.
h u s b a n d r y — t h e s c i e n c e , S K I L L O R ART O F F AR M IN G
The new world of ‘sustainable’ beef
Rancher Cherie Copithorne-Barnes has dealt with the movers and shakers in the sustainable beef movement
BY BRAD BRINKWORTH
Meristem Land and Science
W
ho’s driving this bus?
Amid ‘grocery wars,’
Jamie Oliver, ‘hormone
free,’ Walmart, and a storm of
related debate, this is the core
question many producers and
others in animal agriculture
have about the new swath of
expectations and ‘sustainability’ programs taking hold in the
industry and the marketplace.
One person with a unique,
up-close perspective on what’s
happening at both the ranch
and the boardroom level, is
Cherie Copithorne-Barnes,
a fourth-generation rancher
and CEO of CL Ranches, which
grazes around 28,000 acres near
Jumping Pound, just west of
Calgary.
Copithorne-Barnes grapples
daily with the practical realities of today’s rising pressures
on animal agriculture and has
also dealt directly with many of
the movers and shakers behind
initiatives at Sobeys, A&W,
McDonald’s and others.
She also has a front-row seat
to developments both nationally and internationally, through
her role as chair of the Canadian
Roundtable for Sustainable Beef.
Copithorne-Barnes spoke
at the 5th Annual UCVM Beef
Cattle Conference in Calgary in
June and offered a number of
insights.
Undercover visit
In July 2013, unbeknownst to
her, a marketing representative
of celebrity chef Jamie Oliver
posed as a member of the Sobeys
meat team out for a tour of the
ranch, asking questions about
animal welfare and videotaping
her answers.
“I thought it was a little odd
that he was adamant about seeing our feedlots, even though we
had emptied them out about the
third week of April. He wanted to
see the pens. And when we got
there one of the questions he
asked was, ‘Why would you put
all of these calves into these backgrounding pens when you have
these big, beautiful open fields?’
“I was beginning to get a bit
suspicious of the line of questioning and I said, ‘Think of
yourself being here in the middle of January when it’s 40 below,
the wind is blowing, and there’s
a foot of snow on the ground.
Where would you rather be?
In these pens with the protection of the fence, clean bedding
and adequate food, or out in the
open field, facing that wind?’”
A month later she learned the
truth about the covert mission —
Oliver’s team was evaluating beef
suppliers to help Oliver decide if
he would participate with Sobeys
on what has become the “Sobeys
and Jamie Oliver Partnership,”
a high-profile marketing initiative built around the “Certified
Humane” concept.
She may not agree with all
parts of the approach, but
Copithorne-Barnes said it’s hard
to fault Sobeys from a purely
business perspective.
Cherie Copithorne-Barnes has had a front-row seat as global giants like McDonald’s and Walmart move to selling ‘sustainable’ beef. PHOTO: MERISTEM LAND AND SCIENCE
“How do you say this was a
wrong move for Sobeys to make?
Jamie Oliver has 4.5 million
(Twitter) followers. This is a man of
incredible influence.”
‘Better Beef’
The next group to visit was A&W,
which was considering a “Better
Beef” campaign, which promises
beef with no added hormones and
steroids.
“Before A&W rolled out its marketing plan, its executives actually
took the time to come out and visit
a number of operations,” she said.
“The questions they asked were
real, genuine, and they really tried
to learn and understand. But we
all know the reality of their marketing when they rolled this program out. I am no way endorsing
the fact that to call this better beef
was responsible. Thankfully, even
they eventually started to realize
the negative impact this was having at the producer level. That’s
why you don’t see the words better
beef in the slogan anymore.”
Despite the damage caused,
again it’s hard to argue the business rationale, she said.
“A&W decided that the hormone-free concept was something its consumers were asking
for. It needed to learn how to supply it and it became the very first
national hormone-free burger
available to Canadians. Business is
business whether we like it or not.
It had to follow consumers’ dollars
and this is where A&W decided to
go.”
‘Verified sustainable’
Arguably the most important
retailer initiative is McDonald’s
pledge to begin purchasing “verified sustainable” beef in 2016, with
Canada selected for the company’s first verified sustainable beef
pilot project.
“Business is business
whether we like it or
not. It had to follow
consumers’ dollars.”
Cherie CopithorneBarnes
Copithorne-Barnes said the
inclusive and collaborative
approach McDonald’s has chosen is encouraging and arguably
the best among the big retailers.
“It’s really been a driving force
in bringing together a multi-collaborative platform in order to
ensure that sustainable beef will
be defined in a way that everybody can define and accept.”
That multi-stakeholder pro­
cess stands in contrast to the
opportunistic approaches of
some companies, she said.
“You look at one of the more
extreme examples, such as what
Chipotle in the U.S. is doing,
where it’s clear it has decided
to drive consumers’ thinking for its own gain, whether
there’s truth or not to how it is
representing things,” she said.
“McDonald’s, on the other
hand, wants to make sure that
everyone involved in this concept has a voice at the table and
it gets it right.”
This means working with the
Canadian Cattlemen’s Associa­
tion, the Canadian roundtable,
Alberta Beef Pro­d ucers, and
many other industry players. It
also includes a strong science
basis.
This shows in McDonald’s
position on antimicrobial use.
Rather than promote antibiotic
free, it supports ‘judicious decision-making.’ Bruce Feinberg,
McDonald’s global animal health
and welfare officer, has simply
stated: “McDonald’s believes that
animals deserve care and we still
support the treatment of sick
animals.”
It’s important for producers to
have clear, science-based criteria that aren’t unfairly restrictive,
said Copithorne-Barnes.
“This is more likely to happen
when industry is part of the decision-making team.”
The road ahead
Copithorne-Barnes’ take on
Walmart is an interesting one.
The company recently urged
its meat and egg supplier to curb
antimicrobial use, which garnered massive media coverage.
“The press called this absolutely earth shattering and a
game changer, which made me
laugh because it was about the
last one in the game.”
But she was still relatively
happy at where Walmart landed.
“What I was most proud of
with Walmart is that for once it
was a recommendation. Walmart
has a tendency to send out prescriptive edicts. ‘You will or else
we won’t.’ This was the first time
when it comes to a sustainability
factor that Walmart has said we
‘recommend,’ and the reality is I
think a lot of that has to do with
McDonald’s and others making a
lot of headway through the concept of collaboration.”
But there are other issues to
deal with.
“For example, I know first
hand that antimicrobials are
just the first step. We will be
facing more questions about
Ractopamine and hormones
coming up very soon.”
Bu t t h e re c e n t s i g n s o f
progress are also encouraging,
she said.
“If we can keep what we’re
doing open and transparent,
at both a national and global
level, hopefully these companies such as Walmart, Unilever,
Nestlé, that are all walking
down this path right now, will
pay attention to this and we will
have approaches we can live
with.”
It’s important for the beef
industry to work together, reach
out to consumers and retailers,
and “continually come up with
new and creative ways to influence and deliver our messages.”
Social media will be a key
part of that, but old-style communication is, too.
“One of the most productive
things I’ve been able to accomplish in the past year and a half
is to have people come out to
the ranch so I can show them
what we’re doing,” she said. “It’s
one thing to have a 400-page
document explaining what
we’re doing. It’s another if you
can see it or if I can tell you in
my own words.
“We don’t need to get complicated. Just talk about the
simple things we do every day
and why we do them. That can
go a long way.”
Meristem Land and Science (www.
meristem.com) is a Calgary-based
communications firm that specializes in
writing about western agriculture, food
and land use.
30
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
COLUMN
Bringing the advantages of hydrotherapy to your horse
It is soothing as well as therapeutic when dealing with wounds or injuries
Carol
Shwetz
DVM
Horse Health
O
If an injury is left to heal as an open wound, hosing the wound for 20 minutes daily
encourages further healing. This process can be repeated every day for weeks after
the injury depending on the wound’s progress.
ne of the most valuable
allies in the “doctor’s” kit
of every horseman ought
to be water — simple, soothing, inexpensive, and most often
readily available. The application
of water, a.k.a. hydrotherapy, to
encourage healing brings plenty
of advantages in many equine
injuries. In spite of the many
advancements in veterinary
medicine, hydrotherapy remains
a solid therapeutic modality on
the front lines of first aid treatment as well as extending benefit
into the healing period thereafter.
Veterinarians frequently counsel horse owners to cold hose
an injury for a duration of about
20 minutes. Many horse own-
ers quickly realize the benefits of
this practice and will often have
hydrotherapy well underway
even before the veterinarian has
arrived to tend to an injury.
Initially hydrotherapy serves
to cleanse an open wound of
dirt and debris. A clean wound
is not only the first step to effective healing, it is also valuable
therapy for ongoing healing.
This first step in cleaning will be
important whether the wound is
sutured or left to heal as an open
wound.
If the injury is left to heal as an
open wound, hosing the wound
for 20 minutes daily encourages
further healing. This process can
be repeated every day for weeks
after the injury depending on the
wound’s progress.
The beneficial effects of hydrotherapy extend beyond cleansing the injury. Hydrotherapy is
also remarkably effective at controlling and regulating the three
YOUR GUIDE TO A
SAFE FARM
You know safety is important on your farm
– to protect your workers, your family and
your livelihood.
To help you meet workplace safety and health requirements on your
farm, SAFE Work Manitoba and Keystone Agricultural Producers (KAP)
have partnered to offer you Farm Safety Support Services. Our SAFE
Farms consultant provides free consultations to help you:
• Identify safety hazards on the farm and solutions to protect you,
your workers and your family
• Implement or evaluate a safety program or system on your farm
• Understand how the Workplace Safety and Health Act and
Regulations apply to your farm business
• Come into compliance with an inspection order
Consultations are private and tailored to
your farm’s needs.
Contact us
To talk to our SAFE Farms consultant, contact:
KAP: 204-697-1140
SAFE Work Manitoba: 1-855-957-SAFE (7233)
or [email protected]
safemanitoba.com
main symptoms of inflammation
— heat, swelling and pain.
These three processes are natural and functional responses to
injury, yet they can overwhelm
and slow the healing process.
Hydrotherapy appears to modulate the horse’s natural mechanisms to heal an injury by capitalizing on the stimulating effects of
improved circulation.
Both the immune system and
tissue regeneration appear to
be enhanced as well. The timely
application of cold hydrotherapy
to a laceration, blunt trauma, or
strained and/or sprained soft
tissue constricts and decreases
the permeability of blood vessels at the injury site and thus
reduces the amount of fluid
accumulation.
Cold therapy reduces the tissue’s demand for oxygen and so
limits the triggers for hypoxic
injury. Contraction of the vessels
due to the cold also encourages
the movement of fluid from the
affected area, further reducing
swelling. One of the often overlooked benefits of cold hydrotherapy is that of analgesia and pain
relief.
Invariably the afflicted site
shows noticeable improvement
and appears less painful for the
horse. Horses quickly learn to
accept and enjoy the benefits of
hydrotherapy. Owners often comment on the favourable influence
hydrotherapy will have on their
horse’s overall attitude.
There are numerous variations
on the theme of hydrotherapy.
Cold therapy is recommended
until the initial inflammation
has subsided. Once the injury
feels cool to the touch, heat can
be applied to encourage blood
circulation to the affected area.
Hosing with warm and/or tepid
water can be done if such is readily available. Hot compresses can
also be utilized to accomplish
this end. When heat is applied to
the surface of an injury it causes
the blood vessels to dilate and
increase blood flow to the site
bringing nutrients and oxygen to
the injured tissue.
Although dry heat from lamps
or heating pads can be helpful,
moist heat from compresses are
better able to penetrate deeper
into the tissues. However, if heat
is applied too early after an injury
the heat can spur undesirable
inflammation. Therefore, as a
general rule one would apply cold
if the injury is warm and/or hot
and apply heat if the injury feels
cool/cold. The change of therapy
from cold to hot can take from
days to a week depending on the
nature and severity of the injury.
Contrast baths are another
practice that can be used to
stimulate healing. An alternating
series of warm (not hot) and cold
applications are used to encourage the movement of nourishing
fluids into the affected area and
removal of stagnant fluids out of
the healing site by cycling dilation
and contraction of blood vessels.
It is important not to overlook the inexpensive nature and
extremely wide margin of safety
hydrotherapy offers. As such, it
presents strong arguments in its
favour, bringing a multitude of
advantages to horse owners when
presented with acute injuries or
wounds.
Carol Shwetz is a veterinarian focusing on
equine practice in Millarville, Alberta.
31
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
SHEEP & GOAT COLUMN
Summer auctions continue to support demand
Quality and condition continue to be factors for both sheep and goat prices
BY MARK ELLIOT
Co-operator contributor
P
roducers provided 630
sheep and goats for the
July 8 sale at Winnipeg
Livestock Auction. There was
a good selection, allowing buyers to fill their demand.
The ewe classification
was well represented. There
appeared to be no price differences between wool and hair
ewes. The apparent price differences were between young
and older ewes. Quality and
health-management practices
— which were noticeable —
played major parts in the bidding as well. Whether ewes
were sheared was not a price
factor at this sale.
A herd dispersal of Dorpercross ewes continued with
average price bidding.
The selection for rams was
ver y limited. A 235-pound
Suffolk-cross ram brought
$0.95 per pound. A 230-pound
Rideau-cross ram brought $0.90
per pound.
The heavyweight lambs
were represented by a group
of 21 114-pound Dorset-cross
and Blackface-cross lambs.
This group brought $1.95 per
pound.
T h e m a r k e t l a m b s we re
judged/viewed upon the
immediate condition by the
buyers’ bidding. Quality and
soundness brought higher
prices. There were no price
differences between wool and
hair lambs.
Demand for the feeder
lambs was strong at this sale.
A group of pastured lambs
brought $2.25 per pound. The
bidding continued with this
strong influence throughout
most of this classification.
The price ranged from $2.16
to $2.275 per pound for the
majority of the feeder lambs.
The lightweight lambs continued the high demand from
the buyers. The price ranged
from $2.07 to $2.29 per pound
for lambs in the 70-pluspound range. There appeared
to be no price differences
between the wool and hair
lambs.
Ev e n t h e l a m b s i n t h e
60-plus weight range continued some strong bidding, with
no price differences between
wool and hair lambs. The price
ranged from $2 to $2.36 per
pound.
The price ranged from $2.23
to $2.35 per pound for the
50-plus-pound lambs.
The demand for dairy goats
created some stronger bidd i n g . T h e yo u n g a g e a n d
quality characteristics of the
goats are still major issues.
Alpine-cross goat does represented the dairy selection.
There appears to be a limited
number of goats being brought
to the sales and this creates
high interest and high bidding.
However, proper health management must be shown.
The goat bucks of lower
weights and age brought higher
bids compared to older bucks.
The dairy goat buck selection
was represented by Alpinecross goats.
The goat kids are in major
demand by all buyers. This
interest keeps the bidding in
a more constant price range.
Even the lightweight goat kids
are being purchased for future
purposes. The dairy goat kids
were represented by Alpinecross and La Mancha-cross
kids.
Over the last month, the
Ont a r i o St oc k ya rd Rep o r t
showed similar traits as the
local market, with a combination of high and low
prices. However, the goat bidding/prices remain constant
throughout the month.
162.61 - 193.14
GOATS
DOES
PRICE /
WT.
WT.
1.59
195
95
1.75
107
KIDS
72.25 - 94.50
1.70
125
MEAT
2.67
75
1.62
131
MEAT
3.22
66
1.57
139
MEAT
2.98
50
1.23
162
DAIRY
2.98
51
MEAT
3.63
42
Lambs (lbs.)
110+
222.30
95 - 110
202.65 - 209.72
2.47
80
173.76 - 192.08
1.92
98
3.56
47
140.00 - 156.80
1.86
100
2.40
48
80 - 94
174.15 - 188.79
1.75
107
DAIRY
2.70
46
Under 80
102.00 - 133.98
MEAT
2.79
35
3.29
38
73 - 76
150.75 - 169.46
60 - 69
137.34 - 159.39
1.52
28
51 / 54
119.85 / 120.42 / 125.82
1.83
15
Visit one of our 40 dealerships across Canada and see
for yourself why CASE IH Axial-Flow combines are the
dependable choice.
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WT.
1.87
Rocky Mountain Equipment carries the largest selection
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are top in productivity, have the fewest drive components,
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GOATS
DOES
Ewes
DAIRY
BUCKS
MEAT
DAIRY
2.66
80
1.46
235
2.33
90
1.74
190
DAIRY
DAIRY
32
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
NH T8.330
426E, 284HP, 480/70R34 Front, 480/80R50 Rear, PTO
540/1000, 6th Hyd Outlet, Cab, Suspension. B3097B
193,900 BRANDON
$
NH T9.450
1808E, 710/70R42 168B R-1W FI Firestone Radial, 4 Electric
Remotes, Deluxe Cab, B3090B
256,900 NEEPAWA
$
SEE FULL LISTING ON OUR WEBSITE
‘09 NH CX8080
‘08 NH CR9070
2316E/1693T, Tires Drive 900/60R32, Rear 600/65R28, Auger 24”
Unloading A0727B
1464E, 900/60R32 Drive Tires, 600/65R32 Steering Tires, Long
Unloading Auger K0667C
162,750 ARBORG
$
‘07 NH CR9060
‘12 NH SP.365F
1417E/1073T, 340HP, Deluxe Cab, Intelliview 2 Monitor, Yield &
Moisture Monitor H0826C
444E, 1600 Gal Stainless Steel Tank, 120’ Boom, 3” Quick Fill
161,900 HARTNEY
$
USED EQU
187,900 CRYSTAL CITY
$
S0423B
351,900 ROBLIN
$
*For commercial use only. Offer subject to credit qualification and approval by CNH Industrial Capital Canada Ltd. See your New Holland dealer for details and eligibility requirement
New Holland dealers in Canada. Offer subject to change. Taxes, freight, set-up, delivery, additional options or attachments not included in price. © 2015 CNH Industrial Capital Am
or affiliates. CNH Industrial Capital and New Holland Construction are trademarks in the United States and many other countries, owned by or licensed to CNH Industrial N.V., its su
Come check out our
NEW location
‘12 NH CR9090
‘13 CIH STX450
783E/638T, 22” Rotor Planetary, 80mm Lift Cylinders,
HID Lighting, N1396B
800hrs, 450HP, PTO 1000, Lights 4 HID, AutoGuidance,
650/85R38 Duals R1145B
324,900 NEEPAWA
$
282,900 STE. ROSE
$
‘06 NH BR780A
NH TV6070
9000 Bales, Hyd Pick Up Lift, Bale Counter
B3049B
2155 hrs, 480/85R34 Non Directional Tires, 84LB Loader with
Grapple, 540/100 PTO, P0866B
15,900 BRANDON
$
177 Hwy 16 West,
Neepawa
109,900 PORTAGE
$
‘12 NH TV6070
2600 hrs, Tires 16.9x38 R1 Brand New, Loader with Grapple,
Fork & Manure Tines, Grill Guard N1742B
‘11 NH H7590
High Stubble Kit, 1000 RPM, 15’7” Cut Width, 2 Point Hitch
H1248B
108,500 NEEPAWA
$
27,900 HARTNEY
$
‘10 NH BR7090
‘14 NH TV6070
‘09 NH H7460
‘09 NH CR9070
6300 bales, 2.07 Pick Up, Bale Command, Hyd Pick Up Lift
L0986B
105 PTO HP, 480/85R34 Non Directional Tires, Cab End Diff
15’7” Cutting Width, 10.5” Rubber Conditioning Rolls, Hyd
Swivel Hitch, High Swivel Kit, K0542B
1465E/1173T, 520/85R 42 Duals, Axle Extensions, 24’ Unloading
Auger, Straw Chopper Deluxe M0279B
22,200 SHOAL LAKE
$
like us on
Lock, 84lb Loader, Deluxe Seat, A0750B
85,900 ARBORG
$
34,875 CRYSTAL CITY
$
BRANDON (204) 728-2244
ARBORG (204) 376-5600
CRYSTAL CITY (204) 873-2480
12
76
187,950 MOOSOMIN
$
HARTNEY (204) 858-2000
KILLARNEY (204) 523-4414
NEEPAWA (204) 476-2364
33
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
399,000 SHOAL LAKE
mazergroup.ca
QUIPMENT
14,400 NEEPAWA
$
‘12 NH CR8090
‘13 NH CR8090
453E, 344HP, HID Lighting, w/790CP Pick Up Header, Hyd Flow
and Deluxe Guard, R0891B
461E, 900/60R32 Drives, 600/65R28 Steering, Twin Pitch Rotors,
25’ Unloading Auger P0867B
313,900 ROBLIN
$
334,900 PORTAGE
$
NH T9050
‘14 NH T8.330
2600 hrs, 3 HID Lights, 710/70R42 Duals, Hyd Flow 55
S0488C
1588E, 284HP, 600/70R30 Front @45%, 710/70R30 @70% Rear,
PTO 540/1000, Deluxe Cab B3095B
201,900 SWAN RIVER
197,900 KILLARNEY
$
s and eligibility requirements. CNH Industrial Capital Canada Ltd. standard terms and conditions will apply. Depending on model, a down payment may be required. Offer good through August 31, 2015, at participating
5 CNH Industrial Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. New Holland Agriculture is a trademark registered in the United States and many other countries, owned by or licensed to CNH Industrial N.V., its subsidiaries
to CNH Industrial N.V., its subsidiaries or affiliates.
ading
NH BR780A
Tires 480/45-17, XtraSweep PU, Auto Wrap, Twine Only, Laced
Belts, Double Spring Kit, N1679B
$
SITE
tch
‘12 CL 760
600E/499T, Feeder Hose HP w/Cruise Pilot, Yeild Mapping16’
Pick Up/Swathmaster header L0838B
NOW OPEN
IN
STEINBACH
$
‘10 JD 4830
‘11 NH SP.365F
2795 hrs, 320/90R50 Tires, 1000 Gal Stainless Steel Tank,
Remote Section Control, 100’ Booms, R1142C
480 hrs, 1600 Gal Tank, Fence Line Spray Kit, Intellisteer Ready,
Sharp Shooter H1141B
330,900 HARTNEY
187,900 ROBLIN
$
$
‘08 AGCHM 1286C
‘03 NH CX840
‘13 NH L218
‘13 NH TV6070
120’x20’ Boom, Autoboom Wheels, Dual Tires 380/90R46,
Raven Smartrax M0398B
1945E/1598T, Auger 21’ Unloading, No Chaff Spreader, Yeild &
Moisture Monitor L0915C
85 hrs, 2 Speed EH, Controls, Cab w/ Heat & AC, Hyd HD, Heavy
Duty Tires, 72” LPE Bucket, 200 hrs, HST Transmission, 3 Range,
Rear Remote, MFWD, R4 Tires 10-16.5/43x16-20, 66”, W3453B
1800E, 2 Hyd Outlets, Engine End, Front Fenders, Grapple Fork
175,000 MOOSOMIN
$
116,600 SHOAL LAKE
$
39,900 WINNIPEG
$
R1190B
117,900 ROBLIN
$
‘14 NH T9.435
‘12 NH T9.615
‘09 MB R80
‘13 NH C238
767E, 710/70R42 168B R-1W FI Firestone Radial, 4 Electric
Remotes, Deluxe Cab B3093B
535HP, 1100 hrs, High Cap Hyd Pump, HID Worklight Package,
Lg Color Monitor Display S0582B
? 16’ Disc Mower Conditioner, Steel Rollers, 1000 PTO, Hyd.
Drive, 14L-16.1 Tires, P0754B
105 hrs, 87 HP, Tier 4, AC, HS, HC, Enclosed Cab with
Heater & AC W3376B
8-2000
23-4414
6-2364
268,800 BRANDON
$
288,900 BRANDON
$
PORTAGE (204) 857-8711
ROBLIN (204) 937-2134
SHOAL LAKE (204) 759-2126
28,900 PORTAGE
$
WINNIPEG (204) 253-2900
SWAN RIVER (204) 734-9361
STE. ROSE (204) 447-2739
65,900 BRANDON
$
MOOSOMIN (306) 435-3610
STEINBACH (204) 326-9834
34
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
LIVESTOCK AUCTION RESULTS
Weight Category
Ashern
Gladstone
Grunthal
Heartland
Heartland
Brandon
Virden
Killarney
Ste. Rose
Winnipeg
Feeder Steers
n/a
n/a
n/a
Jul-28
Jul-29
n/a
n/a
Jul-31
No. on offer
n/a
n/a
n/a
117*
*389
n/a
n/a
230
Over 1,000 lbs.
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
900-1,000
n/a
n/a
n/a
225.00-245.00
230.00-244.00
n/a
n/a
n/a
800-900
n/a
n/a
n/a
235.00-252.00
243.00-258.00
n/a
n/a
235.00-247.00
700-800
n/a
n/a
n/a
265.00-280.00
253.00-278.00
n/a
n/a
250.00-270.00
600-700
n/a
n/a
n/a
275.00-308.00
280.00-316.00
n/a
n/a
260.00-285.00
500-600
n/a
n/a
n/a
310.00-325.00
295.00-322.00
n/a
n/a
270.00-315.00
400-500
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
330.00-365.00
n/a
n/a
300.00-345.00
300-400
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
900-1,000 lbs.
n/a
n/a
n/a
195.00-227.00
212.00-224.00
n/a
n/a
n/a
800-900
n/a
n/a
n/a
225.00-240.00
222.00-237.00
n/a
n/a
200.00-228.00
700-800
n/a
n/a
n/a
245.00-254.00
238.00-261.00
n/a
n/a
220.00-245.00
600-700
n/a
n/a
n/a
285.00-305.00
260.00-285.00
n/a
n/a
225.00-260.00
500-600
n/a
n/a
n/a
290.00-311.00
284.00-312.00
n/a
n/a
230.00-275.00
400-500
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
300.00-336.00
n/a
n/a
245.00-275.00
300-400
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
No. on offer
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
155
D1-D2 Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
124.00-136.50
132.00-139.00
n/a
n/a
130.00-137.00
D3-D5 Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
112.00-123.00
127.00-133.00
n/a
n/a
120.00-127.00
Feeder heifers
Slaughter Market
Age Verified
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
134.00-142.00
n/a
n/a
n/a
Good Bulls
n/a
n/a
n/a
160.00-172.00
172.00-183.00 (185.00)
n/a
n/a
160.00-172.00
Butcher Steers
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
178.00-185.50
n/a
n/a
n/a
Butcher Heifers
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
177.00-184.00
n/a
n/a
n/a
Feeder Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
138.00-170.00
n/a
n/a
140.00-165.00
Fleshy Export Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Lean Export Cows
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
Heiferettes
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
n/a
* includes slaughter market
(Note all prices in CDN$ per cwt. These prices also generally represent the top one-third of sales reported by the auction yard.)
Grow informed.
With the new web series: AGGronomyTV
AgCanada.com is proud to present this new informative web video series.
AGGronomyTV is a series of videos that covers today’s top issues related
to soil management and crop production. Video topics include:
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Sponsored by
35
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
briefs
Stubble-burning
ban back in force
as of Aug. 1
Manitoba Agriculture,
Food and Rural Develop­
ment (MAFRD) reminds
producers who choose
to burn crop residue that
authorization is required
between Aug. 1 and Nov.
15. Authorizations are
issued daily by 11 a.m.
based on weather, mois­
ture and favourable smoke
dispersion conditions.
Night burning is banned
year round.
Producers may also
require a burning permit
if located within the city of
Winnipeg or in a burning
permit area. Permit appli­
cation forms and infor­
mation are available by
calling the toll-free infor­
mation line at 1-800-2651233. Information is also
available from MAFRD GO
offices and online at www.
gov.mb.ca/agriculture
under Quick Links.
Manitoba’s controlled
burning program is part
of the Burning of Crop
Residue and Non-Crop
Herbage Regulation. The
program was introduced
to protect public health
and safety while allowing
farmers to deal with dif­
ficult straw management
problems.
Stubble-burning regula­
tions are enforced by envi­
ronment officers and the
RCMP. Failure to follow the
regulations could result in
fines of up to $50,000.
— MAFRD release
It all started with horses
Tractors line up as Ray Cook of Neepawa, Manitoba drives his sulky plow as the horse-powerd portion makes its way around the track. Photo: Sandy Black
A
FIELD
FULL
OF
BALES
IS NO LONGER THE DREADED CHORE IT ONCE WAS
The MFGA wants
to know about
your hay crop
The Manitoba Forage and
Grassland Association
says there is a wide range
of hay quantity and qual­
ity across the province this
year, and it’s asking pro­
ducers to fill out a quick
online survey to help
quantify the situation.
“We saw Mother
Nature’s influence this
year as alfalfa was at the
optimum stage in some
areas, yet the window of
cutting opportunity was
fairly narrow to enable
producers to harvest the
forage in good condi­
tion,” the MFGA says in
a newsletter. “The other
curve Mother Nature
threw at us was dry condi­
tions that slowed the crop
and delayed first cut in
the north and southwest
areas of the province.”
The MFGA said the
information will be used
in its fall and winter
eBulletins to provide an
overview of the hay situ­
ation in various parts of
the province, an indica­
tion of hay prices and
guidelines as to where
hay is available or in
demand.
Questions include dates
of first and second cuts
and whether you will have
hay available for sale this
year. A link to the survey is
on the MFGA web page at
www.mfga.net. — Staff
VISIT WWW.FARM-KING.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION OR SEE YOUR LOCAL FARM KING DEALER.
FARM KING ROUND BALE CARRIERS WILL CHANGE THE WAY YOU
LOOK AT PICKING, MOVING AND STACKING BALES. You’ll not only
save time and money, but Farm King bale carriers are designed
to maintain the integrity of the bale, with gentle handling, even on
bales that have been left on the field through the winter season!
The strings will remain intact, from the field to the stack.
©2015 Buhler Trading Inc. | [email protected] | www.farm-king.com
www.farm-king.com
36
The Manitoba Co-operator | August 6, 2015
*For commercial use only. Offer subject to credit qualification and approval by CNH Industrial Capital Canada Ltd. See your New Holland dealer for details and eligibility requirements. CNH Industrial Capital Canada Ltd. standard terms and conditions will apply. Depending on model, a down
payment may be required. Offer good through August 31, 2015, at participating New Holland dealers in Canada. Offer subject to change. Taxes, freight, set-up, delivery, additional options or attachments not included in price. © 2015 CNH Industrial Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. New
Holland Agriculture is a trademark registered in the United States and many other countries, owned by or licensed to CNH Industrial N.V., its subsidiaries or affiliates. CNH Industrial Capital and New Holland Construction are trademarks in the United States and many other countries, owned by or
licensed to CNH Industrial N.V., its subsidiaries or affiliates.
USED EQUIPMENT www.agdealer.com/raymorenh
COMBINE HEADS
2013 CIH 2152-35FT CNH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $75,000
2010 NH 94C-42FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $59,000
MOWER CONDITIONERS
2013 NH H7460-16FT Rubber . . . . . . . . . . . . $37,000
2011 NH H7460 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,900
2002 NH 1431 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $14,500
SPRAYERS
2013 NH SP.240F XP 1200GAL 100FT . . . . $275,000
2012 NH SP.240F XP 1200GAL-100FT . . . .$235,000
2006 ROGAT 1274C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $110,000
2001 FC 67 XL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $17,000
2000 SPAIR 3200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,900
699153
‘15 Versatile 450
Tractor, 4WD, 500HP, Excellent cond.,
STD, 800’s, 98GPM, 6 REMOTES, E-PRO
STEERING
716097
‘09 New Holland T6050
718209
$110,000
$135,000
677742
‘15 Elmers 1150
Haul Master Grain Cart, Excellent cond.,
1200BU, TRANSFER TRACKS, SCALES,
AGRIMATICS, TARP, PIVOTING AUGER
SWATHERS
2013 NH H8060-36FT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $135,000
2013 NH NEW H8060-36FT. . . . . . . . . . . . . $136,000
2013 NH H8060-36FT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $135,000
2007 CIH WDX1202-36FT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $64,000
2004 MF 9220 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$40,000
1993 MB 960 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $10,000
SEEDING
2013 MR C2 86FT-12IN c/w 9800 TBH . . . $327,000
‘00 Case IH MX270
Tractor, 4WD, 4890hrs, 270HP, Good
cond., MFWD, 710/70R42 Rears, Power
Shift 4 Remotes, front weight
‘98 John Deere 9400
‘00 John Deere 9400T
$24,900
$275,000
$235,000
677744
‘13 New Holland SP.240F
XP High Clearance Sprayer, 4WD, 865hrs,
275HP, Good cond., 100FT, 1200GAL SS,
2 SETS TIRES, FM1000, AUTO PILOT
MISC.
ATV 2009 CK 3100S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,250
Grain Auger 2003 FK 1370TM . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500
Grain Vac 2011 WLNGA 6614 . . . . . . . . . . . . $21,000
Trailer 2005 TTECH CT3200 . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25,000
Mower/Zero Turn 2012 CK RZT 54 KW . . . . $3,650
Mower/Zero Turn 2010 CK TANK 60 . . . . . . $4,900
Mower/Zero Turn 2007 CK RZT54 . . . . . . . . .$1,650
Mower/Batwing 2014 SU XH1500
S3 SERIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $26,900
Lawn Tractor 2012 CK LTX1050KW. . . . . . . . .$1,799
709462
‘09 New Holland TV6070
Tractor, 4WD, 2875hrs, 155HP, Good
cond., 82LB LOADER, THIRD FLOOR PEDAL,
WHEEL WEIGHTS, 480/85R34 R1
718336
Tractor, 4WD, 5538hrs, 425HP, Good
cond., 36” TRACKS, FRT WEIGHTS,
4 REMOTES, STD TRANS
VRX
2012 MR C2 80FT-12IN c/w 9800 TBH . . .$280,000
2009 NH P2070 70FT X 12IN. . . . . . . . . . . . . $92,000
2004 NH SD440 51FT-12IN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35,000
2010 JD 5000-51FT c/w 1910 TBH . . . . . . . . $74,500
1998 JD 1900 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $13,900
677746
718210
Tractor, 4WD, 6138hrs, 425HP, Good
cond., 710/70R42 DUALS, 12 SPEED,
3 REMOTES, EZSTEER 500
$59,000
$37,000
$179,900
2013 NH TD5050 HC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $45,000
2009 NH TV6070 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $90,000
2009 NH T6050 PLUS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $65,900
2006 CIH STX480. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $159,000
2003 NH TM140 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $55,900
2000 CIH MX270 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $85,000
2000 JD 9400T . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $105,900
1998 JD 9400 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $99,000
699185
Tractor, 4WD, 2445hrs, 125HP, 16x16 Auto
Shift, 18.4R38 Rears, 14.9R28 Fronts,
Fenders
‘12 New Holland SP.240F
XP Sprayer, 4WD, 700hrs, 275HP, Excellent
cond., 1200GAL POLY TANK, 380/90R46
TIRES, 100FT/60FT 10 SECTION BOOMS
TRACTORS
$99,000
‘06 Case IH STX480
Tractor, 4WD, 5660hrs, 480HP, Fair cond.,
710/70R42 DUALS, 55GPM, 4 REMOTES
FRONT & REAR WEIGHTS, TOW CABLE
‘08 New Holland CX8080
Combine, 1375hrs, Good cond., Chaff
Spreaders, Yield & Moisture, Intelliview
II Display
$66,000
$270,000
690840
$159,000
716049
679668
‘15 Rem VRX Grain Vac
$251,000
2014 NH CX8090 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$383,000
2013 NH CX8080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$296,000
2011 NH CX8080. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $175,000
2010 NH CX8080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$230,000
2010 NH CX8080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $185,000
2008 NH CX8080 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $179,900
2003 NH CR970 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $125,000
2001 NH TR99 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $69,000
1994 NH TX66 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20,000
1991 NH TR86 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $15,500
2010 NH 94C-36FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $49,000
2010 NH 94C-36FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $51,000
2009 NH 94C-30FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$44,000
2009 NH 94C-40FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $54,900
2009 NH 94C-36FT CR/CX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$56,571
2008 NH 76C-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $18,900
2004 JD 630F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $16,429
HY SP25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,500
‘15 Elmers Super 7 70FT
Harrow, 10’ - 7 bar harrow sections
Hydraulic Tine Adjust Hydraulic
‘14 Versatile 450
Tractor, 4WD, 229hrs, 450HP, Excellent
cond., 800/70R38 DUALS, STD QUAD
SHIFT, MECH REMOTES, DEMO
718342
‘13 Morris C2 86FT-12IN
$280,000
COMBINES
Windrower, 298hrs, 190HP, Excellent
cond., 36FT, DELUXE CAB, CAB SUSPENSION, DELUXE LED LIGHTS, 600/65R
‘11 New Holland CX8080
700503
$90,000
2008 CIH RB564. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $9,900
2007 CIH RBX563 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $12,500
1991 CIH 8460. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,000
Mower Conditioner, Excellent cond.,
CHEVRON RUBBER ROLLS, MOMAX MODULAR DUTTER BAR, HYD TONGUE SWING
690133
Combine, 2WD, 499hrs, 360HP, Excellent Combine, 2260hrs, 360HP, Good cond., 520
cond., 520 DUALS, 600 REARS, CAST, HID, DUALS, 600/65R28 STEERS, LARGE TOUCH
Y&M, 790CP-15FT
SCREEN DISPLAY, CR STYLE SPREADERS
ROUND BALERS
‘13 New Holland H8060-36FT
677757
‘13 New Holland H7460-16FT Disc
$85,000
‘13 New Holland CX8080
ELEVATION Combine, 2WD, 295hrs, 225HP,
Excellent cond., CAST CYLINDER, 520/85R442
DUALS, 600 REARS, RECIEVER, NAV II
‘09 New Holland 94C-40FT
Header, Excellent cond., DOUBLE KNIFE
DRIVE, 6 BAT UII SPLIT REEL, DOUBLE
DRIVE, HYD FORE/AFT, TRANS
$106,000
‘14 New Holland CX8090
677872
$296,000
$389,000
677838
$75,000
‘13 MacDon 2152-35FT
Header, Excellent cond., 35FT, SPLIT
REEL, SINGLE KNIFE DRIVE, HYD TILT, HYD
FORE/AFT, AHHC, TRANSPORT
686695
$179,000
‘10 New Holland 94C-36FT
Header, Excellent cond., 36FT, DOUBLE
KNIFE DRIVE, 6 BAT UII 42IN DIAMETER
ONE PIECE REEL, SLOW SPEED
677851
$327,000
677932
$54,900
677759
$49,000
677738
‘12 Morris C2 80FT-12IN
/w 9800 TBH Air Drill, Good cond., 86FT, /w 9800 TBH Air Drill, Good cond., 80FT,
12IN, PAIRED ROW, MUD GUARDS, 5.5SPP, 12IN, PAIRED ROW, MUD GURADS, 5.5SPP,
DS, 9800TBH
DS, 9800 TBH
Highway #2 South
Highway #6 North
Highway #10 East
Fax: 306-946-2613
Fax: 306-746-2919
Fax: 306-782-5595
Ph: 306-946-3301
Ph: 306-746-2911
Ph: 306-783-8511
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Tornado among several storm events in the southwest