Name ______________________________________
Living With Art – STUDY GUIDE
Chapter 1 –
1. No society that we know of has lived without some form of art. The impulse to make and
respond to art appears to be as deeply ingrained as the ability to:
2. The famous Neolithic structure in England, made of megaliths that once formed several
concentric circles, is called:
3. Radiocarbon testing indicates that the earliest images made by humans date back to:
4. According to the author, the impulse to create art comes from basic human interests in:
5. “All art is basically Paleolithic or Neolithic: either the urge to smear soot and grease on cave
walls or pile stone on stone” was said by whom?
6. The most famous of Maya Lin’s works is:
7. The 10th-century copper sculpture illustrated in this chapter is the work of an artist
performing the role of “giving tangible form to the unknown.” The unknown, in this case, is
the physical form of the deity called:
8. Artists tasks are:
9. Although Vincent van Gogh suffered emotionally throughout his life, he was able to give his
emotions tangible form in works such as:
10. The list of traits that creative people seem to possess, given in this chapter, are:
11. The sculptor Constantin Brancusi spent his life searching for forms that were
12. The nature of perception suggests that the most important key to looking at art is
13. According to the author, the most important meaning of an artwork is
14. Vanitas paintings meditate on
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15. Wheel of Fortune was created by
16. Name methods used by prehistoric painters:
17. Theo van Gogh was Vincent van Gogh’s
18. We owe our access to Vincent van Gogh’s thoughts and feelings about many of his paintings
to:
19. The oldest drawings and paintings found the Chavet cave:
20. Theories regarding the purpose of Stonehenge include:
21. The function of artists to give tangible form to the unknown is evident in the 10th-century
sculpture Shiva Nataraja through images that represent
ART IDENTIFICATION
List the artist’s name and title of the work to the right of each image.
1.
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2.
3.
4.
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5.
6.
7.
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8.
ESSAY OPTIONS
Read over and take notes on each of the essays below. Attach a separate sheet of paper if
necessary.
1. What is the primary symbolism of a vanitas painting? Discuss at least two artists from
different centuries who have created such works, and indicate the reasons for the recurrence
of the vanitas theme in art of various eras.
2. Explain the process of “selective perception,” indicating how this subjective process can
result in differing interpretations of works of visual art.
3. Consider Vincent van Gogh’s work, The Starry Night, included in this chapter of the text.
Explain which function of art this work best fulfilled for the artist and the function it best
fulfills for you as a viewer.
4. Brancusi sought to simplify and purify his forms. Discuss how Brancusi used tangible objects
and created sculpture that conveyed the pure idea of the subject. Cite examples to support
your answer.
5.
Consider the 10th-century C.E. bronze statue, Shiva Nataraja. Discuss the importance of
understanding the beliefs of the culture in which this work was created in order to develop an
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manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
understanding of the meaning or message of the work. What cultural or religious function
was the artist was performing in creating this work?
CHAPTER 2
1. Van Gogh’s paintings are of high value because
2. According to the author, Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa dazzled his contemporaries because
3. During the ________ the term “art” was used roughly in the same sense as “craft.”
4. The field of philosophy called aesthetics asks the question
5. Fisherman’s Cottage on the Cliffs at Varengeville was painted by
6. What term describes work done by nonprofessionals?
7. To discover why the sculptor of the Amida Nyorai depicted the subject with elongated
earlobes, specific hand gestures, and a bun atop his head requires the use of
8. The term style is used to categorize a work of art by its
9. Our modern ideas about art carry with them ideas about
10. During the 18th century, beauty and art were discussed together because both
11. ________ is the name for a standard subject in Christian art, that of Mary, the mother of
Jesus, holding her son after he was taken down from the cross.
12. If a work of art is faithful to our visual experience, its style is
13. When discussing the size, shape, material, color, and composition of a work of art, we are
discussing its
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manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
14. During the Renaissance in Western Europe, ________ came to be regarded as the more
elevated of the arts.
15. After much study of the Arnolfini Double Portrait, experts agree that
16. Context is a factor of ties that bind a work of art to the
17.
Ann Hamilton’s Mantle is an example of
18. Andy Warhol’s images created from celebrities are portrayed through the making of mass
produced:
19. The following are true statements about James Hamilton’s Throne of the Third Heaven…
body of work?
20. Representational art with an approach to naturalism covers:
21. Philosophers determined that the pleasure of art was an intellectual pleasure and was
perceived through:
22. Art is represented in a variety of ways in the Western art world. What terms are used to help
describe the visual appearance of artwork:
23. Representational art resembles ____________________ and the result is a recognizable
_________________of objects and forms.
o Trompe l’oeil:
o Naturalistic:
24. Abstract art distorts, exaggerates, or simplifies the natural world to provide ___________.
25.
The Yoruban Head of a King and Cylindrical Head symbolize what?
26. Nonrepresentational art contains no reference to ____________________ as we see it. This
art is also referred to as _________________.
27.
Content: What a work of art is about or its ________________________.
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•
•
•
28.
•
•
•
Subject Matter:
Message:
Iconography:
Form is the way a work of art looks and includes:
Media:
Style:
Composition:
29.
Installation:
30.
Performance art –
ART IDENTIFICATION
KNOW AND BE ABLE TO IDENTIFY THE FOLLOWING WORKS BY TITLE AND
ARTIST’S NAME. WRITE THE TITLES AND ARTISTS’ NAMES BESIDE THE IMAGES.
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manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
© 2013 by McGraw-Hill Education. This is proprietary material solely for authorized instructor use. Not authorized for sale or distribution in any
manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
READ AND MAKE NOTES ABOUT ESSAY QUESTIONS BELOW. Attach a separate sheet
if necessary.
1. Cite and describe four works representing each of these categories: representational, abstract,
trompe l’oeil, and nonrepresentational. For each of the works you select explain what the
artist communicated through the form of his or her artwork.
2. Rebecca Purdum has compared non-verbal communication with nonrepresentational art.
Discuss this comparison in relation to the roles of the artist and the observer.
3. At the beginning of the 20th century, how did the development of photography transform the
art of artists who worked in non-photographic media? Which artist determined that this new
process changed the process of representing the observable world and how?
4. Consider the differences between “outsider” (naïve or folk) art and the works of professional
artists, explaining the reasons that you believe that “outsider” art should or should not be
accepted by critics, museums and galleries, and the public as “real” art.
5. Discuss the relationship between non-Western works of art that do not appear to represent
conventional Western ideals of beauty and the form and content of those works. Discuss
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manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
several examples of differences in culture or tradition that prove standards of beauty to be
culturally specific rather than universal.
7. Consider Jan van Eyck’s painting, Arnolfini Double Portrait. Discuss three symbols within it
that reveal the possible iconography of the work. Then explain an alternate interpretation of
the work relating to the meaning of the same objects.
8. Considering both of these works, included in this chapter of the text, discuss each artist’s
style and treatment of the subject: Utamaro’s Hairdressing, from Twelve Types of Women’s
Handicraft; and Degas’ Nude Woman Having her Hair Combed.
9. Compare and contrast Matisse’s two paintings Piano Lesson and Music Lesson addressing the
abstract qualities of each, the presentation of the content, and how the objects presented in the
painting inform directly or indirectly the content of the paintings.
10. Discuss how Ann Hamilton’s Mantle and Joseph Bueys’s How to Explain Pictures to a
Dead Hare are examples of installation and performance art, addressing the performance
nature of the pieces, the importance or unimportance of the space, the visual impact, and your
response to this type of art.
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manner. This document may not be copied, scanned, duplicated, forwarded, distributed, or posted on a website, in whole or part.
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chap 1 & 2 study guide