AP/IB Biology – T. Rumppe
Textbook: Biology Concepts and Connections, Neil A. Campbell, 5th edition, Pearson
Benjamin Cummings, 2006
Classroom Textbook: Biology, Neil A. Campbell, 4th edition (the old textbook we
used.)
Labs: Combination of student-designed labs and AP labs from AP Central
This course fulfills the academic requirements of the Advanced Placement and
International Baccalaureate (standard level) Biology courses
First Quarter Topics and Laboratories
AP Topic I.A: Molecules and Cells/Chemistry of Life
IB Topic 2: Chemistry of Life and Option C: Cells and Energy
 Review of Chemistry, properties of water
 Biochemistry/ Organic Molecules (Nucleic Acids, Proteins, Carbohydrates,
Lipids) AP: RNA, DNA structure and function covered here
o Biochemistry/macromolecule pamphlet *PROJECT*
o Biochemistry/macromolecule Qualitative lab: Students perform qualitative
tests for proteins, lipids, monosaccharides, and polysaccharides
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Enzymes and Enzyme reactions
o Students analyze AP lab 2 (Enzyme Catalysis) lab and expected data
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(provided by the teacher). Students graph the data and answer the
questions. This in preparation for their own inquiry-based enzyme-substrate
lab that they design on their own.
Student-designed enzyme/substrate lab: Students design a controlled
experiment with one variable using known enzymes/substrates.
AP Emphasis C6: The integration of the Science as Process,
Relationship of structure to function, and Regulation
general topics covered here.
 AP Emphasis C4: The understanding of science as a process
and not an accumulation of facts.
Diet and Nutrition (AP Topic III B: Structure and function partially
covered here -Human Digestion. IB Option A: Diet and Nutrition)
o McDonalds food item analysis, diet design/analysis
o Digest System drawing/structure/function/enzymes
Issues related to food: eating disorders, nutrition of all peoples,
genetically modified foods, public policy and food-related issues.
Emphasis C7: Applications of biological knowledge and critical thinking
to environmental and social concerns.
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AP Topic I.B: Molecules and Cells/Cells
IB Topic 1: Cells and Option C: Cells and Energy
 Cell Structure and Function
o Student-designed cell game
o Microscopy - cells: sizes, drawings, organelle ID
 Cell membrane, osmosis, diffusion
o Diffusion/Osmosis lab, Water potential of potato AP lab 1
 Mitosis
o Cells in mitosis lab (whitefish blastula/onion root tip)
 Meiosis
Focus on heredity and evolution, especially variation and adaptation.
o Natural Selection will be introduced here.
o Students will be given old IB test questions that relate biochemistry
and its use as ‘evolutionary clock’ to determine when certain
organisms diverted from each other in evolutionary development.
This in turn will be related to meiosis again. The course provides
students with an opportunity to develop a conceptual framework for modern
biology emphasizing the integration of the general topics of biology through the
eight major themes as specified in the Course Description: Science as Process;
Evolution; Energy Transfer; Continuity and Change; Relationship of structure
to function; Regulation; Interdependence in nature; Science, technology, and
society.
o (Introduction to AP Topic II.A: Heredity, AP Topic II.B: Molecular
Genetics, AP Topic III A: Organisms and populations/Diversity, AP
Topic II C: Evolutionary biology) Emphasis C5: The recognition of
evolution as the foundation of modern biological models and
thought.
o Emphasis C1: Molecules and Cells
o Emphasis C2 hereditary and evolution
o AP lab 3: Mitosis and meiosis (mitosis covered earlier)
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Continued introduction to heredity, variation, and adaptation: Students
watch Cracking the Code of Life, (Nova, 2001). This video also found
online: www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/genome/ and can be viewed by students
at home.
o Topics for discussion:
 Gene patenting and the ethics related to this.
 How does natural selection apply today?
 How does this relate to other ethical considerations of today
(stem cell research, genetically modified foods, the role of
science in public policy)?
o Emphasis C6: The integration of the Science as Process,
o Relationship of structure to function, Continuity and Change,
Evolution, Science, Technology and Society, Interdependence in
nature, and Regulation general topics covered here.
o Emphasis C7: Applications of biological knowledge and critical
thinking to environmental and social concerns.
Second Quarter Topics and Laboratories
AP Topic I.C: Molecules and Cells/Cellular Energetics
IB Topic 2: Chemistry of Life and Option C: Cells and Energy
 Energy relationships/ATP
 Photosynthesis
o Photosynthesis analogy Project: Students use an analogy to describe all of the
oxidation/reduction reactions of light-dependant reactions of photosynthesis
o Spectrophotometer lab: collect, analyze absorption spectrum
o AP lab 4 Plant pigments and Photosynthesis
 Chromotagraphy portion of this lab is done in class. Data from the
o
Photosynthesis portion of the AP lab (provided by the teacher) is
graphed and analyzed.Questions from AP lab answered.
Self-designed photosynthesis lab done by the students.
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Emphasis C6: The integration of the Science as Process,
Relationship of structure to function, Energy transfer,
Interdependence in nature, and Regulation general topics
covered here.
Emphasis C4: The understanding of science as a process
and not an accumulation of facts.
Respiration
o AP lab 5 Cell respiration: Students analyze data provided by the teacher for this lab.
o
They graph, analyze and answer questions related to the data. This is an
introduction to set up an inquiry-based-self-designed respiration lab.
Student-designed respiration or fermentation lab
o Emphasis C6: The integration of the Science as Process,
Relationship of structure to function, Energy transfer,
Interdependence in nature, and Regulation general
topics covered here.
o Emphasis C4: The understanding of science as a process and not an
accumulation of facts.
Third Quarter Topics and Laboratories
AP Topic II.A: Heredity
IB Topic 3: Genetics
 Review of Meiosis/gametogenesis
 Genetics
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AP lab 7 Genetics of organisms, substitutions: Students do virtual labs
mating Drosophila melanogaster and cats. The Drosophila Website:
bioweb.wku.edu/courses/Biol114/Vfly1.asp
AP lab 8 Population Genetics and Evolution. Students study and analyze
Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.
Emphasis C2 hereditary and evolution
AP Topic II.B: Molecular Genetics
 Protein synthesis
o Protein Synthesis Model
 DNA electrophoresis/Genetic Technology
o
DNA Electrophoresis/Restriction Enzyme lab AP lab 6
o Emphasis C2 hereditary and evolution
AP Topic III B: Organisms and populations/Structure and Functions of plants
and animals.
IB Topic 5: Human Health and physiology
 Immunity
 Circulatory systems
 Respiratory systems
 Reproductive Systems
 Nervous systems
 Homeostasis
o Group 4 Project: Student-designed and implemented laboratory project
(Done independently outside of class.)
o Pig Heart observation/dissection
o AP lab 10 Physiology of the Circulatory System modified to use fish and in
conjunction with cardiologist (speaker)
Fourth Quarter Topics and Laboratories
AP Topic III A: Organisms and populations/Diversity
AP Topic II C: Evolutionary biology
IB Topic 4: Ecology and Evolution
 Classification/survey of life/evolution and evolutionary patterns
o Diversity of organisms
o Review of Natural Selection, population genetics, and adaptations.
o Survey of plant and animal differences. Students will study how
plants and animals reproduce, transport materials, get rid of waste,
obtain energy, grow, move, adapt to their environment, perform
gas exchange and maintain homeostasis. Overview of phylogenic
characteristics studied in the context of how the organisms (if they
did) made the transfer from living in an aqueous environment, to
living on land. Emphasis C2 hereditary and evolution. Emphasis C3
Organisms and populations. Emphasis C6 Interdependence in
nature, Evolution, Energy Transfer, Regulation, Science
Technology and Society.
Class Stations on the following:
 Plant/Flower dissection
 Bilateral Key. Tree identification activity
 AP lab 10: Transpiration lab data analyzed
 AP lab 11: Animal Behavior lab modified for meal worms
 AP lab 12: dissolved Oxygen and Primary Productivity lab
Mechanisms of evolution
o Review of Natural Selection, meiosis, Hardy-Weinberg
o Populations
AP Topic III C: Organisms and populations/Ecology
IB Topic 4: Ecology and Evolution
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Energy flows
Resource cycles
Habitats/ Biomes
Human Impact
o Student seminars on a current topic in ecology. The seminar must cover
habitats, energy and other resources, plant/animal impacts, human impacts,
ethics, the political aspects of the topic as well as the biological implications.
o Emphasis C6 Interdependence in nature, Evolution, Energy
Transfer, Regulation, Science Technology and Society.
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Review for the tests
Format
Philosophically, I believe that it is essential to utilize as many areas of the brain as
possible. Retention/retrieval of material is gained if the material is stored in many areas of
the brain. Many lessons incorporate design, presentation, 3-D modeling, drawing, or music.
Cooperative learning groups have been a benefit to students –especially study groups. Please
see me if you are interested in brain research on memory and retention that supports this teaching style.
(Howard Eichenbaum and Neal J. Cohen, Nancy Andreason, James E. Zull, David Kolb, to name a few
researchers)
1. Students will have an IB/AP syllabus notebook.
a. Every day, students will have a topic from the syllabus.
b. They will be asked to paraphrase the topic, draw a picture or further explain
the premise of the topic. (My goal is to focus more on the IB/AP topic
requirements… I will still give my lecture notes at the end of the year to the
students taking the exam, but I feel that this approach makes the syllabus more
personal.)
2. Students will have an IB/AP syllabus quiz where they can use their notebook to take a
short quiz using questions from old IB/AP tests.
3. Extra credit will involve paraphrasing topics that we don’t get to…
IB/AP truths that will help you succeed:
1.
Study with others. Have Biology parties. Talk over the material.
(I think that study parties are so essential that I will give extra credit to any student that
hosts a party and announces it in class for all to attend!)
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Ask for help when you need it.
Read the textbook. Re-read the difficult portions. Skim the chapter
first… then tackle the whole thing.
Laugh. Retention is higher if a concept can be tied to an emotion…
Cry only as needed or as a last resort!
Get access to an Internet connection. My lectures and most
worksheets are online. (The media Center is keeping late hours
this year.)
Know my web page: (or ‘google’ teresa rumppe)
http://southwest.mpls.k12.mn.us/Rumppe.html
Know my email: [email protected]
CRITERIA FOR LABORATORY WRITTEN WORK
1. Planning A (Introduction)
________ Background information is provided
________ Nature of the problem is described
________ Purpose is stated
________ Qualitative information is described (characteristics that might influence the
nature of the problem, or affect the experiment.)
________ Hypothesis is stated. (IB states: “A typical formulation for a hypothesis might
be “if … is done, then …… will occur”.”) The best hypothesis is quantitative: “If A is
doubled, then B will triple…”
2. Planning B (Procedure)
________ Materials listed
________ Methods described
________ Methods justified
________ Control is listed and identified
________ Measurement of variables is described
3. Data Collection (Results)
________ Table of quantitative data
________ Units of measurement are identified
________ Range of precision is identified
________ Qualitative data is written in either the table or as additional data
4. Data Analysis (Graphs)
________ Graph has a title,
________ Axes are labeled with units
________ Key is provided (if needed)
________ Graph is appropriate for the data collected
5. Evaluation (Discussion and Conclusion)
________ Analysis of results
________ Evaluation of hypothesis
________ Evaluation of procedure
________ Suggestions of procedure modification
Random Rules:
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4.
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9.
Passes from a planner only.
No passes for first or last 10 minutes of class.
No food or drink (for your own safety.)
You are absent from the class if you walk in 5
minutes after the last bell without a pass.
Late work will be accepted with a 10%
deduction for 1 week (it turns to a permanent
zero after 1 week.)
Tests can be retaken 1 time after school or
during lunch for full credit.
Tests must be taken or retaken within 1 week of
the original scheduled exam.
Absolutely no throwing (or pretending to throw.)
Cell phones, walkmans, and hats need to be off
and hidden.
Grading
 15% Syllabus notes and
notebook
 35% homework/lab write-ups
 15% Activities and
Presentations
 35% tests and quizzes
Of the total points:
90% - 100% = A- to A
80% - 89% = B- to B+
70% - 79% = C- to C+
60% - 69% = D- to D+
Parent/Guardian signature:__________________________________
Parent/Guardian email:_____________________________________
Student signature:_________________________________________
Student email:____________________________________________
“R”-rated movies:
I don’t show ‘R-rated feature films’ but I have shown Autopsy videos. Please let
me know if you object to this…
Appendix:
Media Release form (on the back):
If you don’t mind having your student’s picture on the web page (no names will be
included…) please sign the form on the other side of this page. No guarantees of
display unless you provide the picture to me in a digital format (email), however.
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First Quarter Topics and Laboratories