Eighth Grade: Stuffing Envelopes
Content Rubric—Claim 1
8.EE.B Understand the
connections between
proportional relationships,
lines, and linear equations.
8.EE.B.5 Graph proportional
relationships, interpreting the
unit rate as the slope of the
graph. Compare two different
proportional relationships
represented in different ways.
For example, compare a
distance-time graph to a
distance-time equation to
determine which of two
moving objects has greater
speed.
8.EE.B.6 Use similar triangles to
explain why the slope m is the
same between any two
distinct points on a nonvertical line in the coordinate
plane; derive the equation
y = mx for a line through the
origin and the equation
y = mx + b for a line
intercepting the vertical axis at
b.
0
1
2
Does Not Meet Standard Yet
Level 0 students show
inconsistent or no
understanding of the
connections between
proportional relationships,
lines, and linear equations
by not:
 Identifying who made
more money.
 Showing the proportional
relationship in Anna’s
and Jason’s earnings.
 Providing an equation
that represents their
earnings.
3
4
Meets Standard
Exceeds Standard
Level 3 students show a
good understanding of the
connections between
proportional relationships,
lines, and linear equations
by:
Level 4 students show a
thorough understanding of
the connections between
proportional relationships,
lines, and linear equations
by:
Level 1 students show little
understanding of the
connections between
proportional relationships,
lines, and linear equations
by:
Level 2 students show a
partial understanding of the
connections between
proportional relationships,
lines, and linear equations
by:
 Completing part of the
task correctly, but not
enough to establish
his/her knowledge and
skill in making
connections between
proportional
relationships, lines, and
linear equations.
 Attempting some
mathematical
representation of their
solution that shows
partial understanding of
the proportional
relationship (e.g., unit
rates, proportion table,
graphs, etc.).
 Accurately showing how
much money Anna and
Jason make when
stuffing envelopes using
proportional
relationships, unit rates,
graphs of equations, or
other mathematical
representation.
 Showing how Anna
makes more money
using multiple
mathematical
representations (e.g.,
proportional
relationships, unit rates,
proportion table, graphs,
etc.).
 Inaccurately or not
providing an algebraic
equation that models
either Ann’s or Jason’s
earnings.
 Accurately connecting an
algebraic equation to the
mathematical context
that models either
Anna’s or Jason’s
earnings.
 Accurately connecting
algebraic equations to
the mathematical context
that models both Anna’s
and Jason’s earnings.
SMP RUBRIC ADAPTED FROM RANGE ACHIEVEMENT LEVEL DESCRIPTORS FOR MATHEMATICS (http://www.smarterbalanced.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Smarter-Balanced-Math-ALDs.pdf)
Page 1
Practice Rubric—Claim 3
Claim 3 Students can clearly
and precisely construct
viable arguments to support
their own reasoning and to
critique the reasoning of
others.
Claim 3 Range ALD:
A. Test propositions or conjectures
with specific examples.
B. Construct, autonomously, chains
of reasoning that will justify or
refute propositions or conjectures.
C. State logical assumptions being
used.
D. Use the technique of breaking an
argument into cases.
E. Distinguish correct logic or
reasoning from that which is
flawed and—if there is a flaw in
the argument—explain what it is.
0
1
2
Does Not Meet Standard Yet
Level 0 students
demonstrate inconsistent or
no ability to clearly and
precisely construct viable
arguments in support of his
or her reasoning or identify
obvious flawed arguments in
familiar contexts.
Level 1 students
demonstrate little ability to
clearly and precisely
construct viable arguments
in support of his or her
reasoning using concrete
referents such as objects,
drawings, diagrams, and
actions and identify obvious
flawed arguments in familiar
contexts.
Level 2 students
demonstrate a partial ability
to clearly and precisely
construct viable arguments
in support of his or her
reasoning and should be
able to find and identify the
flaw in an argument by using
examples or particular
cases. Students should be
able to break a familiar
argument given in a highly
scaffolded situation into
cases to determine when the
argument does or does not
hold.
3
4
Meets Standard
Exceeds Standard
Level 3 students
demonstrate an ability to
clearly and precisely
construct a viable argument
in support of his or her
reasoning by using stated
assumptions, definitions,
and previously established
results and examples to test
and support their reasoning
or to identify, explain, and
repair the flaw in an
argument. Students should
be able to break an
argument into cases to
determine when the
argument does or does not
hold.
Level 4 students
demonstrate a thorough
ability to clearly and
precisely construct viable
arguments in support of his
or her reasoning by using
stated assumptions,
definitions, and previously
established results to
support their reasoning or
repair and explain the flaw in
an argument. They should
be able to construct a chain
of logic to justify or refute a
proposition or conjecture
and to determine the
conditions under which an
argument does or does not
apply.
F. Base arguments on concrete
referents such as objects,
drawings, diagrams, and actions.
G. At later grades, determine
conditions under which an
argument does and does not
apply. (For example, area
increases with perimeter for
squares, but not for all plane
figures.)
SMP RUBRIC ADAPTED FROM RANGE ACHIEVEMENT LEVEL DESCRIPTORS FOR MATHEMATICS (http://www.smarterbalanced.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Smarter-Balanced-Math-ALDs.pdf)
Page 2
Task Specific Rubric
Anna & Jason’s Wage Capacity,
Stuffing Envelopes (8th Grade)
Level 0 students do not
meet criteria for a level 1
Level 1 students
demonstrate little ability to
clearly and precisely
construct viable arguments
in support of his or her
reasoning by:
 Identifying who
(Anna/Jason) made
more money or that they
both earned the same
amount of money when
stuffing the same
number of envelopes.
 Attempting an answer
justification, but not
providing enough to
establish his/her ability
to clearly and precisely
construct viable
arguments that support
his or her reasoning.
Level 2 students
demonstrate a partial ability
to clearly and precisely
construct viable arguments
in support of his or her
reasoning by:
Level 3 students
demonstrate an ability to
clearly and precisely
construct a viable argument
in support of his or her
reasoning by:
Level 4 students
demonstrate a thorough
ability to clearly and
precisely construct viable
arguments in support of his
or her reasoning by:
 Identifying that Anna
made more money than
Jason when stuffing the
same number of
envelopes.
 Identifying that Anna
made more money than
Jason when stuffing the
same number of
envelopes.
 Identifying that Anna
made more money than
Jason when stuffing the
same number of
envelopes.
 Inaccurately explains
connections between or
among the mathematical
representations when
justifying that Anna
made more money.
 Justifying how Anna
makes more money
than Jason using
proportional
relationships, unit rates,
graphs of equations, or
other mathematical
representation to
support reasoning.
 Justifying how Anna
makes more money than
Jason using multiple
mathematical
representations (e.g.,
proportional
relationships, unit rates,
proportion table, graphs,
linear equations, etc.) to
support reasoning.
SMP RUBRIC ADAPTED FROM RANGE ACHIEVEMENT LEVEL DESCRIPTORS FOR MATHEMATICS (http://www.smarterbalanced.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Smarter-Balanced-Math-ALDs.pdf)
Page 3
SMP RUBRIC ADAPTED FROM RANGE ACHIEVEMENT LEVEL DESCRIPTORS FOR MATHEMATICS (http://www.smarterbalanced.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Smarter-Balanced-Math-ALDs.pdf)
Page 4
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8th Grade Rubric - Washington State ESDs

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