1- When Heinz introduced their new green ketchup this, seemingly simple, color change
caused a record low in sales. (Points : 1)
True
False
2. Iconography is: (Points : 1)
The meaning we get from what we see.
The symbolic meaning of signs, subjects and images.
A major element in visual media such as film and video.
Any mark on the picture plane that gives the illusion of the "third dimension", also called
"depth".
3. Color is a property of light, not an object in itself. (Points : 1)
True
False
4. Raphael’s The School of Athens provides the viewer with the illusion of the threedimensional world on a two-dimensional surface by the use of: (Points : 1)
linear perspective
symmetrical balance
the golden mean
cross hatching
5. Value in the "art sense" of this chapter refers to the: (Points : 1)
lightness and darkness of surfaces
brightness and dullness of surfaces
foreground and background
quality or "value" according to the individual viewing it
6. The method of creating the illusion of depth on a 2-D surface through the appearance of
converging parallel lines and one or more vanishing points is called_______. (Points : 1)
atmospheric perspective
chiaroscuro
linear perspective
picture plane
7. Any one of us can look at any image, from any time period, and fully understand the
iconography presented, by simply thinking about the details we see. (Points : 1)
True
False
8. According to your text, _________ is the easiest and most basic technique to visually imply
"depth" on a two-dimensional surface. (Points : 1)
implied motion
shading and shadowing  I am sure it is NOT this one
linear perspective  I think this one is correct
overlapping
9. Some artists try to express theories of "passing time" in their work. It can be argued that
both the Aztec Calendar and Aitken's "Sleepwalkers" are examples of the expression of
"passing time". (Points : 1)
True
False
10. This image, from a pro sports team, is a good example of complimentary colors used in
"real life". It could be argued that these colors are chosen because, when placed next to each
other, they give each other intesity that seems to "vibrate" and attract attention. (Points : 1)
True
False
1. Global Warning, the graphic design poster by Chaz Maviyane-Davies, presents an issue of
concern for the artist as well as the global population. This work is an example of art as a
vehicle for:
(a) communicating information
(b) personal expression
(c) social causes
(d) all of the above
2. This artist, who made Rocket to the Moon, paid tribute to the richness of the AfricanAmerican
experience through art.
(a) Romare Bearden
(b) Barnet Newman
(c) Felix González-Torres
(d) Chaz Maviyane-Davies
3. The symbolic meaning of visual signs and imagery is called: (Points : 1)
content
form
iconography
aesthetics
4. Alexander Calder is the first artist to: (Points : 1)
use the elements of "chiaroscurro" as a major element of art.
use the element of "electric light" as a major part of art.
use the element of "motion" as a major part of art.
None of these are the correct answer for what Alexander Calder added to the world of
"art".
5. In trying to interpret an image iconographically, with special consideration to time and place
of creation, you must also pay attention to identification of significant _____________. (Points
: 1)
colors
subjects
forms
all of the above
6. In art, "medium" refers to: (Points : 1)
an artisit who can tell you about your future
the material used for artwork
the size of a painting in between small and large
a particular material, along with its accompanying technique
7. James Hampton, the artist who created Throne of the Third Heaven of the Nation’s
Millennium General Assembly (figure 33), did not have any professional art training. This type
of artist is often recognized as a _______ artist. (Points : 1)
Tukutuku
Constructivist
Naive/Untrained
Nonconforming
8. In Lee Friedlander's work "Bismark, North Dakota" (2002), we see an example of how:
(Points : 1)
figure-ground reversal interlocks light and dark forms.
the image of poles, railings and their shadows, appear as a variety of visual lines.
plant and bird forms create a sense of "mass".
shapes, light and color combine to create the illusion of depth.
9. The realistic manner in which William Harnett painted A Smoke Backstage is called: (Points :
1)
visual relativism
nonrepresentational
painterly
trompe l’oeil
10. When studying an image for form alone, the text advises you (the viewer) to: (Points : 1)
look at the image upside
hold up your hands and fingers to form a square; then look through that square to focus on
various parts of the image
step back from the image to notice the largest shapes
none of the above
1.
The specific area our eyes are drawn to
CORRECT: focal point
2.
provides diversity - acts to counteract unity
a.
CORRECT: Variety
.
CORRECT: contrast
the juxtaposition of strongly dissimilar elements
to draw our attention to an area
CORRECT: Emphasis
Near or exact matching of left and right sides of a 3 dimensional form (or 2 dimens composition)
.
CORRECT: Symmetrical Balance
.
CORRECT: Unity
.
CORRECT: Asymmetrical Balance
the appearance or condition of oneness
Left and right sides are not the same
refers to any kind of movement or structure of dominant and subordinate elements in sequence.
.
CORRECT: rhythm
7 True/False Questions
1.
Balance → the size relation of one thing to another
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Balance → the achievement of equilibrium in which acting influences are held in check by opposing
forces.
2.
proportion → the size relationship of parts to a whole
CORRECT: This is true.
3.
subordination → the size relationship of parts to a whole
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be subordination → create neutral areas of lesser interest that keep us from being distracted fro the
areas of emphasis.
4.
format → the juxtaposition of strongly dissimilar elements
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be format → size and shape of a 2 dimensional picture plane.
5.
Pattern → provides diversity - acts to counteract unity
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Pattern → refers to a repetitive ordering of design elements.
6.
scale → the achievement of equilibrium in which acting influences are held in check by opposing forces.
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be scale → the size relation of one thing to another.
7.
directional forces → The specific area our eyes are drawn to
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be directional forces → influence the way we look at a work of art - paths for the eye to follow.
1. Going Home illustrates this artist’s skillful use of abstraction, unity and variety.
(a) Jacob Lawrence
(b) Pieter de Hooch
(c) Suzuki Haranobu
(d) Edgar Degas
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 60
2. Claus Oldenburg’s and Coosje van Bruggen’s art, as seen in Shuttlecocks, affects us
immediately by its:
(a) symbolism
(b) scale
(c) iconography
(d) color
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 72
3. The balance in Jockeys Before the Race, by the artist Edgar Degas, is:
(a) symmetrical
(b) asymmetrical
(c) isometric
(d) repetitive
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 66
4. Large Reclining Nude is the final result of this artist’s long process of planning and
rearranging the design of the composition.
(a) Henri Matisse
(b) Pablo Picasso
(c) Beverly Pepper
(d) Nicolas Poussin
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 755. Ogata Korin’s Cranes is a good example of the principle of:
(a) insistent rhythm
(b) emphasis and focal point
(c) rhythm and repetition
(d) emphasis and contrast
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 71
6. The result of the process of arranging, selecting and ordering is called the:
(a) purpose
(b) design
(c) emphasis
(d) direction
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 59
7. _______ refers to size relationships between parts of a whole.
(a) probability
(b) scale
(c) proportion
(d) chiaroscuro
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 72
8. The term “format” refers to the size and shape of a _______ picture plane.
(a) three-dimensional
(b) formal
(c) proportioned
(d) two-dimensional
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 73
9. In _______ balance, the two sides of a composition on either side of an imaginary vertical
dividing line correspond to one another in size, shape, and placement of form.
(a) informal
(b) symmetrical
(c) asymmetrical
(d) radial
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 63
10. The juxtaposition of strongly dissimilar elements is referred to as _______.
(a) contrast
(b) asymmetry
(c) hierarchy
(d) composition
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 69
11. The organization of visual elements in a work of art is referred to as _______.
(a) the composition
(b) the proportion
(c) the design
(d) the balance
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 5912. Which of the following occurs when equal forms, masses, or elements balance
one another?
(a) asymmetrical balance
(b) radial symmetry
(c) symmetrical balance
(d) bilateral symmetry
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 63
13. _______ is the appearance or condition of oneness in a work of art.
(a) Rhythm
(b) Emphasis
(c) Balance
(d) Unity
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 59
14. Repetition of similar elements in a work of art creates the illusion of:
(a) shape
(b) color
(c) rhythm
(d) line
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 69
What is wet media?
Media used that are not dry such as oil paint, water paint, acrylic etc.
Learning to draw may be easier to learn because drawing is
less ______________ than writing.
Your Answer: concrete
Correct Answer: abstract
2.
The three purposes of drawing
are: to record, to _________,
and to make a finished art
work.
Your Answer: sketch
Correct Answer: study
3.
Another term for a preparatory
drawing is ____________.
Your Answer: cartoon
4.
The ____________ used today
is similar to that used by
prehistoric people to draw with.
Your Answer: charcoal
5.
A ___________ drawing must
be sprayed with a solution of
thinned varnish to keep
particles of the medium affixed.
Your Answer: charcoal
6.
Pencil, charcoal, and chalk are
examples of
________________.
Your Answer: dry media
7.
When an artist places parallel
lines closely together to create
shade in a drawing it is referred
to as __________.
Your Answer: hatching
8.
Drawing is considered to be the
______________ of all other
media.
Your Answer: precursor
Correct Answer: foundation
__________________ is best
known for his/her paintings of
flowers.
9.
Your Answer: O'Keeffe
Drawings done with ink thinned
with water and executed with a
brush are referred to as
_________.
10.
Your Answer: watercolors
Correct Answer: washes
1. drawing one set of hatching over another in a different direction so that the lines
cross it suggest shadows or darker areas
a. Contour hatching
b. Cartoon
c. CORRECT: Cross-hatching
d. Hatching
a set of parallel curved lines that suggest a volume in space
.
Tooth
a. Cross-hatching
b. Hatching
c. CORRECT: Contour hatching
the process of drawing from observation (looking at something) this provides
an accurate detail sketch
.
CORRECT: Direct Observation
a. Fixation
b. Purpose of Drawing
c. Projective Drawing
degree of roughness presented in drawing papers --> gives texture to drawing
.
INCORRECT:
a. Fixation
b. CORRECT: Tooth
c. Cartoon
A light, liquid varnish sprayed over finished charcoal or pastel drawing to
prevent smudging. Used to "fix" charcoal or pastel on paper
.
Cartoon
a. CORRECT: Fixation
b. Tooth
c. Hatching
A sequential art form based in drawing. Important based on its subject matter
.
Projective Drawing
a. CORRECT: Graphic novels/ comics
b. Cross-hatching
c. Contour hatching
A preliminary sketch. A drawing created as a full scale working drawing used as
a model for a fresco painting, mural, or tapestry
.
CORRECT: Cartoon
a. Fixation
b. Tooth
c. Hatching
Type of tool: conte, crayon, pastel charcoal
.
Purpose of Drawing
a. CORRECT: Dry Drawing Media
b. Hatching
c. Projective Drawing
A technique used in drawing and linear form of printmaking, lines are placed in
parallel series to darken the value of an area
.
Cartoon
a. INCORRECT:
b. Tooth
c. CORRECT: Hatching
Media that uses black and/or colored inks.
Has washes which is ink thinned with water/ thin transparent layer ink paint
.
CORRECT: Wet/ liquid drawing techniques
a. Purpose of Drawing
b. Projective Drawing
c. Dry Drawing Media
1. A notion, sketch, or record of something seen, remembered, or imagined
2. As a preparation for another large, complex work such as a sculpture, building,
etc.
3. Complete work of art
.
CORRECT: Purpose of Drawing
a. Projective Drawing
b. INCORRECT:
c. Direct Observation
the process of drawing from indirect observation and drawing from imagination
or memory
.
Contour hatching
a. CORRECT: Projective Drawing
b. Direct Observation
c. INCORRECT:
1.
A type of painting utilizing egg yolk as a binder is __________.
Correct Answer: tempera
2.
A type of painting utilizing plaster as a medium is __________.
Correct Answer: fresco
3.
In buon fresco the pigments, combined with water, are applied to __________.
Your Answer: wet plaster
4.
The world's largest painting was created by __________.
Correct Answer: Judy Baca
5.
An extremely thick application of oil paint is called __________.
Your Answer: impasto
6.
Tempera paint is always thinned with ____________.
Correct Answer: water
7.
Another name for opaque watercolor is ___________.
Your Answer: gouache
8.
Large paintings done in this technique requires that the artist finish sections completely
before they move to a newly prepared area.
Your Answer: fresco
9.
In ______________ the artist allows for the white of the paper to produce "highlights"
through the transparent color.
Correct Answer: watercolor
10.
________________ is oil paint that is applied "wet into wet" and completed in one
sitting.
Correct Answer: Direct painting
1.
A type of painting utilizing egg
yolk as a binder is __________.
Your Answer: tempera
2.
A type of painting utilizing plaster
as a medium is __________.
Your Answer: fresco
3.
In buon fresco the pigments,
combined with water, are applied
to __________.
Your Answer: wet plaster
4.
The type of painting using wax as
a medium is __________.
Your Answer: encaustic
5.
An extremely thick application of
oil paint is called __________.
Your Answer: impasto
6.
Tempera paint is always thinned
with ____________.
Your Answer: water
7.
Another name for opaque
watercolor is _________.
Your Answer: gouache
8.
Large paintings done in this
technique requires that the artist
finish sections completely before
they move to a newly prepared
area.
Your Answer: fresco
9.
In ______________ the artist
allows for the white of the paper
to produce "highlights" through
the transparent color.
Your Answer: watercolor
10.
________________ is oil paint
that is applied "wet into wet" and
completed in one sitting.
Your Answer: Direct painting
1.
Pigment
Binder/Medium
Vehicle
a.
Casein
b.
Pigment
c.
CORRECT: 3 components of paint
d.
Impasto
Painting techniques that apples pigments thickly so brush or palette knife marks are visible
.
Gesso
a.
Fresco
b.
INCORRECT:
c.
CORRECT: Impasto
Primary layer of paint that's applied to surface that about to be painted. This created a uniform surface
.
Oil
a.
Size
b.
Pigment
c.
CORRECT: Primer
Material that mixed with pigment to hold the pigment particles together without dissolving them. This
allows pigment to attach to the surface as well
.
Primer
a.
Pigment
b.
Fresco
c.
CORRECT: Binder/medium
Pigments mixed with water and applied to plaster support (wall or ceiling) Pigment dry to become apart of
the wall or surface. Plaster must be damp. Work on small areas at a time
.
INCORRECT:
a.
Tempera
b.
CORRECT: True Fresco
c.
Fresco
Pigments suspended in a binder of hot wax.
Pigment is mixes with wax and resin and burned in.
Advantages: creates a texture surface and won't harm paper
.
CORRECT: Encaustic
a.
INCORRECT:
b.
Acrylic
c.
Casein
Glazing
Impasto
Airbrush
.
Pigment
a.
Binder/medium
b.
CORRECT: Painting techniques
c.
Gouache
Binder: water-soluble gum
Vehicle: water
Advantages: transparent and portable
.
Vehicle
a.
CORRECT: Water Color
b.
Acrylic
c.
Fresco
Physical material that provides a base to sustain a 2D work of art
.
Gesso
a.
Primer
b.
Tempera
c.
CORRECT: Support
type of tempera where milk protein is used as a binder in opaque water based paint
.
CORRECT: Casein
a.
INCORRECT:
b.
Oil
c.
Size
Used in oil painting, a thin transparent layer brushed over another layer to show through as substance
enriched its color. This can be color, transparant, or opaque
.
Gesso
a.
INCORRECT:
b.
CORRECT: Glaze
c.
Gouache
Liquid that aids in spreading of paint and holds the pigment and binder together
.
Gouache
a.
CORRECT: Vehicle
b.
Oil
c.
Size
powered color agents
.
Impasto
a.
CORRECT: Pigment
b.
Primer
c.
Size
a small-scale paint sprayer that allows artist to control fine mist of paint
.
Acrylic
a.
Primer
b.
Pigment
c.
CORRECT: Airbrush
Binder: Clear synthetic resin
Advantages: tough, flexible, waterproof, fast-drying
.
Casein
a.
INCORRECT:
b.
Encaustic
c.
CORRECT: Acrylic
type of tempera that has a mixture of glue and chalk thinned with water and applied as a ground before
painting with oil or egg tempera
.
Oil
a.
Fresco
b.
CORRECT: Gesso
c.
INCORRECT:
An opaque (cloudy), water soluble paint like water color. A watercolor to which opaque white has been
added
.
Glaze
a.
CORRECT: Gouache
b.
Fresco
c.
Vehicle
Pigments suspended in water(vehicle) and applied to damp lime plaster surface(binder). Pigments dry and
become apart of the plaster wall
Advantages: large scale and survives for centuries
.
INCORRECT:
a.
Impasto
b.
CORRECT: Fresco
c.
Gesso
Pigment + oil
Advantages: dries slowly, multiple layer can be added, sections can be reworked
.
CORRECT: Oil
a.
INCORRECT:
b.
Primer
c.
Size
Water base paint
Binder=egg yolk
.
Support
a.
Primer
b.
CORRECT: Tempera
c.
Size
Protects surface from deteriorating of paint
Used of wax, glue, clay as fillers for porous material (paper, canvas, wall surface)
.
CORRECT: Size
a.
Primer
b.
Oil
c.
INCORRECT:
1. (Woodcut, wood engraving and linocut) Artist carves away the negative space
a. Etching
b. CORRECT: Relief
c. Print
d. Tusche
Produced in quantities called limited editions
.
Artists Proofs
a. Print
b. CORRECT: Original Prints
c. Printmaking
A planographic printmaking technique based on dislike of water and oil. No
cutting needed. The image is drawing with a grease crayon or painted with tusche
on stone or a aluminum plate The surface is chemically treated and dampened so
that ink will be accepted where crayon and tusche are used
.
Engraving
a. Linocut
b. Matrix
c. CORRECT: Lithography
Relief
Intaglio
Lithography
Screenprinting
.
Wood engraving
a. CORRECT: Categories of Printmaking
b. INCORRECT:
c. Original Prints
In lithography, waxy liquid used used to draw/paint images on lithographic
stone or plate
.
Matrix
a. CORRECT: Tusche
b. Relief
c. Woodcut
Type Intaglio: fine lines are scratched directly into metal plate with a steel
needle. Scratches raise a ridge(Burr) that takes in the ink. Acid-free method
.
Print
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Drypoint
c. Aquatint
Type of relief process: artist cuts away negative space from block of linoleum
leaving raised areas to take ink for printing
.
Woodcut
a. CORRECT: Linocut
b. Drypoint
c. Print
Original prints
.
INCORRECT:
a. Original Prints
b. CORRECT: Multiple originals
c. Wood engraving
total number of prints made and approved by artist and a limited number of
multiple originals of a single design in any medium
.
CORRECT: Edition
a. Etching
b. Relief
c. Registration
Block of metal, wood, stone, other material that an artist works to create a print
.
Print
a. Intaglio
b. Relief
c. CORRECT: Matrix
*A technique where stencils are applied to fabric stretched across frame.Paint
or ink is forced with a squeegee through the unblocked portions of the screen
onto the paper or surface beneath.
*A sheet of paper, cardboard, or metal with a design cut out. Painting or stamping
over the sheet prints the design on a surface
.
INCORRECT:
a. Categories of Printmaking
b. CORRECT: Silkscreen, stencil, screenprinting
c. Original Prints
A method of relief printing in wood. It's made with less denser wood which
required engraving tool
.
CORRECT: Wood engraving
a. INCORRECT:
b. Engraving
c. Printmaking
Number of impressions that will be made in total. This number will be written in
each approved impressions/number of impressions within the edition 6/50
.
Edition
a. INCORRECT:
b. Registration
c. CORRECT: Limited Edition
Type Intaglio: a metal plate is first coated with acid-resistance wax, then
scratched to expose metal where lines are desired. Lines are more relaxed and
irregular.(No Answer)
.
Edition
a. CORRECT: Etching
b. Print
c. Engraving
In color printmaking, the process of aligning to impressions of blocks or plates
on the same sheet of paper
.
CORRECT: Registration
a. INCORRECT:
b. Printmaking
c. Engraving
A/P - satisfactory, best quality that artists puts aside for portfolio(No Answer)
.
Edition
a. Registration
b. CORRECT: Artists Proofs
c. Original Prints
.
CORRECT: The Wave
Color woodblock print
a. Categories of Printmaking
b. Woodcut
c. Original Prints
A multiple original impression made from a plate, stone, wood block, or screen.
They are made in editions: each printed numbered and signed by the artist. If
approves it, he/she will sign it and if disapproves, he/she will destroy it
.
Drypoint
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Print
c. Aquatint
Process for creating multiple copies of an image
.
Intaglio
a. Print
b. CORRECT: Printmaking
c. INCORRECT:
Type Intaglio: value areas rather than lines are etched on the printing plate.
Powdered resin is sprinkled on plate, and immersed in an acid bath. Acid bites
around the resin particles, creating a rough surface that holds the ink(No Answer)
.
CORRECT: Aquatint
a. Print
b. Edition
c. Drypoint
Type Intaglio: grooves are cut into metal or wood surface with a sharp cutting
tool--burin. Lines are more smooth and parallel.
.
Wood engraving
a. CORRECT: Engraving
b. INCORRECT:
c. Print
A variations of silkscreen in which the stencil is prepared by transferring a
photo graph to the stencil
.
Tusche
a. Linocut
b. CORRECT: Photo screen
c. Woodcut
Type of relief made from a plank of soft wood. In order to obtain multiple colos
of matrix, artist prepares multiple matrixes( one for each color)(No Answer)
.
CORRECT: Woodcut
a. Print
b. Linocut
c. Tusche
Techniques in which lines and areas that are recessed below the surface of
printing plate is inked
Engraving
Etching
Aquatint
Drypoint
.
CORRECT: Intaglio
a. Linocut
b. Edition
c. Matrix
1.
Edition → Type Intaglio: a metal plate is first coated with acid-resistance wax, then scratched to expose metal
where lines are desired. Lines are more relaxed and irregular.
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Edition → total number of prints made and approved by artist and a limited number of multiple
originals of a single design in any medium.
2.
Photo screen → A variations of silkscreen in which the stencil is prepared by transferring a photo graph to the
stencil
CORRECT: This is true.
3.
Print → Type Intaglio: fine lines are scratched directly into metal plate with a steel needle. Scratches raise a
ridge(Burr) that takes in the ink. Acid-free method
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Print → A multiple original impression made from a plate, stone, wood block, or screen. They are
made in editions: each printed numbered and signed by the artist. If approves it, he/she will sign it and if
disapproves, he/she will destroy it.
4.
Registration → In color printmaking, the process of aligning to impressions of blocks or plates on the same
sheet of paper
CORRECT: This is true.
5.
Artists Proofs → Produced in quantities called limited editions
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Artists Proofs → A/P - satisfactory, best quality that artists puts aside for portfolio.
6.
Tusche → A multiple original impression made from a plate, stone, wood block, or screen. They are made in
editions: each printed numbered and signed by the artist. If approves it, he/she will sign it and if disapproves,
he/she will destroy it
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Tusche → In lithography, waxy liquid used used to draw/paint images on lithographic stone or
plate.
7.
The Wave
Color woodblock print →
CORRECT: This is true.
8.
Relief → (Woodcut, wood engraving and linocut) Artist carves away the negative space
CORRECT: This is true.
9.
Wood engraving → A method of relief printing in wood. It's made with less denser wood which required
engraving tool
INCORRECT: This is true, but you marked it false.
10. Limited Edition → Number of impressions that will be made in total. This number will be written in each
approved impressions/number of impressions within the edition 6/50
CORRECT: This is true.
11. Matrix → Block of metal, wood, stone, other material that an artist works to create a print
INCORRECT: This is true, but you marked it false.
12. Aquatint → A multiple original impression made from a plate, stone, wood block, or screen. They are made in
editions: each printed numbered and signed by the artist. If approves it, he/she will sign it and if disapproves,
he/she will destroy it
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Aquatint → Type Intaglio: value areas rather than lines are etched on the printing plate. Powdered
resin is sprinkled on plate, and immersed in an acid bath. Acid bites around the resin particles, creating a
rough surface that holds the ink.
13. Original Prints → A/P - satisfactory, best quality that artists puts aside for portfolio
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Original Prints → Produced in quantities called limited editions.
14. Lithography → Type of relief process: artist cuts away negative space from block of linoleum leaving raised
areas to take ink for printing
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Lithography → A planographic printmaking technique based on dislike of water and oil. No cutting
needed. The image is drawing with a grease crayon or painted with tusche on stone or a aluminum plate The
surface is chemically treated and dampened so that ink will be accepted where crayon and tusche are used.
15. Etching → Type Intaglio: grooves are cut into metal or wood surface with a sharp cutting tool--burin. Lines are
more smooth and parallel.
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Etching → Type Intaglio: a metal plate is first coated with acid-resistance wax, then scratched to
expose metal where lines are desired. Lines are more relaxed and irregular..
16. Categories of Printmaking → Process for creating multiple copies of an image
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Categories of Printmaking → Relief
Intaglio
Lithography
Screenprinting.
17. Drypoint → A multiple original impression made from a plate, stone, wood block, or screen. They are made in
editions: each printed numbered and signed by the artist. If approves it, he/she will sign it and if disapproves,
he/she will destroy it
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Drypoint → Type Intaglio: fine lines are scratched directly into metal plate with a steel needle.
Scratches raise a ridge(Burr) that takes in the ink. Acid-free method.
18. Linocut → Type of relief process: artist cuts away negative space from block of linoleum leaving raised areas to
take ink for printing
INCORRECT: This is true, but you marked it false.
19. Multiple originals → Original prints
CORRECT: This is true.
20. Engraving → Type Intaglio: grooves are cut into metal or wood surface with a sharp cutting tool--burin. Lines
are more smooth and parallel.
CORRECT: This is true.
21. Intaglio → Block of metal, wood, stone, other material that an artist works to create a print
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Intaglio → Techniques in which lines and areas that are recessed below the surface of printing
plate is inked
Engraving
Etching
Aquatint
Drypoint.
22. Silkscreen, stencil, screenprinting → *A technique where stencils are applied to fabric stretched across
frame.Paint or ink is forced with a squeegee through the unblocked portions of the screen onto the paper or
surface beneath.
*A sheet of paper, cardboard, or metal with a design cut out. Painting or stamping over the sheet prints the
design on a surface
INCORRECT: This is true, but you marked it false.
23. Printmaking → A multiple original impression made from a plate, stone, wood block, or screen. They are made
in editions: each printed numbered and signed by the artist. If approves it, he/she will sign it and if
disapproves, he/she will destroy it
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Printmaking → Process for creating multiple copies of an image.
24. Woodcut → Type of relief made from a plank of soft wood. In order to obtain multiple colos of matrix, artist
prepares multiple matrixes( one for each color)
INCORRECT: This is true, but you marked it false.
1-
The process of printing came to Europe
from ________.
Your Answer: Japan
Correct Answer: China
2.
Which of the following is a type
of relief printing?
Your Answer: lithography
Correct Answer: wood
engraving
3.
An intaglio printing process in
which a metal plate is scraped
and burnished to achieve effects
of light and shadow is called:
Your Answer: aquatint.
4.
The fraction that appears in the
center of a print below the
image is referred to as the
_____ number.
Your Answer: cancellation
Correct Answer: edition
5.
A(n) _______ work of art is on
that an artist is physically
involved with the production of
the work of art.
Your Answer: reproduction
Correct Answer: original
Which of the following is a type
of stencil printing?
6.
Your Answer: intaglio
Correct Answer: serigraphy
In which of the following media
does the artist draw an image
with a greasy crayon directly on
a flat stone slab?
7.
Your Answer: aquatint
Correct Answer: lithography
When making a print an artist
"pulls" __________ to check on
the image quality.
8.
Your Answer: proofs
The______________ cut is a
modern development in relief
printing.
9.
Your Answer: litho
Correct Answer: linoleum
The rubber-edged tool used in
silkscreening is called a
_________.
10.
Your Answer: brayer
Correct Answer: squeegee
Chapter 9 - Graphic Design
1. Typography → A concise visual announcement that provide information through
the integrated design of typographic and pictorial imagery
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Typography → art and technique of composing print material from
letterform (font type).
2. Serifs → Another name for letter form
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Serifs → short lines with pointed ends or feet at the base of the type.
3. Fonts → An identifying mark based on letterforms combined with pictorial
elements
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Fonts → Another name for letter form.
4. Graphic Design → without serifs
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Graphic Design → Process of working with words and pictures to
enhance visual communication, the goal is to get us to do something.
5. Logo → An identifying mark based on letterforms combined with pictorial
elements
CORRECT: This is true.
6. Medieval manuscripts → Black letter typefaces
CORRECT: This is true.
7. Roman type → Non-Italic typesetting
CORRECT: This is true.
8. Poster → A concise visual announcement that provide information through the
integrated design of typographic and pictorial imagery
CORRECT: This is true.
9. Sans serif → short lines with pointed ends or feet at the base of the type
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Sans serif → without serifs.
1. short lines with pointed ends or feet at the base of the type
a. Logo
b. CORRECT: Serifs
c. Fonts
d. Sans serif
art and technique of composing print material from letterform (font type)
.
Logo
a. Fonts
b. CORRECT: Typography
c. Poster
A concise visual announcement that provide information through the integrated
design of typographic and pictorial imagery
.
CORRECT: Poster
a. Logo
b. Fonts
c. Serifs
An identifying mark based on letterforms combined with pictorial elements
.
Serifs
a. Poster
b. CORRECT: Logo
c. Fonts
Black letter typefaces
.
Roman type
a. CORRECT: Medieval manuscripts
b. Serifs
c. Sans serif
Another name for letter form
.
Logo
a. CORRECT: Fonts
b. Serifs
c. Poster
without serifs
.
Fonts
a. CORRECT: Sans serif
b. Poster
c. Serifs
Process of working with words and pictures to enhance visual communication,
the goal is to get us to do something
.
Poster
a. CORRECT: Graphic Design
b. Sans serif
c. Roman type
Non-Italic typesetting
.
Fonts
a. Poster
b. CORRECT: Roman type
c. Logo
1.
The goal of graphic design is to:
Your Answer: get us to do
something.
2.
Graphic design employs
____________ and
___________ to communicate
ideas.
Correct Answer: art /
technology
3.
An identifying mark or
trademark is referred to as
a(n) __________.
Your Answer: logo
4.
_______________ graphics is
a discipline begun in the
1950s with title sequences for
Hollywood movies.
Your Answer: Motion
5.
Another name for letterforms
is:
Your Answer: fonts.
6.
The short lines or feet at the
base of type are called
__________.
Your Answer: serifs
7.
Non- Italic typesetting is
known as ___________ type.
Your Answer: Roman
8.
Sans serif means
______________ serifs.
Your Answer: without
9.
A(n) _____________ is a
concise visual announcement
that provides information.
Your Answer: poster
10.
Industrial design was primarily
made into a profession by
____________________.
Your Answer: Raymond
Loewy
Edition: 8
4.
Henry Dreyfuss developed a system of ______________ symbols.
Correct Answer: universal
10.
__________________ is best known as the illustrator of Saturday
Evening Post.
Your Answer: Rockwell
9.
A(n) _____________ is a picture or decoration created to enhance
written material.
Correct Answer: illustration
Chapter 10 – Sculpture
1. Lost-Wax → the creation of a three-dimensional form by pouring into prepared
molds a molten or liquid material that will later harden
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Lost-Wax → a casting process in which wax is used to coat the
insides of molds and then melted away when the molds are assembled, leaving an
empty space into which molten metal is poured.
2. Slip → a mixture of clay and water
CORRECT: This is true.
3. Tensile Strength → a heat resistant outer mold packed around a lost-wax casting
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Tensile Strength → a measure of the ability of a material to be
stretched without breaking.
4. Laminate → to unite flat layers of the same or different materials, such as bonded
plates of wood, paper, or plastics
CORRECT: This is true.
5. Maquette → a small model used for planning and guiding the creation of a
sculpture
CORRECT: This is true.
6. Investment → the creation of a three-dimensional form by pouring into prepared
molds a molten or liquid material that will later harden
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Investment → a heat resistant outer mold packed around a lost-wax
casting.
7. Assemblage → an inner skeleton that supports a sculpture made of some
malleable material
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Assemblage → a combination of varying materials to create a threedimensional work of art.
8. Casting → Creating a form by manipulating a soft medium such as clay
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Casting → the creation of a three-dimensional form by pouring into
prepared molds a molten or liquid material that will later harden.
9. Subtractive → the process of carving away material to reveal the desired form
CORRECT: This is true.
10. Armature → a small model used for planning and guiding the creation of a
sculpture
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Armature → an inner skeleton that supports a sculpture made of
some malleable material.
11. Modeling → Creating a form by manipulating a soft medium such as clay
CORRECT: This is true.
12. Contrapposto → the process of carving away material to reveal the desired form
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Contrapposto → figurative works, counterpoised asymmetrical
balance between parts of the body, with most of the weight on one leg and an Scurve in the torso, first used by Classical Greek sculptors.
1. a measure of the ability of a material to be stretched without breaking
a. Investment
b. Casting
c. Maquette
d. CORRECT: Tensile Strength
the creation of a three-dimensional form by pouring into prepared molds a
molten or liquid material that will later harden
.
Slip
a. Laminate
b. CORRECT: Casting
c. Modeling
a casting process in which wax is used to coat the insides of molds and then
melted away when the molds are assembled, leaving an empty space into which
molten metal is poured
.
CORRECT: Lost-Wax
a. Laminate
b. Slip
c. INCORRECT:
a combination of varying materials to create a three-dimensional work of art
.
Armature
a. Laminate
b. CORRECT: Assemblage
c. Casting
a mixture of clay and water
.
CORRECT: Slip
a. Modeling
b. Lost-Wax
c. Casting
the process of carving away material to reveal the desired form
.
CORRECT: Subtractive
a. Armature
b. Laminate
c. Casting
a heat resistant outer mold packed around a lost-wax casting
.
Casting
a. Lost-Wax
b. Modeling
c. CORRECT: Investment
to unite flat layers of the same or different materials, such as bonded plates of
wood, paper, or plastics
.
Armature
a. CORRECT: Laminate
b. Maquette
c. Casting
an inner skeleton that supports a sculpture made of some malleable material
.
Casting
a. CORRECT: Armature
b. Laminate
c. Maquette
a small model used for planning and guiding the creation of a sculpture
.
Armature
a. CORRECT: Maquette
b. Laminate
c. Casting
figurative works, counterpoised asymmetrical balance between parts of the
body, with most of the weight on one leg and an S-curve in the torso, first used by
Classical Greek sculptors
.
Casting
a. CORRECT: Contrapposto
b. Laminate
c. Subtractive
Creating a form by manipulating a soft medium such as clay
.
Casting
a. CORRECT: Modeling
b. Slip
c. Maquette
1.
A sculpture which can be viewed from the front, back and sides is
called:
Your Answer: in-the-round.
2.
Sculpture that projects only slightly from its background is referred
to as
Your Answer: high relief.
Correct Answer: bas-relief.
3.
In __________, a pliable material is shaped into a threedimensional form.
Your Answer: casting
Correct Answer: modeling
4.
A(n) ________ is used to prevent clay figures from sagging when
being sculpted.
Your Answer: armature
5.
The sculpture category in which you start with one material that is
eventually replaced by another material is called:
Your Answer: substitution.
6.
In the casting process, a liquid material is poured into a(n)
Your Answer: mold.
7.
The sculpture category in which you start with a material and cut or
carve it away is called:
Your Answer: subtractive.
8.
Which of the following techniques is NOT used in stone sculpture?
Your Answer: drilling
Correct Answer: casting
9.
Sculptures that move are called:
Your Answer: kinetic.
10.
A(n) ____________ is a space that is transformed in order to tell a
story visually.
Your Answer: construction
Correct Answer: installation
Chapter 12 or 11: Clay, Glass, Metal, Wood, Fiber
1.
In ceramics, clay is __________ in a kiln at high temperatures so it
becomes hardened and nonporous.
Your Answer: fired
2.
The glasslike finish that is on a ceramic object is referred to as:
Your Answer: glaze.
3.
________________ brought ceramic tradition together with modern
art, making the work both art and craft.
Correct Answer: Voulkos
4.
_____________ is generally made from molten sand that may be
cast, blown or rolled.
Correct Answer: Glass
5.
The primary characteristics of metal are strength and
______________.
Your Answer: formability
6.
__________ forged gate appears delicate but weighs over 1200
pounds.
Correct Answer: Albert Paley's
7.
Objects made of _________ have vitality not found of other
materials due to its growth characteristics.
Your Answer: wood
8.
_________________ include the processes of weaving, stitching,
and basket making.
Correct Answer: Fiber arts
9.
The _________ are the cross fibers in a weaving.
Correct Answer: warp
10.
The vast majority of craft artists that work in metal make
____________.
Correct Answer: jewelry
Edition 9
6.
__________ combines some of the intricate metalwork of Middle
Eastern pieces with scenes taken from today's headlines.
Correct Answer: Cal Lane
10.
____________ is a well-known contemporary glass artist.
Correct Answer: Dale Chihuly
Chapter 12 or 13: Architecture
1.
__________ is the simplest stone building technique.
Your Answer: Masonry
2.
Art historians prefer the term ____________ to describe an upright
beam.
Correct Answer: lintel
3.
The most common architectural form is:
Your Answer: post and lintel.
4.
Which of the following allowed for the development of the arch?
Your Answer: keystone
5.
A curving triangular section beneath a dome that carries the weight
from the circular base down to a square formed by the walls is
called a ________.
Your Answer: pendentive
6.
The sides of a triangle, once joined, cannot be forced out of shape.
This principle accounts for the achitectural use of the ____ .
Correct Answer: truss
7.
A masonry strut that transmits part of the load of a vault to a
buttress outside a building is called a(n):
Correct Answer: flying buttress.
8.
Concrete that is strengthened by steel rods or mesh is:
Correct Answer: reinforced concrete.
9.
Le Corbusier’s idea for solving urban crowding was to develop high
rise buildings that are supported by
Correct Answer: steel-cage architecture.
10.
_____________ is the construction technique that made it possible
to rapidly build in America’s Western frontier.
Your Answer: Balloon framing
1. It can easily be said that Frank Lloyd Wright's "Falling Water" home design, is one of the most
famous and well-known uses of cantilevers in the world. (Points : 2)
True
False
2. The text explains that humans have known how to create and use glass for about 4,000
years. (Points : 2)
True
False
3. Due to unprotected metal struts, cast-iron buildings are highly susceptible to being destroyed
by fire. (Points : 2)
True
False
4. Many of architect Zaha Hadid's building designs are so radical that they either cannot, or have
not been built. (Points : 2)
True
False
5. When a clay pot is glazed and fired, the color of the glaze is completely different (after firing)
than it was when it was when it was in liquid form. (Points : 2)
True
False
6.
What is the title of Faith Ringgold’s story quilt that shows an eight-year-old’s dream of
overcoming obstacles?
(Points : 2)
Overcomming Harlem Nights
Tar Beach
Tar Baby
Flying over the Hudson
7. Zimbabwe, as in the "c", means: (Points : 2)
African Country
Homage to Zimba
Lion House
Stone House
8. Glassblowers must have great patience and stamina to work molten glass as slowly as
possible. (Points : 2)
True
False
9.
Because a tree has unique growth characteristics that remain visible in the finished objects,
wood is said to possess a:
(Points : 2)
heart
soul
vision
vitality, or living spirit
10. All of Faith Ringgold’s quilts are dedicated to visually expressing the happy and sad
memories of her childhood in Atlanta Georgia. (Points : 2)
True
False
1- Lithography is a type of stencil printing. (Points : 1)
True
False
2. In lithography, the artist draws an image with a greasy crayon directly on a flat stone slab.
(Points : 1)
True
False
3. The process of printing came to Europe from Japan. (Points : 1)
True
False
4. Because printmaking can be expensive, artist "proofs" are only needed for advanced, multicolor lithographic images as this form is the least expensive process. (Points : 1)
True
False
5. In the short span of about ten years, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec created over 300
lithographs. his innovations in this medium heavily influenced graphic design in the 20th
century. (Points : 1)
True
False
6. Lithography relies on the chemical attributes of oil and water. (Points : 1)
True
False
7. In Sun Mad, Ester Hernandez used silkscreen printing to create posters that denounced the
working conditions of Mexican-American farm workers and help educate others to protest the
use of dangerous pesticides. (Points : 1)
True
False
8. Katsushika Hokusai's The Wave c. 1830, showing Mount Fuji as larger than life, intended to
represent the eternal power of the Japanese Samurai. (Points : 1)
True
False
9. In a linoleum cut relief print, the ink sinks into the cut out areas. These areas holding the ink
create the transfer to the paper. (Points : 1)
True
False
10. When an artist marks a print with "AP", this indicates to a buyer that this is an "Absolutely
Perfect" print. (Points : 1)
True
False
11. United States currency bills are great examples of expert engravings. (Points : 1)
True
False
12. Albrecht Durer's The Knight, Death and the Devil (1513), is famous for its religious
iconography as well as being one of the finest examples of a wood cut print in the world.
(Points : 1)
True
False  acho
13. The _____ cut is a modern development in relief printing. (Points : 2)
wood
intaglio
gauffrage
linoleum
14. The fraction that you will find on an original print, below the image, is referred to as the
____________. (Points : 2)
system marker
series notation
seriography
edition  acho
15. The poster entitled "Jane Avril Jardin de Paris" was created by __________ using the
lithographic process. (Points : 2)
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Mary Cassatt
Honore Daumier
Bethe Morisot
16. Original prints are produced in quantities called: (Points : 2)
serials
editions
artist’s proofs
impression editions
Evaluating Art
In a socio-cultural, or contextual evaluation of an artwork, to evaluate the work of art properly,
we must deal with it in the context of: (Points : 1)
art museums
the society that produced it
the society that sold it
our own values
2. The three main types of art criticism are as follows: (Points : 1)
theoretical, sociocultural/contextual and expressive
formal, theoretical and social
expressive, cultural and emotional
expressive, sociocultural/contextual and formal
3. Art criticism involves making both favorable and unfavorable ___________. (Points : 1)
critical statements
values
decrees
judgments
4. Traditional Chinese criticism declared that artists should try to go beyond _______ of the
subject matter. (Points : 1)
representation
evaluation
judgment
perfection
5. Your text advises that all people who love and appreciate art should try their best to see
everything they can when visiting an art museum. (Points : 1)
True
False
6. When visiting a museum for the first time, your textbook advises that you: (Points : 1)
Do your best to see every piece of art.
First decide what type of evaluation style you have: Formal, Expressive, etc. because
without knowing this, you won't fully understand any work of art.
Be sure that you understand color theory before you look at paintings or drawings that
have color. Without knowing color theory, you won't understand the iconography shown in
any piece.
Follow your own interests and instincts. Don't stay too long and make sure you take
breaks. The quality of your experience is NOT measured by how many works of art you look
at.
7. Expresive theories evaluate how well a work of art functions to create a visual experience
that may interest us as viewers. (Points : 1)
True
False
8. Based on the Sociocultural, or Contextual Theory of art criticism, in Titian's Pieta, the dead
Christ may have given comfort to the people living in Venice who lost loved ones to the plague
during that time and place in history.
(Points : 1)
True
False
9. The theoretical form of art criticism involves: (Points : 1)
making both favorable and unfavorable theories understandable to everyone
making both favorable and unfavorable to those in the "wealthy art world"
making theories about the intended message of the artwork
none of the above
10. Art theories that focus attention on the composition of the work and how earlier works
may have influenced it are called: (Points : 1)
formalism
sociocultural
aesthetics
expressive
1. Global Warning, the graphic design poster by Chaz Maviyane-Davies, presents an issue of
concern for the artist as well as the global population. This work is an example of art as a
vehicle for:
(a) communicating information
(b) personal expression
(c) social causes
(d) all of the above
2. This artist, who made Rocket to the Moon, paid tribute to the richness of the AfricanAmerican
experience through art.
(a) Romare Bearden
(b) Barnet Newman
(c) Felix González-Torres
(d) Chaz Maviyane-Davies
3. The symbolic meaning of visual signs and imagery is called: (Points : 1)
content
form
iconography
aesthetics
4. Alexander Calder is the first artist to: (Points : 1)
use the elements of "chiaroscurro" as a major element of art.
use the element of "electric light" as a major part of art.
use the element of "motion" as a major part of art.
None of these are the correct answer for what Alexander Calder added to the world of
"art".
5. In trying to interpret an image iconographically, with special consideration to time and place
of creation, you must also pay attention to identification of significant _____________. (Points
: 1)
colors
subjects
forms
all of the above
6. In art, "medium" refers to: (Points : 1)
an artisit who can tell you about your future
the material used for artwork
the size of a painting in between small and large
a particular material, along with its accompanying technique
7. James Hampton, the artist who created Throne of the Third Heaven of the Nation’s
Millennium General Assembly (figure 33), did not have any professional art training. This type
of artist is often recognized as a _______ artist. (Points : 1)
Tukutuku
Constructivist
Naive/Untrained
Nonconforming
8. In Lee Friedlander's work "Bismark, North Dakota" (2002), we see an example of how:
(Points : 1)
figure-ground reversal interlocks light and dark forms.
the image of poles, railings and their shadows, appear as a variety of visual lines.
plant and bird forms create a sense of "mass".
shapes, light and color combine to create the illusion of depth.
9. The realistic manner in which William Harnett painted A Smoke Backstage is called: (Points :
1)
visual relativism
nonrepresentational
painterly
trompe l’oeil
10. When studying an image for form alone, the text advises you (the viewer) to: (Points : 1)
look at the image upside
hold up your hands and fingers to form a square; then look through that square to focus on
various parts of the image
step back from the image to notice the largest shapes
none of the above
1.
Approaches to looking and analyzing art that focus on the artist's personal intent or psychological state.
a.
Formal Theories
b.
Methodology
c.
CORRECT: Expressive Theories
d.
Art History
A collection of theories, concepts, or ideas. Study of theories
.
Art Criticism
a.
Art History
b.
CORRECT: Methodology
c.
Formal Theories
Academic study of art and its changing historical and stylistic contexts. Emphasis is on context.
.
CORRECT: Art History
a.
Art Criticism
b.
Formal Theories
c.
Methodology
3 True/False Questions
1.
Sociocultural Theories AKA Contextual Theories → Critical Approaches that focus on the formal elements of a
work of art.
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Sociocultural Theories AKA Contextual Theories → Approaches to looking at and analyzing art that
focus on contextual and environmental influences on a work of art..
2.
Formal Theories → Critical Approaches that focus on the formal elements of a work of art.
CORRECT: This is true.
3.
Art Criticism → The process of using formal analysis, description, and interpretation to evaluate or explain the
quality and meaning of art.
CORRECT: This is true.
1.
Evaluation of art is always ______________.
Your Answer: subjective
2.
The ___________ judged art to be good if it successfully communicated the inner spirit.
Your Answer: Chinese
3.
Our concept of what "good art" is changes as we ______________.
Your Answer: all of the above
4.
___________________ value orientations lead us to make judgments about the works of
art we encounter.
Your Answer: Personal
5.
The term _____________________ refers to making discriminating judgments, both
favorable and unfavorable.
Your Answer: Art criticism
6.
_______________ theories focus attention on the composition of the work and how it
may have been influenced by earlier works.
Your Answer: Sociocultural
Correct Answer: Formal
7.
_______________ theories consider art as a product of a culture and value system.
Your Answer: Sociocultural
8.
________________ theories pay attention to the artist's attempt to express a
personality or worldview.
Your Answer: Expressive
9.
The word museum comes from the Greek mouseion, "place of the muses." Inferring the
power of:
Your Answer: evaluation.
Correct Answer: inspiration.
10.
__________________ once wrote “Museum ethics have become a joke.”
Your Answer: Henri Matisse
Correct Answer: Tyler Green
1.
Evaluation of art is always ______________.
Your Answer: subjective
2.
The ___________ believed that art should contain truth, beauty, harmony, order and
moral goodness.
Your Answer: Impressionists
Correct Answer: Greeks
3.
Our concept of what "good art" is changes as we ______________.
Your Answer: all of the above
4.
___________________ value orientations lead us to make judgments about the works of
art we encounter.
Your Answer: Critical
Correct Answer: Personal
5.
The term _____________________ refers to making discriminating judgments, both
favorable and unfavorable.
Your Answer: Art criticism
6.
_______________ theories focus attention on the composition of the work and how it
may have been influenced by earlier works.
Your Answer: Sociocultural
Correct Answer: Formal
7.
_______________ theories consider art as a product of a culture and value system.
Your Answer: Sociocultural
8.
________________ theories pay attention to the artist’s attempt to express a
personality or worldview.
Your Answer: Expressive
9.
The word museum comes from the Greek mauseion, "place of the muses." Inferring the
power of:
Your Answer: inspiration.
10.
__________________ once wrote “Artists are artists before anything else; otherwise
they’d be revolutionaries, social workers, or monks.”
Your Answer: Peter Plagens
1. Art theories that focus attention on the composition of the work and how earlier works may
have influenced it are called:
(a) formalism
(b) socio-cultural
(c) aesthetics
(d) expressive
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 206
2. To evaluate a work of art properly, we must deal with it in the context of:
(a) the society that produced it
(b) art museums
(c) the society that sold it
(d) our own values
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 207
3. Traditional Chinese criticism declared that artists should try to go beyond _______ of the
subject matter.
(a) representation
(b) evaluation
(c) judgment
(d) perfection
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 206
4. Art criticism involves making _______, both favorable and unfavorable.
(a) critical statements
(b) values
(c) decrees
(d) judgments
Answer: (d)
1.
focus attention on the composition of the work and how it may have been influenced by earlier works.
a.
expressive theories
b.
personal value
c.
INCORRECT:
d.
CORRECT: formal theories
Evaluation of art is always __________
.
Tyler Green
a.
chinese
b.
CORRECT: subjective
c.
inspiration
The word museum comes from the Greek mouseion, "place of the muses." Inferring the power of
.
CORRECT: inspiration
a.
subjective
b.
chinese
c.
INCORRECT:
Our concept of what "good art" is changes as we ______________.
.
expressive theories
a.
formal theories
b.
sociocultural theories
c.
CORRECT: mature, develop critical skills, develop an aesthetic awareness
consider art as a product of a culture and value system.
.
formal theories
a.
inspiration
b.
CORRECT: sociocultural theories
c.
expressive theories
5 True/False Questions
1.
personal value → orientations lead us to make judgments about the works of art we encounter.
CORRECT: This is true.
2.
art criticism → refers to making discriminating judgements both favorable and unfavorable
CORRECT: This is true.
3.
chinese → judged art to be good if it successfully communicated the inner spirit.
CORRECT: This is true.
4.
expressive theories → pay attention to the artist's attempt to express a personality or worldview.
CORRECT: This is true.
5.
Tyler Green → "Museum ethics have become a joke."
CORRECT: This is true.
Week 2 - QUIZ 2
8. Question :
Student Answer:
According to your text, _________ is the easiest and most
basic technique to visually imply "depth" on a twodimensional surface.
( ) implied motion
(X) shading and shadowing
( ) linear perspective
( ) overlapping (10th ed. pg 28)
Week 2 - QUIZ 3
3. Question :
Proportion is the size relation of one
object to another object.
Student (X) True
( ) False
Answer:
10.Question :
Student
Answer:
"Balance", through the use of similar
shapes, lines, etc., in a work of art can be
said to create ___________:
(X) shape
( ) symmetry (10th ed. pg. 63)
( ) line harmony
10th ed pg 116 (Seriography is a type of
stencil printing)
2. In lithography, the artist draws an
image with a greasy crayon directly on a
flat stone slab. (Points : 1)
True
False
10th ed pg 112
3. The process of printing came to Europe
from Japan. (Points : 1)
True
False
9th ed pg 130
10th ed pg 105
4. Because printmaking can be expensive,
artist "proofs" are only needed for
advanced, multi-color lithographic images
as this form is the least expensive process.
(Points : 1)
True
False
10th ed pgs 105-106
5. In the short span of about ten years,
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec created over
300 lithographs. his innovations in this
medium heavily influenced graphic design
in the 20th century. (Points : 1)
True
False
10th ed pg 112-113
9th ed pg 139
6. Lithography relies on the chemical
attributes of oil and water. (Points : 1)
True
False 10th ed pg 114
9th ed pg 137
7. In Sun Mad, Ester Hernandez used
silkscreen printing to create posters that
denounced the working conditions of
Mexican-American farm workers and help
educate others to protest the use of
dangerous pesticides. (Points : 1)
True
False
9th ed P. 141
10th ed pg 117
8. Katsushika Hokusai's The Wave c. 1830,
showing Mount Fuji as larger than life,
intended to represent the eternal power
of the Japanese Samurai. (Points : 1)
True
False
10th ed pg 107
9th ed pg 132
9. In a linoleum cut relief print, the ink
sinks into the cut out areas. These areas
holding the ink create the transfer to the
paper. (Points : 1)
True
False
10th ed pg 108-109
9th ed pg 132
10. When an artist marks a print with
"AP", this indicates to a buyer that this is
an "Absolutely Perfect" print. (Points : 1)
True
False
10th ed pg 106
11. United States currency bills are great
examples of expert engravings. (Points : 1)
True
False
10th ed pg 109
12. Albrecht Durer's The Knight, Death
and the Devil (1513), is famous for its
religious iconography as well as being one
of the finest examples of a wood cut print
in the world. (Points : 1)
True
False
10th ed pg 110
9th ed pg 134
It is an engraving...not a wood cut
13. The _____ cut is a modern
development in relief printing. (Points : 2)
wood
intaglio
gauffrage
linoleum
th
10 edition, page 112
9th edition, page 137
14. The fraction that you will find on an
original print, below the image, is referred
to as the ____________. (Points : 2)
system marker
series notation
seriography
edition
10th ed pg 105
9th ed pg 130
15. The poster entitled "Jane Avril Jardin
de Paris" was created by __________
using the lithographic process. (Points : 2)
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec
Mary Cassatt
Honore Daumier
Bethe Morisot
th
10 edition, page 114-115
9th edition, page 130
16. Original prints are produced in
quantities called: (Points : 2)
serials
editions
artist’s proofs
impression editions
th
10 edition, page 105
9th edition, page 142
1
CORRECT Which of the visual elements can best be described as "the path of a moving point?"
A)motion
B)time
C)mass
D)line
E)light
2
th
CORRECT The 20 century art movement known as Futurism celebrated above all the visual element of:
A)motion.
B)texture.
C)color.
D)line.
E)shape.
3
CORRECT
The 18th-century Indian painting of musicians and acrobats by Rajasthan Mewar utilizes the two most
basic visual cues for implying depth on a flat surface. They are:
A)chiaroscuro and hatching.
B)atmospheric perspective and foreshortening.
C)implied line and a vanishing point.
D)position and overlap.
E)all of the above
4
CORRECT Lines are used in art to indicate:
A)boundaries between forms.
B)direction and motion.
C)shadows and highlights.
D)spatial depth on flat surfaces.
E)all of the above
5
CORRECT In art, shapes that suggest forms found in nature are called _________shapes.
A)organic
B)real
C)geometric
D)environmental
E)three-dimensional
6
CORRECT
Henri Matisse was told by Gustave Moreau, his teacher at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, "You were born
to ______________."
A)be a lawyer
B)simplify painting
C)outdo me
D)sell art, not make it
E)bring joy with your paintings
7
CORRECT
A black-and-white photograph of a scene eliminates the hues and intensities of the scene's colors,
but captures the _______ of the colors.
A)pigments
B)chromas
C)harmonies
D)values
E)all of the above
8
CORRECT
In drawing, the outer boundaries of two-dimensional forms are defined by __________, while the
outer boundaries perceived among three-dimensional forms are defined by __________.
A)graphite/ink
B)visual elements/principles of design
C)outlines/contour lines
D)thick lines/thin lines
E)actual lines/implied lines
9
CORRECT
In painting and drawing, artists often use the technique of ____________ to describe the way
shadows and light define the mass of forms.
A)refraction
B)spatial organization
C)isometric perspective
D)simultaneous contrast
E)chiaroscuro
10
CORRECT Charles White's Untitled, illustrates the technique of:
A)hatching
B)atmospheric perspective
C)impasto
D)saturation
E)foreshortening
11
CORRECT
Which artist uses light itself as the main material and whose work increases our awareness of light as
a presence in the world?
A)Flor Garduño
B)Joseph Wright
C)Joseph Albers
D)James Turrell
E)Claude Monet
12
CORRECT
In the additive process of color mixing, red light, green light, and blue light combine to produce
________ light.
A)yellow
B)black
C)white
D)grayish brown
E)green
13
CORRECT
In this chapter, the author discusses Hopper's use of __________ in one of his paintings, which is his
use of line, shape, mass, space, texture, color, value, and light.
A)subject matter
B)the visual elements
C)content
D)a classical theme
E)pointillism
14
CORRECT Mixing two primary colors produces a __________ color.
A)secondary
B)passive
C)complementary
D)triad
E)monochromatic
15
CORRECT "Passive pink" refers to the color that
A)recedes in a monochromatic color scheme where pure red dominates.
B)results from combining a warm red with a cooler hue.
C)seemed to calm and relax violent children in studies of color's effects upon the mind and
body.
D)is the normal value of red.
E)none of the above
16
CORRECT A necessary feature of pattern is:
A)texture.
B)color.
C)modeling.
D)vanishing points.
E)repetition.
17
CORRECT The German painter Franz Marc associated the color blue with
A)melancholy.
B)destruction.
C)male spirituality.
D)peace and tranquility.
E)water
18
CORRECT The vanishing point in Leonardo da Vinci's The Last Supper is:
A)at the exact center of the picture.
B)just behind the head of the figure of Jesus.
C)on the horizon line.
D)all of the above
E)none of the above
19
CORRECT
In Albrect Dürer's woodcut The Draftsman Drawing a Reclining Nude, the draftsman is using a device
to help him achieve the effect of:
A)foreshortening.
B)chiaroscuro.
C)a restricted palette.
D)the illusion of motion.
E)simultaneous contrast.
20
CORRECT Atmospheric perspective is used to maximum effect in the work:
A)Les bêtes de la mer by Henri Matisse
B)The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak by Albert Bierstadt
C)Subway Drawing by Keith Haring
D)Bird in Space by Constantin Brancusi
E)One Candle by Naum June Paik
1. The organization of visual elements in a work of art is referred to as _______
(Points : 2)
the composition
the proportion
the design
the balance
2. In a formal critique of artwork, the critic is evaluating: (Points : 2)
How much influence the political environment had on the message.
How well the artwork expresses the feeling of the artist.
How well the parts of the artwork "function and fit", while considering prior works in
that category.
How much feeling it provides to the viewer.
3. In art, a medium is: (Points : 2)
an artisit who can tell you about your future
the material used for artwork
the size of a painting in between small and large
a particular material, along with its accompanying technique
4. The symbolic meaning of visual signs and imagery is called: (Points : 2)
content
iconography
form
aesthetics
5. Located outside Wiltshire, England, most historians now believe that Stonehenge
was created to: (Points : 2)
calculate solar and lunar movements
enhance the English countryside and focus attention on environmental arts
serve as a prayer space  not sure
all of the above  I am sure it’s not this option.
6. Original prints are produced in quantities called: (Points : 2)
unlimited editions
limited editions
artist’s proofs
impression editions
7. A glaze has a silica base that causes it to vitrify during firing; this means the glaze
becomes: (Points : 2)
glassy
matte
solid
liquid
8. When clay is exposed to heat, the process is called: (Points : 2)
smoking
heating
glazing
firing
9. The method of creating the illusion of depth on a 2-D surface through the
appearance of converging parallel lines and one or more vanishing points is called
_______ (Points : 2)
atmospheric perspective
chiaroscuro
linear perspective
picture plane
10. Repetition of similar elements in a work of art creates the illusion of: (Points : 2)
shape
impasto
line
rhythm
11. Which of the following occurs when equal forms, masses, or elements balance one
another? (Points : 2)
asymmetrical balance
radial symmetry
symmetrical balance
bilateral symmetry
12. Global Warning, the graphic design poster by Chaz Maviyane-Davies, presents an
issue of concern for the artist as well as the global population. This work is an example
of art as a vehicle for: (Points : 2)
communicating information
personal expression
social causes
all of the above
13. In _______ balance, the two sides of a composition on either side of an imaginary
vertical dividing line correspond to one another in size, shape, and placement of form.
(Points : 2)
symmetrical
informal
asymmetrical
radial
14. Peter Voulkos’ contribution to modern ceramic art is that he: (Points : 2)
he mixed ceramics with glass
he mixed ceramics with etching and printing
he mixed ceramics with abstract expressionism
he mixed ceramics with modernism and ancient glaze formulas
15. According to your text, objective, or figurative, art is considered: (Points : 2)
representational art
abstract art
nonrepresentational art
folk art
16. Weaving combines and interlaces lengthwise and cross fibers, called respectively:
(Points : 2)
piles and knots
warp and weft
woof and tweeter
length and width
17. When a work of art, such as Theo van Doesburg’s Composition (The Cow), shows
no reference to the natural world of images, it is usually called: (Points : 2)
expressionistic
stylized
simplistic
nonrepresentational
18. Because a tree has unique growth characteristics that remain visible in the finished
objects, wood is said to possess a: (Points : 2)
soul
heart and spirit
vitality, or living spirit
mind
19. To evaluate a work of art properly, we must deal with it in the context of: (Points :
2)
art museums
the society that produced it
the society that sold it
our own values
20. Expressive theories evaluate how well a work of art functions to create a visual
experience that may interest us as viewers. (Points : 2)
True
False
21. According to your text, the title sequence in the movie "Psycho", was among the
first motion graphics used in a motion picture feature film. (Points : 2)
True
22. When London's Blackfriar Bridge was painted green, suicides off the bridge
dropped by approximately 34%. (Points : 2)
True
False
23. Bierut's Saks Fifth Avenue logo (2007) is the perfect example of creating a vibrant
consistency. (Points : 2)
True
False
24. While in his architecture school, Frank Lloyd Wright required his students to build
and live in dwellings they created by themselves. (Points : 2)
True
False
25. Destroying the artwork of a group of people is a major way that dictators try to
eliminate or control the group they have oppressed. (Points : 2)
True
False
26. The gargoyles on top of gothic buildings are also known as "flying buttresses".
(Points : 2)
True
False
27. Colors deliver the most powerful symbolism when used in repeated areas. (Points :
2)
True
False
28. Faith Ringgold's quilts vary in themes ranging from the mistreatment of slaves to
her own personal weight loss. (Points : 2)
True
False
29. Frank Lloyd Wright's "Falling Water" was the first building to use carbon fiber
technology for cantilever designs. (Points : 2)
False
30. Auguste Rodin's life-size sculpture of "The Kiss" uses geometric abstraction to
represent the universal harmony of love. (Points : 2)
True
False
31. Horizontal lines tend to create a sense of being at rest while diagonal indicate
movement. (Points : 2)
True
False
32. The Jeppesen Terminal Building in the Denver International Airport is the largest
suspension building on earth. (Points : 2)
True
33. There are research studies that theorize: graffiti (if left visible to the public) leads
to an environment in which people are more likely to commit street crimes, such as
stealing. (Points : 2)
True
False
34. In sculpture, casting is a substitution, or replacement process. (Points : 2)
True
False
35. Handmade paper is considered a type of "fiber art". (Points : 2)
True
False
36. Zaha Hadid and Frank Lloyd Wright are both considered the worlds most famous
"deconstructivist style" architects. (Points : 2)
True
False
37. Regarding typefaces, "sans serif" means "not italic". (Points : 2)
True
False
38. Claus Oldenburg intentionally altered realistic scale in his painting Large
Reclining Nude to convey personal meaning. (Points : 2)
False
39. Artist installations are meant to visually tell a story to the viewer. (Points : 2)
True
False
40. In India, a married woman wearing all white is trying to invite childbearing to
occur. (Points : 2)
True
False
41. In China, it is inappropriate for a bride to wear white on her wedding day. (Points :
2)
True
False
42. When corporations donate huge sums to help finance museum exhibitions, they are
also expected to determine the content of the show. (Points : 2)
True
False
43. Porcelain became highly developed in England, that's why English china is so
valuable. (Points : 2)
True
False
44. The Aztec Calendar Stone represents the linear passage of time. (Points : 2)
True
False
45. Both light and dark shades of a color convey the same meanings but with with
different intensities on the continuum. For example: Dark Blue is authoritative while
Sky Blue is slightly less authoritative. (Points : 2)
False
46. There are three types of clay used for ceramics, they are: China, Porcelain and
Earthenware. (Points : 2)
True
False
47. Your text advises that all people who love and appreciate art should try their best
to see everything they can when visiting an art museum. (Points : 2)
True
False
48. The fourth dimension of art is called Humanism. (Points : 2)
True
False
49. Most graffiti artists can be defined as "naive" artists. (Points : 2)
True
False
50. "Nonrepresentational art" is the same thing as "nonobjective art". (Points : 2)
True
False
1. Petroglyphs → Rock art carvings made by scratching or pecking the surface of
exposed stone.
CORRECT: This is true.
2. Art from Mesopotamia → King Mycerinus and Queen Khamerernebty (2532-2510
BCE; frontal pose; detailed human anatomy; warmth & vitality)
Mask from Mummy Case (Tomb of Tutankamen; 1340 BCE)
Wall Painting from the tomb of Nebamun (Thebes; 1450 BCE)
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Art from Mesopotamia → Ziggurat of Ur-Nammu (temple set on huge
platform; 2,100 BCE)
Lyre (Bulls & Imaginary creatures inlaid in harp; 2650-2550 BCE)
Head of Akkadian Ruler (Bronze; 2300-2200 BCE).
3. Paleolithic Period → Old Stone Age
2M years ago to 9-6000 BCE
2M - crude stone tools
1M - refined stone tools
250K - form & function (symmetrical tools)
CORRECT: This is true.
4. Egypt → Mastaba - table
Step (Djoser) - stacked Mastabas
True Pyramid (great pyramid of Khufu)
Shape symbolizes creation of the world
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Egypt → Deserts on both sides of the Nile diminished outside
influences and enabled Egypt to develop distinctive styles of architecture,
painting, and sculpture that remained unchanged for 3500 years.
Egyptian art greatly influenced that of early Greece, and the Greeks later
developed one of the most important styles in Western Art.
The Great Pyramids (2500; 2650; 2570 BCE)
Funerary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut (1490-1460 BCE).
5. Egyptian Religious Belief → distinguished by its emphasis on life after death. Most
of what we know about ancient Egypt comes from pyramids or underground
tombs. The Great Pyramids built as burial vaults for pharaohs - rulers who were
considered god-kings.
CORRECT: This is true.
6. Beginning of Civilization → Dynasty 18, New Kingdom, Deir el-Bahari, Egypt
The switch to burying the pharaohs within the valley instead of pyramids, was
intended to safeguard against tomb robbers.
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Beginning of Civilization → Complex social orders and high technical
development
specialization
farming and animal husbandry.
7. Art from Egypt → King Mycerinus and Queen Khamerernebty (2532-2510 BCE;
frontal pose; detailed human anatomy; warmth & vitality)
Mask from Mummy Case (Tomb of Tutankamen; 1340 BCE)
Wall Painting from the tomb of Nebamun (Thebes; 1450 BCE)
CORRECT: This is true.
8. Tutankhamen → (King Tut) the best known Egyptian Pharaoh whose tomb was
uncovered unrobbed by fortune hunters.
Mask from Mummy Case; Tutankhamen, circa 1340 B.C.
CORRECT: This is true.
9. Temple of Hatshepsut → Switched from building Pyramids to building many
Temples
Pyramids too expensive and did not protect graves
Temples cheaper, served as warnings to others (Ramses is too powerful) and
ensured Ramses would not be forgotten
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Temple of Hatshepsut → Dynasty 18, New Kingdom, Deir el-Bahari,
Egypt
The switch to burying the pharaohs within the valley instead of pyramids, was
intended to safeguard against tomb robbers..
10. Mesopotamia → Broad plain between Tigris and Euphrates Rivers
CORRECT: This is true.
11. Pyramid → Deserts on both sides of the Nile diminished outside influences and
enabled Egypt to develop distinctive styles of architecture, painting, and sculpture
that remained unchanged for 3500 years.
Egyptian art greatly influenced that of early Greece, and the Greeks later
developed one of the most important styles in Western Art.
The Great Pyramids (2500; 2650; 2570 BCE)
Funerary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut (1490-1460 BCE)
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Pyramid → Mastaba - table
Step (Djoser) - stacked Mastabas
True Pyramid (great pyramid of Khufu)
Shape symbolizes creation of the world.
12. Neolithic Period → New Stone Age
9-6,000 BCE (transition from Hunter/Gatherer to Farmer)
Developed Storage Pots
Abstract Design based on animal and plant forms
CORRECT: This is true.
13. The Start of Western Art History → Understanding the past through works of art
Our understanding changes because we are always discovering new pieces of the
puzzle
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be The Start of Western Art History → Egypt
Message: Order; Stability; Power
Art was 2-D
Body was accurate, but each part was shown from the best angle
Used Hierarchical Scale
Men were darker (reddish); women lighter (yellowish).
14. Art History → King Mycerinus and Queen Khamerernebty (2532-2510 BCE; frontal
pose; detailed human anatomy; warmth & vitality)
Mask from Mummy Case (Tomb of Tutankamen; 1340 BCE)
Wall Painting from the tomb of Nebamun (Thebes; 1450 BCE)
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Art History → Understanding the past through works of art
Our understanding changes because we are always discovering new pieces of the
puzzle.
15. Hieroglyphics → the picture writing of ancient Egyptian priesthood
CORRECT: This is true.
16. Art from Neolithic Period → Engraved Ochre (75,000 BCE; Blombos Cave, South
Africa)
Woman of Willendore (25-20,000 BCE)
Woman of Lespugue
Wall painting of Animals (28,000 BCE, Chauver Cave, France)
Deer and Hands (15,000 BCE, Las Manos Cave, Argentina)
Murujuga Petroglyphs (upto 10,000 yrs old, Dampier Archipelago, Western
Australia)
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Art from Neolithic Period → Earthenware Beaker (4,000 BCE; Susa,
Iran)
Burial Urn (2,200 BCE; China).
17. Art from Paleolithic Period → Earthenware Beaker (4,000 BCE; Susa, Iran)
Burial Urn (2,200 BCE; China)
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Art from Paleolithic Period → Engraved Ochre (75,000 BCE; Blombos
Cave, South Africa)
Woman of Willendore (25-20,000 BCE)
Woman of Lespugue
Wall painting of Animals (28,000 BCE, Chauver Cave, France)
Deer and Hands (15,000 BCE, Las Manos Cave, Argentina)
Murujuga Petroglyphs (upto 10,000 yrs old, Dampier Archipelago, Western
Australia).
18. Ramses The Great → Switched from building Pyramids to building many Temples
Pyramids too expensive and did not protect graves
Temples cheaper, served as warnings to others (Ramses is too powerful) and
ensured Ramses would not be forgotten
CORRECT: This is true.
1. Mastaba - table
Step (Djoser) - stacked Mastabas
True Pyramid (great pyramid of Khufu)
Shape symbolizes creation of the world
a. CORRECT: Pyramid
b. Mesopotamia
c. Egypt
d. Petroglyphs
Old Stone Age
2M years ago to 9-6000 BCE
2M - crude stone tools
1M - refined stone tools
250K - form & function (symmetrical tools)
.
Art from Neolithic Period
a. CORRECT: Paleolithic Period
b. Neolithic Period
c. Art from Paleolithic Period
(King Tut) the best known Egyptian Pharaoh whose tomb was uncovered
unrobbed by fortune hunters.
Mask from Mummy Case; Tutankhamen, circa 1340 B.C.
.
Pyramid
a. CORRECT: Tutankhamen
b. Art History
c. Mesopotamia
distinguished by its emphasis on life after death. Most of what we know about
ancient Egypt comes from pyramids or underground tombs. The Great Pyramids
built as burial vaults for pharaohs - rulers who were considered god-kings.
.
Neolithic Period
a. Paleolithic Period
b. Art from Neolithic Period
c. CORRECT: Egyptian Religious Belief
Earthenware Beaker (4,000 BCE; Susa, Iran)
Burial Urn (2,200 BCE; China)
.
CORRECT: Art from Neolithic Period
a. Paleolithic Period
b. Art from Paleolithic Period
c. Neolithic Period
Egypt
Message: Order; Stability; Power
Art was 2-D
Body was accurate, but each part was shown from the best angle
Used Hierarchical Scale
Men were darker (reddish); women lighter (yellowish)
.
Art from Mesopotamia
a. Temple of Hatshepsut
b. Art History
c. CORRECT: The Start of Western Art History
Dynasty 18, New Kingdom, Deir el-Bahari, Egypt
The switch to burying the pharaohs within the valley instead of pyramids, was
intended to safeguard against tomb robbers.
.
CORRECT: Temple of Hatshepsut
a. Paleolithic Period
b. Tutankhamen
c. Ramses The Great
the picture writing of ancient Egyptian priesthood
.
Egypt
a. Petroglyphs
b. Mesopotamia
c. CORRECT: Hieroglyphics
New Stone Age
9-6,000 BCE (transition from Hunter/Gatherer to Farmer)
Developed Storage Pots
Abstract Design based on animal and plant forms
.
CORRECT: Neolithic Period
a. Art from Neolithic Period
b. Art from Paleolithic Period
c. Paleolithic Period
Understanding the past through works of art
Our understanding changes because we are always discovering new pieces of the
puzzle
.
Tutankhamen
a. CORRECT: Art History
b. Pyramid
c. Art from Egypt
Deserts on both sides of the Nile diminished outside influences and enabled
Egypt to develop distinctive styles of architecture, painting, and sculpture that
remained unchanged for 3500 years.
Egyptian art greatly influenced that of early Greece, and the Greeks later
developed one of the most important styles in Western Art.
The Great Pyramids (2500; 2650; 2570 BCE)
Funerary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut (1490-1460 BCE)
.
Mesopotamia
a. INCORRECT:
b. Petroglyphs
c. CORRECT: Egypt
King Mycerinus and Queen Khamerernebty (2532-2510 BCE; frontal pose;
detailed human anatomy; warmth & vitality)
Mask from Mummy Case (Tomb of Tutankamen; 1340 BCE)
Wall Painting from the tomb of Nebamun (Thebes; 1450 BCE)
.
Art from Mesopotamia
a. CORRECT: Art from Egypt
b. Art History
c. Egypt
Switched from building Pyramids to building many Temples
Pyramids too expensive and did not protect graves
Temples cheaper, served as warnings to others (Ramses is too powerful) and
ensured Ramses would not be forgotten
.
CORRECT: Ramses The Great
a. Mesopotamia
b. Art History
c. Egypt
Engraved Ochre (75,000 BCE; Blombos Cave, South Africa)
Woman of Willendore (25-20,000 BCE)
Woman of Lespugue
Wall painting of Animals (28,000 BCE, Chauver Cave, France)
Deer and Hands (15,000 BCE, Las Manos Cave, Argentina)
Murujuga Petroglyphs (upto 10,000 yrs old, Dampier Archipelago, Western
Australia)
.
CORRECT: Art from Paleolithic Period
a. INCORRECT:
b. Paleolithic Period
c. Neolithic Period
Complex social orders and high technical development
specialization
farming and animal husbandry
.
Neolithic Period
a. CORRECT: Beginning of Civilization
b. Temple of Hatshepsut
c. Egyptian Religious Belief
Ziggurat of Ur-Nammu (temple set on huge platform; 2,100 BCE)
Lyre (Bulls & Imaginary creatures inlaid in harp; 2650-2550 BCE)
Head of Akkadian Ruler (Bronze; 2300-2200 BCE)
.
CORRECT: Art from Mesopotamia
a. Mesopotamia
b. Art from Neolithic Period
c. INCORRECT:
Broad plain between Tigris and Euphrates Rivers
.
CORRECT: Mesopotamia
a. Egypt
b. Tutankhamen
c. Pyramid
Rock art carvings made by scratching or pecking the surface of exposed stone.
.
CORRECT: Petroglyphs
a. Pyramid
b. Egypt
c. Hieroglyphics
1.
The Hall of Bulls is an example of _______ art.
Your Answer: Paleolithic
2.
People first domesticated plants and animals during the
_____________ period.
Your Answer: Neolithic
3.
The "Venus of Willendorf" is an example of a ____________.
Your Answer: mother goddess
4.
Recently, experts have come to believe that Lascaux and similar
caves were ___________.
Your Answer: ceremonial sanctuaries
5.
An early example of _________ is shown through prehistoric tools
that were made by chipping flakes from opposite sides of stone to
create sharp edges.
Correct Answer: form to function
6.
The word Paleolithic means _______________.
Your Answer: Old Stone Age
7.
The vigorous animal paintings of Paleolithic art were replaced by the
______________ art of Neolithic farmers.
Correct Answer: geometrically abstract
8.
Possibly the nonrepresentational signs combined with animal forms
that have been found in Paleolithic caves were meant to
_____________________.
Your Answer: communicate information
9.
The New Stone Age appears to have occurred first in
______________.
Correct Answer: the Middle East
10.
Prehistoric _________________ figures are earliest known
examples of religious art.
Correct Answer: mother goddess
1. The image Woman of Willendorf is thought to be associated with:
(a) the Great Mother Goddess
(b) the development of stone tools
(c) hunting rituals
(d) the agricultural revolution
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 215
2. According to experts’ contemporary theory, Stonehenge was possibly created to:
(a) enhance the English environment
(b) focus attention on environmental arts
(c) calculate solar and lunar movements
(d) serve as a temple
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 220
3. The Wall Painting of Animals is located in south central France at:
(a) Chauvet Cave
(b) Bull Cave
(c) Lascaux Cave
(d) Nomadic cave
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 216
4. The vessel Earthenware Beaker is from the _______ period.
(a) Old Stone Age
(b) New Stone Age
(c) Paleolithic
(d) Middle Stone Age
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 219
5. The Mesopotamians built their temples, such as that of Ur-Nammu, on this type of
structure,
called:
(a) acropolis
(b) cuneiform
(c) ziggurat
(d) mana
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 221
6. Two million years ago, the first stone tools enabled our ancestors to:
(a) kill each other more efficiently
(b) make houses and create cities
(c) impress the opposite sex
(d) gain some control over their relationship to their surroundings
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 224
7. The word “Neolithic” means:
(a) Old Stone Age
(b) New Stone Age
(c) Middle Stone Age
(d) Nomadic
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 218
8. During the Neolithic period, art went from:
(a) naturalistic to realistic
(b) naturalistic to abstract
(c) abstract to naturalistic
(d) geometric to realistic
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 218
9. The ancient Sumerians developed the world’s first wheel, plow and _______.
(a) writing system
(b) calendar
(c) ceramic storage container
(d) sculpture
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 221
10. The sizing of figures as determined by social rank is called:
(a) hieroglyphic scale
(b) caste scale
(c) hierarchic scale
(d) higher order scale
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 225
1.
Question :
The Mesopotamians built their temples, such as that of Ur-Nammu,
on this type of structure, called:
an acropolis
a ziggurat (9th ed pg 239
10th ed pg 221)
a cuneiform ()
a mana
2.
Question :
Researcher's thought Stonehenge funtioned as a solar or lunar
temple, but new information has proven that this may be incorrect.
True (10th ed pg 220)
3.
Question :
False
According to your text, the main theory about the Woman of
Willendorf (figure 333) is that she is associated with:
the development of stone tools for carving (Page Ref: 233)
the Great Mother Goddess (9th ed pg 233
10th ed pg 216)
hunting rituals
the agricultural revolution
4.
Question :
Student Answer:
The sizing of figures as determined by social rank is called:
heirarchic scale (9th ed pg 243
10th ed pg 225)
caste scale
hierogliphic scale ()
higher order scale
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
5.
Question :
The ancient Sumerians developed the world’s first wheel, plow and
_______.
Student Answer:
food storage containers ()
calendar
writing (9th ed pg 238
10th ed pg 221)
sculpture
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
6.
Question :
Student Answer:
The word “Neolithic” means:
Old Stone Age
Middle Stone Age ()
New Stone Age (9th ed pg 236
10th ed pg 218)
Nomadic Stone Age
7.
Question :
Student
Answer:
8.
9.
True (Witcomb/Willendorf website)
Question :
Student
Answer:
Student
Answer:
1.
Question :
False (10th ed pg
225)
In a Paleolithic society, according to Dr. Witcombe's
research, woman held power and were the rulers.
True (Witcomb/Willendorf website)
10. Question :
True
False
Using heirarchal standards of value, the smallest images deem that
the viewer get up close to see detail, thereby giving that small item
the most importance and value.
True
Question :
Student
Answer:
Dr. C. Witcombe proposes that "one could view the Venus of
Willendorf as a Stone Age Doll for a child.
False
The latest theory about the painted images in the Paleolithic caves
at Chauvet and Lascaux is that they were strictly decorative.
False (9th ed pg
234
10th ed pg 216)
Which artist is best known for his/her drawings and paintings of
flowers.
Student Answer:
Degas
Picasso
Rembrandt
O’Keeffe (10th ed. pg 86
9th ed pg 110)
2.
Question :
An artist might draw parallel lines closely together to create shade in a drawing. This is
rereferred to as:
Student Answer:
value-adding
blanching
blending
hatching (10th ed pg 85
9th ed pg 109)
3.
Question :
Student Answer:
When an artist places parallel lines closely together to create
shade in a drawing, it is referred to as _______.
hatching (10th ed pg 85
9th ed pg 109)
valuing
blending
blanching
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
4.
Question :
Student Answer:
Charles White used the technique of _______ to give the figure
in Preacher a feeling of figural mass.
hatching (10th ed pg 85
9th ed pg 109, figure 149)
pixilating
pastel
linear perspective
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
5.
Question :
Some artists prefer to create images using only ink. These ink drawings share many of the
same qualities of water color images. When an artist uses water to thin the ink, this is
called_____________.
Student Answer:
a gouache
a persepolis
a chiaroscuro
a wash (10th ed pg 88)
6.
Question :
Student Answer:
To create Guernica, a monumental painting depicting the horrors
of war, ______________made many preliminary sketches.
Vincent van Gogh
Pablo Picasso (10th ed pg 84
9th ed pg 108, figure 146)
Henri Matisse
Judith Murray
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
7.
Question :
Student Answer:
Drawings done with ink thinned with water and executed with a
brush are referred to as _______.
wet brush
watercolors
washes (10th ed. pg 88
9th ed. pg 113)
wet media
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
8.
Question :
Student Answer:
According to the text, the three purposes of drawing are: to
record, to _______, and to make a finished artwork.
sketch
study (10th ed pg 83
9th ed pg 107)
notate ()
memorize
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
9.
Question :
Conte crayon is made from:
Student Answer:
graphite mixed with wax
graphite mixed with clay (10th ed pg 87)
clay mixed with wax
wax mixed with pigment
Points Received:
Comments:
of 1
10.
Question :
Student Answer:
Dry media includes all of the following: pastel, charcoal, pencil and _____________
ink
conte crayon (10th ed pg 86
9th ed pg 110)
tempera
wax
1.
Question :
In buon fresco the pigments, combined with water, are applied to ____________.
Student Answer:
dry canvas
wet wood
dry plaster
wet plaster (10th ed pg 102
9th ed pg 127)
2.
Question :
Another name for opaque watercolor is _______.
Student Answer:
fresco
acrylic
tempera
gouache (10th ed pg 95
9th ed pg 121)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
3.
Question :
In ________ painting, the artist can allow the paper itself to produce "highlights" through the
transparent color.
Student Answer:
watercolor (10th ed pg 94-95
9th ed pg 120)
oil
tempera
fresco
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
4.
Question :
An extremely thick application of oil paint, which can provide texture, is called ________.
Student Answer:
fresco
impasto (10th ed pg 99
9th ed pg 124)
texturizing
gouaching
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
5.
Question :
For some artists, one of the advantages of oil paint is its:
Student Answer:
viscosity and smoothness
slow drying time (10th ed pg 98
9th ed pg 123-124)
matte quality
rapid drying time
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
6.
Question :
This artist created Detroit Industry, and is considered a leader in the revival of fresco mural
painting during the 1920s and 1930s.
Student Answer:
Judy Baca
Joan Mitchell
Diego Rivera (10th ed pg 103
9th ed pg 127-128)
Audrey Flack
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
7.
Question :
A very thin, transparent film of color painted over an already-painted surface is called:
Student Answer:
coating
varnish
glaze (10th ed pg 98
9th ed pg 123)
layer
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
8.
Question :
Which of the following is an American artist and illustrator best known for his watercolors, such
as Sloop, Nassau?
Student Answer:
Winslow Homer (10th ed pg 95
9th ed 120, figure 163)
Grant Wood
Frank Auerbach
David Hockney
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
9.
Question :
Madonna and Child with the Chancellor Rolin, by the Flemish artist Jan van Eyck, is an excellent
example of a(n) _______ painting.
Student Answer:
acrylic
fresco
oil (10th ed pg 98
9th ed pg 123, figure 166)
watercolor
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
10.
Question :
Student Answer:
The Chinese believe that painting is derived from the art of:
drawing
calligraphy (10th ed pg 96
9th ed pg 121)
printmaking
seeing
1.
Question :
Student
Answer:
Lithography is a type of stencil printing.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg 116
(Seriography is a type of
stencil printing))
of 1
Comments:
2.
Question :
Student
Answer:
In lithography, the artist draws an image with a greasy crayon directly on a flat stone slab.
True (10th ed pg 112)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
3.
Question :
Student
Answer:
The process of printing came to Europe from Japan.
True
Points Received:
False (9th ed pg 130
10th ed pg 105)
of 1
Comments:
4.
Question :
Student
Answer:
Because printmaking can be expensive, artist "proofs" are only needed for advanced, multicolor lithographic images as this form is the least expensive process.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pgs 105-106)
of 1
Comments:
5.
Question :
Student
Answer:
In the short span of about ten years, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec created over 300 lithographs.
his innovations in this medium heavily influenced graphic design in the 20th century.
True (10th ed pg 112-113
9th ed pg 139)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
6.
Question :
Student
Answer:
Lithography relies on the chemical attributes of oil and water.
True (10th ed pg 114
9th ed pg 137)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
7.
Question :
Student
In Sun Mad, Ester Hernandez used silkscreen printing to create posters that denounced the
working conditions of Mexican-American farm workers and help educate others to protest the
use of dangerous pesticides.
True (9th ed P. 141
False
Answer:
10th ed pg 117)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
8.
Question :
Student
Answer:
Katsushika Hokusai's The Wave c. 1830, showing Mount Fuji as larger than life, intended to
represent the eternal power of the Japanese Samurai.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg 107
9th ed pg 132)
of 1
Comments:
9.
Question :
Student
Answer:
In a linoleum cut relief print, the ink sinks into the cut out areas. These areas holding the ink
create the transfer to the paper.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg 108-109
9th ed pg 132)
of 1
Comments:
10.
Question :
Student
Answer:
When an artist marks a print with "AP", this indicates to a buyer that this is an "Absolutely
Perfect" print.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg 106)
of 1
Comments:
11.
Question :
Student
Answer:
United States currency bills are great examples of expert engravings.
True (10th ed pg 109)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
12.
Question :
Student
Answer:
Albrecht Durer's The Knight, Death and the Devil (1513), is famous for its religious iconography
as well as being one of the finest examples of a wood cut print in the world.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg 110
9th ed pg 134
It is an engraving...not a
wood cut)
of 1
Comments:
13.
Question :
Student Answer:
The _____ cut is a modern development in relief printing.
wood
intaglio
gauffrage
linoleum (10th ed. pg 108)
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
14.
Question :
The fraction that you will find on an original print, below the image, is referred to as the
____________.
Student Answer:
system marker
series notation
seriography
edition (10th ed pg 105
9th ed pg 130)
1.
Question :
In graphic design, another name for letterforms is:
Student Answer:
type
serifs
fonts (10th ed pg 150
9th ed pg 171)
symbols
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
2. Question :
Student
Answer:
The third re-design of the NASA logo in 1992 was inspired byt
the explosion of the Space Shuttle Challenger. This new logo
used blue instead of the original black (in the 1959 logo), to
symbolize an astronauts safe return to our blue oceans.
True ( )
False (10th ed pg
150
9th ed pg 171)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
3. Question :
Student
Answer:
When he created the poster titled "Absolute Power", artist Chaz
Maviyane-Davies was forced to leave his country.
True (10th ed pg 153)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
4. Question :
Student
Answer:
True
The small lines or "feet" at the edges of some typefaces are called
"strokes".
False (they are
called "serifs"
10th ed pg. 150)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
5. Question :
Student Answer:
Being among the first artists to create something new has put
Julio Gonzales in your text as the first sculptor who used the
_______ to create his metal sculptures.
chisel
welding torch (10th ed pg 169 9th ed pg 188)
Cubist method
I-beam
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
6. Question :
Student
Answer:
In typesetting, “Roman” means italic.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg
150)
of 1
Comments:
7. Question :
Student Answer:
According to your text, the goal of graphic design is to:
instruct through words
brainwash people to buy things they may not need
create imagery
get us to do something (10th ed pg 149
9th ed pg 170)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
8. Question :
Student Answer:
A subcategory of constructed sculpture that lets artists use
familiar objects in new ways is called:
assemblage (10th ed pg 169 9th ed pg 190)
welding
mobile
collage
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
9. Question :
Student
Answer:
According to your text, of all art forms that exist in our daily
lives, we encounter graphic design the most.
True (10th ed pg 148
False
9th ed pg 169)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
10. Question :
Student
Answer:
Some book covers serve as excellent examples of graphic design,
uniting image and text to create a memorable image.
True (10th ed pg 156)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
11. Question :
Student
Answer:
The concept of a poster is over 100 years old. The main goal is to
make something as inexpensively as possible.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg
151)
of 1
Comments:
12. Question :
Student Answer:
Kinetic sculpture was first explored by which artist who began
this type of art by creating mobiles such as Untitled, (shown
below).
Alexander Calder (10th ed pg 171 9th ed pg 192)
Ilya Kabakov
Nam June Paik
Marisol
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
13. Question :
Student Answer:
Your Artforms texbook uses which style of typeface?
Roman Sans serif
Adobe Garamond (10th ed pg 150
9th ed pg 171)
Armanda
Nobel ()
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
14. Question :
Student
Answer:
The new SAKS FIFTH AVENUE logo is simply the old logo cut
into squares and re-arranged.
True (10th ed pg 150
False
9th ed pg 171)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
15. Question :
Student Answer:
In graphic design, an identifying mark or trademark is referred
to as a(n) _______.
icon ()
logo (10th ed pg 149
9th ed pg 170)
ID mark
symbol
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
16. Question :
Student Answer:
The work by Robert Arneson called California Artist is made of:
clay (10th ed pg 164
9th ed pg 183)
wood
metal
resin
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
17. Question :
Student
Answer:
Sony Corporation used to be called "Tokyo Tsushin Kogyo". They
changed their name in order to increase sales worldwide with a
name that would not be tied to any one nationality.
True (10th ed pg 159)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
18. Question :
Student Answer:
When sculptors work with soft materials, they often use a(n)
_______ to prevent sagging.
skeleton
base
armature (10th ed pg 164-164 9th ed pg 183)
grid
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
19. Question :
Student
Answer:
The logo titled "Olympuke" was created for the 2010 Winter
Games to help remind attendees that the main idea of the
Olympics is to celebrate world class athletics, NOT to party, get
drunk and puke.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg
154)
of 1
Comments:
20. Question :
Student
Answer:
1.
True
Question :
Student
Answer:
Castings can either be solid or hollow.
False
It can easily be said that Frank Lloyd Wright's "Falling Water"
home design, is one of the most famous and well-known uses
of cantilevers in the world.
True (10th ed pg 202)
Points Received:
of 2
False
Comments:
2. Question :
Student
Answer:
The text explains that humans have known how to create and
use glass for about 4,000 years.
True (9th ed. P. 201
10th ed. P. 179)
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
3. Question :
Student
Answer:
Due to unprotected metal struts, cast-iron buildings are highly
susceptible to being destroyed by fire.
True (10th ed pg 196)
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
4. Question :
Student
Answer:
Many of architect Zaha Hadid's building designs are so radical that
they either cannot, or have not been built.
True (10th ed pg 201)
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
5. Question :
Student
Answer:
When a clay pot is glazed and fired, the color of the glaze is
completely different (after firing) than it was when it was when it
was in liquid form.
True (10th ed pg 177)
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
6. Question :
Student Answer:
What is the title of Faith Ringgold’s story quilt that shows an
eight-year-old’s dream of overcoming obstacles?
Overcomming Harlem Nights
Tar Beach (9th ed. Page 209, figure 295
10th ed. pg 186, fig 11.16)
Tar Baby
Flying over the Hudson
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
7. Question :
Student Answer:
Zimbabwe, as in the "Great Zimbabwe", means:
African Country
Homage to Zimba
Lion House
Stone House (10th ed pg 190)
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
8. Question :
Student
Answer:
Glassblowers must have great patience and stamina to work
molten glass as slowly as possible.
True
Points Received:
False (9th ed. P.
201
10th ed. P. 179 180)
of 2
Comments:
9. Question :
Student Answer:
Because a tree has unique growth characteristics that remain
visible in the finished objects, wood is said to possess a:
heart
soul
vision
vitality, or living spirit (
9th ed Page 203
10th ed Page 182
)
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
10. Question :
Student
Answer:
True
All of Faith Ringgold’s quilts are dedicated to visually
expressing the happy and sad memories of her childhood in
Atlanta Georgia.
False (9th ed P.
208
10th ed P 185 187)
1.
Question :
The Mesopotamians built their temples, such as that of UrNammu, on this type of structure, called:
Student Answer:
an acropolis
a ziggurat (9th ed pg 239
10th ed pg 221)
a cuneiform ()
a mana
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
2. Question :
Student
Answer:
Researcher's thought Stonehenge funtioned as a solar or lunar
temple, but new information has proven that this may be
incorrect.
True (10th ed pg 220)
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
3. Question :
Student Answer:
According to your text, the main theory about the Woman of
Willendorf (figure 333) is that she is associated with:
the development of stone tools for carving (Page Ref: 233)
the Great Mother Goddess (9th ed pg 233
10th ed pg 216)
hunting rituals
the agricultural revolution
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
4. Question :
Student Answer:
The sizing of figures as determined by social rank is called:
heirarchic scale (9th ed pg 243
10th ed pg 225)
caste scale
hierogliphic scale ()
higher order scale
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
5. Question :
The ancient Sumerians developed the world’s first wheel, plow
and _______.
Student Answer:
food storage containers ()
calendar
writing (9th ed pg 238
10th ed pg 221)
sculpture
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
6. Question :
Student Answer:
The word “Neolithic” means:
Old Stone Age
Middle Stone Age ()
New Stone Age (9th ed pg 236
10th ed pg 218)
Nomadic Stone Age
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
7. Question :
Student
Answer:
Dr. C. Witcombe proposes that "one could view the Venus of
Willendorf as a Stone Age Doll for a child.
True (Witcomb/Willendorf website)
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
8. Question :
Student
Answer:
Using heirarchal standards of value, the smallest images deem
that the viewer get up close to see detail, thereby giving that
small item the most importance and value.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg
225)
of 2
Comments:
9. Question :
Student
Answer:
In a Paleolithic society, according to Dr. Witcombe's
research, woman held power and were the rulers.
True (Witcomb/Willendorf website)
False
10. Question :
The latest theory about the painted images in the Paleolithic
caves at Chauvet and Lascaux is that they were strictly
decorative.
True
1.
False (9th ed pg
234
10th ed pg 216)
Question :
In Romanesque churches, the largest sculpture (since Roman
times) can be found:
Student Answer:
over the nave (
)
under the barrel vaulting
around the windows
either flanking, or over, the main entrance (10th ed pgs 244247
9th ed pg 262)
There are no sculptures in Romanesque churches because the
focus is on the stained glass windows
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
2. Question :
Student
Answer:
In art, the word “icon” usually refers to an image with sacred
significance.
True (10th ed pg 240
False
9th ed pgs 258 & 494)
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
3. Question :
Student
Answer:
After they were completed, gothic cathedrals were used for
concerts, plays, meetings and worship services.
True (10th ed pg 244)
Points Received:
Comments:
of 2
False
4. Question :
Student
Answer:
One notable feature of Gothic cathedrals was the use of lookout
towers to protect the religious treasures from invaders and
thieves.
True
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
5. Question :
Student Answer:
One feature that set Gothic architecture apart from
Romanesque was the extensive use of:
sculptured door arches (
)
barrel vaulting
stained glass (10th ed pg 244
9th ed pg 264)
domes
None of these
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
6. Question :
Student Answer:
The Purse Cover, from the Sutton Hoo ship burial, illustrates
one distinguishing characteristic of the art of migrating peoples
of the Middle Ages that is based on:
humans
kings
animals (10th ed pg 242
9th ed pg 260)
religion (
)
None of these
Points Received:
Comments:
of 2
7. Question :
Student
Answer:
The greatest artistic triumphs of the Romans was the
development of highly valued ceramic sculptures.
True
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
8. Question :
Student
Answer:
Early Christian and Byzantine figures showed characteristics
that were more symbolic than natural.
True
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
9. Question :
Student Answer:
Head of an Old Man is an example of sculpture from the _______
portrait tradition.
Greek
Roman (10th ed pg 233
9th ed pg 251)
Etruscan
Egyptian
None of these
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
10. Question :
Student Answer:
If you want to see the original Greek marble sculpture from the
pediment of the Parthenon in Athens, you have to go to:
Acropolis Museum: Greece
Uffizi Gallery: Italy
Louvre Museum: France
British Museum: England (10th ed pg 230)
None of these because it is still on the Parthenon
1.
Question :
Michelangelo’s David has a pose influenced by the sculpture of
the ancient:
Student Answer:
Greeks (10th ed pg 256
9th ed pg 275)
Egyptians
Sumerians
Romans ()
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
2. Question :
Student Answer:
Leonardo’s technique of blurred edges, called _______, can be
seen in his Mona Lisa.
sfumato (This is the correct answer from the 9th edition, please
send me an e-mail if you chose this answer because you have the
9th edition.
Page 271, figure 381)
chiaroscuro (This is the correct answer from the 10th
edition page 253.)
tenebrism
camera obscura
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
3. Question :
Student
Answer:
Rococo style is heavily rooted in religious mysticism.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg
268)
of 2
Comments:
4. Question :
Student Answer:
Caravaggio’s dramatic portrayal of scenes at night, as seen
in The Conversion of Saint Paul, is created by his use of
___________ which is quite different from previous images of
the Renaissance period.
common "everyday" themes ()
realism and use of light (10th ed pg 263
9th ed pg 282)
rococo imagery
sfumato techniques
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
5. Question :
Student
Answer:
Paolo Veronese's version of "The Last Supper" differs from
Leonardo da Vinci's version. One of those differences is that some
of the subjects in Veronese's version are clearly drunk.
True (10th ed pg 262)
Points Received:
False
of 2
Comments:
6. Question :
Student Answer:
Many Baroque characteristics developed as propaganda for the:
French Revolution
oppressed minority classes
Counter Reformation (10th ed pg 263
9th ed pg 282)
ruling classes
Points Received:
Comments:
of 2
7. Question :
Student Answer:
The Holy Trinity fresco, by Masaccio, is considered to be the first
painting based on the use of:
sfumato
tenebrism
isometric perspective ()
linear perspective (10th ed pg 250
9th ed pg 268)
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
8. Question :
Student Answer:
In the Netherlands, the major patrons of such artists as Vermeer
and Rembrandt were:
the nobility
the merchant class (10th ed pg 266
9th ed pg 285)
civic organizations
the farm worker classes
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
9. Question :
Student Answer:
The first woman to gain widespread notoriety as an artist in the
Renaissance was:
Rosa Bonheur
Hildagard of Bingen ()
Sofonisba Anguissola (10th ed pg 270
9th ed pg 289)
Marietta Robusti
Points Received:
of 2
Comments:
10. Question :
Student Answer:
Many Renaissance artists benefited from the patronage of the
_______ family.
Borgia
Merchantis
Merisi ()
Medici (Noted throughout the entirety of Chapter 16)
1.
Question :
A minaret is:
Student Answer:
The pointed tip found above the main entryways of Persian
temples.
A tower that can be found on an Islamic mosque. (10th ed
pg. 298)
A religious design found only on Islamic religious pottery.
A book of powerful prayers that can only be used by high-ranking
men of the Islamic faith.
None of the above are correct.
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
2. Question :
Student Answer:
Porcelain plates made by the Chinese were decorated using
_______ because it was the only color that survived the high heat
levels in the kilns.
black
terra cotta
green
reddish-black
None of the above are correct. (10th ed pg 288
9th ed pg 309)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
3. Question :
Student
Answer:
According to your text, at this point in history, the best place to
study ancient Chinese architecture is in the buildings surrounding
the Wu Family Shrine in Northeast China.
True
Points Received:
False (near Kyoto,
Japan. 10th ed. pg
291)
of 1
Comments:
4. Question :
Student
Answer:
The surface of the Taj Mahal is famous for its white marble
exterior that contains silver glitter. This glitter helps it catch the
light and make it look like an entrance to the afterlife.
True
Points Received:
False (9th ed.
page 325
10th ed. page 303)
of 1
Comments:
5. Question :
Sexual ecstasy as a metaphor for divine love is found in the art of
the:
Student Answer:
Hindus (9th ed. Page Ref: 296
10th ed page 276)
Aryans
Chinese
Buddhists
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
6. Question :
Student Answer:
Islamic art is unlike Western art because it prohibits:
ceramics and pottery
abstract art
painting and drawing
figural art in a religious context (9th ed. Page Ref: 319
10th ed. page 297)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
7. Question :
Student Answer:
The indigenous religion of Japan is an ancient form of nature and
ancestor worship called:
Shinto (9th ed. Page Ref: 311
10th ed. page 290)
Hindu
Buddhism
Prana
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
8. Question :
Student Answer:
Sesshu painted in a style that was called haboku, meaning:
Expressive
Drying wind
Flung ink (10th ed pg 293
9th ed pg 436)
Fast brushstrokes
None of the above are correct.
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
9. Question :
Student Answer:
Decorated with stories about Vishnu, _______ is one of the most
famous monuments of Cambodia.
The Great Stupa
Borobudur
Kandarya Mahadeva
Angkor Wat (9th ed. Page Ref: 300, figure 418
10th ed. page 280)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
10. Question :
Student
Answer:
Like the Chinese, Muslims respected the art of Zen painting when
it included realistic images of human representation.
True
Points Received:
False (9th & 10th
editions
Intro section of
Chapter 18)
of 1
Comments:
11. Question :
Student Answer:
Japanese ukiyo-e prints depicted the:
ruler and his court
fantasy landscapes
everyday world great battles (10th ed pgs 294-295
9th ed pg 315)
great battles
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
12. Question :
Student
Answer:
Similar to most conquering nations, when Muslims conquered a
new group, they insisted that the conquered people give up their
religion and follow in the Islamic faith.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed pg.
297)
of 1
Comments:
13. Question :
Respect for books and book learning was particularly high in the
Muslim cities of Cordoba and Granada because of their great
libraries.
Student
Answer:
True (9th ed. page 321
10th ed. page 299)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
14. Question :
Student
Answer:
The two main focal points of traditional Chinese painting are the
landscape and calligraphy.
True (10th ed. pg 284)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
15. Question :
Student Answer:
The Terra Cotta Warriors were found in the tomb of Emperor
_______, from whom China takes its name.
Qin (9th ed. Page Ref: 302, figure 420
10th ed. pages 281 & 282)
Chin Ho
Chang
Shang
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
16. Question :
Student Answer:
The Mughal style of India:
strictly combine elements of their religious architecture with
nature.
combined elements of the diverse people, cultures, and
religions over which they ruled and visited. (9th ed. page
325
10th ed. page 301)
combine images of dieties with nature to represent the
relationship of "gods" and nature".
Is important because it was among the first highly original art
forms that held no connections to other types of art.
None of the above are correct.
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
17. Question :
Shah Jahan commissioned this structure as a tomb for his favorite
wife.
Student Answer:
the Hagia Sophia
the Great Mosque
the Suleymaniye Mosque
the Taj Mahal (9th ed. Page Ref: 325
10th ed page 303)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
18. Question :
Student Answer:
Early burial mounds led to the Indian:
pagoda
pyramid
stupa (9th ed. Page Ref: 293
10th ed. 273 & 291)
temple
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
19. Question :
Student Answer:
Wu Chen’s Album Leaf from Manual of Ink Bamboo illustrates the
idea from the Song dynasty that the true character of the artist is
revealed by:
the balance between light and shadow
the quality of calligraphy (9th ed. Page Ref: 307, figure 426
10th ed. page 286)
the choice of subject matter
the composition
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
20. Question :
Student
Answer:
1.
Believing himself to be a great ruler, Muhammad encouraged
artists to paint pictures of him for the historical record.
True
False (10th ed.
page 298)
Question :
The kachinas, of the Zuni and Hopi people:
Student Answer:
are small representations of animal forms that are used in
religious ceremonies.
are finely woven baskets with sacred designs.
are small dolls made by the women of the villages, used to teach
sacred traditions.
represent the spirits of invisble life forces. (10th ed pg.
317)
None of the above.
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
2. Question :
Student Answer:
The Hopewell culture built large mounds, such as the Great
Serpent Mound (figure 475), in what is now the state of:
Kansas
New Mexico
Iowa
Arizona ()
Ohio (10th ed. pg. 316
9th ed. pg. 338)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
3. Question :
Student Answer:
Power figures of the Congo often have _______ added to them
because it is thought to have special symbolic meaning.
feathers
gold
seeds
stones from spirit gardens
iron (10th ed. pg 308
9th ed. pg 331)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
4. Question :
Student Answer:
Native Australians believe that time (all of time including the past,
present and future) exists as:
eternal dreamtime (10th ed. pg. 314
9th ed. pg. 337)
spiraling movement ()
mythical moments
skeleton seconds
None of the above
Points Received:
Comments:
of 1
5. Question :
Student Answer:
African textiles often feature:
a combination of sewn and hand tied edges for strength
the use of only 3 colors in any one cloth
symbolic meaning (10th ed pg. 309)
heavily stenciled cloth
None of the above.
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
6. Question :
Student
Answer:
The MOAI of Easter Island are stone figures up to 70 feet tall and
were built to welcome fellow Polynesians to the island.
True
Points Received:
False (10th ed. pg.
312
9th ed. pg. 335)
of 1
Comments:
7. Question :
Student
Answer:
The Incas are known for their skill at building with huge, carefully
cut and fitted stones.
True (10th ed. pg. 322-323)
Points Received:
False
of 1
Comments:
8. Question :
Student Answer:
For Oceanic people, "mana" represents _______.
the union of the Earth Mother and Sky Father
false-faces of those who deceive
ancient and honored souls
the seasonal power within all objects
None of the above (10th ed. pg. 310
9th ed. pg. 340 Spritual power within people, places, or
things)
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
9. Question :
Student Answer:
Teotihuacán featured temples, like the Pyramid of the Sun, shaped
like pyramids with decorations of:
skulls and bones
feathered serpents (10th ed. pg. 319
9th ed. pg. 344)
corn gods
scaly lizards ()
None of the above
Points Received:
of 1
Comments:
10. Question :
Student
Answer:
1.
Due to their close proximity, the arts of the Polynesian Islands
have very similar styles and colors.
True
False (10th ed pg.
311-313
9th ed. pg. 335)
Noting the style of this painting (well over 6 ft long); with details of reflecting light, this
painting of Water Lily's must be the work of which artist?
Francisco Goya
Henry Ossawa Tanner
Claudia Mannette
Rosa Bonheur
None of the above (10th ed pg 341)
2. Edgar Degas' paintings revealed his interest in the candid attitudes found in street
photography and the asymmetry of: (Points : 2)
The human body
Chinese silk prints
African masks
Life in general
None of the above
3. Henry Ossawa Tanner's paintings pandered to white insistence on portraying AfricanAmericans as a slower thinking, lower class group of people. (Points : 2)
True
False
4. Claude Monet’s Impression: Sunrise began the movement known as: (Points : 2)
Post-Impressionism
Impressionism
Divisionism
Fauvism
none of the above
5. In his search for spiritual truth, Paul Gauguin moved to _______, where he spent the rest of
his life. (Points : 2)
Tahiti
Fiji
Australia
New Zealand
None of the above
6. Luncheon on the Grass , by _______, was considered scandalous because of its loose
brushwork and depiction of ordinary subjects. (Points : 2)
Paul Gauguin
Vincent van Gogh
Edouard Manet
Claude Monet
None of the above
7. The Post-Impressionists felt the Impressionists did not allow room for: (Points : 2)
momentary impressions
personal expression
emphasis on everyday life
a single style
none of the above
8. Because of the pollution caused by the Industrial Revolution, England's art seemed to focus
on: (Points : 2)
the past
the growth of cities
the future
a celebration of factories
none of the above
9. Angelica Kauffmann’s paintings, such as Cornelia, Pointing to Her Children as Her Treasures,
were in the _______ style, which was based on Greek and Roman models. (Points : 2)
Romantic
Realist
Neoclassic
Rococo
Neo-Greco
10. As a "life-long radical", Gustave Courbet's work shows his belief that the average person
needed to support banking and government in order to have better lives. (Points : 2)
True
False
1. Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 by Marcel Duchamp was based in part on a(n):
Futurist manifesto
idea about motion
discussion with Picasso
stroboscopic
2. The Futurists were inspired by Cubism and their work glorified:
Picasso
birds
space exploration
people
None of the above
3. Henri Matisse was the leader of which artistic movement?
Cubism
Fauvism
Expressionism
Futurism
None of the above
4. In the Futurist sculpture Unique Forms of Continuity in Space by Umberto Boccioni, the
artist attempts to fuse the sculptural form with:
texture
shape
space
line
None of the above
5. A good example of Synthetic Cubism, Violin and Fruit by Picasso, utilized "papier colle"
which became known as:
papier mache
photo montage
collage
mixed media
None of the above
6. Synthetic Cubism refers to the process of taking things apart, or breaking down the subject
into its various parts. (Points : 2)
True
False
7. Although Georges Braque made the dramatic breakthrough, it was Picasso whose
exploratory works contributed the most to the development of Cubism. (Points : 2)
True
False
8. The artist that painted Composition IV, Wassily Kandinsky, felt that art led to a new:
politics
socialism
spirituality
monarchy
9. Events that shook up the world at the beginning of the 20th century included Sigmund
Freud’s work on the subconscious mind and the invention of:
the washing machine
the florescent light bulb
the sewing machine
the fax machine
the airplane
10. Expressionism is an artistic style that emphasized intellectual analysis. (Points : 2)
True
False
http://quizlet.com/3422577/prebles-artforms-ch-21-flash-cards/
1. This artist, creator of Sleeping Muse I, believed that his sculptures revealed the essence of
his forms.
(a) Wassily Kandinsky
(b) Pablo Picasso
(c) Marcel Duchamp
(d) Constantine Brancusi
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 366
2. Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2 by Marcel Duchamp was based in part on a(n):
(a) Futurist manifesto
(b) idea about motion
(c) discussion with Picasso
(d) chronophotograph
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 371
3. The artist that painted Composition IV, Wassily Kandinsky, felt that art led to a new:
(a) politics
(b) socialism
(c) spirituality
(d) monarchy
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 360
4. A good example of Synthetic Cubism, Violin and Fruit by Picasso utilized papier colle, which
became known as:
(a) papier mache
(b) collage
(c) photo montage
(d) mixed media
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 364
5. In the Futurist sculpture Unique Forms of Continuity in Space by Umberto Boccioni, the
artist attempts to fuse the sculptural form with:
(a) space
(b) texture
(c) shape
(d) line
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 370
6. Events that shook up the world at the beginning of the 20th century included Sigmund
Freud’s work on the subconscious mind and the invention of:
(a) the washing machine(b) the camera
(c) the telegraph
(d) the airplane
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 354
7. Because of the 20th century’s rapid changes and discoveries, artists searching for new ways
to express new realities felt they had to put aside dependence on:
(a) the Classical period
(b) the Age of Enlightenment
(c) the Renaissance
(d) the Baroque
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 355
8. The Futurists were inspired by Cubism and glorified:
(a) Picasso
(b) birds
(c) speed
(d) people
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 370
9. It was Marcel Duchamp who was responsible for bringing motion to:
(a) Cubism
(b) Futurism
(c) Fauvism
(d) Expressionism
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 371
10. Henri Matisse was the leader of which artistic movement?
(a) Cubism
(b) Fauvism
(c) Expressionism
(d) Futurism
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 355
11. Picasso combined lessons from Cézanne with _______ sculpture to produce Les
Demoiselles d’
Avignon.
a) African
(b) Roman
(c) Greek
(d) Medieval
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 361-62
1.
A series of events including an understanding of the power of the
____________, the theory of relativity and the invention of flight
would influence the art of the early 20th century.
Your Answer: subconscious
2.
____________ sculptural strength is shown by how he reduced
forms to their essence.
Correct Answer: Brancusi's
3.
Henri Matisse and André Derain's exhibition in 1905 was termed
___________ by a critic.
Correct Answer: les fauves
4.
________________ was the early 20th century style of painting
characterized by dramatic color contrasts with a bold crude finish
that heightens the emotional content.
Correct Answer: Expressionism
5.
Wassily Kandinsky led the _________________ group of
Expressionists.
Your Answer: Blue Rider
6.
Picasso and ___________ are credited with the development of
Cubism.
Correct Answer: Braque
7.
The photographer _____________ introduced America to the
new European art in his New York gallery.
Correct Answer: Alfred Stieglitz
8.
Inspired by the Cubists, the ____________ added a sense of
speed and motion to their compositions of shifting planes.
Your Answer: Futurists
9.
The architect Frank Lloyd Wright developed a style with open
plans that are referred to as _________.
Correct Answer: prairie houses
10.
The _____________ Show in New York introduced the American
public to the artistic developments of Europe.
Correct Answer: Armory
The forms in Pablo Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon are simplified into:
1.
little cubes.
2.
flattened boxes.
3.
abstract planes.
4.
folded paper.
5.
The forms in this artwork are not simplified.
What common characteristic does the artwork influenced by the movement of Cubism
share?
1.
It has many abstract shapes.
2.
It is all made using photography.
3.
It is all bright and shiny.
4.
It has very detailed realistic forms.
5.
There were no artworks influenced by Cubism.
When comparing Ana Mendieta’s Imagen de Yagul and Pipilotti Rist’s Ever is Over
All an important difference between the two pieces is that ______.
1.
only Ever is Over All was made in color
2.
only Imagen de Yagul includes flowers
3.
Ever is Over All is a video installation
4.
only Mendieta appears in her own artwork
5.
the two artworks are exactly the same
Although it looks like a comic-book illustration, parts of Roy Lichtenstein’sGirl With
Mirror recall a Post-Impressionist technique. The use of ______ is seen both in this
painting and also in the technique called ______.
1.
newspaper clippings … collage
2.
value and shading … chiaroscuro
3.
arbitrary brush application … Zen landscapes
4.
drips … action painting
5.
dots … pointillism
The colors of Henri Matisse’s Joy of Life were intended to:
1.
express emotion.
2.
confuse the viewer.
3.
make a political statement.
4.
appear random and chaotic.
5.
look exactly like nature.
Marcel Duchamp’s Bicycle Wheel was constructed using:
1.
symbolic furniture.
2.
found objects.
3.
various items from his aunt’s house.
4.
his brother’s bicycle.
5.
old fast food containers.
The commercially produced items in Dan Flavin’s Untitled were intended to:
1.
allow us to see them in new ways.
2.
degrade the beauty of nature.
3.
comment on the rising cost of being an artist.
4.
transform space and time.
5.
tell the story of his childhood.
The artist Vasily Kandinsky wanted to ______ in artworks like Improvisation #30.
1.
make music
2.
fight poverty
3.
include direct quotations from conversations about war in 1913
4.
show visible content that the viewer can clearly see
5.
express inner spiritual qualities
Multicultural considerations are included in which of the following artworks?
1.
Jolene Rickard, Corn Blue Room
2.
Carrie Mae Weems, You Became a Scientific Profile and A Photographic
Subject
3.
Shirin Neshat, Rapture
4.
Xenobia Bailey, (Re)Possessed
5.
All of the other answers
Mark Rothko’s Untitled is intentionally without a specific title so that viewers will:
1.
have to search the Internet to find the title.
2.
appreciate the enigmatic nature of the work.
3.
not ask questions.
4.
respond individually.
5.
have one definite answer about what the artwork means.
1. Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (Street, Berlin); Emil Nolde
a. CORRECT: The Bridge
b. INCORRECT:
c. The Blue Rider
d. FUTURISM
vivid and angular simplifications; dramatic color contrasts; bold, sometimes
crude finish; The Bridge (Die Brucke) and The Blue Rider (Der Blaue Reiter)
.
FUTURISM
a. INCORRECT:
b. The Fauves and EXPRESSIONISM
c. CORRECT: German Expressionism
Wassily Kandinsky, "exact replica of inner emotion" (Blue Mountain;
Composition IV);
.
FUTURISM
a. INCORRECT:
b. Henri Matisse
c. CORRECT: The Blue Rider
Alfred Stieglitz (The Steerage); Georgia O'Keeffe (Evening Star No. VI); Frank
Lloyd Wright (Prairie House; The Robie House)
.
Andre Durain
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Modern Spirit in America
c. The Bridge
Enthusiasm for life; expressive: lines, colors, subject, composition; Subjects
reduced to outlines with very little detail (La Desserte; Harmony in Red; Joy of Life)
.
The Blue Rider
a. CORRECT: Henri Matisse
b. INCORRECT:
c. FUTURISM
Color is secondary to structure; Pablo Picasso (Les Demoiselle D'Avignon; Guitar
[first constructed sculpture]; Violin and Fuit [collage]); George Braque (Houses at
L'Estaque [Cezanne]; The Portuguese) Rational, formalist counterpart to the
subjective emphasis of the Fauves.
.
Henri Matisse
a. FUTURISM
b. CORRECT: CUBISM
c. INCORRECT:
Brilliant, invented color balanced by some traditional composition and
perspective; Discordant Color; (London Bridge)
.
INCORRECT:
a. CUBISM
b. CORRECT: Andre Durain
c. The Bridge
d. Rapid Change, Diversity, Individualism, Exploration The Blue Rider
e. CORRECT: 20th Century Art
f.
The Bridge
g. Andre Durain
The celebration of Motion; added a sense of speed to Cubism; Giacomo Balla
(Abstract Speed - The Car Has Passed); Umberto Boccioni (Unique Forms of
Continuity in Space); Marcel Duchamp (Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2);
Sonia Delaunay (Bal Bullier)
.
CORRECT: FUTURISM
a. CUBISM
b. Andre Durain
c. The Bridge
Constantine Brancusi (Sleep; Sleeping Muse; The Newborn; Bird in Space)
.
20th Century Art
a. INCORRECT:
b. Andre Durain
c. CORRECT: Abstract Sculpture
(1905-1907); Les Fauves (the wild beasts); expressive color (Gauguin, van
Gogh) and color planes (Cezanne); Matisse and Derain
.
The Blue Rider
a. German Expressionism
b. CORRECT: The Fauves and EXPRESSIONISM
c. The Bridge
http://quizlet.com/3422282/prebles-artforms-ch-20-flash-cards/
1. Angelica Kauffmann’s paintings, such as Cornelia, Pointing to Her Children as Her Treasures,
were in the _______ style, which was based on Greek and Roman models.
(a) Romantic
(b) Neoclassic
(c) Realist
(d) Rococo
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 325
2. The Horse Fair was painted by Rosa Bonheur, the artist who had to get police permission to
wear trousers. It is an excellent example of:
(a) Realism
(b) Symbolism
(c) Impressionism
(d) Postimpressionism
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 334
3. Luncheon on the Grass, by _______, was considered scandalous because of its loose
brushwork
and depiction of ordinary subjects in juxtaposition.
(a) Paul Gauguin
(b) Vincent van Gogh
(c) Edouard Manet
(d) Claude Monet
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 338
4. Claude Monet’s Impression: Sunrise began the movement known as:
(a) Post-Impressionism
(b) Fauvism
(c) Divisionism
(d) Impressionism
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 340
5. In his search for spiritual truth, Paul Gauguin moved to _______, where he spent the rest of
his life.
(a) Fiji
(b) Tahiti
(c) Australia
(d) New Zealand
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 350
6. Perhaps because of the pollution caused by the Industrial Revolution, British art in the late
18th
- and early 19th
-centuries seemed to focus on:
(a) landscape
(b) the growth of cities
(c) the future
(d) a celebration of factories
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 329
7. Eugene Delacroix was famous for his painterly qualities, meaning he used paint to:
(a) smoothly and coolly fill in areas of color
(b) outline his forms
(c) tone down the emotional qualities of the works
(d) define shapes by changes in color
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 331
8. Edgar Degas' paintings revealed his interest in the candid attitudes found in street
photography and the asymmetry of:
(a) the human body
(b) Japanese prints
(c) African masks
(d) life in general
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 342
9. The Post-Impressionists felt the Impressionists did not allow room for:
(a) momentary impressions
(b) emphasis on everyday life
(c) personal expression
(d) a single style
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 345
10. In his letters to his brother Theo, Vincent van Gogh expressed his ideas about color as a
force
to show:
(a) emotion
(b) reverence for nature
(c) intellect
(d) religion
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 347
1.
The leader of the Neoclassical Style and official painter of the
French Revolution was:
Your Answer: Courbet.
Correct Answer: David.
2.
Practitioners of the __________ style believed that imagination
and emotion were more valuable than reason.
Your Answer: Romantic
3.
The painting of The Third of May, 1808 was an emotional
response to:
Your Answer: a public execution by Napoleon's troops.
4.
_______________ paper "The American Negro in Art" spoke of
the need for dignified portrayal of black individuals.
Your Answer: Henry Tanner's
5.
__________ made the first aerial photographs in a hot air
balloon.
Your Answer: Cameron
Correct Answer: Nadar
6.
_____________ studied animals on farms, ranches, and
slaughterhouses as inspiration for his/her outdoor animal
paintings.
Your Answer: Gustave Courbet
Correct Answer: Rosa Bonheur
7.
Thomas Eakins painted in the __________ tradition.
Your Answer: Romantic
Correct Answer: Realist
8.
A work by _________ inspired the label "impressionist".
Your Answer: Seurat
Correct Answer: Monet
9.
_______________ most significant stride toward modernism, as
seen in Mont Sainte-Victoire, was his drastic collapsing of space.
Your Answer: Cézanne's
10.
We can readily see in ______________ painting The Starry
Night how he used strong color to express his emotions.
Your Answer: Monet's
Correct Answer: van Gogh's
1. -Worked with expressive qualities of color, extensive brush stroke - texture,
impasto technique brings dreamlike, emotional character
a. Francisco de Goya
b. Gauguin and Van Gogh
c. American Art
d. CORRECT: Vincent Van Gogh
(1769-84) aimed for an architecture that expressed the values of the new
American republic, his home, Monticello, 1769-84, Charlottesville, VA is in the
Classical style, the design is reminiscent of the Pantheon.
.
Georges Seurat
a. Edgar Degas
b. INCORRECT:
c. CORRECT: Thomas Jefferson
Painters active in Europe (Turner) and US (Hudson River School) portrayed
landscapes in a romantic and nostalgic way that reflected the artists emotion
states.
.
ROMANTICISM
a. INCORRECT:
b. Seurat and Cezanne
c. CORRECT: Romantic Landscape Painting
(Rodin) a large project finished after Roden's death, includes The Thinker and
The Kiss, which were enlarged as independent pieces
.
INCORRECT:
a. The Stone Breakers
b. CORRECT: The Gates of Hell
c. Thomas Jefferson
(David, 1785-5) symbolizes loyalty at any cost, the moral spirit of the time Reminds the classical relief sculpture by strong side light and figures in the
foreground - The figures are rhythmically organized by the 3 arcade behind Stable, orderly composition created by verticals, resembles a stage set.
.
Three revolutions
a. Photography Artists
b. ROMANTICISM Artists
c. CORRECT: "Oath of the Horatii"
clarity, order, simplicity, renewed interest in classicism of Greece and Rome Artistic style associated with the French Revolution characterized by emphasis on
line and strong design to express ideals of honor, order, stability.
.
CORRECT: NEOCLASSICISM
a. EXPRESSIONISM
b. INCORRECT:
c. ROMANTICISM
the predecessor of Impressionism and the most controversial artist in 1860s. Combined in his art : Old Master (Velazques, Rembrandt) + realism( Courbet) +
flatness from Japanese prints -Used familiarity and confrontational views to shock
and comment on society -Believed that a good painting is true to itself -Used
loose, open brushwork -Scandalized France because of the way it was painted and
the subject matter -Concerned with visual issues over storytelling( revolutionary) Depiction of recognizable figures with a nude in public setting -Color builds from
a muted background to a bold foreground
.
INCORRECT:
a. CORRECT: Edouard Manet
b. Edgar Degas
c. Claude Monet
George Seurat (A Sunday on La Grande Jatte);
Paul Cezanne (Mont Sainte-Victoire);
Vincent van Gogh (Japonaiserie: Flowering Plum Tree; The Sower; The Starry
Night);
Paul Gauguin (The Vision After the Sermon; Fatat Te Miti);
Henri de Toulouse-Laurtrec (At the Moulin Rouge)
.
EXPRESSIONISM Artists
a. INCORRECT:
b. POST-IMPRESSIONISM
c. CORRECT: POST-IMPRESSIONISM Artists
(de Goya) a huge painting of an historical scene of French soldiers killing
Spaniards near Madrid -Mood created with color and rhythm, patterns of light and
dark organizes the scene - contrast: from faceless soldiers the light leads to a
focal point, the man, raising his arms - it is the universal protest against the
brutality of tyrannical government\
.
CORRECT: Executions on the Third of May, 1808
a. INCORRECT:
b. Gauguin and Van Gogh
c. The Stone Breakers
French Impressionism -Leader of the Impressionist movement -Used diffused
light and color (small dots that depicts the subjects from the distance) to create
composition -Express not only light but his feelings about the changing qualities
of light -Painted the same subject again and again to record the moods at
different time of the day or seasons.
.
Edouard Manet
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Claude Monet
c. Starry Night
- the most influential artist of his time -Wanted to add solidity to Impressionist
movement -Worked on the theory that an object could be broken into planes of
color -Simplified landscapes into patches of color that suggest geometric planes
and masses -Began this theory by working from apples
.
INCORRECT:
a. Seurat and Cezanne
b. CORRECT: Paul Cezanne
c. Edouard Manet
-More concerned with composition than Monet -Worked on figures in
Impressionist style -Not interested in naturalistic illusion of depth
.
Auguste Rodin
a. CORRECT: Auguste Renoir
b. Claude Monet
c. INCORRECT:
galleries, collectors, and museums emerged at this time.
.
United States
a. CORRECT: The new patronage
b. The Stone Breakers
c. Three revolutions
-Spanish court painter and print maker who worked with psychological
subjects.
.
Vincent Van Gogh
a. REALISM Artists
b. CORRECT: Francisco de Goya
c. INCORRECT:
the Industrial in Britain; the American; and French challenged the traditional
values, forced Europeans to change the view of the world. This shift to rational,
democracy, mix of cultures, scientific advances and exploration were expressed
and abetted by artists with a variety of styles that were developed simultaneously.
.
CORRECT: Three revolutions
a. Eugene Delacroix
b. REALISM Artists
c. INCORRECT:
-Used a process called Pointillism -Worked with theories about optical color
mixing and color complements
.
NEOCLASSICISM
a. CORRECT: Georges Seurat
b. Edgar Degas
c. Gustave Courbet
a movement based on Impressionism, but more theoretical in its nature with
more experimentation.
.
POST-IMPRESSIONISM Artists
a. CORRECT: POST-IMPRESSIONISM
b. IMPRESSIONISM
c. EXPRESSIONISM
(Courbet, 1849) the men breaking stones are ordinary road workers, presented
almost life-size.
.
The Gates of Hell
a. CORRECT: The Stone Breakers
b. The new patronage
c. INCORRECT:
(1819-77) employed direct, painterly technique for portrayal of the dignity of
ordinary things and common life, was first to paint outdoors, directly from nature.
-Created allegorical paintings about society
.
CORRECT: Gustave Courbet
a. Claude Monet
b. INCORRECT:
c. Auguste Rodin
developed formal structure by organizing visual form to achieve clarity of
design each in their own way.
.
CORRECT: Seurat and Cezanne
a. Edgar Degas
b. Edouard Manet
c. INCORRECT:
Gustave Courbet (The Stone Breakers);
Rosa Bonheur (The Horse Fair);
Jean Leon Gerome (Pygmalion and Galatea);
Thomas Eakins (William Rush Carving His Allegorical Figure of the Schuykill River);
Henry Ossawa Tanner (African American; The Banjo Lesson);
Edouard Manet (Luncheon on the Grass)
.
IMPRESSIONISM Artists
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: REALISM Artists
c. ROMANTICISM Artists
brought expressive, emotional intensity and desire to make their thoughts and
feelings visible by strong color contrast, shapes with clear contours, bold
brushwork
.
Vincent Van Gogh
a. Edouard Manet
b. CORRECT: Gauguin and Van Gogh
c. Auguste Renoir
(SYMBOLISM) Edward Munch, The Scream, 1893, oil on canvas. Munch's
powerful paintings and prints explore depths of emotion - grief, loneliness, fear,
love, passion, jealous and death
.
INCORRECT:
a. NEOCLASSICISM
b. CORRECT: EXPRESSIONISM
c. IMPRESSIONISM
French artist, a sculptor-modeler, -Returned sculpture to the status of a major
form, renewed with emotional and spiritual depth, restored sculpture as a vehicle
for personal expression. - Was first to use Michelangelo's unfinished pieces for
rough finish as expressive tool.
.
INCORRECT:
a. Claude Monet
b. Gustave Courbet
c. CORRECT: Auguste Rodin
(France) -Time of great change in society and art should show it -Portrayed
"proletariat" or working class or direct observation of nature -Group of landscape
painters who worked in the "open air" not in the studio
.
CORRECT: The Barbizon School
a. American Art
b. Three revolutions
c. The Gates of Hell
The art produced in the American colonies was closely related to that of Europe.
.
CORRECT: American Art
a. Edouard Manet
b. Starry Night
c. REALISM
Combined Impressionism, Japanese prints composition and street-scene
photography which brought a highly inventive design to his lifelike compositions
with cut figures -Many works with ballet (dancers) as subject.
.
Starry Night
a. CORRECT: Edgar Degas
b. Georges Seurat
c. Edouard Manet
French Romantic Painter - used loose and open or painterly brushwork to
enhance the viewer's emotional response to the subject of his pictures.
.
CORRECT: Eugene Delacroix
a. Edgar Degas
b. Auguste Renoir
c. INCORRECT:
(Vincent Van Gogh, c. 1888-9) oil on canvas, 29"x36 1/4 - all the elements are
symbolic, they are united by rhythm of lines that express the artist's mystical
vision.
.
Claude Monet
a. CORRECT: Starry Night
b. American Art
c. Edgar Degas
(1748-1825) designed the style of the Revolution with the ideal of a free
independent individual, painted Classical themes to incite nationalism and identify
with Classical ideals.
.
CORRECT: Jacques-Louis David
a. Auguste Rodin
b. EXPRESSIONISM
c. IMPRESSIONISM
Georges Seurat, 1884-6, oil on canvas -Group of people from different classes
in an outdoor environment- sign of the time
.
"Oath of the Horatii"
a. CORRECT: Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte
b. Romantic Landscape Painting
c. INCORRECT:
style in art and literature that depicts ordinary existence without exoticism, or
nostalgia , or drama, or heroic, the paintings remind one of photography, labeled
as " a cult of ugliness"
.
INCORRECT:
a. REALISM Artists
b. ROMANTICISM
c. CORRECT: REALISM
began in France with a group of artists interested in capturing light and color Based on observation, not interested in politics or religion -Used broken color Painted "impressions" of what the eye sees -Landscapes and ordinary scenes
painted outdoors in varied atmospheric conditions, seasons, and time of the day main subjects.
.
IMPRESSIONISM Artists
a. CORRECT: IMPRESSIONISM
b. POST-IMPRESSIONISM
c. EXPRESSIONISM
Claude Monet (straddled realism and impressionism with On the Bank of the
Seine, Bennecourt; Impression: Sunrise);
Pierre-Auguste Renoir (The Luncheon of the Boating Party);
Degar Degas (The Ballet Class);
Mary Cassatt (The Boating Party);
Auguste Rodin (The Gates of Hell, The Thinker)
.
EXPRESSIONISM Artists
a. NEOCLASSICISM Artists
b. POST-IMPRESSIONISM Artists
c. CORRECT: IMPRESSIONISM Artists
Neoclassicism (or Federal, Jeffersonian style) was also used in art and the
architecture to show solidity, and order; this was a way of creating the image of a
stable government.
.
CORRECT: United States
a. Edouard Manet
b. NEOCLASSICISM
c. INCORRECT:
Jacques-Louis David (Oath of Horath);
Angelica Kauffman (Cornelia, Pointing to Her Children as Her Treasures);
Thomas Jefferson (Monticello, Federalism)
.
CORRECT: NEOCLASSICISM Artists
a. EXPRESSIONISM Artists
b. NEOCLASSICISM
c. INCORRECT:
Carleton E. Watkins (The Three Brothers);
Eugene Delacroix;
Nadar (Felix Tournachon; first aerial photo from a balloon; Sarah Bernhardt);
Julia Cameron (Portraits);
.
CORRECT: Photography Artists
a. REALISM Artists
b. INCORRECT:
c. ROMANTICISM Artists
Francisco Goya (The Third of May 1808); J.M.W. Turner (The Burning of the
Houses of Lords and Commons); Thomas Cole (Hudson River School; The Oxbow);
Asher Durand (Kindred Spirits); Robert S. Duncanson (African American; Blue Hole,
Little Miami River); Eugene Delacroix (The Death of Sardanapalus)
.
REALISM Artists
a. ROMANTICISM
b. NEOCLASSICISM Artists
c. CORRECT: ROMANTICISM Artists
Edvard Munch (The Scream)
.
IMPRESSIONISM Artists
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: EXPRESSIONISM Artists
c. NEOCLASSICISM Artists
(from "Romances") reaction against Neoclassicism -Encompassed a variety of
past styles -Imagination and emotions are more valuable than reason and ratio Celebrated nature, common people and ideas set "long ago in far away places" Use of color in painterly strokes, and dramatic movement -Considered first
modern art movement
.
REALISM
a. NEOCLASSICISM
b. CORRECT: ROMANTICISM
c. INCORRECT:
1. he development of fast-drying acrylic paints helped to further advance the hard-edge
style of painting.(Points : 2)
True
False
2.European performance artist Orlan, in an attempt to visually exhibit the views of women as
both virgins and whores, dressed as a nun and them performed a strip tease.(Points : 2)
True
False
3.In 1958, there was a Neo-Dada artist in Europe who held an exhibit in an art gallery that had
no art in it at all.(Points : 2)
True
False
4.The focal point of Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s Running Fence is the unity of the people,
process, object and the landscape of the Sonoma and Marin counties.(Points : 2)
True
False
5. A perfect example of color-field painting can be seen in Pollock’s Autumn Rhythm which
shows fluid gestural lines.
(Points : 2)
True
False
6. Rosenquist’s oil painting F-11 inspired the term “pop-art” due to a blonde girl representing
“a child of ambitious parents” holding a lollipop.
(Points : 2)
True
False
7. Jackson Pollock is famous for the stating that “…everyone will be world famous for fifteen
minutes”.
(Points : 2)
True
False
8.Earthworks, Conceptual art, Performance art, and Site works are bound by the philosophy
that art is an experience rather than something to be held and bought for personal enjoyment.
(Points : 2)
True
False
9. The small size of Mark Rothko’s action paintings encourage an intimate view of a luminous
atmosphere.
(Points : 2)
True
False
10. In a reaction to the devastation and death left after WWII, Post Modern artists, reacted by
seeking to promote visual work re-awakened the peacefulness of Romantic Realism in a new
and modern way. (Points : 2)
True
False
1. Jackson Pollock’s Autumn Rhythm is an excellent example of:
(a) Conceptual Art
(b) Minimal Art
(c) Pop Art
(d) Abstract Expressionism
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 396
2. In his work called Monogram, Robert Rauschenberg put everyday objects together with
collage and Expressionist paintings to form what is called:
(a) an installation
(b) combine painting
(c) site-specific art
(d) action painting
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 402
3. One and Three Chairs by artist Joseph Kosuth is a good example of _______ art.
(a) performance
(b) photorealist
(c) Conceptual
(d) Minimalist
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 414
4. The large installation The Dinner Party, by artist Judy Chicago, illustrates the importance of
_______ (in) art, which is considered to be a vital force in the 1970s.
(a) feminism
(b) happenings
(c) installations
(d) site-specific
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 418
5. Chris Ofili’s The Holy Virgin Mary was at the center of a heated censorship battle between
the
Brooklyn Museum and former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. The work was included
in the exhibition titled:
(a) Sensation
(b) Shock of the New
(c) Recent American Art
(d) Art and Religion
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 450
6. Niki de Saint Phalle’s works, which she “killed” with nails, dirt, darts, etc., show the
continuing influence of:
(a) Surrealism
(b) Dada
(c) Post-Impressionism
(d) Futurism
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 404
7. Cooperative events, in which viewers participate with principals in loosely scripted
scenarios, are called:
(a) dramas
(b) playlets
(c) theater of life
(d) happenings
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 405
8. As Minimalism and hard-edge developed, paintings came to be seen as objects themselves,
rather than as:
(a) colorful and linear arrangements
(b) representations of other things
(c) environments
(d) two-dimensional sculptures
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 411
9. Site works differ from earthworks in that site works are designed to interact with the
environment, whereas earthworks:
(a) do not; they just sit there
(b) are made of sculptural material
(c) merge with the landscape
(d) permanently alter the land
Answer: (c)
Page Ref: 414
10. The works of Joseph Beuys, Ana Mendieta, and Guillermo Gomez-Pena are examples of:
(a) photorealism
(b) earthworks
(c) minimalist
(d) performance art
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 420-21
1.
According to the text, __________ was the post-World War II
style of American painting.
Correct Answer: Abstract Expressionism
2.
The term "Action Painting" is most applicable to the work of:
Correct Answer: Pollock.
3.
Which of the following is a Color Field Painter?
Correct Answer: Rothko
4.
________ took the formal ideas of the Cubists with the energy
of the Abstract Expressionists in his sculpture.
Correct Answer: Smith
5.
Robert Rauchenberg referred to his works using ordinary objects
and collage materials as ____________.
Correct Answer: combine paintings
6.
Works by ____________ use common graphic forms such as
targets, maps, flags, and numbers.
Correct Answer: Johns
7.
Popular in the 1960s _________ is the art movement that uses
commercial and popular images and themes as its subject
matter.
Correct Answer: Pop Art
8.
Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty is an example of a(n)
______________.
Correct Answer: earthwork
9.
Which artist has run a 24.5-mile fence across California and
skirted islands in pink fabric?
Your Answer: Christo
10.
_____________ used her own body in several works as a
symbol of the earth and natural cycles.
Correct Answer: Ana Mendieta
1. Drowning Girl
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Roy Lichtenstein
c. Conceptual
d. Asher Jorn
pioneered staining technique; pour paint on canvas (no brush strokes or paint
texture); Mountain and Sea
.
Alexander Calder
a. CORRECT: Helen Frankenthaler
b. Edward Kienholz
c. Blue, Orange, Red
-Abstract Expressionist who worked with a dripping process using house paint
that was called Action Painting.;
-Was trying to create a universally acceptable painting style that others may be
able to emulate and that would fit into any culture/environment.;
poured paint; (Autumn Rhythm)
.
Jasper Johns
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Jackson Pollock
c. Color Field
A loose conglomeration of seemingly unrelated objects.
.
Feminism
a. CORRECT: ASSEMBLAGE
b. INCORRECT:
c. John Cage
deceptively simple; objects of contemplation; Target With Four Faces
.
Joseph Kosuth
a. Asher Jorn
b. CORRECT: Jasper Johns
c. INCORRECT:
Composer; neo-dadaist; encouraged artists to pay attention to the world
around them;
silent composition: 4' 33".
.
ASSEMBLAGE
a. Hard Edge
b. CORRECT: John Cage
c. Pop Art
-He was an artist who took images from popular culture, soup cans, etc. and
through his art gave them greater than usual importance; -Emulated the
manufacturing process for everyday items in the art process;
-Recognized cultural icons (Elvis, Marilyn Monroe, etc.) and used them as heroic
figures by mass producing their images (just like the Greek ideal human forms);
His art form a sort of portrait of America of early sixties.;
his studio was called "The Factory";
Marilyn Diptych; Thirteen Most Wanted Men,
.
INCORRECT:
a. CORRECT: Andy Warhol
b. Mark Rothko
c. Pop Art
Dramatic presentation by visual artists (as distinguished from theater artists
such as actors and dancers) in front of an audience, usually apart from a formal
theatrical setting.
Joseph Beuys (Coyote); Ana Mendieta (Tree Of Life Series); Mierle Ukele (A.I.R.
Wash)
.
Pop Art
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Performance Art
c. Blue, Orange, Red
Paintings consisting of large areas of color with no obvious structure, central
focus, or dynamic balance.
.
Conceptual
a. INCORRECT:
b. Asher Jorn
c. CORRECT: Color Field
International Style; steel and glass (Lever House); Louis Sullivan; Oscar
Niemeyer (Planalto Palace)
.
CORRECT: Architecture
a. Hard Edge
b. INCORRECT:
c. Conceptual
-Pop artists were interested in raising mundane everyday things to heroic
proportions; style of painting and sculpture that developed in the late 50s and
early 60s in Britain and the US; based on visual clichés, subject matter, and
impersonal style of popular mass-media imagery.
.
John Cage
a. Conceptual
b. Hard Edge
c. CORRECT: Pop Art
painting using tape to achieve precise edges, in contrast to blurred or soft
edges in Abstract Expressionist paintings.
Ellsworth Kelly, Blue, Green, Yellow, Orange, Red;
Frank Stella, Agbatana III.
.
INCORRECT:
a. Asher Jorn
b. CORRECT: Hard Edge
c. Pop Art
** -Abstract Expressionist who worked with the idea of spirituality in his work,
he saw a close relationship between aesthetic experiences and spiritual
experiences;
-Layered oil paints in strong solid blocks with no structure and no central focus to
create a psychological and spiritual void where one could meditate, called COLOR
FIELD;
paintings pioneer of color field painting;
paintings evoke different emotions; sensuous appeal and monumental presence;
Blue, Orange, Red;
.
INCORRECT:
a. Jasper Johns
b. David Smith
c. CORRECT: Mark Rothko
European; used burlap sacks; was doctor: used red to symbolize blood, burlap
for bandages (US food aid sent in burlap bags); Composition (No Answer)
.
Alberto Giacometti
a. Architecture
b. CORRECT: Alberto Burri
c. Asher Jorn
nonrepresentational style of sculpture and painting, usually severely restricted
in the use of visual elements and often consisting of simple geometric shapes or
masses.
Doesn't express emotion
Donal Judd Untitled.
.
INCORRECT:
a. CORRECT: Minimalism
b. Norman Lewis
c. Feminism
John Doe
.
Hard Edge
a. CORRECT: Edward Kienholz
b. INCORRECT:
c. Andy Warhol
spontaneous, emotionally charged brush-work and provocative use of shapes;
Woman and Bicycle
.
Feminism
a. INCORRECT:
b. Claes Oldenburg
c. CORRECT: Willem de Kooning
European (Danish) painter; The Great Victory
.
CORRECT: Asher Jorn
a. ASSEMBLAGE
b. INCORRECT:
c. Pop Art
his assembled metal sculptures, combined the formal ideas of cubism and the
energy of abstract Expressionist painting.
Most important post-war US sculpture;
assembled metal sculpture balanced formal qualities with elemental energy;
meant to be viewed outdoors with green landscapes; CUBI series
.
Feminism
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: David Smith
c. Pop Art
One And Three Chairs
.
CORRECT: Joseph Kosuth
a. Pop Art
b. Asher Jorn
c. INCORRECT:
Jackson Pollock controlled paint by movement of his body
.
CORRECT: Action Painting
a. INCORRECT:
b. Minimalism
c. Color Field
originating idea and the process by which it is presented take precedence over
a tangible product.
Conceptual works are sometimes produced in visible form, but they often exist
only as descriptions of mental concepts or ideas.
Partially a way to avoid commercialization.
.
CORRECT: Conceptual
a. INCORRECT:
b. Architecture
c. Color Field
worked with soft sculptures and large scale examples of everyday objects.
.
CORRECT: Claes Oldenburg
a. Conceptual
b. INCORRECT:
c. Alberto Burri
straight and manipulated photos; Aaron Siskind (abstract urban life, isolated
parts of walls and buildings; Chicago 4C);
.
John Cage
a. CORRECT: Photography
b. Pop Art
c. INCORRECT:
irreverent aspects of Dada; St. Sebastian, Or The Portrait Of My Love
.
CORRECT: Niki de Saint Phalle
a. INCORRECT:
b. David Smith
c. Action Painting
Event: Homage To New York (Jean Tinguely), designed to destroy itself with a
turn of a switch;
Happenings: cooperative events in which viewers become active participants in
partly planned/partly spontaneous performances; Household (Allan Kaprow)
.
Willem de Kooning
a. INCORRECT:
b. Action Painting
c. CORRECT: Events and Happenings
-Influenced by European Expressionism and Surrealism; -Based on abstraction
and energetic gestural and painterly way of working;
-Reflected the "wild", brash, American spirit.;
-Spontaneous, full of kinetic visual energy and often driven more by emotion and
the subconscious than by reason, logic and order.;
-Quite playful, poked fun at art itself and was full of parody
.
CORRECT: ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM Characteristics
a. ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM
b. European Abstract Expressionism
c. INCORRECT:
mobile sculptures led him to create interactive, abstract in forms art, that was
based on balance and the movement of air.
.
INCORRECT:
a. CORRECT: Alexander Calder
b. Helen Frankenthaler
c. Andy Warhol
Is a Postmodernist who was originally associated with the Pop Art Movement of
the 1960's and 70's.
-An artist of boundless energy and imagination, he experimented with new
technologies and ways of creating art in both 2 and 3 dimensions.
-Invented new forms of art, where he combined ordinary objects and things such
as everyday trash to collage materials with expressionistic brushwork using
multiple media in what he called "combine-painting"
-Integrated the objects from everyday life and assembled it in ways that made
people think about their everyday experience "combine-paintings";
unexpected, previously unthinkable object;
a prankster, like Magritte; Monogram, Tracer
.
Performance Art
a. Claes Oldenburg
b. CORRECT: Robert Rauschenberg
c. INCORRECT:
a movement among artists, critics, and historians that began in the 70s;
Feminists seek to validate and promote art forms that express the unique
experience of women and to redress oppression by men.
Lucy Lippard (critic, men/women have different art); Judy Chicago (The Dinner
Party); Nancy Spero (Rebirth of Venus); Orlan (The Artist's Kiss)
.
CORRECT: Feminism
a. David Smith
b. ASSEMBLAGE
c. Minimalism
WAR; picketed galleries and dealers reluctant to show work by women; formed
own gallery, Artists In Residence (AIR)
.
CORRECT: Women Artists in Revolution
a. INCORRECT:
b. Richard Hamilton
c. Roy Lichtenstein
kept human form; commented on basic aloneness of individuals and the
disappointments of an exhausted and devastated postwar European society
.
CORRECT: European Abstract Expressionism
a. INCORRECT:
b. ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM
c. Women Artists in Revolution
-Art often involved found objects and included new materials that were being
introduced into American factories, such as new steel and glass technologies.
culmination of expressive tendencies from van Gogh and Gauguin through
Fauvism and German Expressionism;
Jackson Pollock; Mark Rothko; Helen Frankenthaler; Robert Motherwell; Willem de
Kooning; Norman Lewis; Alberto Biacometti; Asher Jorn; Alberto Burri; David Smith
.
European Abstract Expressionism
a. Action Painting
b. ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM Characteristics
c. CORRECT: ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM
Two Cheeseburgers With Everything
.
ASSEMBLAGE
a. INCORRECT:
b. Conceptual
c. CORRECT: Claes Oldenburg
Chris Ofili; Mary as a black woman; elephant dung; Brooklyn Museum.
.
Claes Oldenburg
a. CORRECT: The Holy Virgin Mary
b. Performance Art
c. Edward Kienholz
** British artist; published list of characteristics:
popular, transient, expendable, low-cost, mass-produced, young, witty, sexy,
gimmicky, glamorous, big business;
Just What Is It That Makes Today's Homes So Different, So Appealing?
.
Hard Edge
a. David Smith
b. CORRECT: Richard Hamilton
c. INCORRECT:
began paintings with specific subjects; brood over Spanish civil war; Elegy to
the Spanish Republic
.
INCORRECT:
a. Asher Jorn
b. CORRECT: Robert Motherwell
c. Alberto Burri
site-specific: work made for a certain place (Christo and Jeanne-Claude; Walter
De Maria);
Earthworks: sculptural forms made from earth, rocks, or sometimes plants, often
on a vast scale and in remote locations, some are deliberately impermanent
(Robert Smithson).
.
CORRECT: Site works and Earthworks
a. Events and Happenings
b. Performance Art
c. Helen Frankenthaler
African-American; social realist style; differs from others as it is more poetic
and reserved; Untitled
.
Hard Edge
a. Feminism
b. CORRECT: Norman Lewis
c. INCORRECT:
Richard Hamilton; used color to evoke moods from joy and serenity to
melancholy and despair.
Superimposed thin layers of paint to achieve a variety of qualities from dense to
atmospheric to luminous.
Paintings have sensuous appeal and monumental presence.
.
INCORRECT:
a. Helen Frankenthaler
b. Performance Art
c. CORRECT: Blue, Orange, Red
European Sculpture (kept human form); Main Pointing
.
Robert Motherwell
a. Alberto Burri
b. Asher Jorn
c. CORRECT: Alberto Giacometti
Thomas Hart Benton - Rhythm;
David Siqueiros - Large scale;
Navajo sand paintings - Don't have to touch;
Carl Jung - express feeling (rather than illustrate them)
.
CORRECT: Jackson Pollock influences
a. INCORRECT:
b. Jasper Johns
c. Jackson Pollock
Manipulating light and space;
installed in a an area/room, sometimes altering the entire space;
James Turrell; Andy Goldsworthy
.
Action Painting
a. CORRECT: Installations and Environments
b. Site works and Earthworks
c. Events and Happenings
1.
_____________ mounted blank sheets of paper in frames and
destroyed them in performances that he called Passing Through.
Correct Answer: Saburo Muramaki
2.
The ___________________ style became the governmentsponsored norm for China after the Communist victory in 1949.
Your Answer: Realist
3.
The first artist to achieve a synthesis of Asian and Western
techniques in Indian art was ______________.
Correct Answer: Amrita Sher-Gil
4.
Among the first students to study Western Art at the School of
Fine Arts in Cairo was _______________________.
Correct Answer: Mahmoud Mukhtar
5.
___________________ left a career as a toy designer to
become an artist.
Correct Answer: M.F. Husain
6.
Japanese art helped influence the development of
___________________ in the West, and was in turn influenced
by that movement.
Your Answer: Impressionism
7.
_____________________ has been reluctant to embrace artistic
ideas from the West.
Correct Answer: China
8.
Members of the League of Left-Wing Artists in China created
______________ in the realist style.
Correct Answer: Woodcuts
9.
Artists in many countries combined the ancient tradition of
calligraphy with modern painting techniques to create a distinctly
__________________ type of modern art.
Correct Answer: Muslim
10.
Mahmoud Mukhtar's _______________ attempts to symbolize a
national spirit much as the Statue of Liberty does for the United
States.
Your Answer: Egypt Awakening
1. This artist, creator of Sunrise Over the Eastern Sea traveled throughout Japan in the
1930s sketching and painting the landscape.
(a) Fujishima Takeji
(b) Gao Jianfu
(c) Saburo Murakami
(d) M. F. Husain
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 424
2. The style of Li Hua’s Take Him In! is similar to Western examples of:
(a) Post-Impressionism
(b) Surrealism
(c) Pop Art
(d) Social Realism
Answer: (d)
Page Ref: 425
3. The color schemes and flat patterns illustrated in Amrita Sher-Gil’s The Swing were directly
influenced by the Post-Impressionism of Paul Gauguin and:
(a) the symbolism of Gustave Moreau
(b) the ancient caves at Ajanta
(c) the Court of the Lions at Alhambra
(d) the Egyptian pyramids
Answer: (b)
Page Ref: 427
4. The Japanese group Gutai functioned from 1954 to 1972. In their manifesto, they
proclaimed:
(a) the end of traditional art making
(b) to maintain Japanese traditions
(c) to celebrate the landscape
(d) an end to radical art
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 424
5. In the late 1950s, a group of students in Nigeria formed the Zaria Art Society with the goal of
expressing:
(a) more of their African identity in their works
(b) surrealistic imagery in their works
(c) colonial leadership in their works
(d) minimalist imagery in their works
Answer: (a)
Page Ref: 430
Gallery made secret?
1. Gerard Sekoto → color and perspective based on pictures (Street Scene)
CORRECT: This is true.
2. Gao Jianfu → (Embodiment) "pure and creative activity with great energy"; Saburo
Murakami, Passing Through
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Gao Jianfu → The Five-Storied Pavilion borrowed perspective and
colors from the West; Wood cut (Li Hua, Take Him In);.
3. Calligraphic Movement → Nigeria, dedicated to expressing African identity; Uche
Okeke - "Natural synthesis" modern and African influence, (Ana MMuo)
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Calligraphic Movement → Ibrahim el-Salahi (Funeral And A Crescent).
4. Mahmoud Mukhtar → Egypt Awakening;
INCORRECT: This is true, but you marked it false.
5. Gutai → The Five-Storied Pavilion borrowed perspective and colors from the West;
Wood cut (Li Hua, Take Him In);
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Gutai → (Embodiment) "pure and creative activity with great energy";
Saburo Murakami, Passing Through.
6. Zaria Art Society → color and perspective based on pictures (Street Scene)
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Zaria Art Society → Nigeria, dedicated to expressing African identity;
Uche Okeke - "Natural synthesis" modern and African influence, (Ana MMuo).
7. Progressive Art Group → Nigeria, dedicated to expressing African identity; Uche
Okeke - "Natural synthesis" modern and African influence, (Ana MMuo)
INCORRECT: This is false, but you marked it true.
It should be Progressive Art Group → embody the complex reality of India as it
became a modern state; M.F. Husain (Man - symbolizes various races of India).
8. Amrita Sher-Gil → color and perspective based on pictures (Street Scene)
CORRECT: This is false.
It should be Amrita Sher-Gil → first Indian artist to fuse East and West; The Swing.
1. (Embodiment) "pure and creative activity with great energy"; Saburo Murakami,
Passing Through
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Gutai
c. Gerard Sekoto
d. Gao Jianfu
Nigeria, dedicated to expressing African identity; Uche Okeke - "Natural
synthesis" modern and African influence, (Ana MMuo)
.
Gerard Sekoto
a. INCORRECT:
b. CORRECT: Zaria Art Society
c. Gao Jianfu
The Five-Storied Pavilion borrowed perspective and colors from the West; Wood
cut (Li Hua, Take Him In);
.
Gutai
a. Gerard Sekoto
b. CORRECT: Gao Jianfu
c. Mahmoud Mukhtar
Ibrahim el-Salahi (Funeral And A Crescent)
.
Gerard Sekoto
a. CORRECT: Calligraphic Movement
b. Zaria Art Society
c. INCORRECT:
Egypt Awakening;
.
Gutai
a. Gao Jianfu
b. CORRECT: Mahmoud Mukhtar
c. Gerard Sekoto
embody the complex reality of India as it became a modern state; M.F. Husain
(Man - symbolizes various races of India)
.
INCORRECT:
a. Gerard Sekoto
b. CORRECT: Progressive Art Group
c. Zaria Art Society
first Indian artist to fuse East and West; The Swing
.
CORRECT: Amrita Sher-Gil
a. Gutai
b. INCORRECT:
c. Zaria Art Society
color and perspective based on pictures (Street Scene)
.
Amrita Sher-Gil
a. Zaria Art Society
b. CORRECT: Gerard Sekoto
c. INCORRECT: u
1. Funeral and a Crescent, by Ibrahim el-Salahi: (Points : 2)
shows the image of a man being sacrificed to a crescent moon
honors ancient Islamic mask forms
is a famous example of the calligraphic movement
combines Christian, Muslim and English influences
2. Mahmoud Mukhtar's Egypt Awakening is: (Points : 2)
a connection to Egypt's pre-islamic past
was carved from huge blocks of dark marble
was created to symbolize the liberation of Egypt
a and c are both correct  not sure
3. The Indian/Hungarian artist Amrita Sher-Gil's 1940 work entitled The Swing clearly shows
the influence of which 19th Century artist? (Points : 2)
Paul Cezanne
Paul Gauguin
Georges Seurat
Vincent Van Gogh
4. Man, oil on canvas by M.F.Hussain, represents: (Points : 2)
the political allies that India gained in its independence
the solid, happy, and bright future that India was about to enter
an elevated depiction of the "new man", such as himself, that would now openly exist due
to India's freedom
the exciting, divided, and fragmented state of India during the 1950's
5. According to the your text, "Negritude" means: (Points : 2)
A yearning for freedom of black people
A world awareness of African influences throughout history
The beginning of an African Renaissance
The awareness of African Personality
6. After studying in Europe, artist Amrita Sher-Gil returned home to India with the thought
that: (Points : 2)
she must bring the beauty perfection of the European Renaissance to India
she must bring the deep feelings of the Post-Impressionist to India
she needed to study in Europe in order to see the true beauty in the ancient caves of India
she needed to study in Europe in order to see how much her artwork was needed to help
bring order to Indian modern art.
7. Uche Okeke's oil painting, ANA MMUO is a perfect example of the search for "natural
synthesis" of both modern and African artistic influence. (Points : 1)
True
False
8. The black and white oil painting "TAKE HIM IN" by Li Hua, shows students in a printmaking
class helping a protester. (Points : 1)
True
False
9. Saburo Murakami's 1956 black and white photo entitled, Passing Through, was created to
permanently exhibit the destruction of the sacred spirits that is believed to exist in paper.
(Points : 1)
True
False
10. Gao Jianfu of China, the creator of The Five-Storied Pavilion, helped to overthrow the last
emperor of China and was disliked by art traditionalists because he brought and taught the
influences of Japanese acceptance and openness to Chinese Art. (Points : 1)
True
False
11. After WWII, one area where both Nationalists and Communists in China agreed was that
imperial traditions should no longer remain as they were. (Points : 1)
True
False
12. When the Japanese invaded China in 1937, they gathered up the most valuable Modern
and Post-Modern art for their own museums, rulers and political dignitaries. (Points : 1)
True
False
13. Created by Japanese artists, the Gutai manifesto proclaimed adherence to traditional
Japanese art forms as symbolic gesture that Japan remained strong after their defeat in WWII.
(Points : 1)
True
False
14. The social realist style depicted in Li Hua's TAKE HIM IN! was the same style that was
government sponsored in Russia by Joseph Stalin. (Points : 1)
True
False
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