Adult Literacy and Basic Education
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised April 2009
ALBE SCIENCE 140
Pre-requisite:
Successful completion of English 130, Math 130, and Science 130 or permission from the
instructor.
Co-requisite:
English 140 and Math 140
Minimum Number of Hours:
100 hours (Recommended: 120 hours)
Course Duration:
One semester
Course Description:
This intermediate course introduces the learners to chemistry, physics, earth science and life science. It builds on the learners’
experiences from life and from previous courses in this series, and provides preparation for pre-college level science courses.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
Science 140
August 2009
Suggested Time Allocation for Science 140
ABE Science Level
140
Section Title
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY,
SOCIETY, AND THE
ENVIRONMENT
CHEMISTRY
Atoms & Bonding
Acids & Bases
Chemical Reactions
PHYSICS
Energy and Motion
Simple Machines
Electricity
EARTH SCIENCE
Glaciology
Climatology
LIFE SCIENCE - BIOLOGY
Cells
Cell Division and Reproduction
Plants
Ecology
Science 140 Curriculum
Approximate % of Time
4
24
24
One Semester
Minimum: 100 hrs.
24
Recommended:
120 hours
24
Revised August 2009
1
Science 140
August 2009
ABE Science Level
140
CRITERIA
Participation
Labs, Portfolio, Assignments,
Course Project(s)
Tests and quizzes
Final Exam
TOTAL
%
5%
45%
30%
20%
100%
Portfolios: Portfolios can include examples of a variety of written work, self-evaluations, results of tests, list of goals, plans of how to achieve them, etc.
Anything that provides clear evidence of the learner’s ability to do something can be included in the portfolio. These are not limited to, but might include the
following:
- Written reports of science inquiry and problem-solving
- Descriptions and diagrams of science inquiry and problem solving
- Models created by the learners
- Individual and group research reports and projects
- Video, audio, computer-generated, and photographic examples of learner work
- Learner self-report about outcomes learned and/or yet to be learned
- Learner description about how they feel about science
- Work chosen by the learner
- Excerpts from the learner’s science journal or learning log
Participation: The mark for participation is not limited to, but might include the following:
- arrives on time
- completes activities
- participates in classroom discussion and group work
- works cooperatively with others in group activities
Note: The outcomes have been numbered, but they do not have to be done in the particular order presented. It is NOT intended that each outcome will be dealt
with separately; instead, instructors are encouraged to integrate several outcomes into one learning activity.
 Prepared activities appear in purple.
 Science 140 resources appear in red.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
2
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY,
SOCIETY, AND THE
ENVIRONMENT
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Use standard laboratory procedures,
equipment, and technology to apply
the scientific method in conducting
experiments and investigating
predictions.
Discuss proper attitudes and ethical
issues science raises due to advances
in technology.
Recognize strategies that individuals,
companies, and countries use to
overcome limitations in order to
achieve their scientific and
technological goals.
1. Investigate careers related to the
field of science, and discuss their
relevance to society.
Suggested Instructional Strategies
This is not intended as a separate unit, but rather as overriding themes, which are embedded in each topic
area.
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Science 140 Curriculum
Have learners investigate a career in the field of science.
- Identify a career that requires knowledge of science.
- Investigate and list features of the career that appeal to them. Make a second list of things that are less
appealing about the career.
- Survey the newspaper locally, territorially, and nationally for a career in the field that was chosen.
- Interview someone in a related career, and discuss the findings with the class.
Have learners clip out job advertisements from newspapers for careers in science, which indicate the necessary
academic requirements. Have learners research the academic requirements needed to enter a particular science
program, and determine the length of the program, entrance requirements, and the types of courses they have to
take, using university and college calendars.
 Do the activity: Discover a Canadian Scientist (Appendix A).
Create a poster or collage of local/territorial scientists, including their field of study, educational background,
experience, etc.
Have learners make a poster of all the careers that are related to one of the branches of science. For example:
Biology – zoologist, ornithologist, ichthyologist, etc.
Read biographies of scientists who specialize, such as David Suzuki, Banting and Best, Roberta Bondar., etc.
Discuss the relevance of the work done by these scientists and how their work has benefited society, such as the
discovery of insulin, vaccinations, etc.
Revised August 2009
3
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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Compare and contrast the interdisciplinary nature of science. For example, ask the question: “What other
scientists would be interested in the work of a meteorologist?” One example could be a zoologist who is
investigating the effects of global warming on various species. Science is full of interconnections, but there is
still a need to specialize.
Discuss what would happen if a particular scientific career did not exist.
Possible websites:
http://www.workopolis.com/work.aspx?action=Transfer&View=Content/JobSeeker/FastTrackListView&lang=
EN&FastTrack=SCIENCE&FastTrackId=378855
http://www.pbs.org/safarchive/5_cool/53_career.html
CHEMISTRY
ATOMS AND BONDING
2. Name and describe three family
groups of elements from the
periodic table.
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Science 140 Curriculum
 Chemistry Lesson Plan 1 (Appendix A1)
Have the learner view a video on the periodic table, Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table (Science 140
Resource Kit).
Do the activity: Halides Family Characteristics Lab Activity (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Have learners colour sections of the periodic table to show the three families: alkali metals, halogens, and noble
gases.
Have learners become familiar with all the parts of the periodic table. Point out the element names and
symbols, electron numbers, and atomic masses. Point out the arrangement of elements into families or groups
(vertical rows) and periods or series (horizontal rows). Understand the patterns that occur in the periodic table
and the characteristics of periods and families (ALBE Science 110-120-130 Resource Manual, Chemistry
Section, pp. A22-4; science.connect1, pp. 24-8).
Provide learners with a list of the first 20 elements, with their atomic masses, and have learner put the elements
in order of atomic mass.
Provide learners with a table that includes the headings: name, atomic number, mass number, symbol, number
of electrons, and number of neutrons. Give the names of elements and have the learners fill in the rest.
E.g.
Atomic
Atomic Mass
Total Number
Valence
Element
Symbol
Number
Number
of Electrons
Electrons
Lithium
Li
3
6.9
3
1
Carbon
Revised August 2009
4
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
3.
4.
5.
Distinguish between ionic and
molecular bonds.
Name and write formulas for
some common ionic and
molecular compounds, using the
periodic table and a list of ions.
Represent chemical formulas,
chemical reactions, and the
conservation of mass, using
molecular models and balanced
symbolic equations.
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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ACIDS AND BASES
6. Classify substances as acids,
bases, or salts based on their
characteristics, names, and
formulas.
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Science 140 Curriculum
 Chemistry Lesson Plan 2 (Appendix A2)
Compare and contrast ionic and molecular bonds. One way to remember the difference is that ionic is the
stealing of electrons and molecular is sharing of electrons.
Cf. ALBE Science 110-120-130 Resource Manual, Chemistry Section, pp. A80-3.
Watch the video: Chemical Bonding (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Make atomic mobiles with “Creating Atoms” (Science 140 Resource Kit, pp. 30-1).
 Chemistry Lesson Plan 3 (Appendix A3)
Challenge learners to research the chemical names and formulas of a list of common compounds (e.g. wood,
alcohol, baking soda, aspirin, etc.).
Play Formula Bingo to increase familiarity with the relationship between formulas and nomenclature. Give
learners bingo cards with formulas for ionic and molecular compounds. Call out the name of the compound,
and have the learners locate the formula on their cards.
 Chemistry Lesson Plan 4 (Appendix A4)
Carry out the Chemical Formulas Lab Activity (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Provide learners with carefully guided instruction and drill, as well as practice in balancing equations. Have
learners balance simpler equations, such as those for NaCl (ionic) and H2O (molecular).
Have learners work in pairs, consulting and checking each other’s work, to write formulas and equations.
Check for the proper use of symbols, subscripts, and balancing.
To stress the importance of proper placement of coefficients and subscripts, discuss the differences between
CO2 and CO, H2O and H2O2, O2 and O3, and other molecules with similar formulas.
Have learners perform experiments that lead them to conclude mass is conserved in chemical reactions. For
example, use a precipitation reaction by measuring the solutions prior to mixing them and then after a chemical
reaction occurs to conclude that mass is conserved.
Have learners perform experiments where they can measure the reactants and products, and show that mass is
conserved during a chemical reaction (Science 110-130 Resource Manual, Unit A, Chemistry, Section 6.1, pp.
A86-94).
 Chemistry Lesson Plan 5 (Appendix A5)
Cf. pH Measurement Indicators Kit (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Have learners test the chemical and physical properties of acids, bases, and salt solutions using pH paper.
Challenge learners to write the formulas of each of the acids, bases, and salts used.
Do the Patriotic Colours Chemistry Activity (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Revised August 2009
5
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies

Test common household materials (e.g. tea, vinegar, milk, ammonia, lemon juice, salt solution, milk of
magnesia, etc.) using a pH meter or pH paper.
H+
Bases
OHproton donors
proton acceptors
oxidation
reduction
Describe the origin of the term pH. It is formed from the letter p, the initial letter of the German word potenz
(potency, power), and the H is the symbol for the hydrogen ion in relative concentration.
Demonstrate the creation of acid rain by burning a candle that is sitting in water under a large jar. The carbon
dioxide and water produced by combustion generates carbonic acid. Use pH paper to test the acidity.
Discuss the sources of acid rain pollution and its effects on the environment, i.e. plants, animals, buildings, and
humans.
Cf. the Environment Canada website for activities and information on acid rain:
http://www.ec.gc.ca/acidrain/
Website for information and educational resources:
http://www.epa.gov/acidrain
Acid rain activity:
http://www.swlauriersb.qc.ca/english/edservices/pedresources/webquest/rainwq.htm
View a video on acid rain.
 Chemistry Lesson Plan 6, 7, 8 (Appendix A6)
Demo:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/C02DESU4.html
Have learners perform an experiment using a titration and pH indicator to neutralize an acid (e.g. hydrochloric
acid) and a base (e.g. ammonia solution).
Discuss with learners the fact that acids are important to health, e.g. HCl in the stomach is important to
digestion. Too much acid in the stomach is the cause of acid indigestion. The body has a natural method of
buffering acids and maintaining equilibrium of the pH in the blood using neutralization.
Discuss buffering systems that work throughout the body to ensure that homeostasis is maintained. Website:
http://www.chemistry.wustl.edu/~edudev/LabTutorials/Buffer/Buffer.html
Research the acidity in the small intestine (basic), blood (basic), and stomach (acidic).
Cf. science.connect1, “Maintaining Homeostasis,” Chapter 11, for information and activities on homeostasis.
Acids
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7.
Describe how neutralization
involves tempering the effects of
an acid with a base or vice versa,
using pH indicators and
titrations.
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Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
6
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
CHEMICAL REACTIONS
8. Identify the categories of
chemical reactions: formation
(synthesis), decomposition,
hydrocarbon combustion, and
ion exchange (both single and
double replacement).
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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Synthesis (coming together)
Decomposition (breaking apart)
Single replacement (substitution)
Double replacement (exchange)
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Science 140 Curriculum
 Chemistry Lesson Plan 6, 7, 8 (Appendix A6)
Compare and contrast the four types of chemical reactions.
X + O = XO
XO = X + O
X+O
X
Make coloured cards to show the four types of reactions as illustrated with the symbols above, and to show
how combining different elements creates different types of reactions. Observe that mass is conserved in all
reactions.
Websites:
 Background information:
http://misterguch.brinkster.net/6typesofchemicalrxn.html
http://www.files.chem.vt.edu/RVGS/ACT/notes/Types_of_Equations.html
 Notes on displacement reactions:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/science/chemistry/m_m_chem_props_6.shtml
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/361.html
 Experiments:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/c02lad1.htm
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/c02lad6.htm
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/C02LAD3.HTM
 Demo:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/C02DED2.HTM
 Work sheets for balancing chemical equations:
http://misterguch.brinkster.net/equationworksheets.html
Use the Boreal FUN-damental Chemistry Reactions Kit (Science 140 Resource Kit) to experiment with
different chemical reactions.
Discuss the burning of fossil fuels (i.e. hydrocarbons). A simple, common example of a hydrocarbon
combustion reaction is the burning of methane. The process is shown below:
Revised August 2009
7
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies

9.
Illustrate how factors such as
catalysts, heat, concentration,
light, and surface area can effect
chemical reactions.
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Science 140 Curriculum
In this example, 4 molecules of methane and 7 molecules of oxygen react with heat to form 4 molecules of
carbon dioxide and 6 molecules of water. Have learners observe that carbon dioxide and water are often the
result of combustion reactions. Point out that this reaction is exothermic because it creates a large amount of
heat, most commonly in the form of a flame.
Have learners work together to balance the following combustion reactions which represent fossil fuel burning:
As learners balance the equations for the combustion of fossil fuels, ask what they notice about the product of
this combustion reaction. Where do these products go? How do they alter the environment? Is increasing
amounts of carbon dioxide in the air a problem? Explain to the students that the scientific evidence suggests
that increased carbon dioxide will lead to climate warming.
 Chemistry Lesson Plan 6,7,8 (Appendix A)
Websites:
 Background information:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c04/C04CDVR3.htm
 Experiments:
http://www.cdli.ca/courses/chem3202/unit01_org01_ilo06/c3_lab01.pdf
 Demo:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c04/c04dek14.html
Cf. Glencoe Physical Science (1997), p. 459, for the experiment “Catalyzed Reaction,” which investigates the
problem: “How does the presence of a catalyst affect the rate of a chemical reaction?”
Discuss the use of catalytic converters in cars and how this relates to catalysts (Glencoe Physical Science, p.
457).
Have learners conduct an experiment to test the effect of heat on a chemical reaction. Dissolve an Alka Seltzer
tablet in a beaker of cold water and in a beaker of hot water. Observe the differences in the rate of reaction.
Revised August 2009
8
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
10. Illustrate how the above factors
mediate all chemical reactions
within the living cell, including
cellular respiration and
photosynthesis.
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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Discuss the importance of enzymes as catalysts to increase the rate of reactions in the human body. Enzymes
are important in digestion (e.g. breaking down proteins, albumin, starches, and carbohydrates) and increasing
temperature.
Have learners conduct the investigation: “Enzymes: Your Body’s Catalysts” (Glencoe Physical Science, pp.
492-3).
Cf. information and activity on photosynthesis and cellular respiration (science.connect2, pp. 118-21).
PHYSICS
ENERGY AND MOTION
11. Define, compare, and contrast
scalar and vector quantities.
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12. Describe quantitatively the
relationship among
displacement, time, and velocity,
and contrast with distance and
speed.
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Science 140 Curriculum
Observe that the mathematical quantities used to describe the motion of objects can be divided into two
categories, vectors or scalars. These can be distinguished from one another by their distinct definitions:
Scalars are quantities which are fully described by a magnitude (or numerical value) alone.
Vectors are quantities which are fully described by both a magnitude and a direction.
Cf. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/1DKin/U1L1b.html
Provide learners with a table of quantities and have them categorize each quantity as a vector or scalar.
E.g.
Quantity
Category
 5m
 scalar (no direction given)
 30m/sec. East
 vector ( a direction is given)
 5 km North
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 20 degrees Celsius
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 256 bytes
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 4000 Calories
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Have learners recognize that distance and displacement are two quantities which seem to have the same
meaning, but which have distinctly different meanings:
Distance is a scalar quantity that refers to how much ground an object has covered during its motion.
Displacement is a vector quantity that refers to how far out of place an object is; it is the object’s
overall change in position.
A tip for teaching the difference between distance and displacement: Take the students outside, and take along
a compass. Line them up and have them walk 10 steps north. Ask them how far they’ve traveled, (distance = 10
steps) and how far they are from where they started (displacement = 10 steps north). Tell the students to turn
around, and walk 10 steps south. Ask them the 2 questions again (distance = 20 steps; displacement = 0).
Hopefully they’ll remember walking around outside whenever you ask them the difference between these 2
terms.
Revised August 2009
9
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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Distance vs. displacement lab: The students need a compass and a ruler for this activity. Give the students a
list of directions to follow to travel from an initial starting point (the classroom) to a final point. For example,
the directions could be walk 10m north, 20m east, etc. After the students have finished, have them plot (to
scale) their route, and ask them to calculate the distance they have walked and their displacement.
Provide learners with diagrams, and have them calculate displacement and distance.
Example: A physics teacher walks 4 meters east, 2 meters south, 4 meters west, and 2 meters north.
(See diagram below.)
Even though the physics teacher has walked a total distance
of 12 meters, her displacement is 0 meters. During the
course of her motion, she has covered 12 meters of ground
(distance = 12 m). Yet when she is finished walking, she is
not out of place, i.e. there is no displacement for her motion
(displacement = 0 m).
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Recognize that speed and velocity have different meanings:
Speed is a scalar quantity and refers to how fast an object is moving.
Velocity is a vector quantity and refers to the rate at which an object changes its position. Velocity describes
both the speed and direction.
Acceleration is a vector quantity and refers to the rate of change in velocity.
View the video Roller Coaster Physics (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Have learners compare and contrast speed, velocity, and acceleration.
change in 
displacement
  =
=

time
  =
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Science 140 Curriculum
̅ =
Δ
Δ


Have learners measure the change in position of an electric toy car at various time intervals. An alternate
activity is to have learners use a free falling object or a toy car going down a ramp, which is attached to a ticker
tape machine.
Revised August 2009
10
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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13. Analyze graphically and
mathematically the relationship
among displacement, time, and
velocity.
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Note: There are many ways to demonstrate this (Cf. Glencoe Physical Science, “Mini-lab,” p. 74). Check your
textbooks for other ideas (science .connect 2, Chapter 14).
Create a displacement vs. time graph by plotting position vs. time.
Determine the speed (velocity) from the slope of the displacement vs. time graph, and produce a velocity time
graph. Determine acceleration from the velocity vs. time graph.
Cf. http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/1DKin/U1L3a.html
Consider a car moving with a constant, rightward (+) velocity of +10 m/s.
If the position-time data for such a car were graphed, then the resulting graph would look like the graph below.
Note that a motion described as a constant, positive velocity results in a line of constant and positive slope
when plotted as a position-time graph.
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Science 140 Curriculum
Note: There are many ways to demonstrate this. Check your textbooks for other ideas.
Velocity time graph websites:
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/1DKin/U1L4a.html
http://www.physicssource.ca/pgs/2001_kin_emath_02.html
http://library.thinkquest.org/10796/ch2/ch2.htm
Revised August 2009
11
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
14. Distinguish between
instantaneous and average
velocity.
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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Instantaneous speed is the speed at any given instant in time.
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Animation:
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/mmedia/index.html#kinema
15. Describe quantitatively the
relationships among position,
velocity, acceleration, and time.
SIMPLE MACHINES
16. Describe quantitatively the
mechanical advantage and
efficiency of a simple machine
using appropriate formulas.
change in 

  =
=
displacement
time
ℎ  
  −  
=


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Provide learners with real life problems to solve (whenever possible).
Calculate acceleration (Cf. Glencoe Physical Science, “Mini Lab,” p. 74).
Useful websites:
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/CLASS/1DKin/U1L1d.html
http://physicsisgreat.wikispaces.com/CP+physics : Scroll down to → September → CP-physics motion,
CP-physics acceleration.
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Watch online videos:
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/12891-work-and-the-simple-machine-mechanical-advantage-video.htm
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/23867-energy-in-action-the-efficiency-of-machines-video.htm
Simple Machines –Mechanical Advantage Reference Sheet:
www.teachengineering.org/collection/cub_/lessons/cub_simple/cub_simple_lesson01_refsheet.pdf
Mechanical advantage activity:
http://teachengineering.org/view_activity.php?url=http://www.teachengineering.org/collection/cub_/activities/c
ub_simp_machines/cub_simp_machines_lesson03_activity1.xml
Note that there are two ways of finding the mechanical advantage of a simple machine.
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First Method:
Mechanical Advantage = MA = Resistance = AMA
Effort
The resistance or weight is divided by the effort that is exerted. This is also
called the actual mechanical advantage because extra effort had to be applied
to overcome friction.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
12
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies
Second Method:
  =  =
 
= 
 
The distance the effort moves is divided by the distance the resistance moves. This is
the ideal mechanical advantage because friction is not involved in the calculation.
Efficiency = Work output
Work input
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17. Design a simple machine to
efficiently accomplish a given
task.
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ELECTRICITY
18. Compare characteristics of series
and parallel circuits, and
describe quantitatively the
relationship between current,
resistance, and voltage.
Science 140 Curriculum
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X 100%
 Do the activity: How do Pulleys Work? (Appendix B) to have learners determine the mechanical advantage
(MA) in activities with simple machines.
Provide learners with problems to solve for mechanical advantage and efficiency.
Sample problems:
http://physicsisgreat.wikispaces.com/CP+physics → scroll down to December → Machine problems and
solutions
Website:
www.physics.ohio-state.edu/p670/Sp04/overheads/Per7_over.pdf
Use simulations to problem-solve:
http://scifiles.larc.nasa.gov/kids/Problem_Board/problems/pulleys/sim1.html
 Build a Mechanical System (Appendix B)
Determine a task (e.g. lift a small object from the table and deposit it in a box). Have learners work in pairs to
design a combination of simple machines to complete the task.
Have learners work in pairs to build a pasta car and experiment to determine its efficiency.
Cf. www.the-aps.org/education/k12curric/activities/pdfs/roth.pdf
Use the Boreal Investigating Electricity Kit (Science 140 Resource Kit) to experiment with series and parallel
circuits.
Conduct experiments on series and parallel circuits by giving learners sets of Christmas tree lights and having
them see the effects of removing a light bulb.
Revised August 2009
13
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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Lab activity: Connecting Cells in Parallel and in Series:
http://educ.queensu.ca/%7Escience/main/concept/phys/p01/P01LADB3.htm
Using Ohm’s Law, work through simple problems using substitution and formula manipulation.
Ohm’s Law – The current in a metal conductor is directly
proportional to the potential difference across its ends and
inversely proportional to the resistance.
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Potential difference = current X resistance
V(volts) = I (amperes) X R (ohms)
Lab activity: Electric Potential vs. Current in Circuits (Ohm's Law):
http://educ.queensu.ca/%7Escience/main/concept/phys/p01/P01LADB4.htm
Have learners compare appliances in series and in parallel by connecting three porcelain sockets and one-cell
flashlight bulbs in series. How brightly do the bulbs shine? (Dimly.) What is the effect of removing one bulb?
(The series is broken.) Now have the learners connect the circuit in a parallel arrangement, and note the
brightness of the bulbs and the effect of removing one bulb.
Using circuit symbols, have the learners sketch a series and a parallel circuit, and list applications of each type
of circuit.
Some circuit symbols used in schematic diagrams are shown below. A single cell or other power source is
represented by a long and a short vertical parallel line. A collection of cells or batteries is represented by a
collection of long and short vertical parallel lines. The long line represents the positive terminal of the energy
source, and the short line represents the negative terminal.
See examples below. Source:
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/Class/circuits/u9l4a.html
Description: Three D-cells are placed in a battery pack to power a circuit containing three light bulbs.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
14
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies

19. Demonstrate how electricity in
circuits can produce light, heat,
sound, motion, and magnetic
effects.
20. Describe the relationship
between electricity and
magnetism when using an
electromagnet, and observe how
electromagnetism is used in
generators.
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21. Identify various methods by
which electricity can be
generated.
Science 140 Curriculum


Websites:
http://www.physicsclassroom.com/Class/circuits/u9l4b.cfm
www.apsu.edu/robertsonr/nova/Series%20and%20Parallel%20Circuits.pdf
http://galileo.phys.virginia.edu/outreach/8thGradeSOL/SeriesParallelFrm.htm
Discuss the uses of electricity and have the learners read and discuss how electricity is turned into motion, heat,
light, and sound. Brainstorm a list of appliances that use electricity.
Brainstorm a list of safety rules for dealing with electricity. Contact the electric power corporation, or invite a
representative to talk to the class about safety with electricity.
Have learners construct an electromagnet by passing an electric current through a wire, wound around a nail, to
create a magnetic field. How to do it: wrap the centre part of an insulated copper wire around a nail several
times. Leave about 15 cm of wire unwrapped at each end. Attach each end of the wire to one terminal of the
dry cell. Use the nail as a magnet to pick up some paper clips. Ask the learners to explain what happens.
Place the tip of the nail in some iron filings. What happens? Does anything happen when you disconnect the
wires? What about when you increase and tighten the coils and try this again? Is there any difference?
Experiment with an AC/DC generator (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Build a generator. Cf. science.connect2, “Generating Electric Energy,” Chapter 6, p. 100; or
http://www.eskimo.com/~billb/amateur/coilgen.html
Websites:
http://education.jlab.org/qa/electromagnet.html
www.sciencenetlinks.com/pdfs/build_actsheet.pdf
http://www.windpower.org/en/kids/choose/gen/gnassign.htm
Have learners, in pairs or small groups, do a mini-research study on the methods of generating electricity; and
report to the class.
Compare different methods of generating electricity through a web search activity.
Revised August 2009
15
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies


Websites:
http://archives.cbc.ca/for_teachers/809/
http://www.geocities.com/daveclarkecb/ElecGenProsCons.html
Cf. science.connect2, Chapter 6.
EARTH SCIENCE
GLACIOLOGY
22. Define the term “glacier.”


23. Explain and illustrate the
processes of glacial formation,
including Aboriginal and
historical accounting of
glaciations.
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
24. Define the transformation from
snow to glacial ice, and
investigate the mechanical
properties of ice.
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Science 140 Curriculum
Define a glacier as a huge mass of ice moving slowly down a slope or valley, or spreading outward on a land
surface.
Websites:
 Overview of glaciers and glaciology:
http://www.geosc.psu.edu/~engelder/geosc20/lect14.html
http://www.geography-site.co.uk/pages/physical.html
 For definitions of terms in this section:
http://sparkcharts.sparknotes.com/gensci/geology_earthsci/section10.php
 Lab activity: Observe a miniature glacier in action:
http://educ.queensu.ca/%7Escience/main/concept/is/i01/I01LASF9.html
View the video Glaciers and Glaciation (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Read the Aboriginal story, “How the Sun was Stolen by a Bear” (Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems,
p.122). Find other Aboriginal stories about glaciations and elicit Aboriginal stories about glaciation from
learners.
Using Google, type the search term “interactive maps deglaciation north america” to get the website of Natural
Resources Canada. (It should have nrcan.gc.ca as part of the URL.) Use the interactive maps to have learners
research their own community, in order to discover when it was under ice and when it was ice-free. Cf.
Experiential Science 10, “Where Were You in the Ice Age?” Activity 1, p. 123.
Website:
http://www.northstar.k12.ak.us/schools/joy/denali/OConnor/types.html
Cf. Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems, p.167, for a summary of the key concepts in this section.
Have learners view the interactive animation, “A snowflake takes a ride through a glacier”:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/mtblanc/glacier.html
Cf. Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems, pp.125-6, for a description and diagram of snow under
pressure; and carry out the activity, “Observing the Sublimation of Ice,” p. 129.
Cf. http://www.geosc.psu.edu/~engelder/geosc20/lect14.html
Revised August 2009
16
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
25. Establish the connection between
glaciers, hydrologic cycles, and
rock cycles.
26. Describe, illustrate, and model
glacial movement, including the
processes of plastic flow,
crevices, and glacial surges.
Suggested Instructional Strategies
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27. Investigate, record and explain
the locations of prominent types
of glaciers in Canada to
demonstrate the classification
and morphology of glaciers; and
uses of glaciers by Aboriginal
peoples to acquire food.
28. Explain the two main processes
of glacial erosion: abrasion and
plucking/quarrying.
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29. Research and model the glacial
processes of transportation and
deposition of materials.
30. Investigate and describe
depositional landforms
(including eskers, moraines,
drumlins, and glacial erratic) and
erosional landforms (including
arêtes, cols and horns, cirques,
tarns, and fjords).
Science 140 Curriculum



Review the water cycle and rock cycle (ALBE Science 110- 130 Resource Manual, Section C, pp. C13 and
C26; Experiential Science 10, pp. 85-6).
Discuss how glaciers play a role in these two cycles (Experiential Science 10, “What is a glacier?” p. 124).
Model how alpine glaciers move (Experiential Science 10, “Simulating a Glacier,” Activity 7, p.134).
Web links: Use the search term “glacier animations” to find interactive websites. Have students view the
following website to see illustrations of plastic flow and crevices:
http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/0072402466/student_view0/chapter12/animations_and_movies.html#
This website illustrates an Antarctic glacial surge:
http://www.earthweek.com/2008/ew080229/ew080229a.html
Cf. Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems, Case Study, pp. 142-3; Activities 13-4, p.145.
Web links: Use the search term “glacier animations” to find interactive sites.
Website showing types of glaciers:
http://www.uky.edu/AS/Geology/howell/goodies/elearning/module13swf.swf
A map of glaciers in Canada can be found at:
http://atlas.nrcan.gc.ca/site/english/maps/freshwater/distribution/glaciers
Web links: Use the search term “glacier animations” to find interactive sites that show how glaciers develop,
move, and shape the land.
Animation of plucking:
http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/7639/land/pluckng.htm
Website:
http://www.geography-site.co.uk/pages/physical/glaciers/erosion_procs.html
Model what happens in a glacier by carrying out the activity “Racing Dirty Ice Cubes” (Experiential Science
10, p. 135).
Have students research the web to find descriptions and pictures of both depositional and erosional landforms,
and report their findings to the class.
Possible websites :
http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/10af.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glacial_landforms
http://www.geography-site.co.uk/pages/physical/glaciers/deposit.html
http://www.geography-site.co.uk/pages/physical/glaciers/erosion_procs.html
http://www.geography-site.co.uk/pages/physical/glaciers/erode.html
Revised August 2009
17
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
31. Explain the characteristics of
permafrost by investigating the
formation of permafrost,
characteristics of permafrost, and
the distribution of permafrost in
Canada and in the local area.
32. Explain the development process
of periglacial landforms, such as
pingos and thermokarst
topography.
CLIMATOLOGY
33. Explain how climate affects the
lives of people and other species,
and discuss potential
consequences of climate change.
Suggested Instructional Strategies





Explain what is meant by the word periglacial.
Have students search the net for information on pingos and thermokarst.
Possible sites for pingos:
Parks Canada: http://www.pc.gc.ca/docs/v-g/pingo/index_e.asp;
Wikepedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pingo#Types
Possible site for thermokarst topography:
http://arcticstudies.pbwiki.com/Thermokarst
Online test:
http://www.usd.edu/esci/exams/glaciers.html

Describe the response of humans and other species to extreme climate conditions; describe housing designs,
animal habitats, clothing, and fur in conditions of extreme cold, heat, dryness humidity, and/or wind.
Research the effects of global warming in the NWT (Experiential Science 10, Activity 7, p. 238).
Have learners list signs of global warming that they have observed.
Talk to elders about climate change in their lifetime.
Read and discuss “Traditional Ecological Knowledge,” Experiential Science 10, pp. 242-3; and “Climate
Change and Ecosystems,” p. 244.
Inuit observations of climate change (Sachs Harbour - online video clip):
http://www.teachersdomain.org/resource/ipy07.sci.ess.watcyc.inuitobserv/
See Climatology: A series of online videos and information on many climate related topics:
http://www.teachersdomain.org/collection/tdce/collsci.geos.topic.clim/
Discuss the Earth as a system with four interdependent spheres: the lithosphere (land), hydrosphere (water),
biosphere (the planet’s living organisms) and the atmosphere (Experiential Science 10, pp. 12-5).
Discuss interactions among the spheres (Experiential Science 10, pp. 14-5).
Name the five layers of the atmosphere: troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere and exosphere.
Construct a scale model of the atmosphere (Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems, Activity 1, p. 175).
Investigate the temperature range in each layer.
Discuss where the ozone layer is located, and the causes and consequences of a depleted ozone layer.
Revised August 2009
18
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
34. Describe the major
characteristics of the atmosphere,
hydrosphere and lithosphere, and
explain their relationship to the
world’s biosphere.




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
Science 140 Curriculum
Discuss what permafrost is and how it is formed.
Website:
http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/10ag.html
Cf. Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial System, “Researching Permafrost in Your Community,” Activity 16;
“Comparing Atmospheric and Ground Surface Temperatures,” Activity 17, pp. 154-5.
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies

35. Describe how thermal energy is
transferred through the
atmosphere (i.e. global wind
patterns, jet stream, Coriolis
effect, and weather systems) and
through the hydrosphere (ocean
currents and large bodies of
water).
Science 140 Curriculum


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
Websites:
 Atmosphere:
http://www.geography4kids.com/files/atm_intro.html
http://science.pppst.com/spheres.html
 Hydrosphere:
http://www.geography4kids.com/files/water_intro.html
http://ess.geology.ufl.edu/ess/Introduction/Hydrosphere.html
http://www.brandonsd.mb.ca/crocus/Staff/mckellar/sci20s/s2sdl/sdlweather/hydrosphere_and_atmosphere.
htm
 Lithosphere:
http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/earth/images/earths_crust_gif_image.html
http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/earth/interior/earths_crust.html
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/10460-the-lithosphere-and-asthenosphere-video.htm
 Ozone layer:
http://www.ec.gc.ca/ozone/DOCS/KIDZONE/EN/ozoneupthere.cfm
Use maps and charts to trace the path of air masses across North America (Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial
Systems, “Following Air Masses,” Activity 4, pp. 184-5; “Tracking the Jet Stream,” Activity 6, p. 192.
Use the Internet to observe an animation of the jet stream:
http://squall.sfsu.edu/crws/jetstream.html
Define the Coriolis effect and describe it using a diagram of the Earth. Discuss how the Coriolis effect creates
trade winds.
Useful websites:
 Website animation of the Coriolis effect:
http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/visualizations/es1904/es1904page01.cfm
 Ocean currents and global winds map:
http://www.classzone.com/books/earth_science/terc/content/visualizations/es2401/es2401page01.cfm?chap
ter_no=visualization
 Ocean currents animation:
http://trc.ucdavis.edu/biosci10v/bis10v/media/ch31/climate_currents_v2.html
 El Niňo and La Niňa websites:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/elnino/
http://www.atl.ec.gc.ca/weather/hurricane/hurricanes7.html
Revised August 2009
19
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies
36. Describe what a biome is, and
locate the biomes of the world on
a map.

37. Relate the characteristics of two
major biomes to net radiant
energy, climatic factors, and
topography (i.e. mountain ranges
and large bodies of water).
38. Describe and explain the
greenhouse effect and the role of
the various gases, including
methane, carbon dioxide, and
water vapour.
39. Investigate and evaluate
evidence that climate change
occurs naturally and could be
influenced by human activities.
Include the use of technology in
gathering and interpreting
current and historical data.

40. Identify how human actions
affect biomes and have the
potential to change climate.
Science 140 Curriculum


Have learners use the Internet to examine world biomes (Experiential Science 10, “Examining world biomes,”
Activity 1, p. 379).
There are many websites on biomes of the world. Some are listed below:
http://www.worldbiomes.com/biomes_map.html
http://www.blueplanetbiomes.org/world_biomes.htm
http://www.thewildclassroom.com/biomes/index.html
Choose two of the major biomes (e.g. grasslands, desert, tundra, taiga, deciduous forest, boreal forest, and rain
forest), and locate them on a globe. Observe the angle at which the sun’s light would reach each biome.
Investigate the climate of each chosen biome, and relate this to the topography of the biome. Climatic factors
include: temperature, moisture, sunlight, and wind.

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
Model the Greenhouse Effect (Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems, Activities 3-5, pp. 226-7).
Name the different greenhouse gases, and discuss how an increase in some gases is affected by human activity.
Website:
http://www.eia.doe.gov/bookshelf/brochures/greenhouse/Chapter1.htm

Elicit examples of human activities that affect climate: emission of greenhouse gases, draining of wetlands,
forest fires, deforestation, etc.
Investigate sources of greenhouse gases in your community (Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems,
Activity 9, p. 245).
Investigate how historical data is retrieved from:
 Ice core samples (Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems, p. 133 and pp. 253-71; “Simulating an Ice
Core,” p. 252).
 Ice cores website:
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/warnings/stories/
 Tree ring analysis (Experiential Science 10, p. 251).
 Have learners construct a tree core from data:
http://www.k12.wa.us/edtech/athena/curric/land/global/reconstr.html
Use the Internet to observe how technology is used in monitoring climate change, e.g. satellite imagery.
Find signs of climate change in your community (Experiential Science 10, Activity 8, p. 241).
Investigate the influence you and your community have on the environment (Experiential Science 10:
Terrestrial Systems, “What is your ecological footprint?” Activity 9, pp. 272-3).

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Revised August 2009
20
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies

Use the Internet to investigate carbon footprints and carbon credits:
http://science.howstuffworks.com/carbon-footprint.htm
http://www.naturecanada.ca/climate_change.asp
http://www.climatechangenorth.ca

Recall that the cell theory states that all living things are made up of one or more cells; the materials produced
by these cells are functional units of life; and all cells come from pre-existing cells.
Have learners use the Internet to research the development of cell theory.
Create a historical timeline of the development of cell theory: See activity at the website below:
http://www.usoe.k12.ut.us/CURR/SCIENCE/sciber00/7th/cells/sciber/timeline.htm
Discuss why viruses are not considered to be living things. See: http://www.beyondbooks.com/lif72/2c.asp
Have learners provide a definition and description of a prion. Possible site:
http://www.chemistry-school.info/prions.htm
Collect water samples from local water sources (e.g. ponds, lakes, and ocean). Prepare slides, and observe
under the microscope. Draw and label the microorganisms observed. Note: If you place a few strands from a
cotton ball on the slide it will slow down the microorganisms and make it easier to observe them.
Collect pond water, and add a selection of organic matter to it. Leave it to grow, and then observe.
Have learners grow cultures of microorganisms on agar in a petri dish.
Provide electron micrographs of microorganisms, and have the learners draw and label diagrams.
Observe prepared slides of microorganisms, such as amoebae and paramecia. Discuss how it is a living thing
and has all the characteristics of life. How does a paramecium meet all its basic needs?
Note: This is intended as an expansion of the learner’s existing cell knowledge from Science 130.
Watch the video The Cell (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Make the analogy between the single-celled organisms observed above and the cell.
State the cell theory: cells are the basic units of structure and function of all living things; all cells come from
other cells.
Discuss the following: organelles in a cell are like the parts of a machine. Different parts have different
functions in making a product, just as different organelles have different functions.
Have learners prepare a group research project on the structure and function of a plant or animal cell. Have
them research the cell, describe the function and processes of the cell, and prepare a presentation for the class.
Create three-dimensional models of plant and animal cells. Stress to learners that cells are three-dimensional
and not flat.
LIFE SCIENCE
CELLS
41. Trace the development of cell
theory. Recognize that there are
some sub-cellular particles, such
as viruses and prions, which
have some characteristics of
living cells.




42. Examine microorganisms and
describe how microorganisms
meet their basic needs, including
obtaining food, water, and air.

43. Illustrate and explain that the
cell is a living system that
exhibits all of the characteristics
of life.
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Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
21
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
44. Identify the structure and
describe in general terms the
function of: the cell membrane,
nucleus, lysosome, vacuole,
mitochondrion, endoplasmic
reticulum, Golgi apparatus,
ribosome, chloroplast, and cell
wall, where present, in plant and
animal cells.
45. Describe the role of the cell
membrane in maintaining
equilibrium while exchanging
matter (i.e., active and passive
transport).
Suggested Instructional Strategies

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

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

46. Use models to explain and
visualize diffusion, osmosis,
endocytosis, exocytosis, and the
role of the cell membrane in
these processes.
Science 140 Curriculum




Compare and contrast the characteristics, organelles, and processes in plant and animal cells.
Compare the organelles in a cell with a) the organs in the body, b) a factory or mine, and c) a city.
Ct. ALBE Science 110-130 Resource Manual, Section 5, pp. 24-34 for basic information and activities on the
functions of the organelles; science.connect1, pp. 164-77.
Website: Table of organelles and their functions:
http://www.usoe.k12.ut.us/curr/science/sciber00/7th/cells/sciber/orgtable.htm
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell_main.html
Watch online videos of organelles at:
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/6090-the-cell-the-nucleus-video.htm
http://people.eku.edu/ritchisong/RITCHISO/301notes1.htm
Label diagrams.
Match lists of cell organelles and functions.
Examine electron micrographs of organelles, and explain their function.
List the different systems in the human body and match each system with a cell organelle in terms of its
function, e.g. skin and cell membrane; digestive system and mitochondria; and brain and nucleus.
Note: This is an introduction only and is intended as a brief overview to help learners develop an understanding
of the processes.
Watch the video: The Flow of Matter in the Living World: Photosynthesis and Cellular Respiration (Science
140 Resource Kit).
Have learners research diagrams of a cell membrane. Some websites:
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell_membrane.html
http://library.thinkquest.org/C004535/cell_membranes.html
Animation:
http://www.coolschool.ca/lor/BI12/unit4/U04L03.htm
Describe active and passive transport:
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell2_passivetran.html
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell2_activetran.html
Note: This is an introduction only and is intended as a brief overview to help learners develop an understanding
of the processes.
Demonstrate diffusion: Peel an orange in one corner of the room and have learners signal when they can smell
the orange.
Place a drop of food colouring in a beaker of water. Observe what happens. Describe diffusion as the random
movement of molecules from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration.
Revised August 2009
22
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies






47. Explain structural and functional
relationships between and among
cells, tissues, organs, and
systems in the human body.

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
Science 140 Curriculum
Diffusion Demo: Fill a large container with water. Using a divider (thick cardboard is fine), divide the water in
half. Make sure the divider is fitted tightly in the container so that water from one side of the container cannot
mix with water from the other side. Pour food colouring into water contained in one side of the container. Mix
the solution so that it has a uniform colour. This side of the container has a high concentration of food
colouring. The other side of the container has a zero concentration of food colouring. Remove the divider and
watch the food colouring move from the side of a high concentration to the side with zero concentration.
Conduct an activity to observe osmosis in an egg (Glencoe Life Science, p. 77).
Osmosis demo, Water Sucking Roots:
http://educ.queensu.ca/%7Escience/main/concept/is/i01/I01LARG2.html:
Have learners use the Internet to observe models of diffusion, osmosis, endocytosis, and exocytosis. Websites:
http://www.biologycorner.com/bio1/diffusion.html#
Endocytosis and exocytosis animations:
http://www.coolschool.ca/lor/BI12/unit4/U04L05.htm
http://www.maxanim.com/physiology/Endocytosis%20and%20Exocytosis/Endocytosis%20and%20Exocytosis.
htm
Have learners in the class simulate a cell. Form a circle by holding hands and have learners break off into
smaller circles to demonstrate organelle formation and endocytosis. Show how the plasma membrane allows
substances such as water, waste, nutrients, and gases to move in and out of the cell by passing single learners or
small groups of learners through “the membrane.” Simulate other cellular processes, such as exocytosis,
diffusion, and osmosis.
Have learners brainstorm the different types of cells in the body (e.g. nerve, muscle, blood, epithelial). Display
a diagram of the different types of cells. How are the cells different? Discuss how the shapes of cells are
specialized based on the function they have in the body. Look at prepared slides of different body cell types.
Have learners discuss the importance of cellular respiration. Ask the following questions: What do cells need
to survive and thrive? Why do they breathe? How are toxins eliminated?
Have learners view prepared slides of different tissues – muscle, epithelial, nervous, and connective tissues.
Show the learner the distinctive characteristics of each of the tissues, and discuss the function of each tissue.
Discuss the statement: cells are the building blocks of life. Show the organization of cells:
ORGANELLES  CELLS  TISSUES  ORGANS  SYSTEMS.
Compare this to: STUDENT  FRIENDS  CLASS  SCHOOL  COMMUNITY.
Watch video at:
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/6007-understanding-cells-tissues-and-organs-video.htm
Do a crossword puzzle to review knowledge of human body cells:
www.cdli.ca/CITE/bw_cells.pdf
Revised August 2009
23
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
CELL DIVISION AND
REPRODUCTION
48. Recognize that the nucleus of a
cell contains genetic information
(DNA and RNA) and determines
cellular processes.
Suggested Instructional Strategies

Websites:
http://people.eku.edu/ritchisong/RITCHISO/301notes1.htm
http://www.biology4kids.c/files/cell2_main.html



Note: This is an introduction to DNA; the learners are not expected to know the names of the base pairs.
Cf. ALBE Science 110-130 Resource Manual, Section D, pp. 60-2, for background on DNA.
Have learners make a model of DNA by having pairs of learners hold hands and the form a line representing a
strand of DNA.
Compare and contrast DNA and RNA. Stress that DNA is a type of nucleic acid in the cell. Discuss the
analogy that DNA is like the foreman that has the plans for constructing a building and the RNA is the
construction worker.
Make a model of DNA by wrapping two thin strips of paper (connect the pieces together side-by-side with clear
tape) and then wrapping the strips around a pencil (Glencoe Life Science, p. 110).
Note: This is intended as a brief overview of cell reproduction.
Mitosis:
Demo Activities:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/biol/b12/B12DEML2.htm
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/biol/b12/B12TPJC1.htm
Have learners observe and record their observations of bean seeds growing. Soak beans in water overnight.
Place the soaked bean seeds in a plastic bag with a moist paper towel and seal it. Make observations over a
period of time, and describe what is happening. Explain that the growth observed is due to mitosis.
Have learners observe prepared slides of onion root tips and white fish eggs. Explain the difference between
mitosis in plant and animal cells. Have learners draw and label what they observe.
Observe cell division animation:
http://www.cellsalive.com/mitosis.htm
Meiosis:
Note: This is a general introduction to cell division, allowing learners to have a better understanding of some of
the issues that all members of society are being exposed to, e.g. cloning and genetic links to diseases, such as
cancer. The focus is on the application of this knowledge to contemporary issues rather than an academic focus
on process.


49. Describe the basic process of cell
division, including what happens
to the cell membrane and the
contents of the nucleus (mitosis
– growth, and meiosis –
reproduction).



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



Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
24
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies



50. Define sexual and asexual
reproduction in animals and
plants.







51. Compare sexual and asexual
reproduction in terms of
advantages and disadvantages.




PLANTS
52. Distinguish between vascular
and non-vascular plants.




Science 140 Curriculum
Have learners compare and contrast mitosis and meiosis. Meiosis involves two divisions while mitosis involves
only one division. Meiosis results in four new cells with half the number of chromosomes as the parent and
produces gametes (sex cells). Mitosis produces two new cells with the same number of chromosomes as the
parent and produces somatic (body) cells.
Observe cell division (mitosis/meiosis):
http://www.johnkyrk.com/mitosis.html
Compare mitosis and meiosis:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/biol/b12/B12LAM10.htm
Watch the video: Mitosis and Meiosis: How Cells Divide (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Refer to Cell Division Charts: Mitosis, Meiosis (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Have learners investigate examples of asexual reproduction – budding, regeneration, binary fission, spores,
cloning, and runners in plants.
Demo: Asexual reproduction in plants:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/biol/b12/B12DEMC1.htm
Have learners observe a prepared slide of a Hydra (Science 140 Resource Kit) as an example of an asexually
reproducing organism, and have learners draw what they see.
Have learners make a compare and contrast chart, outlining the different types of asexual reproduction.
Do the “Fun Bug Activity”:
http://www.usoe.k12.ut.us/CURR/SCIENCE/sciber00/7th/genetics/sciber/fnbgacti.htm
Investigate northern examples of layering. Read “Did You Know?” (Experiential Science 10, p. 387).
Compare and contrast sexual and asexual reproduction.
See website for advantages and disadvantages:
http://library.thinkquest.org/22016/contribute/asex_sex.htm
Have learners make a chart listing the advantages and disadvantages of each type of reproduction.
Compare and contrast characteristics of vascular and non-vascular plants.
Provide models, specimens, and prepared slides for learners to examine. Encourage learners to examine them
carefully and describe interesting observations/features they discover. Have learners draw and label diagrams
of the specimens.
Go on a field trip and collect samples of vascular and non-vascular plants in the local area.
Watch the video Eyewitness Plant (Science 140 Resource Kit).
Revised August 2009
25
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies

53. Describe the structures of plant
parts and their functions, and
explain and investigate the
transport system in plants.





54. Explain and investigate the gas
exchange system in plants.


55. Explain and observe
phototropism and geotropism in
plants.



Science 140 Curriculum
Websites:
 Plants and their structure:
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookPLANTANAT.html
 Vascular and nonvascular plants:
http://www.saskschools.ca/curr_content/biology20/unit3/unit3_mod6_les1.htm
 Vascular vegetable activity:
http://www.fi.edu/tfi/units/life/classify/clasact1.html
Have learners place a celery stalk with leaves in a glass of water and add red food colouring. Have the learners
observe the celery stalk and note the food colouring moving up the stalk. Discuss why this is happening. Cut
the stalk and observe the vascular tubes in the stalk. (Science is…p. 249).
Define turgor pressure as outward pressure on the cell membrane and the cell wall caused by vacuoles and
cytoplasm swollen with water due to osmosis. An analogy is an inner tube (cell membrane) filled with air
(water) and tire (cell wall).
Investigate properties of water: surface tension, cohesion, adhesion, and capillary action:
http://www.uni.edu/~iowawet/H2OProperties.html
Observe interactive animations of osmosis, diffusion, and active transport.
Websites:
 Observe animation of xylem and phloem transport at:
http://highered.mcgraw-hill.com/sites/9834092339/student_view0/chapter38/animation__phloem_loading.html
 Discuss the process of transpiration:
http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/mtr/hyd/trsp.rxml
http://ga.water.usgs.gov/edu/watercycletranspiration.html
 Discuss the role of root hairs:
http://www.hcs.ohio-state.edu/mgonline/botany/pla01/04pla01.htm
Investigate stomata in lettuce leaves, using a microscope (Glencoe Life Science , p. 316).
Use the Internet to watch “Gas Exchange in Plants”:
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/14762-simply-science-gas-exchange-in-plants-video.htm
Conduct the “Root Flip” activity with bean seeds to observe geotropism (Science is… p. 407).
To observe phototropism, grow several bean seeds. Place them a distance from a window or light source.
Observe how the plant grows. (They will lean toward the source of light.) Turn the plants around so that they
are leaning away frorn the light. Observe the plants for the next few days to see them straighten up and turn
towards the light once again.
Conduct the “Plant Maze” activity (Science is… p. 410).
Revised August 2009
26
August 2009
ABE Science 140
At the end of the course the learner
will be able to:
Learning Outcomes
Suggested Instructional Strategies



56. Identify the parts of a flowering
plant.




ECOLOGY
57. Understand how technology is
used to investigate and monitor
populations and communities by
gathering and interpreting data
from GIS /satellite sources.
58. Identify and monitor populations
or communities, and sample
representative plants and
animals.
Science 140 Curriculum

Experiment to demonstrate phototropism:
Start a plant in a box lined with black walls. Allow only one small hole for a light source. Put dividers in
between the plant and light source for more of a challenge. Pole bean seeds are good to use for plants. Check on
the plant daily, giving it water, and noting what happens to the plant. Keep a journal to document changes.
Experiment to demonstrate geotropism:
Start bean seeds in a plastic bag with wet paper towels. Tape bags to the window for a light source. To test for
adaptation to gravity, place the bean seeds at different angles. If geotropism occurs, the roots will all grow
down, and the stems will all grow up.
Another way to check geotropism is to take a plant growing in a pot and tilt the pot on its side. Wait to see if
the stem grows up, away from gravity.
Draw and label a diagram of the parts of a plant.
Label parts of a flower (Science is… p. 247).
Flowering plant website:
http://www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/biobk/BioBookflowers.html
Have students use the Internet to observe diagrams of plants. An interactive website to label parts of a flower:
http://www.botany.uwc.ac.za/ecotree/flowers/flowerparts.htm#top

Research caribou monitoring in the NWT. See:
http://www.nwtwildlife.com/NWTwildlife/caribou/satcollars.htm
Observe how satellites are used to monitor populations. Watch the animation of collared caribou at:
http://www.nwtwildlife.com/NWTwildlife/caribou/animation.htm



Define the words population, community, and sampling.
Analyze “Dall’s Sheep Data” (Experiential Science 10, Activity 9, p. 345).
Simulate the capture/recapture technique of sampling (Experiential Science 10, Activity 12, p. 350).
Revised August 2009
27
ALBE Science 140
Suggested Classroom Assessment Strategies
The following are some suggested assessment strategies for Science 140:





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




Make a poster of all the careers that are related to one of the branches of science (chemistry, physics, earth science, or life science).
Give learners a list of physical and chemical properties of an unknown solution, and have them determine whether it is an acid or a base.
Make a display, and write a report about common household acids and bases, how they are used, and cautions to be taken.
Have learners label the parts of a cell on a model or electron micrograph.
Make flash cards of the phases of mitosis and meiosis, and have the learners arrange them in the correct order.
Have learners create a model of DNA and label it.
Have the learners keep a journal of the distance traveled vs. time for a snowmobile or car trip. Ask them analyze the data and construct a distance vs. time
graph and a velocity vs. time graph.
Use one-minute papers to monitor learning (Appendix B: Classroom Assessment Techniques, ABE Science 140 Curriculum 2001).
Have learners design a human-powered machine, and describe the simple machines used in the design.
Provide learners with the necessary equipment, and have them build a parallel and a serial circuit.
See other ideas under “Suggested Teaching Strategies.”
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
28
ALBE Science 140
Assessment Checklists
The Assessment Checklist lists the learning outcomes for Science 140. Following it are five columns where the instructor and/or the learner can record the level
of mastery achieved and how learning was demonstrated. This is a useful tool for both the instructor and the learner as it provides a means of tracking progress
and setting goals. Instructors and learners could have a regular conference to discuss progress and any difficulties. Wherever possible, evidence of learning
should be collected, likely in the portfolios; but, where this is not possible, the instructor’s signature will suffice.
The following is a sample of how the checklist can be filled out:
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of
Learning
CHEMISTRY
2.
3.
Name and describe three family
groups of elements from the
periodic table.

Distinguish between ionic and
molecular bonds.
Instructor’s signature.
Not every outcome will have a
demonstration of learning, but mastery will
be observed by the instructor. Therefore, the
instructor’s signature is all that is required.
Participated in a lab to observe the affect of
temperature.

Self-Evaluations
Self-evaluations can be very useful to both the learners and the instructors. Have learners evaluate the following:
 Behaviour in groups (cf. Appendix B: Assessment Tools, “Group Activity Self-Rating Scales and Self-Rating Scale,” pp. 11-2)
 Oral presentations
 Attitudes
 Personal performance
Interviews
Conduct regular interviews with learners to assess their progress (cf. Appendix B: Assessment Tools, “Interview Questions,” p. 7).
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
29
ALBE Science 140
Informal Observation and Questioning
Make direct observations of the learners, small groups or the class. Use checklists to record observations of learners or group behaviours:
 “Science Inquiry Activity Rating Scale” (Appendix B: Assessment Tools, p. 6)
 “Participation in Classroom Oral Activities” (Appendix B: Assessment Tools, p. 8)
Science Product Evaluation
This evaluation focuses on the evaluation of learner-produced products in “doing science.” The instructor, to determine learner achievement, can evaluate these
products:
 Lab reports
 Assignments
 Research projects and essays
 Models or diagrams
 Quizzes, tests and final exams
Science Portfolios
The science portfolio contains a collection of products produced by the learners that can track the successes of learners over the duration of the course, as well as
provide a base for formative evaluation. Portfolios have been used for some time in English, art, and other subjects, but their use in science courses is relatively
new. What do you put into a science portfolio?









Written reports of science inquiry and problem-solving
Descriptions and diagrams of science inquiry and problem solving
Models created by the learner
Individual and group research reports and projects
Video, audio, computer-generated, and photographic examples of the learner’s work
Learner’s self-report about outcomes learned and/or yet to be learned
Learner’s description about how they feel about science
Work chosen by the learner
Excerpts from the learner’s science journal or learning log
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
30
ALBE Science 140
ALBE Science 140 Assessment Checklist
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of Learning
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY,
SOCIETY AND THE
ENVIRONMENT
1.
Investigate careers related to the
field of science, and discuss their
relevance to society
CHEMISTRY
ATOMS AND BONDING
2. Name and describe three family
groups of elements from the
periodic table.
3. Distinguish between ionic and
molecular bonds.
4. Name and write formulas for
some common ionic and
molecular compounds, using the
periodic table and a list of ions.
5. Represent chemical formulas,
chemical reactions, and the
conservation of mass, using
molecular models and balanced
symbolic equations.
ACIDS AND BASES
6. Classify substances as acids,
bases, or salts based on their
characteristics, names, and
formulas.
7. Describe how neutralization
involves tempering the effects of
an acid with a base or vice versa,
using pH indicators and titrations.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
31
ALBE Science 140
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of Learning
CHEMICAL REACTIONS
8. Identify the categories of
chemical reactions: formation
(synthesis), decomposition,
hydrocarbon combustion, and ion
exchange (both single and double
replacement).
9. Illustrate how factors such as
catalysts, heat, concentration,
light, and surface area can effect
chemical reactions.
10. Illustrate how the above factors
mediate all chemical reactions
within the living cell, including
cellular respiration and
photosynthesis.
PHYSICS
ENERGY AND MOTION
11. Define, compare, and contrast
scalar and vector quantities.
12. Describe quantitatively the
relationship among displacement,
time, and velocity, and contrast
with distance and speed.
13. Analyze graphically and
mathematically the relationship
among displacement, time, and
velocity.
14. Distinguish between
instantaneous and average
velocity.
15. Describe quantitatively the
relationships among position,
velocity, acceleration, and time.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
32
ALBE Science 140
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of Learning
SIMPLE MACHINES
16. Describe quantitatively the
mechanical advantage and
efficiency of a simple machine
using appropriate formulas.
17. Design a simple machine to
efficiently accomplish a given
task.
ELECTRICITY
18. Compare characteristics of series
and parallel circuits, and describe
quantitatively the relationship
between current, resistance, and
voltage.
19. Demonstrate how electricity in
circuits can produce light, heat,
sound, motion, and magnetic
effects.
20. Describe the relationship between
electricity and magnetism when
using an electromagnet, and
observe how electromagnetism is
used in generators.
21. Identify various methods by
which electricity can be
generated.
EARTH SCIENCE
GLACIOLOGY
22. Define the term “glacier.”
23. Explain and illustrate the
processes of glacial formation,
including Aboriginal and
historical accounting of
glaciations.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
33
ALBE Science 140
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of Learning
24. Define the transformation from
snow to glacial ice, and
investigate the mechanical
properties of ice.
25. Establish the connection between
glaciers, hydrologic cycles, and
rock cycles.
26. Describe, illustrate, and model
glacial movement, including the
processes of plastic flow,
crevices, and glacial surges.
27. Investigate, record and explain the
locations of prominent types of
glaciers in Canada to demonstrate
the classification and morphology
of glaciers; and uses of glaciers by
Aboriginal peoples to acquire
food.
28. Explain the two main processes of
glacial erosion: abrasion and
plucking/quarrying.
29. Research and model the glacial
processes of transportation and
deposition of materials.
30. Investigate and describe
depositional landforms (including
eskers, moraines, drumlins, and
glacial erratic) and erosional
landforms (including arêtes, cols
and horns, cirques, tarns, and
fjords).
31. Explain the characteristics of
permafrost by investigating the
formation of permafrost,
characteristics of permafrost, and
the distribution of permafrost in
Canada and in the local area.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
34
ALBE Science 140
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of Learning
32. Explain the development process
of periglacial landforms, such as
pingos and thermokarst
topography.
CLIMATOLOGY
33. Explain how climate affects the
lives of people and other species,
and discuss potential
consequences of climate change.
34. Describe the major characteristics
of the atmosphere, hydrosphere
and lithosphere, and explain their
relationship to the world’s
biosphere.
35. Describe how thermal energy is
transferred through the
atmosphere (i.e. global wind
patterns, jet stream, Coriolis
effect, and weather systems) and
through the hydrosphere (ocean
currents and large bodies of
water).
36. Describe what a biome is, and
locate the biomes of the world on
a map.
37. Relate the characteristics of two
major biomes to net radiant
energy, climatic factors, and
topography (i.e. mountain ranges
and large bodies of water).
38. Describe and explain the
greenhouse effect and the role of
the various gases, including
methane, carbon dioxide, and
water vapour.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
35
ALBE Science 140
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of Learning
39. Investigate and evaluate evidence
that climate change occurs
naturally and could be influenced
by human activities. Include the
use of technology in gathering and
interpreting current and historical
data.
40. Identify how human actions affect
biomes and have the potential to
change climate.
LIFE SCIENCE
CELLS
41. Trace the development of cell
theory. Recognize that there are
some sub-cellular particles, such
as viruses and prions, which have
some characteristics of living
cells.
42. Examine microorganisms and
describe how microorganisms
meet their basic needs, including
obtaining food, water, and air.
43. Illustrate and explain that the cell
is a living system that exhibits all
of the characteristics of life.
44. Identify the structure and describe
in general terms the function of:
the cell membrane, nucleus,
lysosome, vacuole,
mitochondrion, endoplasmic
reticulum, Golgi apparatus,
ribosome, chloroplast, and cell
wall, where present, in plant and
animal cells.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
36
ALBE Science 140
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of Learning
45. Describe the role of the cell
membrane in maintaining
equilibrium while exchanging
matter (i.e., active and passive
transport).
46. Use models to explain and
visualize diffusion, osmosis,
endocytosis, exocytosis, and the
role of the cell membrane in these
processes.
47. Explain structural and functional
relationships between and among
cells, tissues, organs, and systems
in the human body.
CELL DIVISION AND
REPRODUCTION
48. Recognize that the nucleus of a
cell contains genetic information
(DNA and RNA) and determines
cellular processes.
49. Describe the basic process of cell
division, including what happens
to the cell membrane and the
contents of the nucleus (mitosis –
growth, and meiosis –
reproduction).
50. Define sexual and asexual
reproduction in animals and
plants.
51. Compare sexual and asexual
reproduction in terms of
advantages and disadvantages.
PLANTS
52. Distinguish between vascular and
non-vascular plants.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
37
ALBE Science 140
Not
Attempted
Beginning
Improving
Mastery
Demonstration of Learning
53. Describe the structures of plant
parts and their functions, and
explain and investigate the
transport system in plants.
54. Explain and investigate the gas
exchange system in plants.
55. Explain and observe phototropism
and geotropism in plants.
56. Identify the parts of a flowering
plant.
ECOLOGY
57. Understand how technology is
used to investigate and monitor
populations and communities by
gathering and interpreting data
from GIS /satellite sources.
58. Identify and monitor populations
or communities, and sample
representative plants and animals.
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
38
ALBE Science 140
ALBE Science 140 Vocabulary List




Have learners demonstrate an understanding of each of the items in this vocabulary list using ANY of the following strategies: orally, drawing or using
pictures, using real objects or demonstrations, or written explanations. Stress the importance of proper pronunciation.
Work with your ABE English instructor to integrate these words into the English vocabulary study.
Have learners keep a science dictionary with new science words and definitions.
NOTE: Learners who have taken earlier levels of science should be familiar with some of these words.
CHEMISTRY
Atoms and Bonding
alkali metals
atom
atomic mass
atomic number
atomic structure
conductivity
electron
families/groups
halogens
ion
ionic bonds
Law of Conservation of Mass
molecular bonds
molecule
neutron
nobel gases
non-metals
nucleus
periodic table
periods/series
proton
reactivity
Acids and Bases
acids
bases
neutralization
salts
titration
Science 140 Curriculum
Chemical Reactions
catalysts
cellular respiration
decomposition
double replacement
ion exchange
photosynthesis
single replacement
synthesis
mechanical advantage
pulley
resistance force
screw
simple machine
spring balance
wedge
wheel and axle
work
PHYSICS
Energy and Motion
acceleration
average velocity
displacement
distance
instantaneous velocity
scalar quantity
speed
vector quantity
velocity
Electricity
alternating current (ac)
circuits
conductor
current
current electricity
direct current (dc)
dry cell
electric field
electric motor
electrical power
electromagnet
electroscope
generator
insulator
kilowatt-hour
magnetism
Ohm’s Law
parallel circuit
potential difference
resistance
Simple Machines
efficiency
effort force
fulcrum
ideal machine
inclined plane
lever
load
machine
series circuit
static electricity
voltage
voltmeter
wet cell
EARTH SCIENCE
Glaciology
abrasion
arêtes
cirques
cols and horns
crevice
esker
fjords
glacial erratic
glacial surge
glacier
moraine
permafrost
pingo
plastic flow
plucking/quarrying
tarns
thermokarst topography
Climatology
atmosphere
biome
biosphere
Coriolis effect
Revised August 2009
39
ALBE Science 140
greenhouse effect
hydrosphere
jet stream
lithosphere
LIFE SCIENCE
Cells
cell membrane
cell theory
cell wall
chloroplasts
chromatin
chromosomes
cytoplasm
diffusion
electron microscope
endocytosis
endoplasmic reticulum
exocytosis
Golgi body
Science 140 Curriculum
lysosome
metabolism
mitochondria
nucleus
organ
organelle
osmosis
prion
respiration
system
tissue
virus
Cell Division and Reproduction
asexual reproduction
cell cycle
cell division
chromosomes
DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)
egg
fertilization
gene
meiosis
mitosis
mutation
reproduction
RNA (ribonucleic acid)
sexual reproduction
sperm
zygote
Plants
adhesion
angiosperm
cambium
capillary action
cohesion
geotropism
guard cell
non-vascular
ovary
ovule
phloem
phototropism
pistil
pollen grain
pollination
root hairs
stamen
stomata
surface tension
transpiration
vascular
xylem
Ecology
community
population
Revised August 2009
40
ALBE Science 140
ALBE Science 140 Resources
Recommended Resources:
ALBE Science 110-130 Resource Kit. Yellowknife NT: Government of the Northwest Territories.
ALBE Science 140 Resource Kit. Yellowknife NT: Government of the Northwest Territories.
ALBE Science 110-130 Resource Manual. (CD.) Yellowknife NT: Government of the Northwest Territories, 2008.
Bosack, S., Science Is… (2nd Ed.) Markham ON: Scholastics Canada, 2000.
ISBN 0-590-74070-9
Campbell, K., MacLulich, C., et al., Experiential Science 10: Terrestrial Systems. Yellowknife, NT: Government of the Northwest Territories, 2008.
(Note: This text is provided in the Science 140 Resource Kit.)
Colbourne, H., Fehres, C. et al., science .connect2. (Student Text.) Whitby, ON: McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 2003.
ISBN 0-07-089094-3
Colbourne, H., Fernandez, E. et al., science .connect1. (Student Text.) Whitby, ON: McGraw-Hill Ryerson, 2002.
ISBN 0-07-089092-7
Daniel, L., Ortleb, E., Biggs, A. et al., Glencoe Life Science. Westerville, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1997.
ISBN0-02-827737-6
Distasio, J., Chemistry: 100 Reproducible Activities. School Specialty Children's Publishing, 1999.
The activities in this workbook offer practical practice in every area of chemistry that can easily be tailored to fit any level of chemistry competency.
ISBN-10: 1568221878.
Dyke, L., Mackay, R., Geological Features of the MacKenzie Delta Region NWT. (Booklet.) Yellowknife, NT: Science Institute of the NWT.
Feather, R., Snyder, S. et al., Glencoe Earth Science. Westerville, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1997.
ISBN0-02-827808-9
McLaughlan, C.,Thompson, M., et al., Glencoe Physical Science. Westerville, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1997.
ISBN0-02-827879-8
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
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ALBE Science 140
Web Resources
General
The webpage below contains the complete list of the major concepts involved in teaching Science in the Secondary Classroom. The concepts are divided into
Biology, Chemistry, Physics, General Science, and Intermediate Science. Each major concept is listed and linked to its list of Concept Development, Demos,
Tips, and Labs/Activities.
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/mainconcept.htm
Chemistry
Atoms
Atomic Models – online video:
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/5787-niels-bohrs-atomic-model-video.htm
Bonding – online video:
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/18362-elements-of-chemistry-covalent-bonds-video.htm
Chemical Reactions
Demo on neutralization:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/C02DESU4.html
Background information for types of chemical reactions:
http://misterguch.brinkster.net/6typesofchemicalrxn.html
http://www.files.chem.vt.edu/RVGS/ACT/notes/Types_of_Equations.html
Notes on displacement reactions:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/science/chemistry/m_m_chem_props_6.shtml
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/361.html
Experiments – chemical reactions:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/c02lad1.htm
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/c02lad6.htm
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/C02LAD3.HTM
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ALBE Science 140
Demo:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c02/C02DED2.HTM
Factors Affecting Chemical Reactions:
Background information:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c04/C04CDVR3.htm
Experiments:
http://www.cdli.ca/courses/chem3202/unit01_org01_ilo06/c3_lab01.pdf
Demo:
http://educ.queensu.ca/~science/main/concept/chem/c04/c04dek14.html
Physics
Velocity vs. time graphs tutorial:
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/Class/1DKin/U1L4a.html
Velocity and Acceleration Animation:
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/GBSSCI/PHYS/mmedia/index.html#kinema
Speed and acceleration- animation:
http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/insti/lesson1.html
Earth Science
Cf. Fundamentals of Physical Geography, “The Lithosphere.” This book chapter includes many of the glaciations topics, as well as Earth Science topics from
120 and 130 levels.
http://www.physicalgeography.net/fundamentals/chapter10.html
Types of glaciers:
http://www.northstar.k12.ak.us/schools/joy/denali/OConnor/types.html
Glaciers and glaciation, online test:
http://www.usd.edu/esci/exams/glaciers.html
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
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ALBE Science 140
Glaciers and glaciation, vocabulary definitions:
http://sparkcharts.sparknotes.com/gensci/geology_earthsci/section10.php
Glaciers and glaciations:
http://www.geosc.psu.edu/~engelder/geosc20/lect14.html
http://www.geography-site.co.uk/pages/physical.html (Go to Glaciers and Glaciology.)
Images of glaciers:
http://images.google.ca/images?hl=en&q=glaciers%20and%20glaciation&safe=active&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi
Google Earth can be used to soar over real glaciers:
http://earth.google.com/
EarthCam has some alpine glacier locations:
http://www.earthcam.com/
Life Science
Cells
A comprehensive overview of cells, cellular organelles and cell processes, including cellular division and reproduction:
http://library.thinkquest.org/C004535/introduction.htm
Online videos of cellular organelles:
http://videos.howstuffworks.com/hsw/6090-the-cell-the-nucleus-video.htm
Cell structure and function:
http://people.eku.edu/ritchisong/RITCHISO/301notes1.htm
http://www.biology4kids.com/files/cell_membrane.html
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
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ALBE Science 140
ABE Science 140 Equipment List
The 2008 Science Kits were delivered to the Community Learning Centres in 2008. They contained the following equipment:
Science Kits – 2008
Aquarium
Ball and Ring Apparatus
Chemicals:
Agar
Benedict Solution
Bromothymol Blue Solution
Buiret Solution
Calcium Chloride
Hydrochloric Acid
Iodine Solution
Pepsin Powder
Phenol Red Solution
Phenolphthalein Solution
Potassium Nitrate
Sodium Hydroxide
Starch (potato)
Universal Indicator Solution
Zinc (granular 20 mesh)
Compound Bar
Density Block Set
Electricity Kit
Eye Goggles
Eyewash Station
Filter Paper
Funnels
Science 140 Curriculum
Glassware:
Erlenmeyer Flasks, 500 ml
Glass Lift Pump
Graduated Cylinders, 100 ml
Pyrex Beakers, 250 ml
Pyrex Beakers, 600 ml
Pyrex Test Tubes, 9 ml
Globe
Heat Conductometer
Hooked Weights
Hot Plate
Iron Fillings
Litmus Blue Paper
Magnet
Magnifying Glass
Marbles
Microscope
Microscope Cover Glass
Microscope Slides
Prepared Microscope Slides
Molecule Kit
Paraffin Candles
Petri Dishes
Potting Soil
Prism
Pulley Cord, 9 m
Pulley Wheel, Double Sheave
Pulley Wheel, Quadruple Sheave
Pulley Wheel, Single Sheave
Pulley Wheel, Triple Sheave
Rigid Plastic Tubing
Rock and Mineral Test Kit
Rock Kit
Rubber Gloves
Rubber Stoppers
Ruler, 12 inches
Seeds, Bean Seeds
Seeds, Coleus Seeds
Simple Machines Kit
Solar Power Kit
Spring Scale, 1 kg
Spring Scale, 250 g
Spring Scale, 5 kg
Stopwatch
Support Ring, 5 inches
Support Ring With Clamp, 14 cm
Support Ring With Clamp, 9 cm
Support Stand, Rectangular
Support Stand With Rod
Test Tube Brush
Test Tube Clamps
Test Tube Rack
The Universe, Poster
Thermometers
Triple-beam Balance
Types of Rocks Chart
Vernier Calipers
Videos:
Eyewitness Life
Eyewitness Planets
Eyewitness Rock and Mineral
Eyewitness Volcano
Eyewitness Weather
Miracle of Life
The Invisible World
The Universe
Voltmeter 0-5
Weather Centre Set
Wire Gauze
Revised August 2009
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ALBE Science 140
ABE Science 140 Equipment List
The 2009 Science 140 Resource Kits were delivered to the Community Learning Centres in 2009. They contained the following equipment:
Science 140 Resource Kits – 2009
Atomic Mobiles Activity
Cell Division Chart: Meiosis
Cell Division Chart: Mitosis
Chemical Formulas I Lab Activity
Dialysis Tubing Holder (Pkg of 6)
Dialysis Tubing
FUN-damental Chemical Reactions Kit
Investigating Electricity Kit
Model, AC/DC Generator
Modeling with DNA Jewelry Kit
Multicolor Periodic Table of the Elements
Nystrom World Map
Patriotic Colors Chemistry Activity
Science 140 Curriculum
Physical Properties of Minerals Collection
Prepared Slide, Hydra
Videos:
Atomic Structure and the Periodic Table
Chemical Bonding
Glaciers and Glaciation
Mitosis & Meiosis: How Cells Divide
Plant (Eyewitness Series)
Roller Coaster Physics
The Cell
The Flow of Matter: Photosynthesis and Cell Respiration
WARD’S Halides: Family Characteristics Lab Activity
World Physical Map
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ALBE Science 140
Recommended Periodicals
In order to keep current on the sciences, instructors are encouraged to subscribe to various magazines.
Note: If you are unable to subscribe, you may want to ask a librarian to send the table of contents for various science magazines so you can keep up to date on the
new science issues and articles.
Discover
90 Fifth Avenue
11th Floor
New York, NY 10011
Tel: 1-800-829-9132
Science Magazine
Subscription Department
AAAS
P.O. Box 96178
Washington, DC 20090-6178
Tel: 1-866-434-2227
National Geographic
Box 63001
Tampa, FL 33663-3001
Tel: 1-800-647-5463
YES Mag
Peter Piper Publishing Inc.
501-3960 Quadra St.
Victoria, BC V8X 4A3
Tel: 1-888-477-5543
Science 140 Curriculum
National Geographic World
Box 63001
Tampa, FL 33663-3001
Tel: 1-800-647-5463
Wild
350 Michael Cowpland Drive
Kanata, ON K2M 2W1
Tel: 1-888-687-6247
Canadian Wildlife
350 Michael Cowpland Drive
Kanata, ON K2M 2W1
Tel: 1-888-687-6247
Canadian Geographic
Canadian Geographic Enterprises
PO Box 923
Station Main
Markham, ON L3P 9Z9
Tel: 1-800-267-0824
Revised August 2009
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August, 2009
ALBE Science 140
Northern Contacts for Resources and Information
Arctic Energy Alliance
#101, 5102-51st Street
Yellowknife, NT X1A 1S7
Telephone: 867-920-3333
Fax: 867-873-0303
http://www.aea.nt.ca
Their mission is to assist communities, the GNWT, and consumers to work
together to reduce the costs and environmental impacts of energy and utility
services in the Northwest Territories.
Aurora Research Institute
Aurora College
PO Box 1450
Inuvik, NT X0E 0T0
Telephone: 867-777-3298
Fax: 867-777-4264
http://www.nwtresearch.com
Ecology North
5013-51st Street
Yellowknife, NT X1A 1S5
Telephone: 867-873-6019
Fax: 867- 873-6149
www.ecologynorth.ca
Environment Canada
Communications Officer
3rd Floor Scotia Centre, Suite 301, 5204-50th Avenue
PO Box 370
Yellowknife, NT X1A 2N3
Telephone: 867-669-4703
Fax: 867-873-8185
http://www.ec.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=FD9B0E51-1
Science 140 Curriculum
This is an excellent source for FREE brochures and booklets on northern
animals, parks, protected areas, contaminants, and the environment, relating
to the north.
Environment and Natural Resources
Government of the NWT
Public Education Specialist
Scotia Centre, 6th Floor
PO Box 1320
Yellowknife, NT X1A 2L9
Telephone: 867-873-7779
Fax: 867-873-0157
http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/
NWT and Nunavut Chamber of Mines
PO Box 2818
Yellowknife, NT X1A 2R1
Telephone: 867-873-5281
Fax: 867-920-2145
http://www.miningnorth.com
Northwest Territories Workers' Compensation Board – WHMIS
Training (Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System)
PO Box 8888
Yellowknife, NT X1A 2R3
Telephone: 867-920-3888 or 1-800-661-0792 (toll free)
Fax: 867-873-4596
http://www.wcb.nt.ca
WHMIS is a short form for Workplace Hazardous Materials Information
System. It is a comprehensive plan for providing information on the safe
use of hazardous materials used in Canadian workplaces. Information is
provided by means of product labels, material safety data sheets (MSDS),
and worker education programs.
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Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre
Box 1320
Yellowknife, NT X1A 2L9
Telephone: 867-873-7551
Fax: 867-873-0205
http://www.pwnhc.ca/teach/index.htm
Edukits are available for loan from the Heritage Centre. Check out their
website, listed above, to see which kits are available. To request an Edukit
loan, contact Education Services and Extensions at 867-920-3267 or 867920-3255.
St. John Ambulance - First Aid and CPR Training
5023-51 Street
Yellowknife, NT X1A 1S5
Telephone: 867-873-5658
Fax: 867-920-4458
http://www.sja.ca/NWT/Pages/default.aspx
Science 140 Curriculum
Revised August 2009
49
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