UNIVERSITY OF CANBERRA
Faculty of Health
Centre for Applied Psychology
Handbook for
Bachelor of Science
in Psychology
(Honours)
(Course 769AA)
2016
Psychology administrative officer
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (02) 6201 2653
Course convenor: Dr James Neill
Email: [email protected]
Phone: (02) 6201 2536
Version of Handbook: 10 September 2015
1
Table of Contents
1
2
3
Welcome ................................................................................................................. 3
Centre for Applied Psychology .............................................................................. 4
Course Overview .................................................................................................... 4
3.1 What career opportunities are available? ........................................................ 5
3.2 What delivery modes are available?................................................................ 5
3.3 Cost.................................................................................................................. 5
3.4 Scholarships .................................................................................................... 5
4 Entrance Requirements ........................................................................................... 6
4.1 Eligibility......................................................................................................... 6
4.2 Ranking ........................................................................................................... 6
4.3 Number of places ............................................................................................ 6
4.4 Work experience ............................................................................................. 6
4.5 Deferring ......................................................................................................... 6
4.6 What if I don’t get in – what other options are there?..................................... 6
5 How to Apply ......................................................................................................... 7
5.1 When are applications due?............................................................................. 7
6 Course Components ................................................................................................ 8
6.1 When are classes scheduled?........................................................................... 8
6.2 Part- and full-time course structure ................................................................. 8
7...................................................................................................................................... 9
8 Resources .............................................................................................................. 10
8.1 Technical resources ....................................................................................... 10
8.2 Data analysis resources ................................................................................. 10
8.3 Test library .................................................................................................... 10
8.4 Finances ......................................................................................................... 10
8.5 Research space .............................................................................................. 10
8.6 Past fourth year theses ................................................................................... 10
8.7 Reference resources....................................................................................... 10
8.8 Course website .............................................................................................. 11
9 Unit Descriptions .................................................................................................. 12
9.1 7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology ............................................................. 12
9.2 7375 Research Methods and Professional Ethics PG (Part A) (Semester 1) 13
9.3 7410 Research Methods and Professional Ethics PG (Part B) (Winter term)
13
9.4 6489 Psychological Measurement PG........................................................... 14
9.5 9815 Counselling Psychology PG (Counselling Psychology) ...................... 15
10
Staff Research Areas ......................................................................................... 16
10.1
How do I find a supervisor? ...................................................................... 18
11
Honours Classifications .................................................................................... 18
12
More Information .............................................................................................. 18
2
1 Welcome
Thank you for your interest in the Bachelor of Science in Psychology (Honours)
program at the University of Canberra (UC).
An Honours degree builds on the knowledge and skills acquired during your
undergraduate study and helps to prepare you for a professional career in psychology.
Honours is a dedicated fourth year of tertiary study during which you are given
considerable autonomy and independence in developing your learning, research, and
organisational skills whilst working under the supervision of experienced academic
staff. Half of the Honours course is coursework focused on applied topics and skills
and the other half consists of an independent research thesis.
Studying Honours provides a vital capstone to your undergraduate psychology degree.
A successful Honours degree will provide you with an opportunity to continue in the
psychology profession by qualifying to undertake an internship or to enter a Masters
or PhD program. Honours is a period of intense social, professional and intellectual
development during which students become better acquainted with features of
academic life such as seminars, workshops, peer review, research design and
communication of scientific findings.
Honours in Psychology can be an incredibly rewarding experience, especially as you
will undertake your own original research project on a topic you choose to study. In
this way you can study a topic of particular interest and contribute new information
and knowledge in your chosen field, as well as experiencing the benefits of working
in a close, collegial way with an academic expert. Students commonly report that their
Honours study was the most challenging, but also the most rewarding, of their
university career.
3
2 Centre for Applied Psychology
The Centre for Applied Psychology (http://www.canberra.edu.au/aboutuc/faculties/health/courses/psychology) is located within the Faculty of Health at the
UC. It offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses accredited by the Australian
Psychology Accreditation Council (APAC) and approved by the Psychology Board of
Australia (PBA). Staff who work within the centre are engaged in a range of applied
research and teaching in fields such as clinical psychology, health psychology, stress
and health, social and cross-cultural psychology, cognitive psychology, sport
psychology, forensic psychology, and environmental psychology.
3 Course Overview
The Centre for Applied Psychology offers the Bachelor of Science in Psychology
(Honours) (http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/course?course_cd=769AA)
which is accredited by the APAC and the PBA. On completion of this course,
graduates may apply for Associate Membership of the Australian Psychological
Society (APS; http://www.psychology.org.au) and provisional registration as a
psychologist with the PBA. After the completion of two years of approved supervised
practice or postgraduate studies, the provisional registration may be changed to full
registration. Information about any updates to these requirements is available on the
PBA website.
The APAC Rules for Accreditation and Accreditation Standards for Psychology
Courses (2010) state that:
The main objectives of the fourth year psychology course are to
provide for the completion of an integrated and comprehensive
education in the discipline of psychology, to permit advanced level
study in a range of areas, and to develop competence in conducting
research. Fourth year topics must include education in the theoretical
and empirical bases underpinning the construction, implementation,
and interpretation of some of the more widely used cognitive and
personality assessments, and evidence-based approaches to
psychological intervention.
Students in the Honours in Psychology program at UC complete 24 credit points,
made up of:
1. Honours Thesis in Psychology
(12 credit points)
2. Research Methods and Professional Ethics
(6 credit points)
3. Psychological Measurement
(3 credit points)
4. Counselling Psychology
(3 credit points)
4
3.1 What career opportunities are available?
Graduates may either seek employment or apply to enrol in a Master or Doctoral level
program. Employment opportunities exist in many human services organisations.
Graduates most commonly find jobs in areas such as youth work, drug and alcohol
treatment, advertising and marketing, policy and research, consumer research,
industrial relations, human resources, program co-ordination, justice and policing,
child protection, and social welfare.
Provisional psychologists work in a variety of settings including educational, human
services, community, health, and corporate organisations under the supervision of an
experienced registered psychologist. To become eligible to apply for full registration
as a psychologist, students need to either complete a supervised internship or
complete a coursework Masters degree in psychology (two years full-time or four
years part-time) or a clinical PhD (four and half years full-time).
3.2 What delivery modes are available?
This is an on-campus course. All coursework is delivered face-to-face. The course is
not available via external or online study, although some components may involve
external and/or online work.
3.3
Cost
The Bachelor of Science in Psychology (Honours) currently provides Commonwealth
Supported (HECS based) places. For more information, see UC Fees and
Contributions (http://www.canberra.edu.au/future-students/courses/glossary/fees-andcontributions).
3.4
Scholarships
Applicants with high academic standing (well above a GPA of 6) are strongly
encouraged to apply for $6000 UC scholarships (see the UC Scholarships Office
webpage: http://www.canberra.edu.au/future-students/scholarships-and-financialsupport/honours-and-postgraduate-scholarships). There are 10 Honours scholarships
across the university. Applications are due by the last Friday in November in the year
before you commence. In order to apply, you will need to prepare an Honours
proposal and have two referee reports (one referee should be from a nominated
supervisor). Other scholarship opportunities may be advertised via the Honours
Moodle site which is accessible once you are enrolled.
5
4 Entrance Requirements
4.1
Eligibility
The minimum entry requirement is completion of a three year sequence in psychology
(or a course deemed equivalent), which is accredited by APAC and approved by the
PBA, within the last 10 years; and a Credit average (GPA of 5) or higher in the
required, core second and third year psychology units (i.e., not 1st year, not nonpsychology, and not elective psychology units).
4.2
Ranking
Demand exceeds the number of places, thus eligible applicants are ranked by GPA for
the required second and third year psychology (or equivalent) psychology units (GPA
policy - https://guard.canberra.edu.au/policy/policy.php?pol_id=2905 - P = 4, CR =
5, DI = 6, HD = 7).
Where applicants are equally ranked, particular attention is paid to marks and
performance in undergraduate psychology research methods units. Preference may be
given to students who completed their undergraduate psychology degree at UC.
GPA cut-offs vary from year to year. Since 2014, offers have been made to applicants
with a GPA greater than or equal to 6.
4.3 Number of places
There are approximately 25 new places each year (with approximately 20 starting in
Semester 1 and approximately 5 starting in Semester 2). The number of new places
will depend on the availability of academic staff and supervisors in any given year.
There are approximately 100 eligible applicants per year.
4.4
Work experience
Ranking of applications is entirely based on academic results. Work experience is not
necessary. You can include additional documentation in your application if wish, but
there is no guarantee that this will be examined or considered.
4.5
Deferring
Offers for Honours courses cannot be deferred. If you receive an offer, but wish to
start in a later teaching period, you will need to reapply.
4.6
What if I don’t get in – what other options are there?
1. Improve your GPA. This can be done by enrolling as a non-award student on
an upfront fee-paying basis to do one or more graduate-level versions of the
undergraduate psychology units. In calculating your GPA for entry to Honours
in Psychology at UC, we will use your best grade achieved for each of the
APAC-required second and third year psychology units.
2. Apply for entry to other fourth year APAC-accredited courses – see
http://www.psychologycouncil.org.au
3. Consider post-graduate training in related allied health fields such as
counselling, youth work, social work, education, or human resources.
4. Consult with the UC Careers Service: http://www.canberra.edu.au/currentstudents/careers-service
6
5 How to Apply
There are two ways for domestic students to apply for the Bachelor of Science in
Psychology (Honours):
1. Online via UC Applicant Portal:
https://www.canberra.edu.au/applicant/connect/webconnect
2. Hardcopy, using the form downloadable from:
http://www.canberra.edu.au/current-students/forms/forms/otherforms/Domestic-Application-form.pdf
Note: You do not need to complete an Honours Supplement in addition to this form,
even if this is requested during the application process. For Psychology Honours we
organise research topics and supervision after you have been accepted.
International applicants should:
1. Enquire about the administrative aspects of admissions with UC’s
International Office (http://www.canberra.edu.au/futurestudents/international-students).
2. Note that they will need to get their overseas qualifications assessed by the
PBA for equivalency to an APAC undergraduate psychology course before
applying.
General information about courses and studying at UC is available from
http://www.canberra.edu.au. Specific questions about the administrative aspects of
applications should be directed to the UC Student Centre
(http://www.canberra.edu.au/current-students/student-centre; phone 1300 301 727 or
email [email protected]).
5.1
When are applications due?
For first round offers:
 Semester 1 2016 applications are due by 30 October, 2015
– first-round offers made mid-to-late December.
 Semester 2 2016 applications are due by 30 June, 2015
- first-round offers will be made mid-to-late July
Applications made after the due dates may still be processed subject to the availability
of places.
Further offers may be made if sufficient first-round offers are declined.
7
6 Course Components
The following components comprise the Bachelor of Science in Psychology
(Honours) course:
1. 7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology (12 credit points): An empirical thesis,
worth 50% of the overall final grade. For the thesis, you are expected to design a
research project, collect empirical data and report it in a thesis with a length of
between 10,000 and 12,000 words.
2. 7375 Research Methods and Professional Ethics A PG (Semester 1, 3 credit
points) and 7410 Research Methods and Professional Ethics B PG (Winter
Term, 3 credit points): A year long unit covering research methods, ethical issues,
and professional practice.
3. 6489 Psychological Measurement PG (Semester 1, 3 credit points): A unit
covering issues in psychological measurement and its application to psychological
testing.
4. 9815 Counselling Psychology PG (Semester 2, 3 credit points): An advanced
psychological topics coursework unit.
6.1 When are classes scheduled?
Classes are offered during the day. There are no evening classes. Classes usually take
place on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays, with some Friday workshops.
Students are advised to check more exact times through the timetable system:
http://www.canberra.edu.au/current-students/timetables. Meetings with a research
supervisor are arranged separately. Coursework units are delivered during Semester 1,
Winter Term, and Semester 2. Semester dates are available from the principal dates
web page: http://www.canberra.edu.au/future-students/key-dates/semesters-winterterm-principal-dates.
6.2 Part- and full-time course structure
The course involves the equivalent of one year of full-time study. For domestic
students, the course can be studied over one year (two semesters, starting S1), one and
a half years (three semesters, starting S2) or over two or three years (starting S1 or
S2). International students must enrol as full-time students and can only commence at
the beginning of the first semester. One to two year course structures follow.
8
Full-time (2-semester) Structure, starting Semester 1:
Year 1 Semester 1
Year 1 Winter Term
Year 1 Semester 2
7366 Honours Thesis in
Psychology
7410 Research Methods and
Professional Ethics B PG
7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology
cont’d
7375 Research Methods and
Professional Ethics A PG
9815 Counselling Psychology PG
6489 Psychological Measurement
PG
Part-time (3-semester) Course Structure, starting Semester 2:
Year 1 Semester 2
9815 Counselling Psychology PG
Year 2 Semester 1
Year 2 Winter Term
Year 2 Semester 2
7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology
7410 Research Methods and
Professional Ethics B PG
7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology
cont’d
7375 Research Methods and
Professional Ethics A PG
6489 Psychological Measurement
PG
Part-time (4-semester) Course Structure, starting Semester 1:
Year 1 Semester 1
Year 1 Winter Term
Year 1 Semester 2
6489 Psychological Measurement PG
-
9815 Counselling Psychology PG
Year 2 Semester 1
Year 2 Winter Term
Year 2 Semester 2
7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology
7410 Research Methods and
Professional Ethics B PG
7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology
cont’d
7375 Research Methods and
Professional Ethics A PG
Part-time (4-semester) Course Structure, starting Semester 2:
Year 1 Semester 2
Year 2 Semester 1
Year 2 Winter Term
9815 Counselling Psychology PG
Year 2 Semester 2
7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology
7410 Research Methods and
Professional Ethics B PG
7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology
cont’d
Year 3 Winter Term
Year 3 Semester 2
7375 Research Methods and
Professional Ethics A PG
Year 3 Semester 1
6489 Psychological Measurement PG
7
9
8 Resources
8.1
Technical resources
The psychology staff will advise you on the technical aspects of your research, such
as use of software for research, audio-visual resources, and other aspects of computer
use. Through your supervisor, you can access the services of the University’s
Information and Technology Management service.
8.2
Data analysis resources
Psychology students have access to a dedicated PC computer lab, with 24/7 access.
These and other computer laboratories are equipped with computers running a variety
of software programs, including SPSS. You may use computer laboratories at times
when they are not used for teaching to undertake word processing, data analysis, and
for access to the Internet. The Research Methods and Professional Ethics unit will
introduce you to what is available.
8.3
Test library
The Centre for Applied Psychology has a reasonably extensive collection of
professional psychological tests. The majority of the tests have special user
requirements (e.g., they may not be used by non-psychologists, or they may not be
copied). To access the test library you must be accompanied by your supervisor, who
will go through a catalogue of the tests held in the test library with you if required.
For most research purposes, it is generally more suitable to use freely available
research measures which tend to be much shorter and have no specified requirements
for user qualifications. Authors of these measures are more likely to allow copying for
research use where permission is sought.
8.4
Finances
The Centre for Applied Psychology does what it can financially to support research,
and sometimes this help can extend to support for fourth year research projects.
Examples are photocopying for questionnaires, and special tests and equipment that
need to be bought. From year to year no guarantees can be made as to the availability
of funds. Discuss with your supervisor if you think you have a need for financial
assistance.
8.5
Research space
Space is made available each year for research activity - ask your supervisor what is
currently available. Research space includes rooms in Building 12 .
8.6
Past fourth year theses
Theses from past Honours and Postgraduate Diploma students are available for
perusal by arrangement with the Psychology Administrative Officer (12D20). They
cannot be borrowed or removed. Supervisors may have copies which you can borrow.
8.7
Reference resources
Students will be required to read extensively for their coursework and research
project. In addition to the UC library, students may also use other academic libraries
10
in the ACT and the National Library. Honours students of UC are eligible for
ACTUAL borrowing (https://anulib.anu.edu.au/actual/actual_recip.html) which
includes the ANU, ACU, ADFA, CIT libraries on presentation of a current UC
Student ID card and a letter verifying the student's Honours status from the course
convenor. Please ask the Psychology Administrative Assistant to organise a letter of
verification.
8.8 Course website
A dedicated Moodle website is available for students enrolled in the course. This
website allows for online sharing of information and discussion amongst students and
with academic staff.
11
9 Unit Descriptions
9.1 7366 Honours Thesis in Psychology
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/unit?unit_cd=7366
Unit convener: Dr James Neill
12 credit points (This is a year long unit; enrol in this unit in both Semester 1 and 2)
Prerequisites: Course entry requirements
Co-requisite: Research Methods and Professional Ethics A/B PG
Class contact: By arrangement with supervisor (up to one hour per week)
Syllabus: The syllabus is based on the requirements of the Australian Psychological
Accreditation Council. Students will undertake an individual supervised research
project in psychology, comprising topic definition, literature review, design, data
collection and analyses, and write up a thesis of between 10,000 and 12,000 words.
The project will be conducted within appropriate ethical guidelines. The topic will
reflect the mutual interests of supervisor and student.
Learning outcomes: On successful completion of the unit, students will be able to:
1. Design and execute a research project relating to a psychological issue to a
standard acceptable to the profession;
2. Independently undertake an analysis of data derived from survey or experimental
designs in psychology; and
3. Communicate the results of an independent research project in a form acceptable
to the profession.
12
9.2 7375 Research Methods and Professional Ethics PG (Part A) (Semester 1)
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/unit?unit_cd=7375
Unit convener: Dr. Tricia Brown
9.3
7410 Research Methods and Professional Ethics PG (Part B) (Winter
term)
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/unit?unit_cd=7410
Unit convener: Prof. Doug Boer
3 credit points each
Prerequisites: Course entry requirements
Class contact: Up to 6 hours per week
Syllabus: Research Methods and Professional Ethics PG is a year long unit offered in
two parts (A & B). Students must complete both parts to be assigned a result for the
unit and have the credit points count towards course completion. Part A must be
completed in Semester 1 and Part B in the Winter Term. Students will study design,
methodological and data analysis methods and issues relevant to applied
psychological research. The professional ethical guidelines and issues of
psychological research and practice will also be covered.
Learning outcomes: Students who successfully complete the unit will be able to:
1. critically evaluate research designs in psychology
2. develop and carry out psychological research designs
3. analyse research data using SPSS
4. be aware of how the professional code of ethics applies in psychological
practice and research
5. have an understanding of some of the issues involved in professional practice
in psychology.
13
9.4 6489 Psychological Measurement PG
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/unit?unit_cd=6489
Unit convener: Prof. Anita Mak
3 credit points
Prerequisites: Course entry requirements
Class contact: Up to four hours per week
Syllabus: In this unit, students study the principles, practice, and issues in
psychological measurement and its application to psychological testing and
assessment in professional settings, including conceptual underpinnings and
psychometric aspects of test construction and evaluation, including reliability,
validity, and standardisation. Students gain practical experience in the administration,
scoring and interpretation of selected measures and learn to appreciate the potential
utility and shortcomings of psychological measurement in general, and in relation to
specific professional psychological tests.
Learning outcomes:
1. delineate the assumptions, functions, and desirable properties of psychological
measures.
2. locate information on published tests.
3. identify the psychometric, ethical, and sociocultural issues in the construction,
validation, and application of psychological measures.
4. critically evaluate the reliability, validity, and standardisation procedures of
selected psychological tests.
5. interpret the meaning of test scores.
6. write a report on the findings from selected tests.
14
9.5 9815 Counselling Psychology PG (Counselling Psychology)
http://www.canberra.edu.au/coursesandunits/unit?unit_cd=9815
Unit convener: Ms Lisa Oxman
3 credit points
Prerequisites: Course entry requirements
Class contact: 5 hour workshop per week
Syllabus: This unit explores theory, knowledge and methodology in the professional
practice of psychology and prepares students for entry to professional psychology
programs. The unit focuses on advanced theoretical and empirical knowledge in the
history and philosophy of psychological interventions (including psychoanalytic,
behavioural, phenomenological, and cognitive-behavioural models) and develops
practical interviewing and counselling skills. The unit examines evidence-based
approaches to psychological intervention and counselling models and critiques the
philosophical, theoretical, and empirical bases of evidence-based approaches to
psychological intervention.
Learning outcomes: On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to
demonstrate:
1. Knowledge of theoretical and empirical bases underpinning evidence-based
approaches to psychological intervention;
2. Knowledge of interviewing and counselling skills; and
3. Reflective practice through reviewing their own practice of interviewing and
counselling.
15
10 Staff Research Areas
Listed below are academic staff who are likely to be available for research
supervision and their research interest areas. More information about staff and their
expertise is at http://www.canberra.edu.au/aboutuc/faculties/health/courses/psychology/tabs/staff-profiles
Staff member
Research interests
Prof Helen Berry
Climate change, urban design, social connectedness and
mental health; Marginalisation; Large survey and
quantitative methods (note students may access a
number of large survey datasets).
Assessment and treatment of offending, intellectual
disability, sex and violent offenders; Family violence
Road safety behaviours; Mental illness stigma;
Environmental attitudes; Social psychology
Cognitive psychology; Environmental psychology
Prof Douglas Boer
Dr Tricia Brown
Dr Janie Busby Grant
Dr Stuart Cathcart
Dr Peter Chamberlain
Dr Dimity Crisp
Dr Amanda George
Prof Peter Hassmén
Dr Vivienne Lewis
Dr Sally Kelty
Prof Anita Mak
Dr Kristen Murray
Pain; Behavioural neuroscience; Sport and exercise
psychology; Clinical psychology
Adult survivors of childhood trauma; Suicidality;
Domestic violence; Treatment of sex offenders; Theory
of self psychology; Constructs of self, and how this
influences the trajectory of personality development
Ageing and transitions in later life; Stress, coping and
subjective well-being; Help-seeking and mental health
literacy
Social anxiety, personality and alcohol use; Alcohol and
other drug use; Personality psychology
Health, exercise, and sport psychology (e.g., sedentary
behaviour/physical inactivity, physical activity for
mental wellbeing, exercise dependency, overtraining
syndrome & burnout in elite athletes and coaches,
motivation & motivational climate in sport, & ratings of
perceived exertion)
Body image of men and women; Eating disorders; Wellbeing and mental health
Forensic psychology; Management psychology;
Rehabilitation program development, research and
evaluation, and research within the criminal justice,
health and disability sectors
Internationalisation, acculturation, work stress, mental
health of students and migrants, intercultural social
skills & training
Body image; Obesity; Eating disorders; Psychological
stress; Interdisciplinary and interprofessional practice;
16
Staff member
Research interests
Clinical and health psychology
Dr James Neill
Ms Lisa Oxman
Prof Debra Rickwood
Prof Dominic Upton
Dr Clare Watsford
Positive psychology, motivation, and emotion; Outdoor
education and adventure therapy; Educational
psychology; Environmental psychology
Dialectical behaviour therapy; Attachment;
Mindfulness; Acceptance and commitment therapy
Youth and adolescent mental health and wellbeing;
Help-seeking; Service use and engagement; Program
evaluation; Promotion, prevention, early intervention
and recovery in mental health
Health psychology (promoting physical and mental
health, long-term health conditions, stress and pain
management)
Adolescent mental health
17
10.1 How do I find a supervisor?
Before starting the Honours program, it is a good idea to think about a range of topics
you would like to study in your research project. Once you receive an Honours offer,
you are welcome to approach academic staff to discuss possible research projects.
When meeting with potential supervisors, you might like to discuss:
 The supervisor’s research interests and research plans for the coming year
 Your own interests and ideas
 Your working style and supervisor’s supervisory style
The first workshop for the Honours Thesis takes place on Thursday during
Orientation Week of Semester 1. Final allocations of supervisors to students will not
be made until confirmed by the thesis convenor after this workshop. Please note that
first preferences cannot be guaranteed (e.g., because of workload allocations some
supervisors may be oversubscribed).
11 Honours Classifications
Honours Classifications are based on a final mark which is calculated as the weighted
mean of unit marks rounded up to a whole number. UC grade/mark cut-offs are then
applied (i.e., Ist class Honours = HD (85) , IIa = DI (75), IIb = CR (65), III - P (50)).
12 More Information
If you have further questions or queries about the application process, please contact
the Student Centre (1300 301 727 or [email protected]). For coursespecific questions, email [email protected], phone (02) 6201
2653, or contact the course convenor [email protected] For information
about specific units, please contact the appropriate unit convenor.
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Honours Handbook 2016 - University of Canberra