CIS 111
1
CIS 111: Composition and Communication II (3 credits)
Fall 2012
Instructor:
Office:
Office Hours:
Phone:
E-Mail:
Catalog Description
Composition and Communication II is the advanced course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students
in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. In this course, students work in small
groups to explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation, compose
conscientious and well-developed arguments, and propose viable solutions to different audiences. Students will
sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in spoken, written, and visual forms; and
work effectively in teams through sustained interrogation of an issue. A significant component of the class will
involve learning to use visual and digital resources both to enhance written and oral presentations and to
communicate with public audiences. Prereq: CIS 110.
Course Prerequisite Knowledge and Skill Expectations
This class is part of a two-course sequence. To be successful in this course, you are expected to be proficient with
the fundamental competencies from CIS 110 or its equivalent. In other words, should already have mastered the
ability to:
 compose formal written texts and deliver formal oral presentations that represent relevant and informed
points of view appropriate for the audience, purpose, and occasion.
 analyze, create, and use visual media as both independent and interconnected forms of communication.
 demonstrate an awareness of appropriate strategies used to communicate effectively in different situations
(e.g., public speaking, interpersonal) and contexts (e.g., face-to-face, digital).
 work with design elements (font, size, line, color) to successfully incorporate design principles (contrast,
alignment, repetition, and proximity) as part of effective composition
 employ research skills to find, analyze, evaluate, and properly cite pertinent primary and secondary
sources, using relevant discovery tools (e.g. InfoKat, Library Databases, Google), as part of the process of
composing work in written, oral, and visual modes.
 organize, revise, practice, edit, and proofread (for grammar and mechanics) their own and other student
work flexibly and effectively to improve the development and clarity of ideas.
 define goals for improving/revising work, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals, in
collaboration with peers, instructor, and librarians.
 employ and evaluate interpersonal communication skills.
1
CIS 111
2
CIS 111 Student Learning Outcomes
In this course, students will demonstrate the ability to….
• compose at least one major, group-authored persuasive argument project for a public audience using
written, oral, and visual modes grounded in scholarly research in a manner that is appropriate and
effective for the audience, purpose, and occasion in both a face-to-face and digital environment.
• conduct significant, effective research on a subject as an individual and as part of a team, using the
resources of the UK Libraries and other relevant resources to enrich your speaking, writing, and digital
projects.
• employ advanced strategies for developing and analyzing arguments as an individual and in groups using
relevant rhetorical theories, with greater emphasis on addressing and mediating issues of public interest.
• identify and address community stakeholders in an issue of public interest as part of thoughtful and
efficient audience analysis.
• think critically in both the conception and the development of written, oral, and visual arguments.
• work with design elements (font, size, line, color) to effectively incorporate design principles (contrast,
alignment, repetition, and proximity) as part of sophisticated argumentation
• refine your formal speaking, writing, and visual communication skills, focusing on matters of
construction, design, and delivery keeping audience, purpose, and occasion in mind.
• thoughtfully critique the work of peers and professionals.
• organize, revise, practice, edit, and proofread (for grammar and mechanics) your own and other student
work flexibly and effectively to improve the development and clarity of ideas.
• define goals for improving/revising work, and devise effective plans for achieving those goals, in
collaboration with peers, instructor, librarians, and relevant community stakeholders.
• engage in a range of small group activities to explore and express experiences and perspectives on issues
under discussion.
• employ and evaluate interpersonal, small-group, and mass communication skills to show skillful
management of group dynamics (e.g. conflict negotiation, role identification, delegation, effective social
roles).
Required Materials
Sellnow, D., & Warren, J. (Eds.). (2012). Multimodal Communication Fundamentals. Cengage: Cincinnati, OH.
Kercsmar, S., & Kaufmann, R. (Eds.). (2012). Multimodal Communication Fundamentals Workbook. Cengage:
Cincinnati, OH.
Glenn, C., & Gray, L. (2012). Harbrace Essentials. Wadsworth: Boston, MA.
*Bundled ISBN (for all three items): 9781285144092
 3 x 5 inch index cards
 2-pocket portfolio folder
 Thumb drive
2
CIS 111
3
Course Assignments
You will complete an array of major assignments this semester, each of them with an oral, written, and visual
component. You will revise your projects based on instructor and peer review and feedback. You will also
complete several minor assignments to demonstrate your ability to work effectively in a small group, to develop
strong persuasive arguments in written, oral, and visual modes, as well as to evaluate group participation efforts
and the persuasive arguments posed by others.
Point Distribution




Assignments
Points Possible
“This I believe…” Speech
Starting Line-up Presentation
Position Paper
Symposium Speech
10
10
25
100
Percentage of
Total Grade
2%
2%
5%
20%
100
20%
75
10
25
95
15%
2%
5%
19%
50
10%
500
100%
Speech (80)
Symposium Outline (10)
Peer Speech Critiques (5)
Self Speech Critiques (5)
Digital Project & Presentation


Digital Project (75)
Distribution (25)
Rhetorical Analysis Paper
Final Impromptu Speech
Final Exam/Reflective Essay
In-Class work/Activities







Rhetorical Analysis Draft (10)
Rhetorical Analysis Peer Reviews (10)
Annotated Bib. (10)
Group Dynamics Paper (10)
In-Class Writing/Activities (35)
Pre/Posttest (5 pts each= 10)
Digital Project Presentation (10)
Reading Quizzes
TOTAL
Major Assignments
Each of the four major assignments focus on achieving an in-depth analysis of a controversial topic or issue. You
will work individually and with a group to examine an issue critically from multiple perspectives, develop
persuasive arguments about it, compose and communicate that argument using written, oral, and visual
communication, and evaluate the effect of your arguments, the arguments of your classmates, and the arguments
made by messages in popular culture.
3
CIS 111
4
(1) Position Paper (25 points)
As an individual, you will identify a controversial topic that you are interested in studying. Based on research you
conduct to learn more about this topic, you will write a position paper describing the problem and your stance on
it using evidence and reasoning to support your claims. Your position paper must be at least 900 words long and
integrate at least three relevant and credible external sources. It must be typed according to proper APA style.
You must also include an annotated bibliography comprised of at least five additional primary and/or secondary
sources that could inform a discussion of the controversy. Each citation in the bibliography must be typed using
proper APA style and include a two to three sentence summarizing the content and conclusions offered in that
source. You will use this position paper to persuade your group to select your topic for the three remaining major
projects.
(2) Symposium Speech (100 points)
As a group, you will give a symposium speech on your controversy with the following objectives: convince your
audience (of peers) to agree with your position; propose solutions; persuade the audience to take action to help
solve it. Each group will choose a pattern for persuasive speeches (e.g., problem/solution, problem/cause/solution,
refutative, comparative advantages, motivated sequence). One person will serve as the moderator for the
symposium, offering an introduction and conclusion and introducing each member of the group. The group will
create one typed outline to be turned in on your assigned symposium day. The group will conduct a question and
answer session with the class at the conclusion of the symposium. Each individual must speak for 5-6 minutes,
include a minimum of two slides, and orally cite at least two external sources.
(3) Digital Project and Presentation (100 points)
As a group, you will design, construct, and distribute a digital project intended for a large public audience. This is
intended to persuade your audience about the solution you proposed in the symposium speech. You will prepare a
5-6 minute presentation to describe your final digital project (what you did and how it worked) to the class.
(4) Rhetorical Analysis Paper (75 points)
Each member will select a rhetorical artifact that engages a different perspective (poses an argument) about your
group’s issue. Your rhetorical artifact should be visual, oral, written (or some combination) and stem from some
form of popular culture. For example, you might select a magazine or television advertisement, a television
program or film, a speech, a billboard, a comic strip, a website or blog, a Facebook group, etc. (Your instructor
might limit your options among these). As an individual, you will write a 2400 word (minimum) rhetorical
analysis employing a consistent method of analysis and including at least three images to support your arguments.
You will earn a minimum deduction of one letter grade if your essay does not meet the word count.
Minor Assignments
(1) This I Believe Speech (10 points)
This is a 3-minute speech where you introduce yourself and share your own statement of personal belief. You will
focus on one core belief and support why you hold this core belief using specific examples and events from your
4
CIS 111
5
life experiences. For example, you may share a time when you first developed the belief and/or a time when it was
further clarified or even modified. Support for this speech will come from personal experiences and stories; no
outside research is required. You must include at least one object, picture, or other visual aid (projected onscreen
so it is easily visible to all those in your audience) to help support what you are saying. Examples of this type of
storytelling are available at http://thisibelieve.org/
(2) Starting Line-Up Presentation (10 points)
As a group, you will participate in one social activity outside of class time before doing this presentation. Your
presentation will introduce your group name, group logo, and group motto, as well as describe the social activity
you engaged in together. You will include things you learned about one another in the process. This 5-6 minute
presentation must include a PowerPoint slideshow comprised of at least three slides and each group member must
have a speaking part in the presentation.
(3) Group Dynamics Paper (10 points)
In this 1-2 page formal typed paper (350-600 words), you will reflect on and evaluate the group dynamics of your
team thus far. This paper must follow the rules of proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation; and is to represent
your best work. Include a copy of this paper in your portfolio on the day your group presents your symposium
speech. Elements you must address in this paper include:
(1) an overall score (0 – 7) and rationale for each group member (including yourself)
(2) an ethical critique for each group member (including yourself) justifying the score you have
assigned, (Ethical critiques include both positive contributions and concerns/challenges/negatives, are
specific, use “I” language, and give descriptive details.)
(3) A discussion exploring how you and your group have moved through Tuckman’s stages of group
formation and development.
(4) In-Class Assignments and Activities
A portion of your grade will be based on in-class work and activities including essay and speech outline drafts and
peer reviews, an annotated bibliography, rehearsal sessions with peer and self reviews, as well as other in-class
activities and assignments that cannot be made up.
(5) Pretest/ Posttest
Each CIS 111 student is required to complete a pre-test at the beginning of the semester and a post-test at the end
of the semester for departmental assessment purposes. These will be completed online and you will receive credit
for these assignments; your answers will not affect your grade. You will receive 10 pts for completing these two
assignments (5 pts each) and you must complete both tests to receive credit. Each test will take approximately 30
minutes to complete. The pretest will be open for the first two weeks of the semester (August 22 to September 5)
at http://comm.uky.edu/courses/cis111/pretest. The posttest will be open during the last two weeks of the regular
semester before final exams (November 26 to December 9) and can be found at
http://comm.uky.edu/courses/cis111/posttest.
5
CIS 111
6
(6) Quizzes (50 points)
Ten percent of your grade for this class is based reading quizzes. These quizzes are designed to measure
comprehension of textbook content/readings and material discussed in class.
(7) Final Impromptu Speech (10 points)
During our final exam period, you will present a short (2-3 minute) impromptu speech that addresses content from
CIS 110 and 111 and your experience in the courses. In the spirit of impromptu speeches, you will be given a
topic and a set amount of time to prepare your thoughts and notes before speaking to the class. You must
complete the impromptu speech to earn a grade in the course.
(8) Final Exam/Reflective Essay (25 points)
As an individual, you will complete a final reflective essay that will serve as your final exam. You will respond to
two questions in a formal essay using the appropriate mechanics of writing (e.g., spelling, grammar, punctuation,
organization). The questions are: (1) What have you learned over the course of this semester in this class? and
(2) Compare and contrast your experiences working on your topic in your group and working on your topic alone
(e.g., position paper and rhetorical analysis). As you do this comparison, also consider how your group experience
may have changed after midterm feedback.
The essay should be at least 1200 words.
Grading Scale
Only students who have completed all components of the major assignments on time are eligible for a passing
grade in this course.
90 – 100%:
A
80 – 89%:
B
70 – 79%:
C
60 – 69%:
D
59% and below:
E
Course Policies
Attendance and Participation
You are expected to be in class and to participate fully every day so you can benefit as much as possible from this
course. This means you are expected to (a) read and consider applications of the information before coming to
class, (b) ask questions and/or make applications in small group and large group class discussion, and (c) work to
facilitate classroom interaction.
In order to accomplish these goals, you need to be in class every day. If you are absent on a day when an
assignment is due or a quiz or exam is given, you will be allowed to hand in or make-up that work only if the
absence is officially excused. You may be asked to provide official written documentation for absences. Excuses
for university-sponsored activities must be made prior to such absences. No make-up work is available for inclass exercises, workshops, or exams unless approved in advance by your instructor.
6
CIS 111
7
Note: You are required to attend class whenever any student is scheduled to speak. If you miss class on a
speaking day, points will be deducted from your cumulative course grade as follows: 3/week classes- 5 points
each day missed; 2/week classes—15 points for each missed day; 1/week classes—30 points for each missed day.
If you fail to complete any of the 4 major assignments (papers or speeches), you will earn an “E” for the
course.
Absences beyond two per semester will be penalized by dropping your final course grade 5% (1/2 letter grade) for
each such absence. If you exceed 5 unexcused absences, you will be unable to pass this course. Note: Please
reference the definition of excused absence in current edition of Students Rights and Responsibilities or on the
web at http://www.uky.edu/StudentAffairs/Code/.
Students who are frequently tardy or unprepared may be marked absent for the day. Your instructor reserves the
right to add quizzes to the class agenda if too many class members appear to be unprepared. So be prepared and
on time. Preparation involves not only reading but also making notes on the reading so that you are prepared to
discuss issues in depth.
For any emergency situation that arises, call the Instructional Communication Division office (257-8370) to leave
a message with Kaitlin Black or Erin Berger. Also, be sure to email your instructor as soon as you know about
the situation.
Excused Absences
Students need to notify the professor of absences prior to class when possible. S.R. 5.2.4.2 defines the following
as acceptable reasons for excused absences: (a) serious illness, (b) illness or death of family member, (c)
University-related trips, (d) major religious holidays, and (e) other circumstances found to fit “reasonable cause
for nonattendance” by the professor.
Students anticipating an absence for a major religious holiday are responsible for notifying the instructor in
writing of anticipated absences due to their observance of such holidays no later than the last day in the semester
to add a class. Information regarding dates of major religious holidays may be obtained through the religious
liaison, Mr. Jake Karnes (859-257-2754).
Students are expected to withdraw from the class if more than 20% of the classes scheduled for the semester are
missed (excused or unexcused) per university policy.
Verification of Absences
Students may be asked to verify their absences in order to consider them excused. Senate Rule 5.2.4.2 states that
faculty have the right to request “appropriate verification” when students claim an excused absence because of
illness or death in the family. Appropriate notification of absences due to university-related trips is required prior
to the absence.
Academic Integrity
Per university policy, students shall not plagiarize, cheat, or falsify or misuse academic records. Students are
expected to adhere to University policy on cheating and plagiarism in all courses. The minimum penalty for a
7
CIS 111
8
first offense is a zero on the assignment on which the offense occurred. If the offense is considered severe or the
student has other academic offenses on their record, more serious penalties, up to suspension from the university
may be imposed.
Plagiarism and cheating are serious breaches of academic conduct. Each student is advised to become familiar
with the various forms of academic dishonesty as explained in the Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities.
Complete information can be found at the following website: http://www.uky.edu/Ombud. A plea of ignorance is
not acceptable as a defense against the charge of academic dishonesty. It is important that you review this
information as all ideas borrowed from others need to be properly credited.
Part II of Student Rights and Responsibilities (available online
http://www.uky.edu/StudentAffairs/Code/part2.html) states that all academic work, written or otherwise,
submitted by students to their instructors or other academic supervisors, is expected to be the result of their own
thought, research, or self-expression. In cases where students feel unsure about the question of plagiarism
involving their own work, they are obliged to consult their instructors on the matter before submission.
When students submit work purporting to be their own, but which in any way borrows ideas, organization,
wording or anything else from another source without appropriate acknowledgement of the fact, the students are
guilty of plagiarism. Plagiarism includes reproducing someone else’s work, whether it be a published article,
chapter of a book, a paper from a friend or some file, or something similar to this. Plagiarism also includes the
practice of employing or allowing another person to alter or revise the work, which a student submits as his/her
own, whoever that other person may be.
Students may discuss individual assignments among themselves or with an instructor or tutor, but the actual work
must be done by the student. When a student’s assignment involves research in outside sources of information, the
student must carefully acknowledge exactly what, where and how he/she employed them. If the words of
someone else are used, the student must put quotation marks around the passage in question and add an
appropriate indication of its origin. Making simple changes while leaving the organization, content and
phraseology intact is plagiaristic. However, nothing in these Rules shall apply to those ideas, which are so
generally, and freely circulated as to be a part of the public domain (Section 6.3.1).
Please note: Any assignment you turn in may be submitted to an electronic database to check for plagiarism.
Accommodations Due to Disability
If you have a documented disability that requires academic accommodations, please see your instructor as soon as
possible by making an appointment or during scheduled office hours. In order to receive accommodations in this
course, you must provide your instructor with a Letter of Accommodation from the Disability Resource Center
(Room 2, Alumni Gym, 257-2754, email address: [email protected]).
Research Policy
The Department of Communication and the Division of Instructional Communication are committed to involving
undergraduate students in scholarly research to help you begin to understand the importance of generating new
knowledge at the University of Kentucky as a major research institution. Students in this class are required to
8
CIS 111
9
complete 1 research study for 1 research credit. (If you are enrolled in additional CIS or COM courses that
have research requirements, you are responsible for participating in additional research studies, up to a maximum
of 2 studies/credits. Thus, if you are enrolled in 3 or more such CIS or COM courses, you will not be required to
complete more than 2 studies/credits.) Detailed information about research studies and the available session times
to sign up are located on the SONA website: http://comm.uky.edu/research/signup. Failure to either (a) participate
in a research study or (b) complete the designated alternative assignment will result in a 5% deduction in your
final course grade. It is your responsibility to regularly check the SONA website to keep track of the completion
of your research credit and the deadlines and dates of the research studies. (Note: It may take one week or longer
for completed research credit to be recorded and appear in the system.)
Student Responsibilities
(1)
Sign up for a research study or the alternate assignment by the signup deadline (October 12, 2012) through the
SONA system (http://comm.uky.edu/research/signup).
(2)
Participate in the research study(ies) for which you sign up. Remember, failure to participate in a study or to
notify the researcher of the need to cancel/reschedule (which is also managed through the SONA system) will
result in a 5% deduction in your final course grade.
(3)
Login to SONA (http://comm.uky.edu/research/signup) and register the proper class and section to which you
would like your research credit assigned.
Deadlines
(1)
You may sign up for studies between August 31 and October 12. If you opt to complete the alternate written
assignment, you must sign up in SONA (http://comm.uky.edu/research/signup) by October 12 at the latest for
that option, as well.
(2)
You must complete all studied you signed up for by November 30 (Friday before Dead Week), including the
alternate assignment.
(3)
All research credit must be assigned to your class(es)/section(s) in SONA
(http://comm.uky.edu/research/signup) by December 7 (Last day of classes).
Classroom Behavior
Late Assignments
Your assignments for this course, including speeches, essays, journals, and informal assignments, are due on the
dates indicated in the class outline below or as indicated in class. You may request (in advance) one two-day
extension of the due date on the final draft of a major assignment (not drafts). Late assignments are not accepted
unless a two-day extension has been requested and approved in advance of the deadline. If you cannot attend class
on the day an assignment is due, you must post the assignment to Blackboard by the beginning of class. You may
not miss class on the day of a peer review, workshop, or speaking day. You may not write your assignments
during class unless you are directed to do so.
Class Conduct
We will have fun this semester, and there will be a great deal of give and take in our discussions. But we will only
have fun if you conduct yourself with respect for yourself and others. This means you are to 1) come to class
prepared (do all reading and come prepared to discuss it; do all homework) and take pride in the work you do, 2)
offer support and encouragement to your classmates, 3) listen to others carefully before offering your opinion, and
4) talk to your instructor outside of class if anything that happens during class bothers you. In order to maintain a
productive work environment, silence your cell phone or pager before each class period and refrain from eating,
9
CIS 111
10
sleeping, reading the newspaper or your personal email, talking once class is in session unless asked to do so, and
entering the classroom late or leaving early without permission. Students who engage in disruptive behavior may
be directed to leave the class for the remainder of the class period. See the UKY's Code of Student Conduct for
further information on prohibited conduct.
Peer Groups
Because most writers, educators, and other professionals must learn to work collaboratively, you will collaborate-cheerfully--with your peers both in and out of class. I will ask you to form groups early in the semester. You will
work with this group often in class as well. While I do not expect you to develop life-long friendships through this
process, it has been known to happen in my classes! Treat everyone in this class as a valued colleague, and you
will have few problems. That means that you will honor all deadlines agreed to by your classmates as though I
was the one who set them and in general be respectful. Consequences for "slacking" may result in anything
ranging from a full letter grade deduction for the assignment to a zero (determined on a case-by-case basis).
Gender and Pronoun Reference
It is no longer customary to use the masculine pronoun for cases of indefinite pronoun reference, e.g., "When a
professor grades papers, he is often swayed by a student's degree of effort." Instead, stylebooks recommend
changing pronouns to the plural form, e.g., "When professors grade papers, they are often swayed by a student's
degree of effort." Some call this practice "gender-fair language." Others just call it good sense. Regardless of the
reason, it is standard procedure in professional settings and this class, so bring your gender-bender sentences to
class so we can figure them out together.
Blackboard
I am responsive to student requests for changes in the schedule, which means that the daily schedule may change
during the semester. You will be responsible for checking the online syllabus and schedule before beginning your
homework for each of our class meetings for any changes or updates. I will post all assignments on Blackboard. If
you lose an assignment page or handout, you are expected to get a copy from Blackboard rather than from me.
All of your work in this class must be available to be posted both on Blackboard and on paper. In general, all
assignments will require a title, your name, my name, and the date. When you post papers on your Blog (which
only presents texts single-spaced), you must have 1) spacing between each paragraph, 2) all characters visible
(including quotation marks, asterisks, and dashes), and 3) underlining or italics for titles. You are responsible for
keeping back-up (I recommend several) copies of all your work since electronic texts can be lost. Copies of work
can be saved in the “Content Collection” area of your Blackboard account. If your assignment is lost in
cyberspace, you will be expected you to repost it within the same day.
You may also be required to post a message to the class discussion board on Blackboard. To try to make our
messages to each other easy to recognize, try to place in the subject heading a meaningful phrase describing the
content of your message. For instance, if you are discussing a chapter in Williams, you could write in the subject
line "Ch. 1 of Williams." If you have a response to someone's comments, you might put in the subject line, "Re:
Linda's Response to Williams." If you have a question about a class policy, please post it to this list so others can
10
CIS 111
11
benefit from my response. So, for instance, if you want to ask about the grading policy, write, "Question about
Grading."
Additional Student Resources
The Writing Center and The Multimodal Communication Lab (MC3)
The Writing Center is located in W. T. Young Library, Thomas D. Clark Study, 5th Floor, West Wing (phone:
859-257-1368). The staff can help you identify and correct problems with your writing. I will not require you to
go to The Writing Center, but I recommend that all of you consider going if you feel stuck at any stage of the
writing process. You can also schedule an appointment online at: http://wrd.as.uky.edu/writing-center
The Multimodal Communication Lab (MC3) is located in 107A Grehan (phone: 859-218-0221 or 859-2578370). The MC3 is your go to location for assists on class presentations of all types. You have the opportunity to
work one-on-one with peer tutors with experience and specifically trained in presentational methods. We offer
several resources: Brainstorm potential oral, written, and visual presentation topics; organize content and develop
outlines; use proper APA/MLA style in outlines and papers; develop and use effective presentational aids,
including PowerPoint, poster sessions, and prezi, improve public speaking delivery; and Create effective digital
texts (e.g., websites, blogs). You can also schedule an appointment online at: http://cis.uky.edu/icd/mc3-schedule
11
CIS 111
12
Tentative Monday/Wednesday Daily Schedule (CIS 111)
Important: This schedule is tentative. Due dates, reading assignments, and discussion topics could change.
*CC= Textbook
*WB=Workbook
Date
Topics and Activities
Assignments Due on This Date
UNIT 1: GROUP COMMUNICATION
W Aug 22 Course Overview, Introduce Major
Complete Pretest
Projects
M Aug 27
W Aug 29
M Sept 3
W Sept 5
M Sept 10
W Sept 12
M Sept 17
W Sept 19
M Sept 24
W Sept 26
M Oct 1
W Oct 3
M Oct 8
W Oct 10
M Oct 15
W Oct 17
M Oct 22
W Oct 24
M Oct 29
W Oct 31
Communicating in Groups
Solving Group Conflicts/Perspective
Taking
No Class- Labor Day
“This I Believe” Speech
Teambuilding and Group Dynamics
Read:
CC, Module 6.1, 6.2
Read:
CC, Module 6.3
“This I Believe” Speech
Read:
Read: CC, Module 6.5
CC, Feature: Considering Ethics: Group
Dynamics on TV Shows”
UNIT 2: RHETORIC AND ARGUMENT
Starting Line-up Presentations
Starting Line-up Presentations Due
Foundations of Rhetoric
Read: CC, Module 7.1
Rhetorical Situation and Context
Constructing and Deconstructing
Arguments
Position Paper Group Discussion
Position Papers Due
UNT 3: GROUP DELIVERY
Delivery/Making Presentations in a Group Read: CC, Module 6.4
Building a Cohesive Group Argument
In-Class Work Day
Bring Member Outlines & Slide
In-Class Rehearsal Day for Group
Symposium Presentations
All Formal Outlines Due
Speaking Outline Due
Group Dynamics Paper Due
Symposium Presentations
Speaking Outline Due
Symposium Presentations
Speaking Outline Due
UNIT 4: DIGITAL PROJECT
Visual Communication
Read: CC, Module 8.1
Digital Communication
Effective Visuals
Read: CC, Module 8.2, 8.3, 8.4
Visual Communication Online
Distributing Messages for a Public
Audience
Group meetings with instructor about
distribution and digital project
In-Class Work Day
12
CIS 111
13
M Nov 5
Digital Project Presentations
Distribution and Digital Due
UNIT 5: PERSUASIVE APPEALS and Critical Rhetorical Analysis of Visual Artifact
W Nov 7
Conducting a Rhetorical Analysis and
Read: CC, Module 7.5
Selecting an Artifact
M Nov 12 Ethos
Read: CC, Module 7.2
Bring visual for rhetorical analysis to class
W Nov 14 Logos
Read: CC, Module 7.4
M Nov 19 Pathos and Aesthetic Strategies
Read: CC, Module 7.3
W Nov 21 No Class—Thanksgiving
No Class—Thanksgiving
M Nov 26 Fallacies and Supporting Claims
W Nov 28 Peer review/In-class work day
Rhetorical Analysis Draft Due
M Dec 3
Impromptu Speech
W Dec 5
Impromptu Speech
Rhetorical Analysis Due
Final Exam Day/Time: TBA
Period
**Final Essays are due during final
exam time
Please note: Our final exam time is set by the Office of the Registrar and is not negotiable. Please check the
schedule before making travel plans for the end of the semester (http://www.uky.edu/Registrar/finals.htm)
13
CIS 111
14
Tentative Tuesday/Thursday Daily Schedule (CIS 111)
Important: This schedule is tentative. Due dates, reading assignments, and discussion topics could change.
*CC= Textbook
*WB=Workbook
Date
Topics and Activities
Assignments Due on This Date
UNIT 1: GROUP COMMUNICATION
R Aug 23 Course Overview, Introduce Major
Complete Pretest
Projects
T Aug 28
Communicating in Groups
Read:
CC, Module 6.1, 6.2
R Aug 30
Solving Group Conflicts/Perspective
Read:
Taking
CC, Module 6.3
T Sept 4
“This I Believe” Speech
“This I Believe” Speech
R Sept 6
Teambuilding and Group Dynamics
Read:
Read: CC, Module 6.5
CC, Feature: Considering Ethics: Group
Dynamics on TV Shows”
UNIT 2: RHETORIC AND ARGUMENT
T Sept 11
Starting Line-up Presentations
Starting Line-up Presentations Due
R Sept 13 Foundations of Rhetoric
Read: CC, Module 7.1
Rhetorical Situation and Context
T Sept 18 Constructing and Deconstructing
Arguments
R Sept 20 Position Paper Group Discussion
Position Papers Due
UNT 3: GROUP DELIVERY
T Sept 25 Delivery/Making Presentations in a Group Read: CC, Module 6.4
R Sept 27 Building a Cohesive Group Argument
T Oct 2
In-Class Work Day
Bring Member Outlines & Slide
R Oct 4
In-Class Rehearsal Day for Group
T Oct 9
Symposium Presentations
All Formal Outlines Due
Speaking Outline Due
Group Dynamics Paper Due
R Oct 11
Symposium Presentations
Speaking Outline Due
T Oct 16
Symposium Presentations
Speaking Outline Due
UNIT 4: DIGITAL PROJECT
R Oct 18
Visual Communication
Read: CC, Module 8.1
Digital Communication
T Oct 23
Effective Visuals
Read: CC, Module 8.2, 8.3, 8.4
Visual Communication Online
Distributing Messages for a Public
Audience
R Oct 25
Group meetings with instructor about
distribution and digital project
T Oct 30
In-Class Work Day
R Nov 1
Digital Project Presentations
Distribution and Digital Due
No Class – Presidential Election
T Nov 6
14
CIS 111
15
UNIT 5: PERSUASIVE APPEALS and Critical Rhetorical Analysis of Visual Artifact
R Nov 8
Conducting a Rhetorical Analysis and
Read: CC, Module 7.5
Selecting an Artifact
T Nov 13
Ethos
Read: CC, Module 7.2
Bring visual for rhetorical analysis to class
R Nov 15 Logos
Read: CC, Module 7.4
T Nov 20
Pathos and Aesthetic Strategies
Read: CC, Module 7.3
R Nov 22 No Class—Thanksgiving
No Class—Thanksgiving
T Nov 27
Fallacies and Supporting Claims
R Nov 29 Peer review/In-class work day
Rhetorical Analysis Draft Due
T Dec 4
Impromptu Speech
R Dec 6
Impromptu Speech
Rhetorical Analysis Due
Final Exam Day/Time: TBA
Period
**Final Essays are due during final
exam time
Please note: Our final exam time is set by the Office of the Registrar and is not negotiable. Please check the
schedule before making travel plans for the end of the semester (http://www.uky.edu/Registrar/finals.htm)
15
CIS 111
16
Tentative Monday/Wednesday/Friday Daily Schedule (CIS 111)
Important: This schedule is tentative. Due dates, reading assignments, and discussion topics could change.
*CC= Textbook
*WB=Workbook
Date
Topics and Activities
Assignments Due on This Date
UNIT 1: GROUP COMMUNICATION
W Aug 22 Course Overview, Introduce Major
Projects
F Aug 24
Communicating in Groups
Read:
CC, Module 6.1, 6.2
Complete Pretest
M Aug 27 Solving Group Conflicts
Read:
CC, Module 6.3
W Aug 29 Perspective Taking
F Aug 31
Teambuilding
M Sept 3
No Class- Labor Day
W Sept 5
“This I Believe” Speech
“This I Believe” Speech
F Sept 7
“This I Believe” Speech
“This I Believe” Speech
M Sept 10
Group Dynamics
Read:
Read: CC, Module 6.5
CC, Feature: Considering Ethics: Group
Dynamics on TV Shows”
UNIT 2: RHETORIC AND ARGUMENT
W Sept 12 Starting Line-up Presentations
Starting Line-up Presentations Due
F Sept 14
Foundations of Rhetoric
Read: CC, Module 7.1
M Sept 17 Rhetorical Situation and Context
W Sept 19 Constructing Arguments
F Sept 21
Deconstructing Arguments
M Sept 24 Position Paper Group Discussion
Position Papers Due
UNT 3: GROUP UNIT
W Sept 26 Presentations in a Group Speech
Read: CC, Module 6.4
F Sept 28
Delivery in a Group Speech
M Oct 1
Building a Cohesive Group Argument
W Oct 3
In-Class Work Day
Bring Member Outlines & Slide
F Oct 5
In-Class Rehearsal Day for Group
M Oct 8
In-Class Rehearsal Day for Group
W Oct 10 Symposium Presentations
All Formal Outlines Due
Speaking Outline Due
Group Dynamics Paper Due
F Oct 12
Symposium Presentations
Speaking Outline Due
M Oct 15 Symposium Presentations
Speaking Outline Due
4: DIGITAL PROJECT DELIVERY
W Oct 17 Visual Communication
Read: CC, Module 8.1
F Oct 19
Digital Communication
M Oct 22 Principles of Effective Visuals
Read: CC, Module 8.2
W Oct 24 Visual Communication Online
Read: CC, Module 8.3
16
CIS 111
F Oct 26
17
Ethical Choices with Visuals
Read: CC, Module 8.4
M Oct 29
Distributing Messages for a Public
Audience
W Oct 31 Group meetings with instructor about
distribution and digital project
F Nov 2
In-Class Work Day
M Nov 5
Digital Project Presentations
Distribution and Digital Due
UNIT 5: PERSUASIVE APPEALS and Critical Rhetorical Analysis of Visual Artifact
W Nov 7
Conducting a Rhetorical Analysis and
Read: CC, Module 7.5
Selecting an Artifact
F Nov 9
Ethos
Read: CC, Module 7.2
Bring visual for rhetorical analysis to class
M Nov 12 Logos
Read: CC, Module 7.4
W Nov 14 Pathos and Aesthetic Strategies
Read: CC, Module 7.3
F Nov 16
Identifying Rhetorical Appeals in Visual
Arguments
M Nov 19 Fallacies
W Nov 21 No Class—Thanksgiving
No Class—Thanksgiving
F Nov 23
No Class—Thanksgiving
No Class—Thanksgiving
M Nov 26 Supporting Claims
W Nov 28 In-Class work day
F Nov 30
Peer review
Rhetorical Analysis Draft Due
M Dec 3
Impromptu Speech
W Dec 5
Impromptu Speech
F Dec 7
Impromptu Speech
Rhetorical Analysis Due
Final Exam Day/Time: TBA
Period
**Final Essays are due during final
exam time
Please note: Our final exam time is set by the Office of the Registrar and is not negotiable. Please check the
schedule before making travel plans for the end of the semester (http://www.uky.edu/Registrar/finals.htm)
17
Download

CIS 111 Fall 2012 - College of Communication and Information