James Madison University – College of Education
Social Studies Lesson Plan Format
Name: __Erinn Dinsmore______
Date: ___July 14, 2011______
Subject/Class: __Honors World History II_____ Grade Level: __10__ Topic: French Revolution
NCSS Theme #_6_ : Power, Authority and Governance (see page 143-44)
Subthemes:
Knowledge: “Learners will understand the need for the rule of law, as well as a recognition of times when
civil disobedience has been justified”, “Fundamental values of constitutional democracy (the common
good, liberty, etc.)”, comparing political systems with that of the U.S., “Mechanisms by which
governments meet the needs and want of citizens…manage conflict, establish order and security”.
Processes: “Analyze and evaluate conditions, actions, and motivations that contribute to conflict among
groups”
Essential Questions/Big Ideas:
1. How did the Enlightenment and the American Revolution cause the French Revolution?
2. Is Revolution acceptable if attempting to overthrow a tyrant?
3. When does Revolution turn to Civil War?
SOLs/Standards addressed:
The student will demonstrate knowledge of scientific, political, economic, and religious changes during
the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries by
d) explaining the political, religious, and social ideas of the Enlightenment and the ways in which they
influenced the founders of the United States;
e) describing the French Revolution.
Learning Outcomes/Objectives: (See objectives in chart below)
Assessment alignment chart: How will you know they know the objectives listed above?
Objective
U 1: SWBAT list and explain the
significance of the events of the
French Revolution
U2: SWBAT identify similarities
and differences between the
Declaration of Independence and
the Declaration of the Rights of
Man
U3: SWBAT identify and explain
the influence of the
Enlightenment on the Declaration
of Independence and the
Declaration of the Rights of Man
Assessment (formative and summative)
-observation (formative)
-Zooburst, Movie or Flipsnack (summative)
-unit test (summative)
-worksheet (formative)
-unit test (summative)
-discussion (formative)
-worksheet (formative)
-unit test (summative)
-discussion (formative)
Background Content Outline:
In World History II, the preface to the “Age of Revolutions” unit is the Enlightenment, during which I teach
students the ideas that inspire the acts that follow. Therefore, I will start there.
I.
Enlightenment
a. Result of the Scientific Revolution; inspired by an era of questioning which leaks from science
into government and philosophy
b. In an age of monarchy, philosophes such as Locke, Voltaire, Montesquieu and Rousseau
question the status quo. They introduce ideas such as natural rights theory, freedom to be
guaranteed by law to speak and worship as one pleases, the separation of the branches of
government as well as the social contract theory.
c. Still others defend monarchy- the elite and men like Thomas Hobbes who feel that human
beings are incapable of governing themselves and require absolute rule.
d. Books written by philosophers are read by men all over Europe and even make their way to
America.
II.
American Revolution (a very short portion of the WH2 curriculum)
a. Causes- briefly discuss key revolutionary events: Stamp Act, Boston Massacre, Boston Tea
Party, Intolerable Acts, Lexington and Concord and the signing of the Declaration
b. Watch a few short clips from America Rocks and complete a reading on the general summary of
the war
c. Investigate the influence of the Enlightenment on the Declaration of Independence, the
Constitution and Bill of Rights (examining quotes and federalist ideas)
III.
French Revolution
a. Causes- Enlightenment, American Revolution, social structure and
economic struggles in France due to deficit spending. I lead a History
Alive-based activity in which students are assigned an estate and must
do the job of that estate on our class farm to allow students to
experience the social inequity in 18th century France.
b. The History Channel film, “The French Revolution” (pictured on the
right) is supplemented by lecture to give the students the bulk of the
information about the events of the Revolution. I structure the unit by
showing a clip and then debriefing whatever the students have seen or
giving a primary source reading and then showing another clip and so
on. At the close of the movie, I would complete this lesson.
DEAN CHART
Concept word
Revolution
Declaration
D=define
A severe change to
society so that at
the close, the
society has been
completely
transformed from
its original state
Important
announcement
E=examples
French, American,
Latin American,
Industrial,
Communist, etc.
A=attributes
-violent
-sometimes lacks
equity for one
group
-sometimes radical
N=non-examples
Tradition
Status Quo
Ex: Declaration of
Independence,
Declaration of the
Rights of Man,
Balfour
Declaration
-political basis
-document that
men often sign to
give it weight
-directed toward a
power that must be
limited
Silence
Passivity
Instructional Plan: This lesson is made for a 90-minute block. However, when I actually teach this lesson and
give the French Revolution Assignment, the lab time spills over into a second 90-minute block before the
assignment becomes homework.
Warm Up
Class
Discussion
Assignment
Computer
Lab Time
Exit Slip
Question
What the Teacher Will Do
Direct the students to bring up Google on their computer
screens. The teacher will give the following directions
(either verbally or written on the Smart Board): Go to
advanced search and look for the text only versions of the
Declaration of Independence and the Declaration of the
Rights of Man. Copy and paste both of those sections into
Wordle. Compare the results. Find at least 2 words that
are prominent in both Wordles and explain their
significance. Now choose 1 word prominent only in one
document or the other and explain its significance.
The teacher will lead a discussion regarding the
comparison of these two documents in their Wordle form.
What is the biggest difference between the two? What
similarity can we identify? Do you see any words that
might connect to the Enlightenment; how? (etc.)
Upon completion of the discussion, the teacher will hand
out the French Revolution Assignment (see NOTE at the
bottom of the Instructional Plan). The students may
choose a partner or work alone to complete their project of
choice. They will have two class periods to work on this
project, using the information they gleaned from class
lecture/video on the events of the French Revolution.
The teacher will come around with a clipboard to record
partnerships, project choice and go over individual
questions on the project. She will then wander around the
room to observe student work.
With 10 minutes left in the period, the teacher will ask the
students to pack up and turn off the computers. She will
tell them they have next class to work on the assignment.
She will then ask the students, “Was the French
Revolution truly a revolution, considering the entrance of
Napoleon?”
What the Students Will Do
Follow teacher directions.
Compare the two Wordles and
write down the answers to the
questions.
Students will answer the questions
based on their warm up answers.
Students will choose a partner and
a project type. They will use only
their class and video notes to
complete the assignment.
Students will work to complete the
assignment.
The students will answer the exit
question on a slip of paper.
NOTE: I have attached the instruction sheet I used this past year for the French Revolution book assignment.
Using the knowledge I gained from CTA, the “Book” option I have listed will be an electronic book this
upcoming year. Students will have the option to create a 3D book on Zooburst.com or choose to create an
electronic flipbook on flipsnack.com. Of course, the movie option remains.
Materials Needed for the Lesson:
-Class set of computers; access to google.com, flipsnack.com, wordle.com, zooburst.com or Windows
MovieMaker
-French Revolution Assignment Sheet
-Exit Slips
Bibliography/Resources Used (using APA):
This is an actual lesson, with the exception of the wordle.com reference, that I have taught the past 4 years. I
integrated technology using two lectures I listened to at CTA:
Helkowski, T. (6/29/11). Google Presentation. Content Academy History K-12. Lecture conducted from
James Madison University.
Woolever, T. (6/28/11).Using Technology. Content Academy History K-12. Lecture conducted from James
Madison University.
Adaption/Differentiation: Each year that I give this assignment, I issue a challenge for creativity. I tell my
students I am very flexible with the format of the book. This differentiation in the type of product students
submit allows them to take ownership and really have a stake in the final project.
ELL/struggling
I could limit the scope of the assignment for ELL students, although I could also
readers
urge them to create a middle-school aged book to ease the level of the assignment.
ADHD
I would have to monitor students with ADHD during the computer lab time and
perhaps have checkpoints built into the assignment to keep them on task.
Gifted
I could remove some of the minor events of the Revolution and include Napoleon
as a small chapter at the end.
Explanation of Instructional Strategies Used:
I chose the Wordle as the warm up to reactivate prior knowledge and look at two documents we already studied
in a new way. One cannot talk about the French Revolution without also speaking about its influences.
However, the two movements are not carbon copies of one another and this activity brings that comparison and
contrast to light. I chose the book/movie assignment because it helps students understand the significance of
each event as well as the cause-and-effect nature of history. In addition, it is a fun way for students to interact
with the material. Hopefully, after making a book outlining the events of the French Revolution, they have a
better understanding of it. The exit slip is a question I love to ask my students because it really makes them
think. They love to debate and argue so I usually lead with the best answers from the exit slip the next class as
the warm up.
2010 French Revolution Book Assignment
Directions:
1. First, choose if you would like to work ALONE or in a group of no more than 4 students from any of
my Honors World History II classes. By choosing to work in a group, you are choosing to receive a
group grade.
2. Next, select the type of project you would like to tackle: a storybook geared toward 6-8th grade students
OR a movie geared toward high school-aged students.
3. The point of the project is to make the French Revolution easy to understand and interesting. Be
creative. You can make an analogy for the Revolution, tell the story from a certain perspective, make a
comic strip; the sky is the limit. Ask if you are unsure about your idea. What I do not want: class
notes with pictures and a title on the front page.
4. This project is worth 100 points. It is due on: _________________________ (class after your test!)
5. In class Work Date:
*** I will choose the best book from each class and send it to James Wood Middle School for their
use; I will choose the best movie from each class and have a special screening in each of my
Honors World History II classes. ***
Book Requirements:
1. Title Page: include your name(s), your
period, a picture and a creative title for your
story. (8 points)
2. Each page should include: a full description
of the event, including the significance in
relation to the Revolution, any key people
involved and an accompanying illustration.
(8 points per page)
3. I expect you to have a page for each of the
following:
1. Set the scene: why is there a revolution?
(Highlight the causes)
2. Meeting of the Estates General & Tennis
Court Oath
3. Storming the Bastille
4. Writing the Declaration of the Rights of
Man
5. March on Versailles
6. Louis Attempts Escape/War with Austria
7. Execution of the King
8. Reign of Terror
9. Outcomes of the French Revolution
4. You can use the computer to create your
illustrations or you can draw them. You will
be assessed 20 points for
neatness/creativity/organization of your
project. Each storybook page can consume a
full 8 ½ x 11 piece of computer paper or you
can split that piece of paper in half and use
one half per event.
Movie Requirements:
1. Title slide: include your name(s), your
period, a picture and a creative title for your
movie. (8 points)
2. Inclusion of the following events within
your movie: 8 points per topic (this means a
full description of the event, including the
significance in relation to the Revolution &
any key people involved)
1. Set the scene: why is there a revolution?
(Highlight the causes)
2. Meeting of the Estates General & Tennis
Court Oath
3. Storming the Bastille
4. Writing the Declaration of the Rights of
Man
5. March on Versailles
6. Louis Attempts Escape/War with Austria
7. Execution of the King
8. Reign of Terror
9. Outcomes of the French Revolution
3. There is no time minimum; only a 15
minute limit. I want these to be creative
movies that showcase your talents, not
necessarily feature films.
4. You MUST have a credits slide that cites
any outside sources you utilized in the
making of your film. Failure to give
appropriate credit is plagiarism and will
result in a 0 on the project. You will be
assessed 20 points for MLA citation and
the neatness/clarity/creativity of the
themes of your movie.