Agency Accreditation Self-Assessment Report
for the
City of South Bend
Parks & Recreation Department
Submitted to:
Commission for Accreditation
of Park and Recreation Agencies
National Park and Recreation Association
May, 2012
ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword......................................................................................................................................................................ix
Introduction by the Executive Director ....................................................................................................................xi
Agency Overview .........................................................................................................................................................2
ACCREDITION STANDARDS
NOTE:
 Standards marked are fundamental standards for quality operations and are required of all Agencies
seeking accreditation.
1.0
AGENCY AUTHORITY, ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITY .....................................................................................6

1.1
Source of Authority ..................................................................................................................................6
1.1.1 Public Authority/Policy Body ......................................................................................................6
1.1.2 Citizen advisory boards/committees ..........................................................................................7
1.1.3 Responsibilities of Approving Authority, Chief Administrator and Staff .................................8
1.2
Jurisdiction................................................................................................................................................9
1.3
Mission ......................................................................................................................................................9
1.3.1 Goals and Objectives .................................................................................................................. 10
1.3.2 Personnel Input .......................................................................................................................... 11


1.4
Policy, Rules and Regulations, and Operational Procedures ............................................................. 12
1.4.1 Policy Manual ............................................................................................................................ 12

1.5
Agency Relationships ........................................................................................................................... 13
1.5.1 Operational Coordination and Cooperation Agreements ...................................................... 15
2.0
PLANNING ....................................................................................................................................................... 16



2.1
Overall Planning Function within Agency ......................................................................................... 16
2.2
Involvement in Local Planning ............................................................................................................ 17
2.3
Planning with Regional, State and Federal Non-governmental Agencies ........................................ 18
2.4
Comprehensive Plan ............................................................................................................................. 19
2.4.1 Trends Analysis .......................................................................................................................... 20
2.4.2 Community Assessment ............................................................................................................ 21
2.4.3 Community inventory ............................................................................................................... 22
iii
2.4.4 Needs index ................................................................................................................................ 23

2.5
Feasibility Studies .................................................................................................................................. 23
2.6
Strategic Plan ...................................................................................................................................... 24
2.7
Site Plans
2.8
Cultural, Historic and Natural Resource Management Plan ............................................................. 26
2.9
Community Involvement ...................................................................................................................... 27
...................................................................................................................................... 26
3.0
ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION .................................................................................................. 29

3.1
Organizational Structure...................................................................................................................... 29
3.1.1 Statement of Purpose for Each Organizational Component .................................................. 29

3.2

3.3
Administrative Policies and Procedures .............................................................................................. 30
3.2.1 Administrative Offices............................................................................................................... 31
3.2.2 Support Services......................................................................................................................... 32
Communication System ........................................................................................................................ 34

3.4
Process for Public Information, Community Relations, Marketing .................................................. 37
3.4.1 Public Information Statement ................................................................................................... 38
3.4.1.1Public Information and Community Relations Responsibilities ................................ 39
3.4.2 Community Relations Plan ........................................................................................................ 40
3.4.3 Marketing Plan .......................................................................................................................... 41
3.4.3.1 Marketing Position Responsibility ............................................................................. 43

3.5
Management Information Systems ...................................................................................................... 44
3.5.1 Application of Technology ........................................................................................................ 45
3.6
Records Management Policy and Procedure ...................................................................................... 46
3.6.1 Records Disaster Mitigation and Recovery ............................................................... 47
4.0
HUMAN RESOURCES...................................................................................................................................... 48

4.1


Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual ........................................................................................ 48
4.1.1 Code of Ethics ............................................................................................................................. 48
4.1.2 Recruitment Process .................................................................................................................. 50
4.1.3 Equal Opportunity Employment and Workforce Diversity ................................................... 51
4.1.4 Selection process ........................................................................................................................ 51
4.1.5 Background investigations ........................................................................................................ 53
4.1.6 Employee Benefits ...................................................................................................................... 54
4.17 Supervision ................................................................................................................................. 55
4.1.8 Compensation ............................................................................................................................ 55
4.1.9 Performance Evaluation ............................................................................................................ 57
iv
4.1.10 Promotion
.................................................................................................................. 58
4.1.11 Disciplinary System ................................................................................................................. 59
4.1.12 Grievance Procedures ............................................................................................................... 60
4.1.13 Termination and End of Employment ..................................................................................... 60

4.2
Staff Qualifications................................................................................................................................ 61

4.3
Job Analysis and Job Descriptions........................................................................................................ 62

4.4
Chief Administrator .............................................................................................................................. 63
4.5
Physical Examination ............................................................................................................................ 64
4.5.1 Workforce Health and Wellness .................................................................................. 64
4.6
Orientation Program ............................................................................................................................. 65
4.6.1 In-Service Training Function.................................................................................................... 66
4.6.2 Employee Development ............................................................................................................. 67
4.6.3 Succession Planning .................................................................................................................. 69
4.6.2 Professional Organization Membership .................................................................................. 69
4.7
Volunteer Management ........................................................................................................................ 70
4.7.1 Utilization of Volunteers ........................................................................................................... 70
4.7.2 Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, Training and Retention ............................................... 71
4.7.3 Supervision and Evaluation ...................................................................................................... 72
4.7.4 Recognition................................................................................................................................. 73
4.7.5 Liability Coverage ...................................................................................................................... 74
4.8
Consultants and Contract Employees .................................................................................................. 74
5.0
FINANCE (FISCAL POLICY AND MANAGEMENT) ....................................................................................... 77

5.1

Fiscal Policy ............................................................................................................................................ 77
5.1.1 Fees and Charges ....................................................................................................................... 77
5.1.2 Acceptance of Gifts .................................................................................................................... 78
5.1.3 Governmental Grants ................................................................................................................ 79
5.1.4 Private, Corporate, and Non-Profit Support............................................................................ 80

5.2
Fiscal Management Procedures ........................................................................................................... 81
5.2.1 Authority and Responsibility for Fiscal Management ............................................................ 81
5.2.2 Purchasing Procedures .............................................................................................................. 83
5.2.2.1 Emergency purchase procedures .............................................................................. 84

5.3
Accounting System ................................................................................................................................ 84
5.3.1 Financial Status Reports ............................................................................................................ 86
5.3.2 Position Authorization ............................................................................................................... 86
5.3.3 Fiscal Control and Monitoring ................................................................................................. 87
5.3.4 Independent Audit ..................................................................................................................... 88

v

5..4 Annual Budget ....................................................................................................................................... 89
5.4.1 Budget Preparation, Presentation and Adoption ..................................................................... 90
5.4.2 Budget Recommendations ......................................................................................................... 91

5.5
6.0
PROGRAM AND SERVICES MANAGEMENT ................................................................................................. 95

6.1
Recreation Programming Plan ............................................................................................................. 95
6.1.1 Program and Service Determinants ......................................................................................... 95
6.1.2 Participant Involvement ............................................................................................................ 97
6.1.3 Self-Directed Programs and Services ....................................................................................... 98
6.1.4 Leader-Directed Programs and Services.................................................................................. 99
6.1.5 Facilitated Programs and Services ............................................................................................ 99
6.1.6 Fee-Based Programs and Services .......................................................................................... 100
6.1.7 Cooperative Programming ...................................................................................................... 100

6.2
Objectives............................................................................................................................................. 102
6.3
Program Evaluation ............................................................................................................................ 102
6.4
Outreach to Underserved Populations .............................................................................................. 103
6.5
Scope of Program Opportunities ....................................................................................................... 104
6.6
Selection of Program Content ............................................................................................................ 105
6.7
Community Education for Leisure ..................................................................................................... 107
6.8
Program and Service Statistics ........................................................................................................... 108

7.0

Budget Control ...................................................................................................................................... 91
5.5.1 Supplemental/emergency appropriations .............................................................................. 92
5.5.2 Inventory, Fixed Assets Control ................................................................................................ 93
FACILITY AND LAND USE MANAGEMENT ............................................................................................... 111
7.1
Acquisition of Park and Recreation Lands ........................................................................................ 111
7.2
Development of Areas and Facilities ................................................................................................. 112
7.3
Defense Against Encroachment ......................................................................................................... 113
7.4
Disposal of Lands ................................................................................................................................ 114
7.5
Maintenance and Operations Management ..................................................................................... 115
7.5.1 Legal Requirements ................................................................................................................. 116
vi
7.5.2 Preventive Maintenance.......................................................................................................... 118
7.5.3 Recycling .................................................................................................................................. 119

7.6
Fleet Management Plan....................................................................................................................... 120
7.7
Agency-owned Equipment and Property .......................................................................................... 120
7.8
Natural Resource Management and Environmental Stewardship .................................................. 122
7.9
Environmental Sustainability ............................................................................................................. 123
7.10 Maintenance Personnel Assignment ................................................................................................. 124
7.11 Capitol Asset Depreciation and Replacement ................................................................................... 125
8.0
PUBLIC SAFETY, LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SECURITY ........................................................................... 128

8.1
Laws and Ordinances ......................................................................................................................... 128

8.2
Authority to Enforce Laws by Law Enforcement Officers ............................................................... 130
8.3
Law Enforcement Officer Training.................................................................................................... 131

8.4
Public Safety and Law Enforcement Role of Agency Staff ............................................................... 131
8.4.1 Staff Liaison to Law Enforcement Officers ............................................................................ 131
8.4.2 Public Safety and Law Enforcement In-Service Training for Staff ...................................... 132
8.4.3 Handling Disruptive Behavior ................................................................................................ 133
8.4.4 Traffic Control, Parking Plans, and Crowd Control ............................................................. 133
8.4.5 Handling of Evidentiary Items ................................................................................................ 134

8.5
General Security Plan.......................................................................................................................... 135
8.6
Emergency Management Plan ........................................................................................................... 137
8.6.1 In-Service Training for Agency Staff ..................................................................................... 138
9.0
RISK MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................................................... 140

9.1
Risk Management Plan ....................................................................................................................... 140
9.1.1 Statement of Policy .................................................................................................................. 141
9.1.2 Risk Management Operations Manual ................................................................................. 142
9.1.2.1 Accident and Incident Reports ............................................................................... 143
9.1.3 Personnel Involvement and Training .................................................................................... 144
9.2
Risk Manager ....................................................................................................................................... 146
vii
10.0 EVALUATION AND RESEARCH .................................................................................................................... 148
10.1 Evaluation Analysis ............................................................................................................................. 148
10.1.1 Position Responsible for Evaluation...................................................................................... 150
10.2 Experimental and Demonstration Projects ....................................................................................... 152
10.3 Staff Training for Evaluation of Programs, Services, Areas and Facilities ...................................... 152
10.4 Quality Assurance ............................................................................................................................... 154
ATTACHMENTS
Attachment #1 – Executive Organizational Chart .............................................................................................. 156
viii
FOREWORD
Self-Assessment Process
of the
South Bend Parks and Recreation Department
An Accreditation Team was assigned to guide the staff through the ten chapters of the selfassessment, with a coordinator to assist and compile the efforts.
Chapter #
12345678910 -
Team Leader / Title
Matt Moyers, Special Projects Coordinator
Matt Moyers, Special Projects Coordinator
Mark Bradley, Director of Marketing & Promotions
Matt Moyers, Special Projects Coordinator
Bill Carleton, Fiscal Officer
Susan O’Connor, Director of Recreation
Mike Dyszkiewicz, Director of Maintenance
Betsy Harriman, Director of Administration
Betsy Harriman, Director of Administration
Matt Moyers, Special Projects Coordinator
Each team leader was responsible for researching, locating compliance documents, and writing
the summary of their chapter. Team leaders established their own teams to assist with these
tasks. When the compliance documents were identified and the summaries drafted, the Executive
Director reviewed the entire self-assessment document.
The Department wishes to thank the Board of Park Commissioners and the Mayor of the City of
South Bend for their support during this process and for the many park and recreation agencies
who have assisted and contributed to the storehouse of information any agency needs to
complete this process.
City of South Bend Board of Park Commissioners
Robert Henry (President)
Robert Goodrich
Ms. Amy Hill
Garrett Mullins
Executive Director of Parks and Recreation
Phil St. Clair
Mayor, City of South Bend, Indiana
Pete Buttigieg
ix
x
xi
1
AGENCY OVERVIEW
I. Community Demographics (from most recent 2010 U.S. census)
A. Predominant form(s) of government in the tax jurisdiction (i.e., manager, mayoral, commission):
The City of South Bend, mayoral, municipal
B. Population of tax jurisdiction:
101,168 (within city limits)
C. Population of metropolitan service area:
266,931
D. Age profile of tax jurisdiction:
Under 5 years
5 to 9 years
10 to 14 years
15 to 19 years
20 to 24 years
25 to 29 years
30 to 34 years
35 to 39 years
40 to 44 years
45 to 49 years
50 to 54 years
55 to 59 years
60 to 64 years
65 to 69 years
70 to 74 years
75 to 79 years
80 to 84 years
85 years and above
Median age

8,259
7,7187
7,210
6,979
7,557
7,959
7,256
6,287
5,878
6,218
6,548
6,004
4,666
3,211
2,358
2,280
2,303
2,477
8.2%
7.6%
7.1%
6.9%
7.5%
7.9%
7.2%
6.2%
5.8%
6.1%
6.5%
5.9%
4.6%
3.2%
2.3%
2.3%
2.3%
2.4%
33.3 years of age
source: 2010 US Census Data (from internet website WWW.census.gov)
E. Income profile of tax jurisdiction:
Households
42,627
Less than $10,000
$10,000 to $14,999
$15,000 to $24,999
$25,000 to $34,999
$35,000 to $49,999
$50,000 to $74,999
$75,000 to $99,999
$100,000 to $149,999
$150,000 to $199,999
$200,000 or more
4,755
3,707
7,404
6,902
8,053
6,714
2,899
1,505
224
464
100.0%
11.2%
8.7%
17.4%
16.2%
18.9%
15.8 %
6.8%
3.5%
0.5%
1.1%
2
Median household income (dollars)
With earnings
Mean earnings (dollars)
With Social Security income
Mean Social Security income (dollars)
With Supplemental Security Income
Mean Supplemental Security Income (dollars)
With public assistance income
Mean public assistance income (dollars)
With retirement income
Mean retirement income (dollars)
$32,439
$33,410
$41,135
$12,369
$11,690
$2,008
$6,635
$2,183
$2,155
$7,306
$11,398
78.4%
29.0%
4.7%
5.1%
17.1%
* source: 2010 US Census Data (from internet website WWW.census.gov)
F. Racial diversity of the tax jurisdiction:
White
Black or African American
American Indian, Eskimo or Aleut
Asian
Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander
Persons reporting two or more races
Hispanic or Latino origin (of any race)

60.5%
26.6%
.5%
1.3%
.01%
4.2%
13%
source: 2010 US Census Data (from internet website WWW.census.gov)
II. Agency Characteristics (all sited from the 2011 annual report)
A. Operating budget:
$13,070,878
B. Capital budget:
$872,052
C. Full-time employees:
114 full-time positions for the Department.
D. Part-time/seasonal employees:
324 part-time/season positions for the Department over the entire year.
E. Parkland acreage:
1,296.28 acres .
F. Significant agency awards and/or recognitions:
 1997 - IPRA Outstanding Facilities Award – Belleville Softball Complex
 2001 – IPRA Outstanding Facility Award – O’Brien Recreation
Center/Administrative Offices
 2002 - Superintendent and Marketing Director earn advanced certification from
Charles Reitz Marketing & Revenue School
 2003 - South Bend Parks & Recreation Dept. wins Kudos Award from National
Recreation & Parks Assn. for Best Website for a Class III city – 2003
 2003 - IPRA Outstanding Facilities Award – O’Brien Skate Park
 2003 – IPRA Outstanding Special Project Award – B.L.A.S.T. Program
3










2004 – IPRA Outstanding Park Development - Southeast Park
2004 – N.R.P.A. Great Lakes Region Partnership Award – Potawatomi Zoological
Society, Potawatomi Zoo/South Bend Parks & Recreation Dept.
2005 - IPRA Outstanding Facility –Martin Luther King Center
2005 Indiana Parks & Recreation Assn. Essential Services Award (new)– Promotion
Publications/Advertisement; benefits of health & fitness to the community through
parks & recreation.
2007 – IPRA Outstanding Service Award – South Bend Parks & Recreation Dept.
2008 – Outstanding Park Development – Potawatomi Park Universally Accessible
Playground
2009 – IPRA – Excellence in Partnership – in conjunction with the St. Joseph
County Community Foundation for programming at the new Chris Wilson Pavilion
at Potawatomi Park.
2010 IPRA – Outstanding Professional of the Year, Executive Director Phil St. Clair,
South Bend Parks and Recreation Department
2011 IPRA – Outstanding Park Agency of the Year – South Bend Parks and
Recreation Department.
2011 IPRA Distinguished Lifetime Service Award – Susan O’Connor, Director of
Recreation, South Bend Parks and Recreation Department.
III. Physical Characteristics
A. Geographic size of tax jurisdiction (square miles):
41.45 square miles
B. Describe significant rivers, lakes, mountain ranges, which influence the community:
South Bend lies along the north/south continental divide in the verdant St. Joseph valley. From
rich black farmland at its edges, to the groves of leafy hardwood trees throughout the city,
South Bend enjoys a veritable umbrella of color from spring through fall. But it is the St. Joseph
River, lazily winding its way through the center of downtown, that has defined South Bend,
forever marking the City as an economic and cultural crossroads, transportation hub, and the
regional center for business and industry, government, health, and education.
Three and half centuries ago, the first Europeans sailed on the St. Joe, recognizing the
importance of this area as the shortest portage for a route to the Mississippi. More than 160
years ago, the first telegraph was strung through the City, followed five years later by the first
train. The tradition continued with the rise of Studebaker wagons and automobiles in the
nineteenth and twentieth Century.
From its position at the top of the state, South Bend is perfectly located for business, in the
center of a triangle between Chicago, Indianapolis and Detroit. A UPS study showed that only
one other city, Harrisburg, PA is more strategically positioned than South Bend to offer one-day
delivery to reach a significant portion of the country’s population.
In the 21st Century, South Bend once again lies on the crossroads, now of the information
super-highway. Through the use of 21st Century technology and access to trans-continental
fibers, South Bend has opened up a robust, competitive environment, on a level playing field
with Chicago and other large cities, offering internet connectivity, data backup, disaster
recovery operations, conference centers and research facilities.
4
IV. Cultural Characteristics
A. Significant social and/or cultural factors that influence the agency's delivery of service:
A Great Place to Live . . .
From its historic neighborhoods, with classic Victorian and Craftsman homes, to new suburban
development, to downtown apartments and condominiums, South Bend offers multi-ethnic and
socio-economically diverse neighborhoods, with very affordable housing. Community
Development programs like First Time Homebuyers Assistance, Building Block Grants, and the
Neighborhood Partnership Centers work with residents to invest in neighborhoods, by creating
ownership and providing assistance to build a better community.
The home of seven universities and colleges, including the University of Notre Dame, St. Mary’s
College, Holy Cross College, Indiana University South Bend, and Ivy Tech, South Bend is a
center for learning. We are working to make South Bend a place where students settle, develop
careers and grow families after graduation, resulting in a “brain gain” for the community. The
South Bend Community School Corporation provides quality education from grades K-12,
including a high school magnet program, in addition to South Bend’s fine tradition of private
and parochial schools.
South Bend boasts a rich arts and entertainment scene: the Morris Performing Arts Center,
ranked in the Top 50 in the world, has it all – national touring, Broadway shows, superb
classical music performances, the best in pops concerts, great country shows and uplifting
dance. Vibrant local bands and arts organizations present a multiplicity of venues for all ages.
The Studebaker National Museum and the Center for History form a museum campus that
reflects the grand history of the community and celebrates the rich ethnicity that is the
cornerstone of the city. Car enthusiasts revel in the creative displays that bring to life the
legacy, the innovations, and the entrepreneurial spirit of Studebaker.
The South Bend Regional Museum of Art offers the finest in gallery shows and special exhibits
and provides the opportunity for learning and experiencing art for all ages. Downtown’s arts
district is growing, with a variety of galleries and music venues that encourage a walkable,
new-urbanist atmosphere. This eclectic scene is also catching the attention of 21st Century
business, who are drawn to the City’s combination of creativity and innovation .
South Bend is a destination for sports enthusiasts of all kinds. When the weather is warm,
residents of South Bend enjoy hitting the greens for a round of golf on any of the four PGAcaliber City golf courses, or walking and biking the 11 miles of riverside trails along the St.
Joseph River. The more adventurous can battle the rapids of the East Race Waterway, the first
artificial whitewater course in North America.
If you’re more of a spectator than a participant, a viewing of any one of neighboring Notre
Dame’s varsity sport clubs matches is for you. From division 1 basketball game match-ups to a
stadium rattling football games amidst thousands of fans, the University of Notre Dame offers a
sport to suit any fan. South Bend is also home to Olympic team trials on the East Race, NCAA
championships at Notre Dame and Belleville Softball Park, International Special Olympics, the
McDonald’s All-American High School Basketball Games, and the College Football Hall of Fame.
For the family, the South Bend Parks & Recreation Department offers scores of programs at over
60 parks and recreation facilities. Kids can try the “Children’s Arts in the Parks,” the “Kids’
Triathlon” or the “Rum Village Fall Festival”. Work up a sweat at the O’Brien Skate Park and
cool off at the Potawatomi Pool and Kennedy Water Park. Kids and adults alike will love
visiting the Potawatomi Zoo, ranked in the top 20 Zoos in the nation for kids. And don’t leave
town without attending South Bend’s own minor league baseball team Silver Hawks game!
5
South Bend was awarded “All American City” in 2011 and just in the past year was designated
a bronze status Bicycle friendly city.
6
1.0 AGENCY AUTHORITY, ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITY
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
1.1 Source of Authority
Standard: The source of authority of, and powers for, the public recreation and park managing
authority shall be clearly set forth by legal document.
Commentary: The source of authority or legal basis of operation and extent of the powers of the
managing authority shall be identified in legal document such as the state statute, local
charter, city ordinance, or park district code.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide legal citation and, if appropriate, date of resolution by local
governing entity or legal authority (i.e., enabling act, support documentation, ordinance; if
permissive state authority, provide charter).
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The legal source of authority for the South Bend Department of Parks and Recreation
was established pursuant to Indiana Code 36-10-4, in 1939, and is confirmed in the
City’s municipal code, Chapter 2, Article 11, Sec. 2-137.
Available for review On-Site
A copy of the code and the municipal ordinance is available in Accreditation File 1.1 in
the Agency’s reference library. Additionally, the sited state law is available on-line at:
http://www.state.in.us/legislative/ic/code/
and the municipal ordinance at:
http://www.municode.com/resources/gateway.asp?pid=13974&sid=14.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.1.1 Public Authority/Policy Body
Standard: The organizational authority structure should provide for one public authority
responsible for policy-making functions.
Commentary: The policy-making entity is legally, ultimately responsible for the operation of the
recreation and parks department; it has the "power to accomplish without recourse." It may
be the city council or commission, an elected board of citizens specifically for parks and
recreation, the school board, the county supervisors, or another legally established and elected
body. This entity usually has taxing power and must approve the budget; it holds title to
property. It also serves an important function in interpreting the programs, services, and
facilities and in exerting influence throughout the community to improve and expand park
and recreation programs, services, and facilities.
When the policy-making entity is not an elected independent board specifically for parks and
recreation, the governing entity may appoint a parks and recreation board, which is delegated
7
authority for operating policies and general administrative practices. This body would be
considered a semi-independent board, since it would depend upon the city council or county
commission for ultimate policy approval, in addition to approval and allocation of its funds.
The board would be an integral part of city or county government or other local entity; and,
the park and recreation executive may be directly responsible to the city or county manager,
or to the park and recreation board itself. The park and recreation executive should not be
responsible to both. When the operating policy-making body is a citizen board, it should hold
regular meetings, duly publicized, with the actions of the board and reports of the
administrator officially recorded and available. Board members should be representative of
the total community and serve with staggered terms.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the organizational authority structure chart with a narrative
description; show relationship to governing body, approving authority and the department.
Distinguish this chart from a staff organization chart. Provide the public authority bylaws or
charter.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Board of Park Commissioners serves as the policy making body for the South
Bend Parks and Recreation Department. The Board is made up of four members
who serve staggered four-year terms and are appointed by the Mayor of the City of
South Bend. The South Bend Board of Parks Commissioners, by ordinance, operates
under the Second Class City Park Law. State Statute (36-10-3, Refer to Indiana
Code) establishes the executive department of public parks in cities and towns and
provides Boards of Parks and Recreation shall have exclusive government,
management, and control of all parks and recreation areas within the City or Town,
subject only to the laws of the State.
Available for review On-Site
A copy of Indiana Code 36-10-3 lists all duties and grants authority to the Board of
Park Commissioners.
Included Attachment #1: Executive Organizational Chart
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.1.2 Citizen Advisory Boards/Committees
Standard: There should be citizen advisory boards/committees.
Commentary: Advisory boards may serve an entire local governmental area, but also may serve a specific
neighborhood, function, activity, center, or a particular site. The board(s) may be appointed
by the mayor and the city council and/or the county commissioners, or may be elected. They
may have delegated authority to manage their own affairs; however, have no final authority
or responsibility for policy or administration. These types of boards are purely advisory to
the governing body of the jurisdiction, which appoints them. Such boards may be composed
of a relatively large body of representatives from all interested factions of the locality. In
addition to those members appointed by officials of the city or county, interested civic groups
may select representatives. The advisory board(s) engage the community and serve as
advocates for the advancement of programs, facilities, and services.
8
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide list of boards/committees with membership, authority,
responsibilities and duties, terms of office, meeting minutes.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department benefits from the advice and
support of several citizen organizations, committees and task forces. All of these
groups are populated by volunteers; serve to advise and inform the Board and staff;
and bring a diversity of opinions and perspective to the planning process for the
Department.
Recently the South Bend Park Foundation has been formed to support the agency in
its work.
Available for review On-Site
A matrix of affiliated groups is in Accreditation File 1.1.1.2 in the Department’s
reference library and distinguishes the type of group, its authority and the scope of
its work.
Copies of the by-laws of the South Bend Urban Tree Advisory Council, the
Potawatomi Zoological Society, the operating agreement of the South Bend Swim
Club, and a selection of information about the Park Foundation are available in the
accreditation file.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.1.3 Responsibilities of Approving Authority, Chief Administrator, and
Staff
Standard: There should be established guidelines defining the delineation of responsibilities for the
policy-making functions of the approving authority and the administrative functions of
the chief administrator and staff.
Commentary: The agency should have a clear understanding of how the overall approving authority,
chief administrator, and staff relate to one another. Documentation of these roles is often
defined through bylaws, memoranda of understandings (MOUs), charters, position
descriptions, etc.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the established guidelines outlining the delineation of
responsibilities for approving authority, chief administrator, and staff.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The various roles are defined by the job description of the South Bend Parks and
Recreation Department’s Executive Director and by Indiana Code.
Available for review On-Site
G-9 of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Masterplan Update 2009-2013 is a
chart and clear delineation of the various component responsibilities.
9
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.2 Jurisdiction
Standard: The specific geographical boundaries of the agency's jurisdiction should be set forth by
geographical description and map.
Commentary: It is important that the Agency clearly sets forth the description of the geographical
boundaries of its jurisdiction both within and outside the corporate limits. A detailed official
map depicting the boundaries of the jurisdiction is essential.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a map with geographical boundaries of jurisdiction and
service areas, including location of facilities identified.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The jurisdiction of the City of South is defined by the sum of its six clearly delineated
council districts. This is set out in Chapter 1, Section 1-4 of the municipal code.
Available for review On-Site
A copy of the sited code is in Accreditation File 1.1.2., as well as being available on-line
at:
http://www.municode.com/resources/gateway.asp?pid=13974&sid=14.
A map on display in the Department’s reference library, South Bend City Parks, clearly
defines the jurisdictional boundaries graphically and displays the locations of all park
properties.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.3 Mission
Standard: There shall be an established mission statement, which defines the direction and
purpose of the Agency.
Commentary: The agency mission is the purpose or reason for the existence of the agency and establishes
the long-term direction for the agency services and activities. It shall reflect the outcomes or
impacts that the agency seeks on its constituency. The mission statement shall be reviewed
periodically by the public authority and is implemented through making and keeping of
policies and achieving stated goals and objectives.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the established mission statement and evidence of periodic
review.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
“We Build Community through People, Parks and Programs.”
10
The Mission of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department is to:
 Provide recreational and leisure experiences
 Strengthen community image and sense of place
 Foster human development
 Forge community partnerships
 Increase cultural unity
 Promote health and wellness
 Strengthen the ethic of environmental stewardship
 Create a safer community
 Support and enhance economic progress
 Maintain, utilize and preserve the resources entrusted to us for the public good.
Available for review On-Site
A-2 of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Masterplan Update 2009- 2013 lists the
Mission Statement, it is posted on the South Bend Parks and Reaction’s website at
www.sbpark.org and is publically posted at our facilities and points of public contact.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.3.1 Agency Goals and Objectives
Standard: There shall be established, measurable goals and objectives for the agency and for each
organizational component within the agency. Such goals and objectives shall be
directed toward accomplishing the agency mission, be reviewed annually, and
distributed to all appropriate personnel.
Commentary: Establishing and routinely reviewing goals and objectives of the agency and each
component helps to ensure direction and unity of purpose and serves as a basis for measuring
progress. The goals and objectives shall state outcomes or impacts that the agency seeks to
have on its constituency. There shall be an annual review stating the progress made toward
the attainment of goals and objectives submitted to the agency's chief administrator and
boards.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the goals and objectives for each organizational component,
with evidence of annual review and distribution.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The goals and objectives of the Department are determined annually as a critical part of
the annual review and evaluation procedure. Goals and objectives for organizational
components of the Department are tied to the evaluation process and flow from the City
of South Bend’s comprehensive twenty-year City Plan through the Park and Recreation
Department’s Master Plan, and are tracked and updated in its Action Steps Matrix.
Each goal reflects and reinforces the mission statement and indicates measurable
progress targets. Each individual employee also develops goals and objectives for their
own performance and the various operations they overseer with his/her supervisor up
to and including the superintendent level. Each level of goals is a progression, i.e., in
order for City Plan to progress, certain reinforcing components of the Park and
11
Recreation’s Master Plan (2009-2013) need to be met, and for to happen, certain
objectives and goals from the various Division heads have to succeed, and therefore the
programs and staff that they oversee also have to meet their own individual goals and
objectives.
Available for review On-Site
Goals for the organizational components of the Department are found in the South
Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2009-2013)’s Action Plan Matrix, M-1
through M-16, as well as described in the Administration, Policies and Procedures
Manual.
The text description of the Department’s organization chart also defines its goals and
objectives.
In Accreditation File 1.3.1 is a listing of the current performance indicators tracked
through the performance based budget.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.3.2 Personnel Involvement
Standard: There should be a process for acquiring and considering input from the various
personnel levels within the agency in the development of agency goals and objectives.
Commentary: Obtaining the input of personnel has great value in improving the relevancy and coverage
of goals and objectives statements; further, it encourages the feeling that employees have
contributed to the management and operation of the agency.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of the methods utilized to obtain input from
personnel at various levels of the organization (e.g., surveys, focus groups, etc.) and how the
organization’s goals and objectives are communicated to all personnel.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
All levels of staff involvement are considered essential to accomplishing the South Bend
Parks and Recreation Department’s mission. The formation of plans and goals seeks
staff input in a variety of ways. Many of the components of the Department have
divisional plans, including goals and objectives, which are created directly from staff
meetings and discussions, and the park Master Plan updates require four to six
intensive all-staff meetings to solicit input and critique. Since the creation of goals and
objectives are created in a “stepping stone” manner for the Department (staff goals
supporting program goals, program goals supporting divisional goals, divisional goals
supporting the Department’s goals) and are also part of every employee’s personal
evaluation, the entire planning process is based upon a high level of input from every
level of staff.
Available for review On-Site
Individual goals are developed as part of the employee evaluation process and are on
file in the Department’s personnel files.
The Recreation Department Programs Manual, which includes staff evaluations of
programs and input of future development is available in the reference library.
12
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.4 Policies, Rules and Regulations, and Operational Procedures
Standard: A distinction should be made among policies, rules and regulations, and operational
procedures and how each is developed and implemented within the agency.
Commentary: The differences between Policies, Rules and regulations, and Operational procedures are
often confused. Policies are broad statements set forth by the policy-making approving
authority. An established policy is a settled course of action required to be followed by the
chief administrator and staff. Rules and regulations are administrative statements developed
by the agency chief administrator and, when appropriate, approved by the board. They are
based on the policies and set forth requirements guiding the activity of participants and staff
functions. Operational procedures are guidelines, set forth by the administrator and staff to
facilitate the implementation of policies, how something is to be done, when, and by whom.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation establishing how policies, rules and
regulations, and operational procedures are developed and implemented.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Operational Procedures
The Superintendent, Division Heads of the Department, Managers, Supervisors and
Foremen establish operational procedures to facilitate the efficient and effective
execution of the Department’s operations. Although staff input is sought in the
formulation of these procedures, formal administrative and/or board approval is not
required.
Rules and Regulations
Rules and regulations are administrative statements developed by the Superintendent
and approved by the Board of Park Commissioners to provide guidance to staff at all
levels. They are task-specific, based on existing policies, and provide checks and
balances for operational controls. Board approval of rules and regulations may be
accomplished by a single reading and review during regular board meetings and a vote
affirming adoption by a majority of the board.
Policies
Policies are broad statements that guide and direct the actions of the Department.
Policies for the Parks and Recreation Department are developed in accordance with the
General Policy 1010, of the Department’s Policy Manual, updated as needed, and
require a complete review at every cycle of the five-year Master Plan.
Available for review On-Site
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department Administration, Policies and
Procedures Manual is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.4.1 Policy Manual
13
Standard: There shall be a manual setting forth the agency policies, which is kept up-to date,
reviewed systematically, at least every five years, by the administration, and made
available to pertinent administrative and supervisory personnel.
Commentary: The agency chief administrator shall prepare a review of policies for the approving
authority. Policies may be reviewed in general or with specificity, but in either case, the chief
administrator shall recommend to the approving authority the need to continue, change or
terminate existing policies. Of course, policy changes can be recommended at any time and
do not have to wait for the systematic review.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide access to the agency policy manual, demonstrate how it is
made available, and provide evidence of its review by the approving authority and
administrators.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department works with the following policy
manuals:
•
City of South Bend, Department of Human Resources, Personnel Policies &
Procedures: As established and administered by the Department of Human Resources.
•
The South Bend Parks and Recreation and Department Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual: As established and administered by the City of South Bend
Parks and Recreation department.
•
OSHA Programs for the City of South Bend, the City of South Bend’s Risk
Management Manual: administered by the City of South Bend Safety and Risk
Management Department.
These manuals are kept current at all times, adjusted and updated as needed, and are
available to all department employees in the department reference library.
The Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual is also distributed to all City employees
upon orientation.
The Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual is completely
reviewed at each five-year cycle of the renewal of the Master Plan, is distributed to each
Division Head, and a stationed copy is kept at many of our facilities, as well as being
hosted on the Department’s data server.
Available for review On-Site
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department Administration, Policies and
Procedures Manual is available in the Department’s reference library with its
distribution list and the update trackings.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.5 Agency Relationships
14
Standard: There shall be an understanding of the roles of counterpart and complementary
organizations through liaison roles with nearby park and recreation agencies, public
and social service organizations, and other local government agencies.
Commentary: Establishing and maintaining effective channels of communication between governmental
and non-governmental agencies are essential in improving cooperation through partnerships.
Good liaison can result in more productive efforts, including greater cost effectiveness and
efficiency, in accomplishing the mission of the agency.
When possible, there shall be park and recreation agency representation on all development
and subdivision control committees. This is especially important when the park and
recreation service is not a department of local government, but has an independent board or
commission. Also, it is particularly important to maintain liaison with regulatory agencies.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide evidence of cooperative efforts, including a list of staff with
liaison responsibility. This information may be evidenced through Memoranda of
Agreement, Memoranda of Understanding, Cooperative Agreements, etc.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department is fortunate to work in partnership and
share in cooperative ventures with many public, private and not-for-profit agencies. The
roles and relations of these agencies can usually be broadly defined into three broad
categories:

Those outside agencies who work primarily or exclusively in support of the Parks
and Recreation Department, for example the South Bend Botanical Society who are
organized strictly in support of the Department’s botanical conservancies,

Those agencies that hold certain shared concepts or ideals that are core to the
mission of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department. An example would be the
St. Joseph County Parks Department which shares many similar goals and beliefs, but
also maintains a separate focus and has a different, distinct overall mission, and

Those agencies that may not share any core ideals or mission-orientated goals,
but who may also provide similar services and programs to the community, or who, when
in partnership with our operations, can accomplish some of their goals or tasks that they
couldn’t achieve independently. In some cases, these agencies, through partnership or
support, may be enablers for the Department to achieve goals or tasks that we could not
attain without their assistance. The YMCA would be an example, or an independent
private fitness center.
Available for review On-Site
A grid listing of counterpart agencies and the staff liaisons to those agencies is in
Accreditation File 1.5.
15
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
1.5.1 Operational Coordination and Cooperation Agreements
Standard: There should be established policies on cooperative use and maintenance of facilities
and program operation, facility design, land development, finances, etc., with other
agencies or organizations or individuals.
Commentary: Long-term agreements with periodic review are preferable to annual agreements, inasmuch
as they permit longer-range program planning. There should be agreements between the park
and recreation agency and other city/county agencies, as well as the schools and other public
and private agencies.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the policies and agreements.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The primary partner in the cooperative use of facilities and program operation is the
South Bend Community School Corporation through contract. Smaller, less detailed
arrangements are usually made for organizations generally using our standard facility
rental contracts with any changes to price or expectations made upon the agreement
and agreed to by both partners. Some facilities have specialized regulations beyond the
standard rental contracts for cooperative group use, and those are clearly defined and
signed for each agreement.
Available for review On-Site
In Accreditation File 1.5.1. is a copy of the interlocal contract between the South Bend
Community School Corporation and the South Bend Park and Recreation Department.
Included in this file is a sample standard contract, modified for special consideration
for co-operative use by Wheelchair Basketball, and a copy of Group Policies for
Potawomi Pool, which is a listing of additional regulations for such group use. See also
the Administration, Polices and Procedures Manual, 8040 Co-sponsored Programs.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
16
2.0 PLANNING
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
2.1 Overall Planning Function within Agency
Standard: The agency should have planning functions with established responsibilities, including
at least one staff member or consultant with planning capability.
Commentary: Planning activities are essential to effective agency management. Frequently, they are the
responsibility of a permanent component of the agency; however, they may be performed by
staff from various units or contracted to an outside professional consultant. Complex
demands for services and limited public resources require that the park and recreation agency
carefully research operational alternatives and plan future programs.
Precise guidelines should establish the parameters of planning tasks and responsibilities. The
planning functions that may be included in the guidelines are: multi-year planning, operations
planning, budgeting, personnel allocation alternatives, systems analysis, contingency
planning, etc. The functions should include a description of activities (budget development,
forms control, grant management, strategic operational planning, traffic analysis, and
information management) and how they should be organized or assigned.
The competence of the planning unit's leadership is a major ingredient in a productive and
effective planning effort. This competence may be reflected both in academic training and in
prior professional experience. The chief administrator should be closely involved in the
planning process.
A direct relationship between planning personnel and the chief administrator enhances the
ability for the planning personnel to collect data and make recommendations, and the chief
administrator's ability to make informed decisions.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the responsibilities and functions of the planning entity.
Provide resume of training and experience for staff and/or consultants who have planning
capabilities.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department utilizes the services of professional
park planners, landscape architects, representatives of Indiana University, Notre Dame,
City Planners and other knowledgeable planning and design professionals for the
development of resource management and land use plans.
The planning process also includes guidance, input, review, and discussion from
various neighborhood representatives, historic preservation officers, department
advisory councils, the members of the Board of Park Commissioners, City of South Bend
Administration and staff. Significant input from the public at large is received on issues
related to resource management and appropriate land use.
17
The City of South Bend also operates the Community and Economic Development
Division which maintains a staff of planners for all city projects.
Available for review On-Site:
In Accreditation File 2.1 there are qualifications for Chuck Lehman of Lehman &
Lehman, Landscape Architects and planners, and Greg Kil, of Kil Architecture as
examples.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.2 Involvement in Local Planning
Standard: The park and recreation agency shall be regularly involved in local planning
(community, comprehensive planning, strategic planning, capital improvement
planning) that will impact parks and recreation services within their jurisdiction.
Commentary: Agency personnel shall be involved with the community planning process through
participation on local planning committees.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Define the role, personnel and documentation of involvement (i.e.,
minutes, agenda, cooperative agreements, etc.).
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
South Bend Parks and Recreation believes that community representation in the
creation, planning, implementation and evaluation of all programs and services is
integral to the expected outcomes. Informal and formal community input is derived
from a variety of forums and considered when addressing issues relative to the overall
delivery of parks and recreation services.
In conjunction with the development of the 2009 - 2013 Master Plan update,
department staff initiated a meeting for all recreation service providers and identified
stake holders to discuss services offered, eliminate duplication of services and maximize
available resources. This effort helped open lines of communication with all recreation
service providers.
The staff is involved with over fifty neighborhood associations and responds to the six
districts’ Common Council members dealing with park and recreation issues with wide
ranging complexity.
Examples of community planning groups are:
•
Master Plan Focus Groups – The current Master Plan planning process began in
September 2003. The initial phases of the process included a variety of focus group
meetings to assist the staff in determining the recreational needs of the community.
These focus groups consisted of staff, government officials and leadership, department
partners and other community organization representatives, volunteers, and
community members.
•
Interested citizen organizations - These organizations consist of citizens who
serve in an advisory role to staff and the Board of Park Commissioners. Each of these
groups have contributed valuable input regarding issues pertinent to their respective
18
areas resulting in major improvements including but not limited to; preservation of the
conservancies, improvements such as a new veterinary hospital at the Potawatomi Zoo,
and large portions of the design elements at South East Park.
Department of Parks and Recreation staff have been, and continue to be, involved in a
variety of community planning groups. This involvement ranges from informal
communications with grass roots local neighborhood associations to membership on
councils at the state level to involvement with federal organizations. These efforts
combine to provide a comprehensive approach in which to address social issues,
natural resource management, and short and long term planning efforts. An excellent
example of involvement with community planning groups is the development of City
Plan.
The Parks and Recreation Department’s Director of Marketing and Special Project
Coordinator frequently participate in neighborhood association meetings, and regularly
make presentations of issues and solicit input from the community.
The Natural Resources Coordinator is the assigned staff member to coordinate the
meetings and agenda of the Environmental Resources Advisory Team whose members
provide ongoing input and advisory opinion regarding planning and development
issues that directly affect department properties.
Available for review On-Site
In Accreditation File 2.2.2 is the listing of the Neighborhood Associations for South
Bend, and a sample agenda..
In the department’s reference library is a copy of City Plan, Section D, pgs 4- 7 detail
the process of community input, stakeholders and feedback from planning
organizations.
In the departments reference library is a copy of the department’s Master Plan, section
K, demonstrating the community planning process.
A grid displaying other community planning organizations and park liaisons involved is
in the accreditation file.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.3 Planning with Regional, State, Federal and Non-government Agencies
Standard: The public park and recreation Agency should have a working relationship with
regional, state, and federal agencies as well as non-governmental service providers that
impact the services within their jurisdiction.
Commentary: The agency should be engaged with regional, state, federal and non-government groups to
ensure the coordination of planning efforts that affect the delivery of parks and recreation
services within the jurisdiction. Involvement in these efforts should highlight the
complementary nature of the services and minimize duplication.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Define the role of agency personnel and documentation of
involvement (minutes, agendas, cooperative agreements) in state federal and nongovernmental agencies planning.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
19
The Indiana Parks and Recreation Association has an active and important legislative
committee that reviews and submits state legislative proposals on a regular basis.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Superintendent and the Director of Recreation are
current members of the Indiana Parks and Recreation Association’s legislative
committee and have been for more than three years each, and both the Superintendent
and the Director of Recreation hold posts as representatives of Indiana on the Great
Lakes Regional Council for the National Parks and Recreation Association. The
Superintendent of Parks sits on the Board of Regents for the N.R.P.A. Reitz Marketing
and Revenue Sources Management School, and is active on national issues on their
behalf.
The Indiana Parks and Recreation Association has an active and important legislative
committee that reviews and submits state legislative proposals on a regular basis.
Each year the legislative committee of the I.P.R.A. reviews proposed state legislation that
could have a potential impact on parks and recreation agencies in Indiana. The
committee members meet as needed to review legislative proposals. In addition,
members of the committee call and write their legislators to voice the Indiana Park and
Recreation Association’s stance on particular issues. Often times, members of the
legislative committee testify at state committee meetings on the benefits or detriments of
a particular piece of legislation. The Association retains a paid lobbyist to assist with
contacting and representing the Association’s position on relevant legislation.
The Superintendent and the Director of Recreation have also represented the Indiana
Parks and Recreation Association and the Great Lakes Regional Council for the NRPA in
lobbying efforts at the national level in conjunction with the NRPA Mid-Year
Conference held in Washington, DC. Recent lobbying efforts on the national level
include support for a return in funding of the Land and Water Conservation Fund.
Available for review On-Site
A listing of professional organizations that park staff are members of and are active
attendance with are available in the accreditation files.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.4 Comprehensive Plan
Standard: There shall be a comprehensive park and recreation system plan, which is basically an
inventory of existing conditions and recommendations for future programs and
services, acquisition and development of areas and facilities, and administration. The
plan shall be officially adopted by the appropriate governing body, updated regularly,
be linked with a capital improvement budget and a phased development.
Commentary: The Agency shall have a multiyear plan, which includes: goals and operational objectives,
anticipated workload and population trends, anticipated personnel levels, and anticipated
capital improvements and equipment needs. The planning process and its "end product" are
essential to effective agency management. The agency shall have a clear written articulation
of goals and objectives and a plan for achieving them. The plan shall cover successive years
beyond the current budget year and shall contain provisions for updating regularly.
The plan shall reflect transportation patterns, population profiles, demand projections, private
facilities, and socioeconomic factors, aligned and impacted agencies, organizations, and
groups, and many other variables.
20
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the current plan, with date of official approval; describe
linkage to the agency's capital improvement budget and a phased development.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Two comprehensive plans work as guides to operations of the South Bend Parks and
Recreation Department. The twenty-year City Plan, approved in November, 2006 by
the Common Council of the City of South Bend, and the Area Plan Commission was a
massive two-year undertaking, involving all sections of municipal government and sets
the guiding principles for the City of South Bend. This document addresses, on the
regional scale, current conditions, demographic projections, socioeconomic profiles and
future states, inventory of services and a complete needs assessment, future land use
requirements and development plans, and provides a phased plan of segmented actions
to move the City towards its vision.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation’s Master Plan Update was constructed after the
completion of City Plan and its action steps necessarily support the larger documents’
objectives. The parks’ Master Plan projects out capital investment, and is linked to the
Capital Improvement Plan and the budget process for the entire Department.
Both plans are subject to regular review and are considered “living documents”
undergoing constant evaluation and adjustment as working plans.
Available for review On-Site
Both documents are available in the Accreditation reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.4.1 Trends Analysis
Standard: There shall be a system in place to assess societal and local trends over time.
Commentary: It is essential that park and recreation agencies keep abreast of local, regional, state,
national, and world societal trends to keep dynamic in serving their constituencies. The
analysis of trends over time may include impact of demographic changes, lifestyle and
employment practices, complimentary recreation providers, medical advancements, etc., to
inform the strategic thinking processes for the agencies’ comprehensive plan.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the trends analysis documentation.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Recognizing the changing demands of the parks and recreation mandate, the continually
altering landscape not just in the scope of services that our communities desire, but also in the
varied approaches possible to deliver and make our users aware of these services, and to
constantly develop innovative funding strategies, the South Bend Parks and Recreation
Department utilizes several techniques to monitor developing societal and local trends.
21
The Department subscribes to several industry trade magazines that regularly cover emerging
trends, including not just the recreation sector, but also the golf sector, maintenance operations,
safety and government trends.
Networking with our local affiliated agencies through regular meetings and shared
experiences, and encouraging a high degree of participation in our regional and state park and
recreation associations (I.P.R.A., and Northern District I.P.R.A.) from our staff is also critical.
Attendance at district meetings and workshops provided at the state level and attendance at the
state conference and N.R.P.A’s national congress and exposition annually gives our staff
educational opportunities in their specific fields, and facilitates a broader perspective to
recognize, discuss with other professionals and learn creative approaches to dealing with a
shifting environment.
Identifying trends is part of the Recreation 3 year Plan, and a budgeted item in the Master Plan
Action Framework.
Available for review On-Site
Trend Analysis was also completed for this last Master Plan Update, section K-18.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.4.2 Community Assessment
Standard: A comprehensive community study based on population shifts and changing social and
economic conditions shall be conducted regularly.
Commentary: A community assessment is a description of a community and its people. The purpose is to
identify the needs of a community in order to provide services appropriate to those needs.
Data collection should identify needs and priorities in support of planning decisions. It should
take into account the cultural, economic and physical conditions that make up the community.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the latest community assessment and an indication of its use
in park and recreation agency planning.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
As part of the City Plan process, in Phase II, over 100 small group meetings were held
with more than 170 different community stakeholders present as part of the research
identified from Phase I in which twelve general topics were identified for complete
exploration:
•
Transportation
•
Land Use and Zoning
•
Urban Design
•
Environmental Management
•
Parks and Open Spaces
•
Community Building
•
Health and Safety
•
Housing
•
Economic Development
22
•
•
Arts and Culture
Education
Stakeholders in the process included the business community, elected and appointed
government officials; CEOs and executive directors; experts in the topic areas from the
public, private and nonprofit sectors, clergy from different faith communities; and
leaders from various civic organizations. A draft of this extensive, in-depth analysis
was returned to more than 200 key stakeholders in 2005 for feedback. Revisions were
made based on this input, and a comprehensive demographic and economic survey and
projection was created for the City by Indiana Business Research Center (IBRC). The
result of Phase II was the Current Conditions Report, 2004-2005 (CCR) and this
document was used by the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department for our own
planning and long-term projections of possible future states and current conditions.
Available for review On-Site
A complete copy of the Current Conditions Report,(CCR), is available in the department
reference library.
Appendix C of the CCR, IBRC Population Projections, is in Accreditation File 2.4.2.
Section K of the current Master Plan Update includes community assessment.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.4.3 Community Inventory
Standard: There should be a compiled, complete and current inventory of all agency used and/or
managed areas, facilities, programs and services, as well as, alternative providers of
such.
Commentary: The inventory should include programs, services, parcel locators, park names, facilities and
specific components (ball fields, playgrounds, pools, centers, etc.) of the system-wide parks
and recreation infrastructure and land holdings for all properties and facilities owned and/or
managed by the agency. This inventory should also include alternative providers such as
schools, other governmental agencies, for-profit and not-for-profit providers, as it is critical
for the park and recreation agency to understand where there are overlapping areas, facilities,
programs and services or gaps in such. The inventory may be complimented by the use of
GIS.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide an inventory of programs and services and the physical
resources of the community, demonstrating how the agency utilizes this information in the
planning process.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Current Conditions Report (CCR) performed an exhaustive analysis of resources
available, areas of perceived deficit, potential core develop areas, stakeholder
perceptions and community value analysis. For community inventory, the South Bend
Parks has used this resource most recently.
In the South Bend Park’s Master Plan Update done previously, the Department did a
comprehensive community inventory listing educational, recreational, cultural,
medical, financial and religious facilities and services and produced an overview
description of our community and its assets.
23
Available for review On-Site
A complete copy of the Current Conditions Report, (CCR), is available in the
department reference library.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan Update section J lists the park
inventory of services and amenities.
The Department is gathering a comprehensive list of other service providers as part of
the Active Youth Initiative, and that material is available as it develops.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.4.4 Needs Index
Standard: A needs index for determining priorities for development of services within the
community should be established within the comprehensive plan.
Commentary: A needs index often is considered a survey of citizen attitudes and opinions on what
recreational activities they desire; however, it really is much more and involves consideration
of the basic needs of the people of the community, where such are not being fulfilled, and
how parks and recreation can contribute toward human development.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the needs index within the comprehensive plan.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Current Conditions Report (CCR), as part of the development of the comprehensive
City Plan document was essentially one vastly developed “needs assessment” survey.
Including a thorough examination of precisely what the city and community had
available, projecting out through demographic and economic analysis where we were
likely to be over the twenty-year time span of the life of City Plan, and carefully
assessing what the public’s and the stakeholder’s largest priorities were, the CCR listed
the greatest needs and identified the areas which the action steps that were to follow in
City Plan were to address, and in what priority.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan essentially did the same procedure
but on a much smaller scale. A series of public forum and stakeholder public meetings
were held, public surveying was done, and, with input from staff strategic planning
sessions, a list of needs and issues was created, which was incorporated into the action
steps of the Five-Year plan.
Available for review On-Site
A complete copy of the Current Conditions Report, (CCR), is available in the
department reference library.
A copy of City Plan is available in the department’s reference library.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan Update Sec. K – Needs Assessment, is
available in the department’s reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.5 Feasibility Studies
Standard: Feasibility Studies shall be conducted to determine the feasibility of proposed facilities.
24
Commentary: Feasibility studies should also include market analysis, cost benefit analysis, site analysis,
and external impact analysis.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of recent feasibility studies.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Department of Parks and Recreation is committed to providing complete,
comprehensive, and accurate professional analysis of resource management and land use
planning. Some of this work is completed by department staff, some by other city
departments as their involvement requires and some is provided by qualified consultants.
A feasibility study is completed for almost every acquisition or development project as
part of the evaluation process. These studies may consist of a statistical analysis and map
overview of the potential project amounting to a few pages of documentation, or may be
a very in-depth physical, environmental, financial, and economic analysis of potential
land use activities. Examples of feasibility studies that have been conducted include, but
are not necessarily limited to, the following:
•
Kennedy Water Playground (1999): Produced by Lehman and Lehman for the
Department. This was a project to convert an obsolete, vacated tank-style pool into a
splash pad facility with some revitalization of the park grounds.
•
Family Aquatic Center (February, 2000): Produced by Lehman and Lehman.
This is an example of a pro forma and feasibility study that has not yet been acted upon.
•
South East Community Park Presentation (2003): Produced by Lehman and
Lehman. In this project, the Department is taking an older park in our system and, in
conjunction with a larger development plan for the area, setting up a new community
park to act as an anchor to the neighborhood.
•
LaSalle Park (2006): A study to refurbish a section of one of our larger portions
of greenspace at one of our recreation centers.
Available for review On-Site
The General Parks library has many other examples.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.6 Strategic Plan
Standard: An agency shall have a strategic plan, approved by the approving authority, stating how
the agency will achieve its mission, goals, and objectives. The strategic plan shall be
reviewed annually.
Commentary: Strategic planning is vital to high performing organizations and involves large scale input
(organizational and community) to identify and come to agreement on vision, mission, and
values that support and guide the systems, structures, and strategies as a framework for
organizational progress to achieve results. Strategic plans are devised using trends analysis,
25
needs assessment, and organizational and community input. The goals and objects of the
plan shall be measurable to demonstrate progress and results. The strategic plan shall support
the priorities and initiatives of the whole organization.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the agency's strategic plan, date of approval by approving
authority and indicate progress being made in implementing the plan.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department has strategic planning at the base of its
process. Looking towards the end results, strategic planning is an essential tool to help us
do better job in achieving the target objectives. It helps us focus our efforts on what we
believe to be important, ensure that the members of the department are all working
towards the same goals, acts as a roadmap assess our progress and current location and
permits us to continually adjust our current course to hold a straighter line during the
process.
Strategic planning is a disciplined effort to produce fundamental decisions and determine
actions that shape and guide what we are, what effect we have, and explain why we do it.
To that end, our strategic planning has followed a “step-up” procedure, the most basic
components acting as the foundation for the next level, up to the most comprehensive
document for our organization, our five-year Master Plan, which in turn supports the
even more complex and comprehensive twenty-year City Plan for the City of South
Bend.
The Parks and Recreation Department’s vision, mission and values were re-evaluated and
articulated by staff and Board based on strategic planning sessions held during 2008 in
preparation for the next articulation of the Master Plan. The current versions, formally
approved for the years 2009-2013, will again be totally reassessed during a departmental
process of self-examination and community feedback/assessment in 2013 for the next
iteration of the five-year Master Plan cycle.
A responsive, proactive Five-Year Master Plan, this was prepared with in a joint venture
between our own staff and consultation from Lehman & Lehman, Inc. Required by the
State of Indiana, Department of Natural Resources – Division of Outdoor Recreation to
allow the Department to remain eligible for State and Federal Parks and Recreation grant
funding, it was adopted in spring of 2009 by the Board of Park Commissioners to go into
effect April 1st, 2009.
Available for review On-Site
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan Update is available in the
department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
26
2.7 Site Plans
Standard: There should be site plans to guide the use of existing and the development of future
areas and facilities.
Commentary: The site plans should relate to a specific park site or special use area, delineating areas of
activity, circulation patterns, building locations, parking areas and other components of
overall development. The plan may include cost estimates for long-range operations. Site
plans are not necessarily required for all areas or land holdings within the agency’s
jurisdiction, but should be developed for those areas being actively maintained (or managed)
by the agency or being planned for utilization.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a representative sampling of the agency’s areas and facilities
site plans.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department, where appropriate, and where
funding allows, completes a Master Site Plan as a tool for planning, budgeting, and
development of city parks, facilities, and trail projects. These plans are used to
solicit public input though presentations, workshops and exhibition. Included in
the plan process are review an approval by the public, citizen groups, local and if
applicable, state and federal agencies. This is usually handled through the
regularly scheduled Park Board meetings.
The recommended master site plan document, at minimum, includes site analysis to
include zoning designations, flora, fauna, and vegetation surveys, soils analysis, site
and infrastructure development phasing plan, facilities development phasing plan,
cost estimates for each phase, anticipated timetable for development and
construction, and public meetings. Wherever appropriate, the development of a
master site plan includes representation from community citizens as members of
the Steering Committee, and includes a summation of their input incorporated into
the final document.
Available for review On-Site:
In the Accreditation folder, several site plans are available for review.
Additional samples of master site plans are located in the Superintendent’s library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.8 Historical, Cultural and Natural Resource Management Plan
Standard: A historical, cultural and natural resource management plan(s) should address all
resource-based areas.
Commentary: The historical, cultural and natural resource management plan(s) should be an integral part
of the planning process. This should include an inventory of historical, cultural and natural
resources and recommendations for how these will be managed. These resources may be
addressed as part of the agency’s comprehensive plan.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the historical, cultural and natural resource management
plan(s).
27
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation has a separate Natural Resource plan that outlines
its vision and procedures for responsibly overseeing the sensitive natural resources that
are entrusted to it. A Natural Resource Advisory Committee operates under this plan and
acts in an advisory capacity to the Board of Park Commissioners.
For Cultural and Historical management, the Department acts as partner with the Historic
Preservation Committee and other organizations as part of the City of South Bend’s
larger vision.
Available for review On-Site:
The Natural Resource Management plan is available in the Department’s Reference
library.
The City of South Bend’s Comprehensive City Plan (8. Environmental Management,
especially and Section 10, Community building) is available in the Department’s
Reference library.
An overview of partnership operations and guidelines in working with the HPC is in the
Accreditation library,
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
2.9 Community Involvement
Standard: The agency should include community involvement in the planning process.
Commentary: Agencies should develop a systematic process to include the entire community in the
planning process. It is critical that the diversity of individuals comprising the community
(i.e., all cultures, ages, and abilities) are provided opportunities for input.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Describe how the interests (community organizations and
individuals) representing the diversity of the community were involved.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Department of Parks and Recreation takes an active role involving citizens in the
planning process for all construction and renovation projects coordinated by the
department. Examples of citizen involvement in the project planning process include,
but are not necessarily limited to, the following:

Focus Group and Stakeholder meetings:
as part of the Master Plan process, separate meetings for citizen focus groups,
interested stakeholders, and partner organizations are convened by the
Department to garner evaluation and suggestions and new areas for possible
development are always solicited.

Citizen feedback - When a patron or general member of the public wishes to
suggest, commend or complain the staff offers them the opportunity to
complete, or offers to complete for them a report. Citizens also submit input via
28
mail, telephone, or email commentary via the Department Website at
www.sbpark.org.

Neighborhood Meetings - The Department regularly solicits input from
residents through attendance at various neighborhood meetings. This is
frequently used to garner support, to gauge reaction, and to explain the
Department’s vision.

Unsolicited comment - Every meeting of the Board of Park Commissioners
allows a portion of the agenda to be given to comments or concerns of
interested citizens on any subject relating to the parks and recreation
operations.

Mayor’s Night Out – City Administration on a monthly basis, at rotating spots
across the city, takes Department heads, including parks to open community
meetings were all city staff are to address and respond to open citizen concerns.
Available for review On-Site:
In Accreditation File 2.9 is a sample Park Board Agenda
In the Department’s reference library is the Master Plan, Sec K, Issues
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
29
3.0 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
3.1 Organizational Structure
Standard: The agency shall establish a staff organizational structure, specifying the
interrelationships within the organization.
Commentary: An agency's structure shall reflect its purpose, its methods of operation in relation to its
resources, and its relationship to the community. The organizational structure shall be
established so that the alignment of responsibility and delegation of authority is clearly
understood to enable an agency to carry out its goals.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the agency’s organizational structure (i.e., organizational
chart) showing interrelationships.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department has a formal, established structure
comprised of five main components: the Administrative Division (which also includes
Marketing and Finance), the Golf Division, the Recreation Division, the Zoo Division
and the Maintenance Division. A series of organizational charts outline the
responsibilities of each component and reflect the chain of command and line of
authority within the Department. The Organizational Charts are included in the
Department’s Master Plan, in the Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual, and
are on location at various locations throughout the department.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of the complete organizational chart, including alignment of responsibilities is
available in the Accreditation file 3.1
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.1.1 Statement of Purpose for Each Organizational Component
Standard: The agency should have an established purpose statement for each organizational
component that is available to all employees.
Commentary: In support of the agency’s mission, each organizational component should be guided by
the purpose. The purpose statement should guide the work of agency staff with responsibility
in the respective component.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the purpose statements and indicate how they are made
available to personnel.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
30
The written purpose for each Division of the South Bend Parks and Recreation
Department and the basic duties and obligations for each component within the
organization are included in the Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual.
Copies of all department job descriptions are usually maintained in the office of the
payroll clerk, and a complete set is in the Department’s reference library. All staff
personnel have access to the Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual and the
job descriptions without restriction.
All supervisory/managerial staff is encouraged to review the job descriptions to
maintain accuracy and to recommend upgrades/changes as needed.
The Parks and Recreation Department ensures adequate supervision of all staff
members by utilizing a chain of command approach. The Division Directors are
supervised directly by the Superintendent. All staff in a particular Division are
responsible to that Director through any designated supervisors in the direct chain.
Available for review On-Site:
Sec G Agency Profile, from the Master Plan Update is available in the accreditation file
3.11
A complete set of job descriptions is available for review in the Department’s reference
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.2 Administrative Policies and Procedures
Standard: There shall be policies and procedures, encompassing administrative aspects of the
organization.
Commentary: These policies may be included in the agency policy manual. Whether a component of the
policy manual or managed separately, the material shall be organized in manner allowing
personnel easy access. This may be accomplished through the development of an
administrative manual, comprising the policies and procedures, covering various topical
components such as personnel, maintenance and operations, risk management, human
resources, and financial procedures. Each employee shall have access to the section(s)
applicable to their position responsibility. The policies and procedures shall be reviewed on
an annual basis and revised as needed.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the administrative policies and procedures and demonstrate
how this information is made available to personnel.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department has an Administration, Policy and
Procedure manual encompassing policies, rules and regulations and operational
procedures. The manual is provided to each Park Board Commissioner and members of
the administrative staff as well as being stationed at various major park facilities
around the department so that manual is available for as a resource for all employees.
Every full-time employee of the City of South Bend is also provided with a City of South
Bend Policies and Procedures Manual upon orientation.
Available for review On-Site:
31
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual
is available in the Department’s reference library along with its distribution list.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.2.1 Administrative Offices
Standard: There should be allocated administrative space and equipment to perform the agency's
functions and responsibilities.
Commentary: The administrative offices should be accessible to the public. There should be functional
meeting rooms for use by both professional staff and volunteers. There should be adequate
office space for personnel with functional workspace, storage facilities, and filing cabinets.
There should be an accessible resource library for staff use and research. In smaller agencies,
particularly, these administrative office functions might be in conjunction with other
departments of the governing body.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation that describes the types of office space and
administrative equipment used by the agency.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The administrative offices of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department are
located in O’Brien Park in the O’Brien Recreation Center that formerly housed the
O’Brien School. The building was converted to offices largely by the Department’s own
Skilled Trade’s division when the Park Board acquired it in 1999. The entire building
was renovated in 1999 and 2000, respectively, creating a more modem atmosphere.
The reception area features an attractive display of photos along one wall and two racks
filled with Department brochures and seating. Upon entering the lobby, visitors will
find a customer service window with a receptionist. The entrance of the building is
wheelchair accessible. Spacious offices and workstations are located on the first floor
and are equipped with file cabinets and either closet or cabinet storage. A number of
equipment storage closets are also located in the hallways. Office supplies are stored in
the front office in cabinets. A reference library is located on the first floor adjacent to
the Superintendent’s office. The library contains annual reports, minutes of Park Board
meetings, scrapbooks, and master plans and other materials of interest to staff.
Computer access to the City’s web site and Internet access from most workstations make
it possible for staff to access information from many sources throughout the country.
The administrative office building has a main board rooms and a number of conference
areas. The main board room is located on the first floor and seats approximately 40
people. Smaller conference rooms are located throughout office pods. The Department
also owns a number of facilities which can be used for public meetings or when a
larger space is required. These include several park pavilions, Newman Recreation
Center, Martin Luther King Center, Howard Park Recreation Center, the Potawatomi
Zoo, the Botanical Conservatory, and the Charles Black Center.
Available for review On-Site:
The Visitation Team will be housed at the O’Brien Administrative Offices during their
visit.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
32
3.2.2 Support Services
Standard: Support staff and services should be provided to enable the professional staff to perform
their appropriate functions.
Commentary: Sufficient and appropriately skilled clerical and administrative staff should be provided.
Adequate support services, equipment, and materials, such as computers and copiers,
resource literature, and AV equipment, should be provided. Current technology, where
appropriate and feasible, should be utilized to effectively perform functions.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a listing of support staff and services.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Parks and Recreation Department has adequate support staff to enable the
professional staff to perform their appropriate functions. Receptionists are located at the
Zoo, the Recreation Centers, the Ice Rink and the maintenance complex, in addition to
the administrative offices. Reservation and registration specialists handle all program
registrations and general park facility reservations from the administrative offices.
Support staff handles payroll, accounts payable and receivable, and bookkeeping
functions. With voicemail, e-mail and personal computers at every workstation, the
need for secretarial staff has all but vanished at the South Bend Parks and Recreation
Department. All staff has personal computers and handles their own correspondence.
Clerical staff and interns help with large mailings or other time-consuming office tasks.
The park maintenance staff is the largest organizational component in the Parks and
Recreation Department. We employ numerous grounds keepers, mowers, equipment
operators, mechanics, cleaning persons and skilled trades workers. These support staff
not only maintain parks, facilities, vehicles and equipment, but also provide support in
numerous ways to the programs offered by the Recreation Division.
Support Staff
Auditor II
1 Auditor III
1 Auditor IV
1 Systems SpecialistDepartmental
1 Secretary IV
1 Secretary V
3 Park Police II
1 SuperintendentMaintenance
1 Courier
1 Manager
5 Group Leader
2 Athletic Field
Maintenance
2 Mechanic
1 Forester
2 Arbortist
3 Arborist II
1 Arborist/Weed Control
2 Superintendent V
1 Foreman V
1 Plumber IV
1 Electrician
1 Construction
Maint. Mason
1 Construction
Maint. Welder
5 Construction
Maint. Carpenter
2 Painter IV
4 Head Custodian
1 Bldg. MaintenanceCustodian & Labor
1 Manager – Golf
Course & Ice Rink
2 Greenskeepers
Manager – Golf Course
Equipment Operator II
1 Supervisor Fitness
33
4 Heavy Equipment
1 Supervisor - Athletics
Operator I
1 Supervisor - Centers
1 Operator I
1 Coordinator – Youth Sports
4 General Labor
1 Coordinator - Academic
1 Coordinator – Stock
Charles Black Center
and Safety
1 Coordinator - Violence
1 Manager – Operations
Prevention I
1 Coordinator –
1 Head Custodian
Violence Prevention II 1 Building and Structure
1 Coordinator –
Maintenance
Healthy Seniors
1 Zoo Grounds
1 Leader – Senior
4 Keeper IV
Citizen’s Center
1 Dietitian
1 Supervisor – Centers
2 Keeper II
1 Coordinator – Academic
1 Veterinarian Tech.
King Center
2 Mechanic IV
1 Coordinator –
2 Asst. Greens
Youth Sports
Superintendent
1 Supervisor – Youth
2 Golf Operator I
1 Supervisor – Program
1 Superintendent III2 Coordinator – Events
Head Greenskeeper
2 Grower III
1 Marketing and Education
Curator
Equipment and Materials
Fax machines
Copiers
Telephones
Personal computers / software
Printers
Business cards
Typewriters
Cameras (digital, video, 35mm)
Slide projectors
Multi media projector
VCRs
Overhead projector
Sound system/speakers Video projector
Video camera
Display panels
Scanner
Department stationery
Postage meter
All clerical/office support staff has access to copiers, fax machines and AV equipment.
Each workstation is equipped with a personal computer and the software necessary to
perform their assigned duties. Network printers are located in each work area. All
telephones are equipped with voice mail and caller ID. All computers are networked for
internal e-mail.
Available for review On-Site:
The Visitation Team will be housed at the O’Brien Administrative Offices during their
visit and will be able to verify equipment.
34
A listing of department Job Descriptions is available in a binder in the reference library
in support of the positions cited.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.3 Communication System
Standard: A communication system shall be established to ensure the accurate and timely transfer
of information, both internal and external.
Commentary: An internal communications component within the agency includes “upward” and
“downward” communication. This would include unit newsletters and other briefs and how
they are disseminated.
An external communications component includes formal communications to higher levels of
government, counterpart agencies, news media, and members of the public. Timely
communications with external departments of government and outside agencies are crucial to
success in cooperative efforts in meeting the needs of the community. Good communications
with the appropriate news media are essential.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a communication matrix illustrating how internal and
external communications are managed by the agency.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Very few things are more essential than the ability for an organization to communicate
effectively. The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department utilizes the following
channels of exchanging information routinely, but not exclusively:
Internal Communication System
Internal communications within the department are carried out through memos, email, staff meetings, staff reports and documents, an employee newsletter and face-toface interaction.
Division Heads Meeting
Held with the Superintendent on a bi-weekly basis, this is the regular executive level
conference for the Department where policy, management and operational issues are
addressed. The Administrative Director, Fiscal Director, Zoo Director, Marketing
Director, Golf Director, Recreation Director and the Maintenance Director for the
Department will all be present or have sent representatives.
Division Meetings
Management level staff in each division meet regularly (weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly)
to address management issues. Much of information discussed at the Division Heads
meeting is implemented through Division meetings.
One on Ones
The Administrator and each Division Director meet weekly with their direct reports to
address issues, although these are often less formal the other style of conference. The
focus of these meetings is for direct reports to have access to their supervisor to seek
input or request resources to complete their job responsibilities.
35
Staff Meetings
All staff periodically attends department wide staff meetings. These meetings are held to
discuss vision and broad picture issues and to celebrate achievements of the
department. Staff meetings are broadly used for planning and focus issues.
Email
Email is used by all staff to respond to internal and external requests for information, to
arrange schedules for meetings and to distribute electronic documents. All staff
members either have a computer at their work-station or share a computer in their
work location.
Memos
Memos are used when issues requiring security sensitivity are communicated or as an
alternative to email when computer systems are unavailable or undesirable.
Employee Newsletter
Distributed now electronically as the City Hot Sheet, this provides updates on local
government issues, introduces new employees, announces retirements, announces
personal and team accomplishments, promotes upcoming events and distributes useful
schedules of services and contact information.
Monthly Reports
All Division Heads compile monthly reports for the Superintendent which are presented
to the Board of Park Commissioners. These reports are often derived from formal
reports of the management/supervisory staff who work beneath the Division Head.
External Communication System
Public and Legal Notices
Public notices are posted in the local newspapers to announce meetings of the Board of
Park Commissioners, to announce meetings or focus groups that seek input from the
public regarding a specific plan or project or when a decision of public interest is to be
made. Legal notices are posted in the local newspaper to announce public bids or
Request for Proposals for construction or maintenance projects, partnerships or official
business as relates to the Department.
Press Releases
The Marketing Department issues press releases to announce various Department
programs and events, and also to notify the public of newsworthy issues or decisions
made by department officials.
News Conferences
The Director of Marketing schedules and plans news conferences at the request or with
the permission of the Superintendent to celebrate notable events or to notify the
community of newsworthy issues.
Evaluations, Surveys and Comments
To initiate public feedback regarding Department programs and events, a set of
customer evaluations, surveys and official comment channels are available. These forms
offer a system of written documentation of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with a
program, event, or facility. Once feedback is received, it is reviewed by appropriate
staff members, and if necessary, the citizen is contacted to resolve the issue.
Promotion/Advertising
36
The agency communicates with public through the following promotions: a seasonal
activity guide, brochures, flyers, two electronic bulletin boards, newspaper ads, TV
commercials, magazine and periodical ads, news releases, radio spots and other venues.
Program information is primarily distributed through schools and through our facilities
themselves.
Staff Communication
When possible, department staff is available at facilities, at programs and events, and in
the public to provide face-to-face contact, and provide immediate feedback regarding
citizen questions. Just performing our daily operations, running our programming,
and being seen as a regular, dependable element in our community is a valuable
component of communicating our image and purpose.
Web Site
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s website at www.sbpark.org
contains information regarding our parks, programs and facilities as well as links to the
City of South Bend’s, the National Park and Recreation Association’s and the Indiana
Recreation and Parks Association sites. The web site hosts a downloadable version of
our Activity Guide and also an addendum to the most recent version of that guide. The
great majority of facilities and components of the Department’s operations display their
own specific pages of updated information.
Social Media – The Department does a fair amount of outreach through Facebook and
Twitter, and is utilizing a few other techniques.
Public Service Announcements
Public Service Announcements are used to inform the community of various benefits or
issues.
Staff Liaisons with Community Groups
The Department communicates with community groups through staff liaisons. These
relationships may be formal or informal, but they are often used to assess opinion and
garner support.
Park Board Meetings and other Public Meetings
Monthly meetings of the Board of Park Commissioners are open to the public and
generally covered by local media. Other public meetings, usually created to make
formal announcements or to garner feedback, are used for strategic planning.
Receptionists/Front Line Staff
Department front-line staff such as receptionists and registration/reservation specialists
are an important avenue of external communication for the Department. They gather
information, pass along customer feedback, provide information and an impression of
the Department to the community, give directions and manage complaints.
Annual Report and the South Bend Parks and Recreation Five-Year Master Plan
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Annual Report outlines the major
issues and highlights of the year, and the Department’s Master Plan clearly describes
the Department's vision and outlines the projected next steps in moving towards that
vision. Both are a public documents, released to the media, distributed to various
officials and made available at the public library.
Available for review On-Site:
In Accreditation File 3.5 there is a sample Division Report to the Park Board, a sample
employee newsletter, examples of program evaluations, and facility surveys.
37
In Accreditation Files is a copy of the Marketing Strategy Plan, 2012
In Accreditation Files is a copy of the Monthly Financial Statement.
A copy of the most current Annual Report is available in the department’s reference
library.
A copy of the Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual (Policies 3000-3999)
deals with communications and is available in the department’s reference library.
A grid further detailing both internal and external communications was created and is
the Accreditation files.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.4 Process for Public Information, Community Relations, Marketing
Standard: There shall be an established process regarding the integrated role of public
information, community relations, and marketing functions of the agency including
periodic reporting and evaluation.
Commentary: Public information, community relations, and marketing are complementary functions,
which must exist within the agency. The functions overlap because they all deal with an
organization’s relationships and employ similar communication tools. While they have the
same ultimate purpose of helping assure an organization’s success, the purpose of each
differs and each approaches the task from a different perspective.
The person or persons responsible for the public information, community relations and
marketing functions shall periodically submit a report to the agency's chief administrator.
The report shall include, at a minimum, the following elements: a description of current
opportunities/problems/needs voiced by the community that have a bearing on park and
recreation activities within the community; and a statement of recommended actions. The
process shall be evaluated annually, at a minimum, for effectiveness.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the established process and examples of implementation.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Public Information:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department is committed to informing the
community and the local media of major events and activities involving the department.
All public information distributed is to be as clear and open as possible in keeping with
the spirit and letter of the Indiana Open Door Law and the Access to Public Records Act.
(Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy 3240)
Community Relations:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Division has a strong commitment to establishing
strong ties with the community and responding to its needs. Community relations is
the means to address concerns arising between the parks department and all of the
segments of its service population. The Parks and Recreation Department should not
only interact and utilize the many organizations that already exist in its jurisdiction, it
should be active in fostering new groups where there is a need and none already exist.
By establishing these links with the community, the Parks and Recreation agency can
learn of needs, issues and opportunities and incorporate them into our active decision
38
and strategic planning processes. By working to increase the communities
understanding of the activities and roles of the Parks and Recreation Department,
public confidence can be increased, and obstacles to future new ventures can be more
easily overcome. (Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy 3500)
Marketing Functions:
Marketing is creating a high-profile image of who we are, what we do and what we
believe. The fundamental goal of the Marketing Division is to create, preserve and
promote a unified image of the Parks and Recreation Department’s goals and public
image to the community. The primary responsibilities of the Marketing Division are:
 Establish a complete overall marketing strategy
 Centralize information distribution for all programs, Divisions and activities while
increasing the accessibility of this information
 Improve perceptions and image of the Department
 Evaluate and promote customer service and employee relations
 Public, employee and media relations
 Solicit corporate sponsorship, gifts, and manage grant applications.
(Marketing Strategy and Plan, 2012)
The Marketing Division oversees or is directly or indirectly responsible for park and
program promotion, marketing research, customer service, service quality, public
relations, sponsorships, grant procurement, media relations, community relations, and
program/event/facility evaluations.
(Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy 3000)
Available for review On-Site:
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual
is available in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Department’s Marketing Manual is available for reference in the
Department’s resource library.
A copy of the Marketing Strategy and Plan, 2012, is available for reference in the
Department’s resource library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.4.1 Public Information Statement
Standard: A written statement states that the agency is committed to informing the community
and the news media of events within the public domain that are handled by or involve
the agency and sets forth policies that govern what information should be released,
when it should be released, and by whom it should be released.
Commentary: To operate effectively, a park and recreation agency must have the support of its
community. An agency can obtain such support by informing the public and news media of
events that affect the lives of citizens in the community. By providing the news media and
the community with information on agency administration and operations, a relationship of
mutual trust, cooperation, and respect can be maintained.
39
The agency's written statement should address how the agency will handle potential situations
in, which the news media is interested in Agency operations, as well as situations where the
Agency wishes to generate media interest.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the written statement.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
“The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department is committed to informing the
community and the local media of major events and activities involving the department.
All public information distributed is to be as clear and open as possible in keeping with
the spirit and letter of the Indiana Open Door Law and the Access to Public Records
Act.” (Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy 3240)
One of the basic goals is for the department to be recognized as a positive, structured
and integral part of the quality of life of the community through the provision of
programs, events and facilities. What we do as a department through our programs and
services, in addition to all the methods used to communicate these messages to the
public should reflect this image.
South Bend Parks and Recreation should be positioned as a foremost recreation outlet
for area residents. Our second goal is to be in a position where people look to the
department first as a source of recreational opportunities.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Agency has written policies, procedures and
guidelines regarding public information, how it is handled and by whom.
Available for review On-Site:
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual
(Policies - 3210, 3220, 3230, 3240) is available in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Department’s Marketing Manual is available for reference in the
Department’s resource library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.4.1.1 Public Information and Community Relations Responsibility
Standard: A specific position in the agency should be designated to direct the public information
and community relations functions.
Commentary: The agency should have a point of control for information dissemination to the community
and the media. In large jurisdictions where media contacts are frequent a full-time public
information officer may be needed to coordinate activities; however, where the community
served is small and media contacts infrequent, the assignment of the function to an individual
as a part-time responsibility may suffice. While it is recognized that each employee has the
responsibility for promoting community relations, the intent of the standard is to establish the
authority and responsibility for developing and coordinating the agency's community
relations function in an identifiable position. The person in the position should either be or
have direct access to the chief administrator.
40
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the position description that reflects responsibilities for such
functions.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department has a 3-member Development and
Marketing team. Each team member has different and specific duties, however all three
work together to coordinate the various marketing functions.
The Director of Marketing serves as the Department’s public information officer. All
press releases, newspaper pieces for the Department, press conferences, radio, TV
advertisement and printed promotions all are approved by his office. Although the
Superintendent frequently speaks for the Department to media, the Director of Marketing
is prime point of contact for public information.
The Director of Marketing is in regular contact with other public information officers in
other city departments, including the Mayor’s Office, police, fire, animal control, public
works, and economic and community development to exchange accurate information
between municipal operations. This staff position reports directly to the Superintendent
of Parks.
Many employees, however, are involved in community relations for the department,
although the Marketing Department acts as the central coordinator. The Special Project
Coordinator for the Marketing Department is generally responsible for attending
neighborhood meetings, scheduling, planning and promoting focus group meetings and
meetings with special interest groups.
Available for review On-Site:
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual
(Policies – 3000, 3100 – 3299, 3500) is available in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Department’s Marketing Manual is available for reference in the
Department’s resource library.
In Accreditation Filed is a copy of the Director of Marketing’s job description.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.4.2 Community Relations Plan
Standard: The agency should establish a community relations plan.
Commentary: The community relations plan focuses on identifying and addressing community needs of
all segments of its service population. An agency should make use of the many community
organizations that exist in its jurisdiction and establish relationships with them. The park and
recreation agency should play an active role in organizing community groups where they do
not exist. By establishing such links with the community, the park and recreation agency
learns of issues, needs, and opportunities and responds to them before they become problems.
A well-organized community relations effort can act as an effective means of eliciting public
support and can serve to identify problems in the making.
41
The community relations plan usually provides for the following: establishing contact with
formal community organizations and other community groups; developing community
relations policies for the agency; identifying training needs through interviews with
community representatives; and establishing community groups.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the community relations plan.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The goal of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Development and
Marketing Division is to create a comprehensive communications program for
announcing our services, our activities, and our benefits to our community, while at the
same time to set up a system where what our community has to say about its needs, our
direction and its perception of our Department are an integral part of our self-evaluation
and planning processes.
The policies and activities of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s
Development and Marketing Division define a complete community relations plan. The
Marketing Manual, the Marketing Strategy and Plan, 2012 and the established policies of
the Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual all outline these objectives and the
plan
Available for review On-Site:
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual
(Marketing Policies – 3000 - 3999) is available in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Department’s Marketing Manual is available for reference in the
Department’s resource library.
A copy of the Marketing Strategy and Plan, 2012, is available in the Department’s
resource library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.4.3 Marketing Plan
Standard: The agency should have an established marketing plan, based on market research that
includes an annual evaluation.
Commentary: Effective market research, planning, product development, strategies and objectives for
delivering demand-driven, high quality programs and services contribute to successful park
and recreation operations. Marketing is a process for accomplishing agency mission and
objectives by developing, pricing, making accessible, and providing accurate and timely
information about recreational opportunities that satisfy the wants/desires of target markets.
Larger park and recreation agencies should designate a person or staff unit with the primary
responsibility for development, implementation and evaluation of marketing strategies and
tactics. In addition, the complexities of marketing and related research functions require that
all agency staff be appropriately educated about marketing and its application across
functions.
All park and recreation agencies perform certain marketing functions; the scope of their work
however, depends on their size and mandate. Among the functions are user inquiry,
42
development of an agency marketing philosophy and marketing plan, and development of
operational procedures and policy guidelines to implement that philosophy.
The marketing plan should be based on marketing research. An agency should perform
market research (i.e., needs assessment, trends analysis, etc.) to determine community
program needs/demands, develop user-profiles and identify potential target markets for the
agency. Analytical reports should be provided to appropriate organizational units.
An annual evaluation of the marketing functions should include the following items: type of
activity, location, time, date, objectives achieved, and actual costs. The position accountable
for the marketing of the agency should perform evaluations comparing the plans and the
results of activities and meet regularly with operating units of the agency, neighborhood
associations and other business/community groups to assess program needs and evaluate
current programs. Marketing strategies should be evaluated against marketing objectives.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the plan and latest evaluation.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Development and Marketing Division oversees or is directly or indirectly
responsible for park and program promotion, marketing research, customer
service, service quality, public relations, sponsorships, grant procurement, media
relations, community relations, and program/event/facility evaluations.
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures
Manual (Policy – 3000)
The Development and Marketing Division is further defined by its policies and the
Marketing Manual. Working in close cooperation with the other Divisions,
particularly the Recreation Division with its complex needs for promotion and
support, the Marketing Division creates an annual Marketing Plan that is generally
adjusted quarterly with staff feedback and situational circumstances.
The Department of Parks and Recreations Department regularly performs market
research to assess community parks and recreational programming needs and to
evaluate programs and services currently being provided by the department.
Marketing research methodologies utilized by the Marketing division include, but
are necessarily limited to, the following: written surveys, program evaluations,
focus or feedback groups, special interest meetings and feedback responses from
facility comment forms.
Participant evaluations are an essential part of effective programming. Guidelines
have been established to assist programmers in implementing evaluations to
determine community needs/demands.
Responses are input into a database to evaluate information received. Compiled
results of evaluations are returned to appropriate programmers to be used for
overall program evaluation, and reports are sent to Division Heads and the
Superintendent.
A market research study and needs assessment is prepared for each five-year cycle
of the South Bend Park’s and Recreation Master Plan. These results are directly used
in the formation of the strategic plan and help shape the programs offered through
the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department for the each life cycle of the fiveyear document.
The goals of the research include, but are not limited to, the following:
43






Determine satisfaction with current prices
Determine what programs are perceived as strengths for the Department
Determine what programs are perceived as weaknesses for the Department
Identify demographic information of users and non-users
Identify perceived effectiveness of staff
Track perceptions the cleanliness and attractiveness of facilities
Additional program research is conducted through the registration process, voluntary
sign-up through the website, post-event evaluations and on-site facility satisfaction
surveys.
Available for review On-Site:
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures
Manual (Policies – 3000, 3100 – 3299, 3500) is available in the Department’s
reference library.
A copy of the Department’s Marketing Manual is available for reference in the
Department’s resource library.
A copy of the Marketing Strategy and Plan, 2012, is available in the department’s
resource library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.4.3.1 Marketing Position Responsibility
Standard: A specific position should be designated to direct the marketing function.
Commentary: If possible, marketing functions should be the responsibility of a permanent position of the
agency. This person works closely with all agency units in developing, coordinating, and
implementing the agency marketing plan. In smaller agencies, this may be one of several
responsibilities of a single position.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the position description that includes responsibility for
marketing.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Department of Parks and Recreation Marketing Division is managed by the
Director of Marketing. The responsibilities of the Director and the goals of the
Division are described in the Marketing Manual, and defined by park policy.
The relative position of the Director in the Department is graphically represented in
the Organizational Chart.
Available for review On-Site:
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures
Manual (Policies – 3000) is available in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Director of Marketing’s job description is available in Accreditation
File 3.4.3.1
44
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.5 Management Information Systems
Standard: The Agency shall have a management information system, including statistical and data
summaries of agency activities, such as daily, monthly, and annual reports.
Commentary: The management information system shall provide reliable information to be used in
management decision-making. This is important in predicting workload, determining
manpower and other resource needs, and in preparing budgets. Examples of data sources are
program attendance, equipment and material inventories, work orders, budget administration
records.
The administrative reporting system shall provide management information on the activities
of the agency. Properly designed administrative reports will reflect comparative data and
trends on activities. An administrative reporting system is effective in ensuring
communications throughout the chain of command. An appropriate information system shall
include at least financial, personnel, and program records; property inventories; legal
documents; and accident report.
A monthly report shall provide heads of organizational components an opportunity to account
for the activities in their units. Administrative matters may be discussed in the report, and
comparative data on activities of the previous month, same month in the previous year, and
year-to-date are valuable sources of management information. The monthly report may also
permit the heads of organizational units to identify the objectives of their units for the next
month.
The annual report may be a summary of the monthly reports. The report, which may be in a
digital format, shall provide comparative data and statistics and account for the activities of
the agency.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Describe and provide examples of use of the management
information system, such as recent statistical and data summaries.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Department of Parks and Recreation utilizes a variety of management information
systems to maintain and report program statistical and financial data. Department staff
currently meet the daily data processing needs of the department for registration and
facility rentals by utilizing the Rectrac system of database applications. Program
registrations are processed in the department administrative offices for point of sale
management.
The South Bend Park and Recreation Fiscal Division tracks and monitors the daily
receipts and attendance figures generated by operations that utilize point of sale cash
registers away from the administrative office with a system of daily cash/attendance
balance sheets.
Monthly statistical reports are generated from the Department financial office, and
these reports are used by the Department financial offices to produce the Department
of Parks and Recreation Annual Report.
45
A Monthly Financial Statement is prepared at every month as a report document for
presentation to the Board of Parks Commissioners. This report gives accumulative year
to date revenue and expense totals, and compares this data to the same period of time
for the prior year.
Available for review On-Site:
In Accreditation File are sample Rectrac reports.
In Accreditation File is a sample of the Monthly Financial Statement
In Accreditation File is a sample of the Daily Sheet for Potawatomi Zoo.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.5.1 Application of Technology
Standard: The application and use of technology should enable the agency to operate efficiently.
Commentary: With increasing availability of technology systems providing a myriad of functions an
agency should be researching and applying such resources as it deems appropriate. Examples
could include but are not limited to office systems, records management and sharing systems,
lighting and irrigation systems, work orders and work assignment applications, financial
systems, course programming software, etc.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a list of systems currently in use by the agency and any
evidence of research regarding future systems uses.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Department of Parks and Recreation staff creates and utilizes numerous
facility and program technology systems. These management tools to monitor and
display these statistics include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following:
Security Systems
Electronic Alarm Systems, Security Cameras, Automatic lighting systems across many of
the park operations
Registration and Programming Statistic Software
Used for registration and rentals, the Rectrac software produces a variety of useful tools
for producing and assessing program attendance, program revenue, facility rental use,
and frequency of use of our services by our patrons.
City Software Network
The backbone of the Information Technology applications for the city workstations.
This network operates the email systems provides the automatic electronic document
backup and access to the internet.
Maintenance Systems
Automatic Sprinklers and irrigation controlling devices, auto-lock systems and the
other applications for monitoring and tracking the regular maintenance functions.
Application Software
46
The office suite for word-processing, spread sheet applications, image manipulation,
publishing software, inventory software and other specialized programs for general use
and operations.
Fiscal Technology
The specialized software and equipment used to track expenditures and revenue. Cash
registers, P.O.S systems, purchase order tracking, and others.
Available for review On-Site:
A grid index of the South Bend Park and Recreation Department’s technology systems
and specialized programs has been prepared and is available in the Accreditation File.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
3.6 Records Management Policy and Procedure
Standard: The agency should have established policy and procedures for control, maintenance,
and retention of records.
Commentary: The records management function is important to the effective delivery of park and
recreation services and may be available in a centralized location. Those records that are
basic to meeting the management, operational, and information needs of the agency should be
included. Records management should be consistent with legal requirements.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the records management policy and procedures.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Indiana Law (IC 5-14-3-2) defines a “public record” as “any writing, paper,
report, study, map, photograph, book, card, tape recording, or other material that is
created, retrieved, retained, maintained, or filed by or with a public agency and
which is generated on paper, paper substitutes, photographic media, chemically
based media, magnetic or machine readable media, electronically stored data or
any other material, regardless of form or characteristics.”
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department creates and maintains many
documents of historical value. These records are maintained by various staff
persons as well as the public.
Retention and disposal of public records are mandated by the County Commission
of Public Records of St. Joseph County (CCPRSJC) in conjunction with the
Department of Records Management and Archives as established by Indiana State
Law (IC 5-15-6). This organization has produced the City of South Bend Retention
Schedule for control, maintenance, retention and archival.
Available for review On-Site:
In the Accreditation Files is the Records Management Manual issued by the
CCPRSJC in the reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
47
3.6.1 Records Disaster Mitigation and Recovery
Standard: There should be an established Records Disaster Mitigation and Recovery plan and
procedures.
Commentary: Agencies may potentially incur disasters such as office floods, fires, and major weather
disasters. In addition many records are filed electronically, which open them up to electrical
and erasure disasters. An agency should have a plan and procedures for protecting its records,
storing them and recovering critical information after a disaster, no matter the level.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the Records Disaster Mitigation and Recovery plan and
procedures.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Electronic archival and storage processes are set by the Information Technology
department of the city. These are the critical back-up and storage systems for the
vast majority of documents and information.
Some hard-copy documents and records are stored in secure fire-proofed locations
and many other non-replaceable records, especially those of significant age or
historical import are in the gradual process of scanning and storing.
Available for review On-Site:
In addition to the Records Management Manual issued by the CCPRSJC in the
reference library, copies of the city directives and procedures for disaster mitigation
and recovery are in the Accreditation Files.
.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
48
4.0 HUMAN RESOURCES
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
4.1 Personnel Policies and Procedures Manual
Standard: There shall be established policies, which govern the administration of personnel
procedures for both professional and nonprofessional employees that are reviewed
annually.
Commentary: The personnel practices shall include procedures for selection, hiring, and dismissal;
retirement, hospitalization, leaves, vacation, other benefits, and increment policy; salary
schedule; incentive system; and staff development program. The personnel policies and
procedures manual shall be available to each employee, as appropriate to the position held.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the personnel policies and procedures manual and the date
of latest review.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department employees follow the policies set
in the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual. This manual is produced
and updated by the City of South Bend Human Resources Department. All
employees are issued a copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures
Manual during their pre-employment processing. This manual is reviewed on an
annual basis by the human resources department and policies are changed
throughout the year as needed. The complete City of South Bend Policies and
Procedures Manual can be found in the department reference library.
Available for review On-Site:
A Copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual is maintained in
the Department’s Reference Library and is available to the Visitation Team
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.1 Code of Ethics
Standard: There must be an established statement of ethical principles for agency personnel.
Commentary: Professional integrity is the cornerstone of credibility. Personnel shall have a clear
understanding of ethical responsibility involving issues as related to the park and recreation
system, business dealings with other entities, interrelationships with other organizations and
agencies, and interactions with participants.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the Code of Ethics.
49
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual lies out code of
conduct for political activities, properly managing potential conflicts of
interest and procedures dealing with outside solicitation and behavior
appropriate and inappropriate to a city employee.
1. Staff shall not abuse participants including:
Physical abuse – strike, sank, shake, slap;
Verbal abuse – humiliate degrade, threaten;
Sexual abuse – inappropriate touch or verbal exchange
Mental abuse – shaming cruelty
Neglect – withholding food, water, basic care, etc.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Any type of abuse will not be tolerated and will be cause for
immediate dismissal.
Employees must use positive techniques of guidance, including
redirection, positive reinforcement and encouragement rather than
competition, comparison and criticism.
Employees respond to participants with respect and consideration
and treat all participants equally regardless of sex, race, religion
and culture.
Employees will refrain from intimate displays of affection towards
other in the presence of visitors and participants.
Staff must appear clean, neat and appropriately attired.
All employees shall remain drug free while acting within the scope
of their employment. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, or
use of a controlled substance on City Premises or while conducting
City business is prohibited.
Profanity, inappropriate jokes, sharing intimate details of one’s
personal life, and any kind of harassment in the presence of staff
and participants is prohibited.
Staff will portray a positive role model for youth by maintaining
values of respect, responsibility, caring and honesty.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department has a
responsibility to add its leadership to that provided by the
employee(s) at a public place where our youth are mixed with
others.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department is guided by our Vision,
Mission and Values statements in dealing with the community, our users,
our peers and our staff. Our Departmental Code of Conduct policy is cited
in the Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual (Policy
4020), although there are more specific Codes of Conduct for different
components of the operation, ex. aquatics, golf and youth athletics have
separate, more narrowly defined Codes of Conduct that their staff is also
required to be in compliance with.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies
20, 27 and 28) is available for review in the Department’s reference
library.
50
A copy of the Mayor’s Code of Ethics is available in the Accreditation Files
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 4020- Code of Conduct) is available in the
Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.2 Recruitment Process
Standard: There should be a comprehensive recruitment process to attract qualified personnel.
Commentary: A written statement should initiate the formal recruitment process. Administration of the
process should be the responsibility of one identifiable position. The recruitment process
should be based upon an established recruitment plan with specific goals and measurable
objectives that are evaluated annually.
Recruitment activities will be enhanced by cooperative arrangement with a personnel agency,
if any and with community organizations and key leaders. Recruiters should be sent on-site
to educational institutions and community service organizations. An extension of recruitment
is establishing a park and recreation student intern recruitment process.
It is understood that in certain cases an agency is required to handle its personnel through a
state or local civil service merit system, and is, therefore, linked to that system in the
recruitment of its park and recreation personnel. Agencies are obligated to comply with all
applicable statutes and policy statements.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the recruitment procedures.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend Human Resource Department oversees the administrative
process of recruitment and selection. Applications can be made in person in the
Human Resource Department, 12th Floor, County City Building, downtown South
Bend.
Policy 3 of the City of South Bend Policy and Procedures Manual details how a job
vacancy is determined and the steps involved in the normal job posting procedure.
The Human Resources Department has detailed the steps involved in the “Personnel
Requisition” document.
This document describes the process of filling a position from the receipt of the Job
Requisition form to the applications being forwarded to the appropriate department
management/supervisor.
Policy 3, section 4.2 of the City of South Bend Policy and Procedures Manual
describes the selection process. This begins with who is eligible to bid on a specific
job through the position being filled. This document can also be found in file in our
department reference cabinet.
51
Staying within these parameters, the South Bend Park and Recreation Department
takes a more assertive approach to recruitment, utilizing professional associations,
networking and direct advertising and solicitation to fill certain specialized
positions.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual is available for
review in the Department’s reference library, Policy 3 - Personnel Hiring
Procedure, Policy 4- Personnel Requisition Form
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.3 Equal Opportunity Employment and Workforce Diversity
Standard: There shall be an established policy regarding diversity for all employment practices
and evidence that it is being implemented.
Commentary: The policy shall assure equal opportunities for employment, promotion, and equity in
employment working conditions. The agency shall have an established diversity program
that creates and sustains a respectful and culturally responsive workforce. The agency must
comply with the American Disabilities Act.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the equal opportunity and workforce diversity policy and
show evidence of implementation of the policy.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Parks and Recreation Department is committed to having a culturally diverse
staff that is reflective of the South Bend community. When positions become
available, those hiring work closely with the Human Resources Department to assist
in fulfilling this commitment; Equal Employment Opportunity is a mandated policy
of the City of South Bend. A statement that the City of South Bend is an EEO
employer is included on all advertising and solicitation for positions, and the policy
is displayed in the Human Resources Offices. The policy is stated as follows:
“It is the City’s intent to comply will all aspects of Federal, State and local
government regulations in the area of Equal Employment Opportunities covering
selection, promotion and termination of employees and also to aggressively promote
an atmosphere within the City and the community to assure all persons the
opportunity to succeed on their own merits without regard to race, color, creed,
national origin, age, sex or handicap, except where the foregoing are bona fide
occupational requirements or the person’s handicap substantially limits the
employee’s ability to engage in any particular occupation.”
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual is available for
review in the Department’s reference library, Policy 2 – Employment Practices.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.4 Selection Process
52
Standard: There should be comprehensive procedures for the process of hiring personnel.
Commentary: Comprehensive procedures are essential for the proper administration, use, and
defensibility of the selection process. The procedures describe the order of events in the
selection process. The procedures may deal solely with the selection process or may be
incorporated in a larger personnel management or general policy and procedure manual. The
procedures should include, at the least, information about the purpose, development, validity,
utility, fairness, adverse impact, administration, scoring, and interpretation of all elements
used in the selection process. The park and recreation agency may rely upon a state or local
civil service commission, employment agency, or other public or private external
organization to administer or provide one or more elements of the selection process.
Where a centralized personnel agency exists, the responsibilities retained by the park and
recreation agency shall be specified. The park and recreation agency should retain specific
prerogatives concerning the selection process that will allow the agency to obtain qualified
candidates for its positions. Identification of the specific needs of the Agency, determination
of skills and the personal attributes required for positions and the selection of personnel on
these bases are examples of responsibilities that should be retained by the park and recreation
chief administrator. The agency also should have a role in the development of the
measurement instruments that are used in determining the skills and attributes of applicants
for positions.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide selection process procedures and evidence that procedures
are being followed.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The selection process for the City of South Bend is detailed in the Selection Process
& Employment/Promotion Policy 3.4.2 of the City of South Bend Policy and
Procedures Manual. Those responsible for hiring positions within parks and
recreation work closely with the City’s Human Resource Department in following
these procedures. This policy can be found in its entirety in file in the department
reference library.
Along with this policy is the New Employee/Trial Period Policy 6.4.1 of the City of
South Bend Policy and Procedures Manual that explains the trial period of up to
ninety (90) days and what information is given to each city employee upon hire. It
also explains that the supervisor of the employee should conduct a performance
evaluation one week before the trial period ends to communicate to the employee
their strengths or weaknesses. At this time the supervisor may extend the trial
period up to thirty (30) days if warranted by the performance evaluation. The
supervisor also has the option of terminating employment. This policy can also be
found in its entirety in file in the department reference cabinet.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy 3 is
available for review in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.5 Background Investigation
53
Standard: Personnel hiring should include procedures for background investigation prior to
appointment, including verification of a candidate's qualifying credentials, review of a
candidate's civil and criminal record, particular attention to drug and child/adult-abuse
records, and driving record for employees assigned to operate motor vehicles.
Commentary: The background investigation is a very useful and relevant component of the selection
process. Investigators must use all data available on the candidate to assess his or her
suitability for employment. It is more reliable to conduct the inquiry in person, though
telephone and mail inquiries are appropriate in cases of criminal history and driving records.
Background investigations are generally listed among the final stages in the selection process
only to suggest that this is when they should be completed; they are likely to have
commenced much earlier. There is a need for special sensitivity to any possible child-abuse
record. Background investigation procedures should be in the personnel manual.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the background investigation procedures and examples of
background checks completed.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s goal in hiring is to recruit and
select the most experienced, qualified and best-matched applicants for employment. In
order to assure the application of an employee is accurate and the qualifications,
abilities and experiences are valid, the City of South Bend’s Human Resources
Department:

performs any and all reference checks requested by the hiring supervisor;

may request copies of licenses or degrees from applicant or transcripts of college
work;
The Parks and Recreation Department staff member who is responsible for filling a
position reviews all the job applications to verify the qualifying credentials of
candidates for that position. This staff member also calls the personal references listed
on the application.
The City of South Bend does not have a formally stated criminal history background
policy for the hiring of employees, although the South Bend Parks & Recreation
Department does require that all employees coming into contact with the public to
undergo a criminal background check prior to hiring. This process is coordinated with
the South Bend Police Department and is defined by policies 4030 – Background Check
Policy and 9010 Background Check- Volunteers
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual is available for review
in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation’s Administration, Policies and
Procedures Manual (4030 – Background Check Policy and 9010 Background CheckVolunteers) is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
54
4.1.6 Employee Benefits
Standard: There should be an established employee benefits plan.
Commentary: Each of the benefits provided to employees should be described in terms of what is
provided, under what conditions, and the extent of the benefit. Types of benefits often
include administrative leave, holiday leave, sick leave, vacation leave, retirement program,
health insurance program, disability and death benefits program, liability protection program,
provision of clothing and equipment used by employees in performing park and recreation
functions, employee education benefits, if any, and personnel support services to employees.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the employee benefits plan.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The benefits package for the City of South Bend is administered through the
human resources department. Policy 15.4 of the City of South Bend Policy
and Procedures Manual outlines the benefits that are available to
employees.
Upon acceptance of an offer of employment, new employees are informed
of the date of pre-employment processing. Pre-employment processing
includes receiving insurance and benefit information. All new employees
are required to attend a formal orientation program administered by the
human resources department during which the fringe benefits arc
described. These benefits include, but are not limited to, the following:
• medical benefits • dental benefits • group life insurance • long-term
disability • flexible benefit plan • deferred compensation • employee
assistance program • personal time • holiday time • vacations • paid sick
time • sick time bank program (short term disability plan) • overtime
pay/compensatory time • leaves of absence • family and medical leave
(FMLA) • take-home vehicles
All City of South Bend employees receive annual updates and open
enrollment dates for available health insurance plan options. The open
enrollment period falls sometime between November and December of each
year.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies
15, 31, 32, 33, 34, 36, 39, 41, is available for reference in the
Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Employee Benefit Plan folder is available on the Reference
shelves
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
55
4.1.7 Supervision
Standard: There should be constructive and effective supervision of all personnel to help them
grow professionally and improve programs and services.
Commentary: Supervision should be an on-going and systematic process and not just available when a
problem occurs. Effort should be made toward establishing the supervisory process as one of
helpfulness for the well-being of the individual and agency, and not just overseeing.
Supervision can be one of the most important self-development programs available to the
employees.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a narrative of the systematic process for supervising
personnel.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department ensures adequate supervision of
all staff members using a chain of command approach. The Superintendent
supervises the Division Heads. The Division Heads supervise middle
management/supervisory positions. Employees in clerical, technical/skilled
positions are supervised by middle management/supervisory positions.
The Superintendent holds bi-weekly staff meetings with the Division Heads in the
conference room at the Superintendent’s office. Division Heads hold divisional
meetings on a weekly, by-weekly or monthly basis.
The Human Resources Department of the City of South Bend may hold several
supervisory training sessions during the year. These training sessions cover
disciplinary actions, customer service training, accident prevention, sexual
harassment, and various other topics.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of the Job Description Manual is available in the Reference Library
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual is available for
reference in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.8 Compensation
Standard: There should be an established compensation plan that is reviewed annually that
establishes equity of compensation among units within the agency.
Commentary: The compensation plan should include entry-level compensation for the agency;
compensation differential within position; compensation differential between positions;
compensation levels for those with special skills, if any; salary augmentation; compensatory
time policy; and overtime policy. The compensation plan for an agency should take into
account agency employment standards, agency skill needs, and compensation levels offered
by other local employers. The compensation plan should be based on the agency's position
classifications and provide for differentiation between positions, uniform percentage
56
increases between classes and positions, and room within the ranges for recognition of
superior performance.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the compensation plan and evidence of its annual review.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The salaries of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department employees
are determined by the City of South Bend, which follows the compensation
program set forth in the salary Special Ordinance. This sets the salaries for
all salaried, non-bargaining positions. The City of South Bend Human
Resource Department and City Council administers the salary ordinance.
Departments and titles classify all City employees. They follow a grid system
fixed as a scale and job class. During the annual budget each department
reviews process salaries. The grid is an attempt to maintain an orderly,
consistent and competitive pay policy.
Any request to reevaluate a position is done with guidelines from the
Human Resource Department. This request must be in writing and contain
a current job description along with a completed job analysis questionnaire
form.
The South Bend Parks & Recreation Department has an agreement between
the City of South Bend and The Teamster’s Local Union which includes all
employees except: administrators, supervisors, clerical, and those
employees of the recreation division who perform more than 50% of their
duties in recreational activities. Contracts are usually negotiated for a
period of three years. Those with input include Parks and Recreation
Department Management, Teamster employees, and City of South Bend
Labor Relations Representative. Wages are included for a three-year period,
per classification/title. (A copy of the current Teamster contract can be
found in file in the department reference library.)
Once an agreement is written a committee for the City consisting of the
Mayor, President of the Board of Park Commissioners, City of South Bend
Attorney, Director of the Human Resource Department and the
Superintendent of the Parks & Recreation Department meets. They agree on
the terms with representatives for the Union, to include a Business
Manager, Business Representative, and Parks and Recreation Department
Teamster members. This agreement is then taken before the Common
Council for the City of South Bend and a special ordinance is approved. (An
example of these can be found in file folder in the department reference
library)
Available for review On-Site:
The Accreditation File contains a copy of the most recent salary Ordinance,
and a copy of the most current Teamster’s Agreement with the City of South
Bend.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
57
4.1.9 Performance Evaluation
Standard: There should be a fair and systematic procedure for annual appraisal of job
performance.
Commentary: Such personnel evaluation should be utilized for the development and improved quality of
the individual's performance on the job, as well as a basis for promotion, monetary
increments, and dismissal. Evaluation should be a continuing process of, which the annual
review is a summary. Evaluation should involve a face-to-face analysis of performance,
dealing objectively with facts and job-related personality factors. Evaluation instruments
should be utilized in addition to evaluation interviews and general comments. Although
evaluation is a day-by-day process, there should be periodic specific reviews with the
employee, including at the end of the probationary period, at the end of a specific assignment,
and annually. An employee's record should include a written annual evaluation.
Tasks of the position, as set forth in the job description, form the basis for the description of
what work is to be performed and thus evaluated. Criteria used to define the quality of work
should be descriptive, measurable, and allow a characterization regarding how the work is
performed. The supervisor of employees is the person most familiar with their performance
and able, therefore, to evaluate performance most accurately. This responsibility should not
be delegated. In cases where an employee is supervised by more than one supervisor during a
reporting period, the current supervisor should confer with the other supervisor(s).
A performance evaluation system should include the participation of the employee in the
process. This should contribute to the fairness and objectivity of the system. As a full
participant in the evaluation process, it is important that the employee be given a copy of the
performance evaluation report, as well as, a copy be place in the employee's personnel file.
Each evaluation report of an employee's performance should be read and understood by the
employee. The signature should indicate only that the employee has read the report and
should not imply agreement or disagreement with the content. If the employee refuses to
sign, the supervisor should so note and record the reason or reasons, if given.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the procedures and a sample of completed performance
evaluations without identifying personal information.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department conducts performance
evaluation reviews of all bargaining and non-bargaining employees at each year’s
end. Each supervisor conducts a one on one discussion with each staff member that
he oversees, and includes last year’s completed evaluation as a reference and
comparison tool for the process.
A list of pertinent goals and objectives for the specific areas that the staff member is
directly responsible for are created and recorded during this discussion, and
progress on the stated goals and objectives are summarized from last year’s
evaluation.
Performance indicators, such as from pre-determined program benchmarks, or
benchmarks from the performance-based budget or operational
surveys/evaluations that the staff member is responsible for are used in this review
process.
58
The supervisors go through the identical process with their respective Division
heads, and the Division heads go through the identical process with the
Superintendent. The list of goals and objectives for their operations, which should
have been supported by the goals and objectives of their staff, are completed for the
upcoming year, and evaluated and assessed for effective completion from the
previous year.
All annual personnel review forms are signed and every staff member is given a
copy of the evaluation. All personnel evaluations are forward to the Superintendent
of the Parks and Recreation Department for his review and signature, and then
forwarded to the City of South Bend’s Human Resources Department for inclusion
into the personnel files.
New hires are required to undergo a probationary evaluation as cited in the South
Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy number 6.
Available for review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File are samples of the personnel annual review forms.
Completed personnel reviews are kept secured in the Division head’s personnel
files, or with the City of South Bend Human Resources Department.
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies 6 –
Probationary Periods, Status, Evaluations, is available for reference in the
Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.10 Promotion
Standard: There should be an established statement available to all employees defining the
promotion process and the agency's role.
Commentary: The park and recreation agency may rely upon a state or local civil service commission, or
other public or private external organization to administer one or more elements of the
process in accordance with legal, professional, and administrative requirements. Where a
centralized personnel agency exists, the statement should govern the responsibilities retained
by the park and recreation agency's chief administrator for the promotion of personnel. The
agency should have a role in the development of the measurement instruments that are used
in determining the skills, knowledge, and abilities of employees for positions.
The statement should describe all elements used in the promotional process and may be
incorporated within a comprehensive personnel management or general policy and
procedures manual.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the statement, and indicate how it has been communicated to
employees.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
According to City Policy Number 11:
59



Consideration for promotions will be based on, but not limited to, such
factors as education, training, experience, performance, dependability, and
the ability to perform the job.
It will be the responsibility of the Department Head and the Bureau
Manager to make recommendations for promotion to the Human Resources
Director.
Current job openings with the City are posted in departments and the
Human Resources Office. All City employees are eligible to apply. The
selection criteria may differ depending upon the vacancy.
.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies 11 –
Promotions, is available for reference in the Department’s reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.11 Disciplinary System
Standard: There should be a disciplinary system based on the code of conduct and performance.
Commentary: The system should specify the conduct expected of employees, and particularly identify
prohibited employee behavior. This system should include, but not be limited to: (1)
compliance with agency statements; (2) unbecoming conduct; (3) appropriate appearance; (4)
use of alcohol and drugs; (5) acceptance of gratuities, bribes, or rewards; (6) abuse of
authority; and (7) proper care and maintenance of equipment. Prohibitions should be
specific, whereas approved behavior may be stated in general terms (e.g., courtesy,
punctuality). In addition to providing a copy of the code of conduct and performance to each
employee, this should be a topic included in all levels of training and repeated at intervals to
emphasize its importance.
The components of the disciplinary system should identify the methods to be applied to
individual conduct in the interest of discipline. The system should be based on fairness to the
employee, the agency and the community for, which it serves. Disciplinary action steps may
be defined in collective bargaining agreements, if applicable.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the code of conduct and performance and the policies and
procedures that guide the disciplinary system, and how this information is communicated and
made accessible to employees. Copies of the disciplinary action steps should be included in
collective bargaining agreements, if applicable.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy Number
20.4 contains the procedures for disciplinary action up to and including
discharge. This policy may be found in its entirety in file folder in the
department reference library. This policy may also be found in the policy
manual chapter 20 – 22
Available for review On-Site:
60
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies
20, 21, 22, is available for reference in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.12 Grievance Procedures
Standard: A grievance procedure, available to all employees, should be established.
Commentary: The procedures shall identify matters that are grievable; establish time limitations for filing
or presenting the grievance; establish procedural steps and time limitations at each step in the
grievance procedure; and establish criteria for employee representation. Formal grievance
procedures should be written in clear, concise terms. If grievance procedures are part of a
collective bargaining agreement, such agreement must be used.
A grievance usually contains the following information: a written statement of the grievance
and the facts upon, which it is based; a written allegation of the specific wrongful act and
harm done; and a written statement of the remedy or adjustment sought. These three
principal elements of a grievance may be included in one written statement. A form may be
designed for this purpose to include spaces for noting significant times, dates, and actions
taken relative to the grievance. Grievance procedures are outlined in most collective
bargaining agreements.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the grievance procedures and indicate how the procedures
have been communicated to the employees. Grievance procedures should be included in
collective bargaining agreements, if applicable.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy Numbers
23.4 (Salaried, Non-Bargaining Unit, Complaint Process) contain the
procedures for filing a grievance.
The procedure for bargaining employees is defined in the Agreement
between the City of South Bend and the Teamsters Local Union No. 364.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies
23 – Due Process, Appeal Procedure, is available for reference in the
Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Agreement between the City of South Bend and the Teamsters
Local Union No. 364
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.1.13 Termination and End of Employment
Standard: There should be established policies and procedures for termination and end of
employment.
61
Commentary: Agencies should be prepared for instances of termination and end of employment with
policies and procedures outlining the process.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the dated and approved termination and end of employment
policies and procedures, and indicate how they have been communicated to employees.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual Policy Number 21.1
(Terminations), contains the procedures for employee termination. This policy may
be found in its entirety in file in the department reference library. This policy may
also be found in the policy manual chapter 21.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies 21 –
Termination, Discharge, Resignation, Retirement, RIF, is available for reference in
the Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Agreement between the City of South Bend and the Teamsters Local
Union No. 364
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.2 Staff Qualifications
Standard: The agency shall employ professional staff qualified to develop and operate programs
and services.
Commentary: Competent professional staff shall be employed to carry out the program in accord with the
goals and objectives. Type of staff needed to carry out specific program elements and
services shall be concisely identified in the budgeting process. Each individual employed
shall be delegated authority commensurate with the assigned tasks. Staff shall be qualified
for the positions as provided in the job descriptions. Professional park and recreation
personnel shall have certification and/or educational training appropriate to the position.
Staff in certain positions should carry the appropriate certifications.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: List professional staff with the responsibilities and qualifications to
carry out such duties.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department employs professional staff with
various educational backgrounds. The Department employed a total of 114 fulltime positions, and, at peak of the season, utilized more than 300 part-time or
seasonal workers as well for 2011.
The needs of an operation as broad as the Department’s, including but not limited
to expertise in areas as diverse as administration, forestry, childhood development,
heavy equipment operation, education, horticultural cultivation, public wellness,
carpentry, veterinary science, community dynamics, aquatic safety, hazardous
waste management, and leisure services requires a complex collection of
individuals, experience, education and backgrounds.
62
Copies of all job descriptions are maintained in the department reference library.
The job descriptions outline the duties, responsibilities, knowledge, skills, and
abilities required for all staff in the Department. All staff has access to these job
descriptions, and supervisory/managerial staff is encouraged to review the job
descriptions to maintain accuracy and to recommend upgrades/changes as needed
for the Department to have the qualifications, experience and education necessary
for us to meet our objectives.
Available for review On-Site:
A complete list of job descriptions for the Department is available in the reference
library.
The Accreditation File continues a brief synopsis of staff resumes, certifications and
degrees.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.3 Job Analysis and Job Descriptions
Standard: Established job descriptions for all positions shall be based on the job analysis and
include, at a minimum: duties, responsibilities, and tasks of each position; and
minimum level of proficiency necessary in the job-related skills, knowledge, abilities,
and behaviors.
Commentary: A variety of valid and useful methods are available for conducting a job analysis and
establishing job descriptions. A job description should include both the position description
(title, line of authority, scope and range of authority; duties, functions, responsibilities; and
amount and kind of supervision exercised and received) and job qualifications (education,
certification or registration, experience, competencies, special skills, etc.). Some agencies
within civil service systems are obligated to use the job analysis and job descriptions
established by that system.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a job description for a full-time, part-time, temporary and
internship position, if applicable, and an example of a job analysis.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
A job analysis for each full-time Department of Parks and Recreations staff position
is included in the Job Description Manual.
Available for review On-Site:
A complete list of job descriptions for the Department is available in the reference
library
A copy of The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policy 5 – Job
Description and Position Classification, is available for review in the Department’s
reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
63
4.4 Chief Administrator
Standard: There shall be a professionally-qualified administrator who is responsible to the
approving authority for the management, direction, and control of the operations and
administration of the agency, and who shall have authority to perform such
responsibilities.
Commentary: The administrative or executive function is accomplished by the chief administrator
employed by the approving authority to be responsible for the operation of the agency. The
chief administrator shall be employed full-time, year-round, and be qualified by experience
and education in park, recreation, or related disciplines.
Evidence of "professionally qualified" include holding the Certified Park and Recreation
Professional (CPRP) certification, having a degree in parks and recreation or related field, or
five years professional experience in parks and recreation commensurate with the position
qualifications and involvement in professional park and recreation organizations. All criteria
are highly desirable.
The chief administrator shall help the approving authority to become familiar not only with
the individual responsibilities of the approving authority members, but also with general
operation of the agency. The chief administrator shall keep the approving authority, staff,
and community informed of public policy issues that affects the community.
A system shall be established to ensure that leadership is available when the agency's chief
administrator is incapacitated, off duty, out of town, or otherwise unable to act.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the chief administrator position description and the name
and professional qualifications of the current agency chief administrator.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Phil St. Clair is the Executive Director of the South Bend Parks and Recreation
Department for the City of South Bend. Mr. St. Clair has a degree in Business and
Industrial Management. He has been in the parks and recreation field for over twenty
(20) years and served for ten years as Director of Equipment Services for the City of
South Bend. He has served on the Board of Regents for the National Parks and
Recreation Association’s Reitz Marketing and Revenue School, and was the 2010
Indiana Park and Recreation Associatio’s (IPRA) Outstanding Professional of the Year.
The Director of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department is appointed
according to Indiana Code 36-4-9-2 which states that the city executive (Mayor)
appoints the head of each department with the executive appointment subject to the
approval of the statutory board or commission. In the City of South Bend’s case, the
statutory board or commission is the Board of Park Commissioners.
Available for review On-Site:
The Accreditation File has a compressed biography and credentials for the
Superintendent.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
64
4.5 Physical Examination
Standard: There should be an established policy governing the provision of physical examinations
for employees.
Commentary: Certain positions may, because of the physical job requirements, involve a
pre-employment physical as a condition of appointment. Some agencies within civil service
systems are obligated to follow the physical examination policy established by that system.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the physical examination policy and evidence of compliance.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Parks and Recreation staff are not required to have a physical upon
being hired or during their term of employment.
The medical benefit program does provide coverage for an annual
physical (with a small employee co-pay). This annual physical is
recommended and provided for in the insurance benefits program but
is not required.
Some union employees, depending on the nature of the position, are
subject to a pre-employment physical. In addition, employees who
maintain a CDL (commercial driver’s license) are required to take a
physical upon renewal of the license.
Available for review On-Site:
The Agreement between the City of South Bend and the Teamster’s
Local Union no 364, pg42, 28-E establishes the City’s obligations in
regards to the union employee’s CDL licenses and physicals.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.5.1 Workforce Health and Wellness
Standard: There should be an employee health and wellness program(s) within the agency.
Commentary: Park and recreation agencies are often the model for healthy and active lifestyles. As such,
park and recreation agencies should provide opportunities that improve the health and
wellness of its employees. Such opportunities do not necessarily have to be conducted by
the agency, but may utilize community resources.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide evidence of the agency’s health and wellness program and
employee participation.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend began a formal Heath and Wellness program for
all full-time employess in 2011. The program includes membership to
the O’Brien Fitness center, nutrional counselling, healthy life-style
65
instruction, smoking cessation assistance and several other wellness
components.
Health and Wellness Screens - The event is held twice each year to,
“raise awareness and empower employees, retirees & their spouses to
make positive health-enhancing lifestyle choices and engage in
practices that will benefit their quality of lives.” Services such as blood
pressure screenings, blood lipid profiles, and nutritional
demonstrations of heart-healthy food are offered. The Parks and
Recreation Fitness Supervisor, works with the Human Resources
Department and Healthcare Solutions in providing health & Fitness
information numerous times annually.
This program is tied into the health insurance program and employee
activity in the program is tracked and montiored on a group basis.
Available for review On-Site:
In Accreditation Folder contains the summation of the Health and
Wellness program as distributed to new and existing employees.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.6 Orientation Program
Standard: There should be an orientation program for all personnel employed by the Agency.
Commentary: An orientation program of the agency should include (1) philosophy, goals, and objectives;
(2) the history and development of the agency; and (3) pertinent sociological and
environmental factors of the community and specific neighborhood in which the individual is
to serve. Full-time staff may be provided a more in-depth orientation than part-time staff.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide outline of orientation program.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
It is the policy of the City of South Bend that all new employees are
adequately oriented to City operations and personnel policies. The Human
Resources department conducts orientation training for all new full-time
employees
It is the policy of the City of South Bend that all new employees attend a
formal orientation program administered by the Human Resources
Department. This program is normally conducted once each month and
new employees are required to attend the first such meeting scheduled after
their first day of employment, unless circumstances warrant a later date.
Issues covered include, but are not limited to, introduction of Human
Resources staff, Mayor’s goals, history of the City of South Bend, City
organization chart, the City of South Bend’s Policies and Procedures
Manual, residency requirements, Drug Free Workplace Act of 1988,
workplace violence prevention, public records, benefits, customer service,
PERF and payroll, employee assistance plan and resolving conflict, health
and safety, workplace harassment prevention and diversity.
66
New hires also go through a Department orientation with their supervisors.
The Human Resources Department has a checklist that must be completed
and returned to them within one week after the start date.
A copy of the City of South Bend New Employee Orientation, Employee
Departmental Orientation Checklist and City Policy Number 4.6 and 8.1
(New Employee/Trial Period) are located in the department reference
library.
A copy of the new employee manual is distributed to each new employee
upon hire.
Available for review On-Site:
In the Reference Shelves is a copy of the new employee manual.
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies 8,
is available for reference in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.6.1 In-Service Training Function
Standard: There shall be an in-service training function within the agency that is evaluated,
updated, and reviewed annually.
Commentary: The nature of the training function will be based on the size of the agency, with larger
agencies having a specific training component and smaller agencies relying on training
provided by other agencies as required.
The training component should facilitate the development of agency training programs;
notifying personnel of available and/or required training; maintaining training records;
assuring that required training programs are attended; implementing and coordinating training
programs; selecting instructors; and evaluating training programs.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide evidence of the in-service training function and an outline of
the training programs offered.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend’s Human Resources Department, offers several
training programs each year that are open to all employees. Some of the
training programs that have been offered include: Performance
Management Training (a guide to performance evaluations), Coaching to
Improve Performance, Diversity in the Workplace, Sexual Harassment
Guidelines, Customer Service, and various workplace and supervisory
seminars. In addition to the training programs offered through the Human
Resource Department, the safety and Risk Management Division also offers
programs on ergonomics, defensive driving, Incident Command, and
various required and optional safety courses, including chainsaw safety,
food and beverage handling, Exposure Control, and various supervisory
courses.
67
The Information Technology Services Department offers regular classes on
most of the computer software programs that are supported by their staff.
Department staff is encouraged to attend these programs to make the best
use of available technology.
The City of South Bend has a uniform travel policy for all departments
within the city. This policy sets forth the maximum amount for
reimbursable expenses that will be allowed for any travel done by city
employees on official city business.
Student internships are provided year around for students studying in the
fields of recreation, sports management, therapeutic recreation, leisure
studies, outdoor recreation, and other areas of concentration within the
recreation field.
The Master Plan Update and Three Year Recreation Plan includes Action
Steps for staff development and training.
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies
38 – Travel Policy, is available for reference in the Department’s reference
library.
Signin sheets from In-Service Training sessions included in the
Accreditation Folder 4.6.1
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.6.2 Employee Development
Standard: There should be a program of employee development, available for employees
throughout the agency, based on needs of individual employees and future
organizational needs.
Commentary: Employee development is a structured process that is utilized by an agency to provide
opportunities for individual growth and development at all levels. The employee
development program should foster the improvement of personal skills, knowledge, and
abilities of personnel in order to successfully meet agency tasks and employee advancement
requirements. The program ensures all employees equal access to training and development
opportunities. The aim of employee development is to highlight specific opportunities for
individual growth at all levels and to improve overall job satisfaction and performance. The
agency may utilize the career development program to further the professional growth and
capabilities of the employee's present and/or future job role within the agency. Leadership
development programs should support current leaders and provide an avenue for growth of
new leaders to address future organizational needs. The employee development program
should include availability of periodicals, books, and other resource materials; attendance at
conferences and workshops; staff seminars and study groups; in-service education program of
a specific sequence and content; encouragement of correspondence courses and academic
work; visitation to other programs; relevant certifications; and/or utilize a mentorship
program.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of how the agency supports employee
development.
68
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Department of Parks and Recreation has budgeted approximately
$53,000 in its 2012 fiscal year budget to allow for staff to attend
professional development and training as deemed appropriate. All staff
members are encouraged to attend some specialized training every year. It
is the interest of the Park Board to provide every opportunity for the staff to
attend professional development seminars when possible. The
Superintendent will designate specific personnel to attend appropriate
seminars. When authorization is approved, the department shall pay all
justified expenses when appropriate. (If out of state travel is involved, a
pre-approved travel request form must be filled out prior to the travel
date.)
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department employees attend various
career development programs throughout the year. Examples of these
would include, but are not limited to: Indiana Parks and Recreation
Association (IPRA) Annual Conference, National Recreation and Park
Association (NRPA) Annual Conference, N.R.P.A.’s Reitz Marketing &
Revenue School, Midwest Turf Expo, and Annual P.G.A. Schools.
Student internships are provided year around for students studying in the
fields of recreation, sports management, therapeutic recreation, leisure
studies, outdoor recreation, and other areas of concentration within the
recreation field.
As part of the annual evaluation of staff, goals are set for the next year, and
last years stated goals and the progress made towards them are assessed.
Supervisors are encouraged to help set and support personal, professional
goals for those that they oversee in this process.
The Master Plan Update and Three Year Recreation Plan includes Action
Steps for staff development and training
Available for review On-Site:
A copy of the City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual, Policies
38 – Travel Policy, is available for reference in the Department’s reference
library.
The Accredition File contains samples of approved training travel requests,
training schedules, a summation of all the development for the Zoo for one
year, and a sampling of attended seminars syllabi.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.6.3 Succession Planning
Standard: Agencies should formulate a succession plan to ensure the continued effective
performance of the organization by making provisions for the development and
replacement of key people over time.
69
Commentary: Every organization has a unique population of employees that often reflects the age and
life cycle of the organization. Over time, employees reach retirement age and vacate
positions. Often, the retiring employees are in leadership positions or possess institutional
knowledge critical to organizational sustainability. Organizations should be aware of the age
demographics of their employee workforce and plan for their inevitable departure. Planning
should involve employee development, leadership training, knowledge transfer and possible
reorganization to ensure continuity of services.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the agency’s succession plan.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Often, the retiring employees are in leadership positions or possess institutional
knowledge critical to organizational sustainability.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s steps to creating a successful
Succession Plan were:
1. Identify the challenges and outcomes that come with the exodus of key staff.
2. Apply identification of necessary leadership expertise and skill sets to both
training upcoming staff if you are leaving, and/or in yourself if you are the one
hoping to become a leader.
3. Create strategies, steps, and a plan for identifying appropriate replacements and
building their capacity to lead.
Building on the current Department’s organization, “managing up” and training
leaders for possible replacement through cross-training and deliberate foresight are the
key components.
Available for review On-Site:
The Organization Charts found in the South Bend Parks and Recreation Departments
Administration Polices and Procedures Manual is available in the Reference Library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.6.4 Professional Organization Membership
Standard: Professional personnel should be active members of their professional organization(s).
Commentary: "Active" means more than holding membership. It includes attendance at meetings,
presentations, committee work, elected and appointed positions, participation in educational
opportunities, etc.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a list of professional personnel and the professional
organization(s) in, which they are a member; indicate nature of participation.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Superintendent of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department
actively encourages and supports involvement in the Indiana Parks and
Recreation Association (IPRA) and the National Recreation and Park
Association (NRPA) in addition to other professional organizations related
70
to specialized areas (NYSCA, ASA, PGA, etc.) To help encourage this active
involvement, the Department, in many cases pays the annual membership
fee for NRPA, IPRA and certain other qualified professional associations.
Every Division head and a large portion of the Department’s management
team are active in at least one professional organization in their fields.
Available for review On-Site:
The Accreditation File contains a table displaying the comprehensive list of
the professional associations that Department staff is involved in.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.7 Volunteer Management
Standard: There should be a volunteer management function within the agency, including a
comprehensive Volunteer Management Manual.
Commentary: Park and recreation agencies rely heavily on the contribution of volunteers. As such, the
agency should have a comprehensive Volunteer Management Manual that includes policies
and procedures related to the management of volunteers.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the Volunteer Management Manual.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
A completely new volunteer operation was begun in 2008. Manuals were
updated, new tracking procedures where installed, recruitment was begun in
combination with other outreach and social media efforts.
Available for review On-Site:
The Accreditation File is the Volunteer Manual for the Department.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.7.1 Utilization of Volunteers
Standard: Volunteers should be utilized by the agency in a variety of positions.
Commentary: Agency volunteers should be used for functions such as program leadership, fundraising
and fiscal management, public relations and promotion, clerical services, advisory councils,
program/service support, etc. Volunteer positions carrying higher levels of responsibility
should be supported by the agency volunteer position descriptions.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide list of functions in which agency volunteers are utilized, the
extent of such utilization, and examples of volunteer position descriptions.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s various Division Heads are
responsible for the coordination of volunteers for the programs under their own
operation’s assistance. Staff members are responsible for the coordination of volunteers
for their Advisory Councils.
71
Volunteers serve in the following areas:

Youth activity leaders

Docents

Promotion and marketing

Special Events assistance

Trails maintenance

Parks maintenance

Reception and greeters

Specialist Advice
Available for review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is this year’s Volunteer tracking charts, showing projects and
hours.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.7.2 Recruitment, Selection, Orientation, Training, and Retention
Standard: There should be an on-going function within the agency for the recruitment, selection,
orientation, training and retention of volunteers, including procedures on background
screening.
Commentary: As part of the selection process, background investigations are highly desired for all
volunteers who work routinely with vulnerable populations, especially youth, senior adults,
and persons with disabilities.
In certain circumstances, training specific to the volunteer’s area of responsibility is strongly
recommended, especially for volunteers who work routinely with vulnerable populations,
such as youth, senior adults, and persons with disabilities (i.e., youth coaches, senior center
volunteers, and rehabilitation center volunteers).
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the agency’s recruitment, selection, orientation, training, and
retention procedures. Provide the agency’s background investigation procedures for
volunteers and evidence of implementation.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
72
A database is been created which tracks the individuals who provide a service, and this
database is used to recruit volunteers for other projects.
The staff’s selection of volunteers is based on the type of service they are interested in
providing. Background checks may be conducted on individuals who are interested in
working with youth on a long-term basis.
A Volunteer Coordinator exists for the Botanical Conservancy (who herself is a
volunteer) who directs orientation for those projects, and the Docent Program at the
Potawatomi Zoo is overseen by the Zoo Director and the Educational Curator who
provides the guidance and orientation for that program. Other individuals or groups
are referred to the appropriate staff person for an orientation to the program and
specific need.
To assist new volunteers in learning about the Parks and Recreation Department and
their specific volunteer function, the department has completed a Volunteer Manual. A
completed Docent Manual is already on file. The purpose is to provide each volunteer
with a solid training foundation which includes information concerning department
policies, procedures, goals, mission, program responsibilities and general guidelines.
Available for review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is the Docent Manual being used for Potawatomi Zoo.
In the Accreditation File is the comprehensive Volunteer Manual.
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation’s Administration, Policies and
Procedures Manual (9010 Background Check- Volunteers) is available in the
Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.7.3 Supervision and Evaluation
Standard: Agency volunteers should be monitored, should receive supervisory visits and
conferences, and be evaluated regarding performance.
Commentary: Supervision and evaluation of volunteers is important to ensure adequate training is
provided and to verify satisfactory conduct and performance. The degree to which the
agency supervises and evaluates volunteers may vary depending on the role of the volunteers
(i.e., one-time volunteer assisting with a park cleanup vs. a repeat volunteer assisting with a
rehabilitation program).
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide written description of the monitoring system including
current practices for supervisory visits, and examples of completed evaluations.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The majority of the volunteers currently providing services to the department are onetime volunteers serving at one of our many special events. The evaluation takes place
on-site and is the volunteers’ evaluation of the experience, along with suggestions for
changes, improvement or enhancement.
73
The volunteers are also asked to evaluate their volunteer experience, and use the
standard program evaluation tools available to participants. This will provide valuable
information on program layout for next year, or the next event. It also assists the
supervisor in addressing their growth needs, and in retaining volunteers.
Other volunteers, with a more regular interaction with the Department, include
coaches, tutors, mentors, program assistants, and are evaluated by the staff person(s)
for whom they provide the service. These type of volunteers can be supervised and
guided in their development.
Available for review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is the Docent Manual being used for Potawatomi Zoo.
In the Accreditation File is the comprehensive Volunteer Manual.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.7.4 Recognition
Standard: There should be a function within the agency for the recognition for volunteers.
Commentary: Volunteers provide their time and energy to assist an agency without expectation of
monetary benefit. Thus, officially recognizing the agency’s appreciation for volunteers is
meaningful and appreciated by volunteers. Recognition may take many forms, depending on
the nature of the volunteer roles, from a simple thank-you letter posted on the agency website
to an individual certificate of appreciation, to personal recognition at a banquet, etc.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide description of the nature of recognitions given, including any
awards and public recognition.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
There are currently four types of recognition for Parks and Recreation Department
volunteers: event t-shirts or small promotional items, thank you notes, Board of Park
Commissioner’s recognition and the Annual Volunteer Recognition Event every
September.
The thank you notes are sent to all volunteers at the end of the season, and will include
a statement that commemorates their hours of service for the past year. These notes
either come from the Division head where the volunteer provided service, or from the
facility or program staff contact where the volunteer provided service.
Volunteers at Department special events such as the Kid’s Triathlon, A.S.A. Softball
tournaments, or East Race Waterway competitions receive event t-shirts that
commemorate their participation.
Occasionally, for extraordinary efforts or remarkable participation, volunteer groups or
individuals will be presented to the Board of Park Commissioners in a regular Park
Board Meeting, and be officially commended and thanked by that body.
The Annual Volunteer Recognition Event is a public outdoor ceremony, usually
including the Mayor and the Executive Director of the Parks and Recreation
Department. Certificates of appreciation, photo opportunities and cookies and goodwill
74
are the hallmarks of this event at the Chris Wilson Pavilion at the end of the
programming season.
Available for review On-Site:
Agenda from the 2011 event is available in the Accreditation File.
Photographs from the event are available in the Accreditation File
Certificate samples are available in the Accreditation File
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.7.5 Liability Coverage
Standard: Agency volunteers should be covered for negligence liability by the agency.
Commentary: Individuals representing the agency in any official capacity, such as volunteers, should be
provided appropriate negligence liability insurance.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation indicating coverage.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 states that all volunteers are required to be
covered by the City of South Bend. This is not Worker’s Compensation, but rather a
general liability coverage for all volunteers while working.
The City of South Bend is a self-insured and necessarily assumes this liability as part of
its operations.
Available for review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is the comprehensive Volunteer Manual.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
4.8 Consultants and Contract Employees
Standard: The agency should have policies and procedures regarding the use of consultants and
contract employees.
Commentary: Consultants and contract employees may be utilized by the agency for specialized
functions. These may be officially contracted for a fee or their services may not involve a
fee. This may include consultants on human development, management, finance, landscape
design, facility construction, etc.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the agency’s policies and procedures regarding the use of
consultants and contract employees.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The majority of contract employees hired by the Parks and Recreation Department are
instructors for the various leisure activities. All contractual employees are required to
fill out a contract, which lists the dates worked, number of hours or lessons worked
75
and rate of pay and is the signed by the contractual employee. Contract employees
must comply with all Department rules and regulations.
Consultant services are frequently procured for professional services such as
planning, feasibility and marketing studies, civil engineering, architecture, and
landscape architecture. These services are used on an as needed basis to assist,
augment, or enhance the capabilities of existing staff.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department follows Indiana State Code (IC) to
procure these services. IC 5-16-11.1-4 and 11.1-5 deal specifically with the
Procurement of Services of Architects, Engineers and Land Surveyors.
IC 5-16-11.1-4 Notice of requirement of professional services Sec. 4.
(a) When professional services are required for a project, a public agency may:
(1) publish notice in accordance with IC 5-3-1;
(2) provide for notice (other than notice in accordance with IC 5-3-1)
as it determines is
reasonably calculated to inform those performing professional services
of a proposed project;
(3) provide for notice in accordance with both subdivisions (I) and (2);
or
(4) determine not to provide any notice.
(b) If the public agency provides for notice under subsection (a)(1), (a)(2), or
(a)(3), each notice must include:
(1) the location of the project;
(2) a general description of the project;
(3) the general criteria to be used in selecting professional services
firms for the project;
(4) the place where any additional project description or specifications
are on file;
(5) the hours of business of the public agency; and
(6) the last date for accepting statements of qualifications from
interested parties.
As added by P.L.24-1985, SEC.16. Amended by P.L.51-1988, SEC.1.
IC 5-16-11.1-5 Basis for contracts; compensation Sec. 5. A public agency may
make all contracts for professional services on the basis of competence and
qualifications for the type of services to be performed and negotiate compensation
that the public agency determines to be reasonable. As added by P.L.24-l985,
SEC.16.
IC 36-10-4 “Parks Department in Certain Cities”, by which the Department was
established, also includes specific language with regard to powers of the Board of
Park Commissioners in these matters. IC 36-l0-4-9(c)(2) states as follows:
(2) Appoint a secretary, and, in his absence a secretary promote more, landscape
architects, engineers, surveyors, attorneys, clerks, guards, laborers, playground
directors, and other employees, prescribe their duties and authority, and fix their
compensation. If a superintendent of the department is appointed, he shall be
appointed under IC 36-4-9-2.
76
Min-max fee limit guides are not prescribed in the statutes. However it is the
practice of the SBPRD to solicit Request for Proposals (RPP’s) for professional
services or Request for Qualifications (RFQ’s) — see IC 5-16-11.1-4(b). On modest
value projects or on a time sensitive basis, professional services are directly solicited
based on a firms known expertise and qualifications in the area of need.
Available for review On-Site:
In Accreditation File is a sample copy of the contractual services contract, and copy
of the sited Indiana Code.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
77
5.0 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
5.1 Fiscal Policy
Standard: Fiscal policies setting guidelines for management and control of revenues, expenditures,
and investment of funds shall be set forth clearly in writing, and the legal authority
must be clearly established.
Commentary: Policy of an agency must comply with the higher authority of the parent organization and
be based on appropriate enabling legislation. General and enterprise/self-sustaining fund
revenues include revenues from property taxes, sales taxes, income taxes, licenses and
permits, fees and charges. Policy decisions regarding revenues from other than general funds
may include millage, grants, gifts and bequests, special taxes and assessments. Policies may
include pay-as-you-go or pay-as-you-use. This shall include policies that low-income
portions of the population will be accommodated.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide policies for fiscal and legal authority.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend Parks & Recreation Department is a department of the City of South
Bend and is included in the City’s monthly and annual financial statements. The South Bend
Parks & Recreation Department is responsible for it own fiscal budgeting and monitoring under
the provisions set by Municipal code and under policy set by the authority of the City
Controller, though final approval of the annual budget rests with the City Council.
City policies regarding finance are established by the City Controller’s Office in accordance
with the City of South Bend Code of Ordinances. The ultimate legal authority regarding
finances is the Indiana State Board of Accounts.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Indiana State Board of Accounts Manual for Cities & Towns.
City of South Bend Purchasing Policy & Procedure Manual
In the Accreditation File is a copy of sited Municipal Code (Art. 4, sec 2-13 establishing the
Executive Departments, and Art 7, outlining the budgeting procedures)
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.1.1 Fees and Charges
Standard: There shall be an established policy on the type of services for what fees and charges
may be instituted and the basis for establishing the amount of such fees and charges.
Commentary: Recognition shall be given to the function of income-producing and subsidized activities as
well as "break-even" activities. Often a local agency will establish a policy to subsidize
78
children's activities, but not adults, or establish differential fees for residents and nonresidents. Such policies shall be regularly evaluated.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the policy on fees and charges and the current fee schedules.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department works from a guiding principles
policy set in the Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual (#6020). All fees are
reviewed annually by staff and submitted to the Board of Park Commissioners at
various times of the year.
Available for Review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is a copy of the Fees and Charges for the South Bend Parks and
Recreation facilities and services.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and
Procedures Manual (Policy 6020) is available for review in the department’s reference
library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.1.2 Acceptance of Gifts and Donations
Standard: The agency should have an established policy for the acceptance of gifts and donations.
Commentary: "Reverter Clauses" are sometimes used to assure that the properties given for recreational
use continue for that purpose or revert to the owners or heirs. Where a gift is real property,
funds to build a facility, or funds to purchase acreage, there must be a provision for
adequately maintaining the property after acquisition.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the policy on acceptance of gifts and donations.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
All City of South Bend departments are regulated to comply with Indiana Code on the
subject of gifts.
The City of South Bend Parks and Recreation department will periodically receive
major gifts in the form of property, stocks, bonds, material and equipment. All
donations need to be recorded (in kind, services, monetary, equipment and materials)
and submitted to the Board of Park Commissioners.
For cash donations by individuals to the department, the process is accounted similar to
the procedures for grants from organizations. All cash gifts must be deposited within
twenty-four hours of receipt. All gifts are presented on a monthly basis to the Board of
Park Commissioners for their acceptance.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Indiana State Board of Accounts Manual for Cities & Towns is available in the
Department’s reference library
79
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and
Procedures Manual (Policy 6030) is available for review in the department’s reference
library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.1.3 Governmental Grants
Standard: Where feasible and appropriate, regional, state and federal grants should be used to
supplement agency funding through an established procedure to research, coordinate
and implement grants.
Commentary: Governmental grants can provide significant funding for programs, services, land
acquisition and development. Grants from other governmental agencies leverage agency
resources to enhance services, expand programs, acquire land and develop facilities.
Typically, grants are awarded on a competitive basis through regional, state and federal
programs. Grants may require local matching funds or in-kind services and generally include
special conditions or restrictions to ensure that the grant funds are utilized in accordance with
the program intent.
Prior to grant procurement, agencies should evaluate how the grant application process,
approval, implementation and management will be coordinated.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the procedure along with a summary of governmental grants
received by the agency for the past five years, including identification of the following:
project descriptions, grantor, date awarded, grant amount, agency-match requirements.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Whenever possible, the Department of Parks and Recreation solicits funding assistance
for department construction projects, department renovation projects, and department
programs and services. Financial assistance funding sources have been sought from or
include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following:







Land and Water Conservation Fund for the provision and development of
public parks and recreation sites, and amenities
Community Development Block Grants for development of physical
improvements to buildings and grounds in targeted economic areas within
the City of South Bend
Federal Highway Department Transportation Enhancement Grants (ISTEA,
Tea-21) to acquire and develop alternative, non-motorized routes of travel
Build Indiana Funds appropriated by Indiana State legislature for
miscellaneous community improvements, acquisitions and construction
projects
Indiana Arts Commission Grant for implementation of A Fair of the Arts
program
National Center for Substance Abuse Prevention for programming and
salaries
ARRA (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) funds.
Available for Review On-Site:
80
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and
Procedures Manual (Policy 3310 for grant solicitation) is available for review in the
department’s reference library.
Included in the Accreditation File is a grid matrix for the past five years of
governmental funds support including the programs and operations utilizing the
funds.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.1.4 Private, Corporate, and Non-Profit Support
Standard: Where feasible and appropriate, private, corporate, and non-profit support should be
used to supplement agency funding through a established procedure to research,
coordinate and implement alternative funding.
Commentary: Such support can provide significant contribution for capital improvements, and enhanced
agency programs and services. Financial and in-kind support from individuals, corporations
and foundations can provide opportunities to address mutual goals of the agency and the
grantor. This financial support may involve recognition of sponsorship ranging from public
acknowledgement to facility-naming rights.
Prior to acceptance of support, agencies should evaluate the terms of acceptance and how the
implementation and management process will be coordinated.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a procedure along with a summary of private, corporate and
non-profit support received by the agency for the past five years including identification of
the following: project descriptions, grantor/sponsor, date awarded, value of the contribution
and applicable recognition.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Whenever possible, the Department of Parks and Recreation solicits funding assistance
for department construction projects, department renovation projects, and department
programs and services. Financial assistance funding sources have been sought from or
include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following:






United States Golfing Association
United States Tennis Association
Potawatomi Zoological Society
Botanical Society of South Bend
Private donations of land for facilities and expansions
Local Service organizations such as the Rotary Club, the Lion’s Club, and the
Kiwanis Club.
Available for Review On-Site:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and
Procedures Manual (Policy 3310, 3320 for grant solicitation and sponsorship
procedures) is available for review in the department’s reference library.
Included in the Accreditation File is a sample Sponsorship Report presented to the
Board of Park Commissioners.
81
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.2 Fiscal Management Procedures
Standard: There shall be established procedures for the fiscal management of the agency.
Commentary: Procedures for the fiscal management function within the agency include, at a minimum,
annual budget development, supervision of internal expenditures and revenues and related
controls, and maintenance of liaison with the government's fiscal officers.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the procedures for the fiscal management of the agency.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
City policies are established by the City Controller’s Office in accordance with the Indiana State
Board of Accounts. The City Purchasing Department also distributes a Purchasing Policy &
Procedure Manual to assist with all procurement procedures. South Bend Parks & Recreation
Department participates in the citywide budget process, which directs fiscal management. The
City Controllers Office guides this process. Department employees are involved in the
preparation, presentation and management of fiscal activities.
The Department of Parks and Recreation is required to comply with all City policies and
procedures contained in the South Bend Municipal Code, and as established by Indiana Code.
Available for Review On-Site:
City of South Bend Purchasing Policy Manual and the State Board of Accounts Guidelines
Manual for Cities & Towns are both available as references in the department’s reference
library.
In the Accreditation File are the cited sections of Municipal Code referenced to the fiscal and
budgetary processes. (Art. 4, sec 2-13 establishing the Executive Departments, and Art 7,
outlining the budgeting procedures)
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.2.1 Authority and Responsibility for Fiscal Management
Standard: The agency's chief administrator should be designated as having the authority and
responsibility for the fiscal management of the agency.
Commentary: Although an agency's chief administrator is ultimately responsible for all fiscal matters of
the agency, the size and complexity of the agency may dictate the need to delegate
responsibility for fiscal management functions to an identifiable person or component within
the agency.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation demonstrating clear delegation of fiscal
authority for the agency.
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Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Department of Parks and Recreation shall be administered by the Executive
Director of Parks and Recreation who is appointed by the Mayor, with the approval of
the Board of Park Commissioners, and shall serve at the pleasure of the Mayor.
Indiana code chapter 36-10-4-3 applies to cities that have adopted this chapter by
ordinance. In it, “a department of public parks is established as an executive
department of the city. The department is under the control of a board of park
commissioners. Money received by the board shall immediately be paid into the city
treasury and credited to the department. All expenditures relating to the parks,
parkways, public grounds, public ways, and other places of the city under the control
of the department shall be provided for by a special levy of taxes. The money shall be
paid from the city treasury when ordered by the board. The board may appoint
employees, prescribe their duties and authority and fix their compensation. A tax on
the taxable property in the district, shall be levied annually by the city legislative body
for park purposes. The tax shall be collected the same as other city taxes are collected,
and the city fiscal officer shall, between the first and fifth days of each month, notify
the board of the amount of taxes collected for park purposes during the proceeding
month. At the date of notification, the city fiscal officer shall credit the park fund with
the amount. The board may expend on behalf of the city all sums of money collected
from: taxes, the sale of privileges in the parks of the city, the sale of bonds of the city
for park purposes, and any other source. All money remaining in the treasury to the
credit of the board at the end of the calendar year belongs to the general park fund, the
special non-reverting operating fund, or the special non-reverting capital fund for use
by the board for park purposes.
Park and recreation facilities and programs shall be made available to the public free
of charge when feasible. However, if it is necessary in order to provide a particular
activity, the board may charge a reasonable fee. The city legislative body may establish
by ordinance upon request of the board a special non-reverting operating fund for
park purposes from which expenditures may be made as provided by ordinance, either
by appropriation by the board or by the city legislative body, or a special non-reverting
operating fund for the purpose of acquiring land or making specific capital
improvements from which expenditures may be made by appropriation by the city
legislative body.
The city legislative body shall designate the fund or funds into which the city fiscal
officer shall deposit fees from golf courses, swimming pools, skating rinks, or other
major facilities requiring major expenditures for management and maintenance.
Money received from fees other than from major facilities or received from the sale of
surplus property shall be deposited by the city fiscal officer either in the special nonreverting operating fund or in the non-reverting capital fund, as directed by the board.
However, if neither fund has been established, money received from fees or from the
sale of surplus property shall be deposited in the general park fund. Money from either
special fund may be disbursed only on approved claims allowed and signed by the
president and secretary of the board. Money placed in the special non-reverting capital
fund may not be withdrawn except for purposes for which the fund was created,
unless the fiscal body repeals the ordinance establishing the fund. The fiscal body may
not repeal the ordinance under suspension of the rules. Money procured from fees or
received from the sale of surplus property shall be deposited at least once each month
with the city fiscal officer.”
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Municipal Ordinance accepts the cited Indiana code in Article 11, Sec 2-137 stating,
“The Public Parks Department shall operate under provisions of IC 36-10-4, pursuant
to IC 36-10-4-1(a). (Ord. No. 7108-82, § 6)”
The Indiana Code, section IC 36-10-3-14, designates the Superintendent
(Administrator) as having the fiscal authority for the fiscal management of the
department as follows:
“Under direction of the Board, the Superintendent (Administrator) shall:
1. propose annually a plan for the operation of the department;
2. administer the plan as approved by the board;
3. supervise the general administration of the department;
4. keep the records of the department and preserve all papers and documents of
the department;
5. recommend persons for appointment as assistants if the board determines there
is a need;
6. appoint the employees of the department, subject to the approval of the board,
according to the standards and qualifications fixed by the board and without
regard to political affiliation;
7. prepare and present to the board an annual report; and
8. perform other duties that the board directs”
Available for Review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File are copies of the Job Description for the Executive Director of
the Parks and Recreation Department.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.2.2 Purchasing Procedures
Standard: Agencies should have established procedures for the requisition and purchase of agency
equipment, supplies and services.
Commentary: There shall be formal procedures for controlling the requisition and purchase of agency
supplies, equipment and services such as; specifications for items requiring standardized
purchases, bidding procedures, criteria for the selection of vendors and bidders, and petty
cash and procurement cards.
Purchasing procedures may be controlled by the governing entity.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the procedures for the requisition and purchase of agency
equipment, supplies, and services.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
There is a published Purchasing Policy and Procedure Manual, which establish the
procedures for purchasing, procurement and contracts for the city of South Bend,
which includes the South Bend Parks & Recreation Department. The manual
covers, but is not limited to the following:
 State Laws and City Policies
 Requisition processing
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








requisition preparation
specification preparation
Request for quote process
Annual quotes
Emergency purchase orders
Legal public bid over $75,000
Annual Contracts
Public Works projects
Disposal and transfer of assets
Available for Review On-Site:
City of South Bend Purchasing Policy Manual and the State Board of Accounts
Guidelines Manual for Cities & Towns are both available as references in the
department’s reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.2.2.1 Emergency Purchase Procedures
Standard: There should be established procedures for emergency purchases within the agency.
Commentary: Established procedures are necessary to the agency in making emergency purchases to
secure equipment or services in a swift and efficient manner.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the procedures for emergency purchases.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
An emergency is defined as “a situation, which jeopardizes the life, safety or health
of the citizens of South Bend.”
Procedures for an emergency purchase or rental\lease procedures have been
established by the City of South Bend Purchasing Department and are included in
the City of South Bend Purchasing Policy and Procedure Manual.
Available for Review On-Site:
City of South Bend Purchasing Policy Manual is available in the department’s
reference library.
The Accreditation File has a copy of the cited section of the Purchasing Policy
Manual.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.3 Accounting System
Standard: The agency shall have a comprehensive accounting system.
Commentary: The accounting system shall be compatible with, or may be a part of, the central
accounting system of the governing jurisdiction with the availability of regular status reports.
It is essential that an agency establish such a system to ensure an orderly, accurate, and
85
complete documentation of the flow of funds. The accounting system shall facilitate rapid
retrieval of information on the status of appropriations, expenditures and revenue any time
the information is required.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a description of the accounting system.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The basic accounting systems utilized by the City of South Bend include:
Navaline (Sungard HTE) — Primary accounting package used citywide — tracks budget
information, expenditures, revenues, grants, appropriations, purchasing, requisitions,
purchase orders and encumbrances, capital assets, and payroll. Navaline’s fixed asset
module tracks all fixed and capital assets with a value greater than $5,000 and all
computer equipment.
Rectrac — This system is specific to the City of South Bend Parks and Recreation
Department and tracks facilities scheduling, class registration and related revenue.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department has an auditor within the Department’s
Fiscal Division for all of the financial activities of our operations.
The Indiana State Board of Accounts conducts an independent citywide audit annually. The
auditors generally spend a week with South Bend Parks & Recreation Department
employees and records. The auditors create the schedule, guidelines and determine the
scope of the audit. The final results of this process are published as the Comprehensive
Annual Finance Report (CAFR).
Section 5-11-1-25 of the Indiana Code requires that an examination (audit) of all City
fiscal year financial records be conducted annually. Indiana State Board of Accounts
conducts this audit on an annual basis. However, they have the freedom to come at any
time unannounced as they see fit. The state examiner shall require from every municipality
and every state or local government unit, entity, or instrumentality financial reports
covering the full period of each fiscal year. The state examiner, personally or through the
deputy examiners, field examiners, or private examiners, shall examine all accounts and all
financial affairs of every public office and officer, state office, state institution, and entity.
On every examination, inquiry shall be made as to the following:
 the financial condition and resources of each municipality, office, institution, or
entity
 whether laws of the state and the uniform compliance guidelines of the state board
of accounts established under section 24 of this chapter have been complied with
 the methods and accuracy of the accounts and reports of the person examined
A copy of any audit is sent to the department Superintendent, the President of the Parks
Board of Commissioners, the City Controller and the Mayor upon completion and is
recorded at the home office of the State Board of Accounts. Internal audits of financial
records of units in the Department of Parks and Recreation are conducted on a periodic or
requested basis as required. Copies of the City financial report for 1998 are in the
department reference library.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Accreditation File has a copy of the cited section of Indiana Code, the latest CAFR
report.
86
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.3.1 Financial Status Reports
Standard: The agency should utilize monthly financial status reports.
Commentary: Monthly financial status reports should include, at a minimum:
• Initial appropriation for each account (or program);
• Balances at the commencement of the regularly defined period;
• Expenditures and encumbrances made during the period;
• Unencumbered balances; and
• Revenue status.
Each appropriation and expenditure should be classified, at a minimum, according to
function, organizational component, activity, object, and program.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the previous three months’ financial status reports.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Fiscal Division produces the Monthly Financial Statement for presentation to the
Board of Park Commissioners at each regular monthly meeting of the Board. The Fiscal
Division also produces status reports and financial statements on request. These
reports, depending on which reports are requested, can provide the following
information:










Transfers to/from each budget line
Expense audit trails
Open encumbrances at period end
Unencumbered budget line balances
Year to date expenses
Month to date expenses
P. O. numbers of outstanding encumbrances
Prior year(s) encumbrances still outstanding
Current year expenses compared to prior year(s)
Detail trial balances
Available for Review On-Site:
The Accreditation File has copies of the a few month’s Monthly Financial Statements, as
presented to the Board of Park Commissioners
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.3.2 Position Authorization
Standard: There should be established procedures for maintaining control over approved positions
in relation to budget authorizations.
87
Commentary: The intent of the standard is to establish controls on the number and type of agency
positions filled and vacant at any time to ensure that persons on the payroll are legally
employed and that positions are in accordance with budget authorizations.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the position authorization procedures and budgeted
positions.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
There are various controls in place to monitor the staffing levels of the department. All
positions are approved by the Common Council of the City of South Bend via an
ordinance fixing salaries of full and part-time.
By direction of the City Council, the Human Resources Department of the City of South
Bend monitors the employment status of all full-time permanent positions that are
authorized in the City operating budget that is adopted by City Council each fiscal
year.
All positions are reviewed prior to each new fiscal year to ensure the salary is within
the City’s Salary Ordinance. As well, paperwork on all new employees is reviewed to
ensure compliance with the City’s Salary Ordinance. Staff in the Parks and Recreation
Department who coordinate the department payroll process have been assigned the
responsibility of assisting the Human Resources Department to ensure that the
department does not exceed its budgeted position authorizations at any time. As part
of this responsibility, staff monitors, on a biweekly basis, the payroll budget.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Accreditation File has copies of the approved Salary Ordinance, and a copy of the
Organization Chart.
A complete collection of Job Descriptions is also available in the Department’s
reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.3.3 Fiscal Control and Monitoring
Standard: There should be established procedures used for collecting, safeguarding, and
disbursing funds.
Commentary: The fiscal control and monitoring procedures should include, at a minimum:
• Maintenance of an allotment system, if any, or records of appropriations among
organizational components;
• Preparation of financial statements;
• Conduct of internal audits; and
• Persons or positions authorized to accept or disburse funds.
Formal fiscal control and monitoring procedures enable an agency to establish accountability,
to comply with funding authorizations and restrictions, to ensure that disbursements are for
designated and approved recipients and, to alert agency management to possible problems.
The procedures should enhance security and accountability of all monies received by the
88
agency, and should include designation of persons permitted to receive money, receipt
procedures, accountability, security, and audits. Employees handling money should be
bonded.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the fiscal control and monitoring procedures.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The department’s Fiscal Division performs internal monitoring of department fiscal
activities on a daily basis and the City Controller’s office oversees the Department’s
fiscal activities.
Reports are received weekly showing disbursements from all South Bend Parks &
Recreation Department’s funds. These reports are checked for accuracy in amounts
and accounts.
Section 5-11-1-25 of the Indiana Code requires that an examination (audit) of all City
fiscal year financial records be conducted annually. Indiana State Board of Accounts
conducts this audit on an annual basis.
Cash receipts are processed daily from all locations and any discrepancies are
investigated. Transaction reports are supplied to the Division Heads for their
information.
All procedures followed are in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards.
In addition to the standard tracking forms for balances and revenue accounting, other
audit techniques are utilized such as surprise cash counts of petty cash, safe balances,
or registers or handing out of payroll checks with spot identification checks to insure
compliance with payroll rules and standards.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department is required to follow the procedures
created by the City Controller’s office, and as cited in the State Board of Accounts
Guidelines Manual for Cities & Towns.
Available for Review On-Site:
In the Accreditation Folder are samples of the Daily cash balance sheets
In the Accreditation Folder is the cited Indiana Code
Monthly Budget Variance Reports
Physical Inventory and Capital Assets
City of South Bend Purchasing Policy Manual and the State Board of Accounts
Guidelines Manual for Cities & Towns are both available as references in the
department’s reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.3.4 Independent Audit
Standard: There shall be an independent audit of the agency's fiscal activities conducted annually.
Commentary: As a basis for determining the financial integrity of an agency's fiscal control procedures,
an independent audit shall be conducted at least annually or at a time stipulated by applicable
statute or regulation. The audit may be performed by the government's internal audit staff
(external to the agency being audited) or by an outside certified public accounting firm.
89
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the most recent independent audit and management letter, if
provided. Provide the response to the audit recommendations.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Section 5-11-1-25 of the Indiana Code requires that an examination (audit) of all City
fiscal year financial records be conducted annually. This code is reflected in
department policy 7020. Indiana State Board of Accounts conducts this audit on an
annual basis. However, they have the freedom to come at any time unannounced as
they see fit. The state examiner shall require from every municipality and every state
or local government unit, entity, or instrumentality financial reports covering the full
period of each fiscal year. The state examiner, personally or through the deputy
examiners, field examiners, or private examiners, shall examine all accounts and all
financial affairs of every public office and officer, state office, state institution, and
entity. On every examination, inquiry shall be made as to the following:
 the financial condition and resources of each municipality, office, institution, or
entity
 whether to laws of the state and the uniform compliance guidelines of the state
board of accounts established under section 24 of this chapter have been complied
with
 the methods and accuracy of the accounts and reports of the person examined
A copy of any audit is sent to the department Administrator, the President of the Parks
Board of Commissioners, the City Controller and the Mayor upon completion and is
recorded at the home office of the State Board of Accounts. Internal audits of financial
records of units in the Department of Parks and Recreation are conducted on a periodic
or requested basis as required.
Available for Review On-Site:
In Accreditation File 5.3 is the latest CAFR report
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.4 Annual Budget
Standard: There shall be an annual operating and capital improvements budget(s), including both
revenues and expenditures.
Commentary: Operating budgets include both capital and operating expenses and cover a one-year period
and capital improvements may extend five or six years with annual review. The nature of an
agency's budgetary system may be determined by the kind of system in use by its
governmental authority.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the current and approved annual operating and capital
improvements budgets.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
90
The annual budget is prepared working closely with the City Controller’s Office. A
schedule and guidelines are published by the City Controller’s Office, and
distributed to each Department. Under the direction of the South Bend Parks and
Recreation Executive Director, the staff prepares the annual operating and capital
improvements budgets for review.
After amendment, these budgets are then presented to the City Controllers Office
for review. After further amendment and revisions the City of South Bend’s
Common Council will approve the final budget in September of each year to be
implemented beginning in January of the following year.
Available for Review On-Site:
In the Accreditation file is the current approved budget and Capital Improvement
Plan (C.I.P)
In the Accreditation file are the budget preparation instructions.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.4.1 Budget Development Participation
Standard: The heads of major agency components within the agency should participate in the
development of the agency's budget.
Commentary: An agency's budget should be developed in cooperation with all major organizational
components within the agency. To increase the value of the input and to enhance
coordination in the budget process, guidelines should be established to inform the heads of
components of the essential tasks and procedures relating to the budget preparation process.
The guidelines should include instructions for preparing budget request documents and for
providing adequate justification for major continuing expenditures or changes in continuing
expenditures of budget items. Information should be included regarding operating impact.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide evidence of such participation by major organizational
components in the budget preparation process.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The development of the Department of Parks and Recreation’s annual operating
budget and capital improvement budgets involves input from all Department
management staff. Proposed budgets for all operational units in the Department
are developed by the designated supervisor that coordinates the different
individual program units within the department. These individuals then present
their proposed budget to their respective supervisors or Division Directors for
review and consideration. The Division Directors then present their proposed
operating budget recommendations to the Superintendent. The Superintendent
then develops a proposed operating budget for the entire Parks department, which
is submitted to the City Controller for review, then the Mayor for approval, then
the Board of Parks Commissioners at a public Parks Board meeting prior to going
to City Council for final approval.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Accreditation File contains worksheets from the submission process of the
budgeting procedure.
91
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.4.2 Budget Recommendations
Standard: Agency components should provide recommendations, based on operational and activity
analysis, for use in the development of the agency's budget.
Commentary: In particular, recommendations concerning personnel resources are logical and necessary
outcomes of analytic and programmatic activities. In addition to an assessment of future
personnel needs, the analysis should include an assessment of presently assigned positions to
ensure that positions allocated to agency functions are appropriate.
Unit costs per program element should be computed and line items established for the
operational procedures determined to insure adequate support funding for all personnel
authorized. Adequate financial records and service statistics should be maintained to assist in
this process.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of agency component recommendations and
evidence of their consideration in the budgeting process.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
As discussed in Standard 5.4.1, critical issues and needs are identified and given in
written submission form to the Executive Director and Fiscal Director to work into
the budgeting preparation process. The Department’s Division Head’s budget
submissions are integral components in the preparation of a budget that is
submitted to the Controller for final approval, and the Division heads are generally
present to speak to both the Board of Park Commissioners and to the City Common
Council in detail about their elements of the proposed Department budget before
its review.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Accreditation file contains worksheets from the submission process of the
budgeting procedure.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.5 Budget Control
Standard: There should be procedures for budget control within the agency, including an
allotment system, accounting system, frequent reporting of revenues and expenditures,
and continuous management review.
Commentary: Agencies should utilize appropriate accounting methodologies and systems to ensure proper
budget control.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the procedures for budget control within the agency.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
92
The City of South Bend operates an integrated, centralized accounting system for
all components within City government. All revenues and expenditures are
accounted for using this software package. This system is also able to generate
financial reports on this information.
Budget reports are monitored by the Fiscal Director of the South Bend Parks and
Recreation Department. Monthly reports are distributed to all Division Heads
during bi-weekly staff meetings, and specialized reports for monitoring the budget
can be created on request.
The Fiscal Director whose primary role is the management of the various funds
and budgets controls the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department budget. The
role of the Fiscal Director includes, but is not limited to the following: monitoring
of accounting structure/procedures; serves as point person for budget
activities/questions/processing; issues monthly and annual financial reports;
provides financial research; oversees payment of bills; maintains systems of
accounting and financial reporting; prepares monthly budget exception reporting
and prepares monthly reconcilements of records.
Monthly reports are also used as a primary budget control method. All levels of
staff are given various monthly budget reports and access to request special reports
as they relate to their area of responsibility and\or cost centers.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Accreditation File contains the samples of the reporting tools, detail
revenue/expense reports, and budget year-to-dates.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.5.1 Supplemental/Emergency Appropriations
Standard: There should be established procedures for requesting supplemental or emergency
appropriations and fund transfers.
Commentary: Provisions should be available within the agency's budget system to meet circumstances
that cannot be anticipated by prior fiscal planning efforts (e.g., additional funds to
compensate for overtime expended during a civil disturbance or funds needed to purchase
needed material not authorized in the operating budget). Mechanisms of adjustment may
include transferring funds from one account to another and/or requesting that additional funds
be granted for agency needs.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the supplemental/emergency appropriations procedures.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The State Board of Accounts has established written procedures for all City
Departments to follow regarding any requests for supplemental or emergency
appropriations, or requests for fund transfers. These written procedures are
contained in the State of Indiana, Accounting Manual for Cities and Towns, section
4-5, 4-6, 4-7, 4-8.
93
The procedures state: “all cities and towns using departmental budget may, by
ordinance or resolution, transfer appropriations from one major budget
classification to another within a department or office at any regular public
meeting without prior notice and without approval form the State Board of Tax
Commissioners, provided such transfer does not necessitate expenditure of more
money that the total amount set out in the budget.
If the municipality’s budget was advertised and passed by ordinance listing minor
object classifications within any major classification, transfers may be made by
resolution of the city council without advertising and without certification to and
approval of the State Board of Tax Commissioners.
For additional appropriations of funds that receive revenue from property taxes or
the state’s motor vehicle highway account or local road and street account, a
certified copy of additional appropriation form must be filed with the State Board
of Tax Commissioners. For other funds requiring appropriation, local fiscal body
approval is still required.”
The City of South Bend’s Administration and Finance Department has procedures
in place to request supplemental or emergency appropriations and fund transfers.
Additional appropriations and fund transfers are presented to the City Council for
formal approval via an additional appropriation ordinance.
Available for Review On-Site:
The State Board of Accounts Guidelines Manual for Cities & Towns is available as
references in the department’s reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
5.5.2 Inventory and Fixed Assets Control
Standard: There should be established procedures for inventory control of agency property,
equipment, and other assets.
Commentary: Inventory controls are intended to prevent losses and unauthorized use, and to avoid both
inventory excesses and shortages. There should be a complete and current listing of agency
assets.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide procedures for inventory and fixed asset control.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Procedures for physical inventories and capital assets have been established
citywide by the City Controller’s Office of the City of South Bend.
Fixed assets are recorded by serial and model number and physical location. The
City Accounting Department then produces reports to reconcile against actual
inventories in the various locations and departments. Annual audits are conducted.
Under law, any property sold by the Department must be declared surplus by the
Board of Park Commissioners. Staff will be requested to submit a list of potential
surplus equipment to the Superintendent by a designated date. Designated surplus
94
equipment will be placed in the city’s annual public auction generally held in
August each year where the most responsive bid will be considered. Any money
received from such sale of property will go into the Parks and Recreation
Department’s general fund, so designated by the Mayor or Controller’s Office.
Available for Review On-Site:
In Accreditation File there is a Fixed Asset report for 2011 in the department’s
reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
95
6.0 PROGRAMS AND SERVICES MANAGEMENT
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
6.1 Recreation Programming Plan
Standard: The agency shall utilize a recreation programming plan that includes both a long-range
plan covering 3-5 years or more that is periodically reviewed and a current-year
implementation plan.
Commentary: The recreation programming plan includes all elements and services of the public park and
recreation agency’s programming functions, including activity selection, type and scope of
programs, outreach initiatives, etc. Program elements are aspects such as community centers
and playgrounds; programs for senior adults, persons with disabilities and other groups; and
specialized program fields such as cultural arts and athletics. Program services are aspects
such as program consultation, provision of equipment and facilities, and literature. While
related to a master or comprehensive plan, the recreation programming plan shall be an
outgrowth of other strategic and program forecasting tools. Program service determinants and
participant involvement shall be included in this plan. Agencies with limited recreation
program services need to have a plan that defines the scope of services provided by the
agency within its service area.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a Recreation Programming Plan including both long-range
and current-year plans.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
In 2010, the Recreation Division, through a series of comprehensive strategic meetings,
completed a 3-year Recreation Plan. This document reflects the Division’s core values,
and identifies the operation’s key strategic issues and objectives. An action matrix for
the activities to guide the Division over the next three years, including a time line and
responsibility graph was completed and this document will be used and incorporated
into the next version of the Department’s Five-Year Master Plan.
Available for review On-Site
The 3- Year Recreation Plan is available for review in the department’s reference
library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.1.1 Program and Service Determinants
Standard: The programs and services provided by the agency shall be based on the conceptual
foundations of play, recreation, and leisure; constituent interests and needs; community
opportunities; agency philosophy and goals; and experiences desirable for clientele.
Commentary: A systematic and studied approach should be taken in determining what programs and
services should be provided by the agency. Other opportunities in the community, needs of
96
the targeted constituencies, and the agency's own goals must be specifically a part of the
consideration for programs and services selected.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation and examples demonstrating that the five
determinants are used in determining programs and services.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department understands the responsibility to
provide opportunities and services to enhance the quality and character of the
community by offering and delivering a well balanced, diversified, community-wide
recreation program. This can be created and delivered by working with the community
to deliver these services through the five determinants.
Conceptual foundations of play, recreation, and leisure
Structured opportunities are provided in many area of interest:
• Sports
• Cultural arts and crafts
• Aquatics
• Special Events and Festivals
• Instructional opportunities
• Youth opportunities and enrichment
• Health and Fitness
• Senior opportunities
• Leagues, outings, and tournaments
Unstructured opportunities:
• Swimming
• Outdoor ice-skating
• Indoor and outdoor open play areas
• Playgrounds
• Open play golf and disc golf
• Movies and concerts
• Open play areas
• Baseball and softball areas
• Open and covered picnic areas
• Hiking and biking areas
Constituent Needs
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department use several methods to collect
information to determine our constituent needs. Some examples include:
Participant and staff evaluations Internet feedback: e-mail addresses and comment or
suggestion sections are availableDemographic overviewOpen Door Policy: Our staff is
strongly encouraged to interact with our participants for new ideas and to improve
existing programsPublic meetings; these are held periodically for ideas and information
searches. Community evaluationsSecret Shopper ProgramCommunity Associations and
Committees: We actively work with several associations and committees to get valuable
ideas and share concerns. These groups also provide support for our department. Such
groups include but are not limited to: Focus and Discussion GroupsSouth Bend Sports
CommissionNeighborhood AssociationsCity wide area Partnership BoardsZoological
Society Foundation South Bend Swim Club Board
97
Community Opportunities
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department work with many community groups.
We have established and maintain open lines of communication with these groups to
evaluate and provide services for the needs and wants of our service area. Examples
include:
South Bend Community Schools Boys and Girls ClubYMCAIndiana University South
BendIvy Tech CollegeLogan CenterMemorial HospitalSt. Joseph County Parks
Agency Philosophy and Goals The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department uses
several documents to effectively plan for the future and insure the philosophy of the
department is kept. Some of these are:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department Master Plan (2009-2013) The
Department’s 3-Year Recreation Plan which feeds into the Master Plan document. The
City of South Bend’s comprehensive City Plan, which provides guidance and focus for
the City’s priorities and philosophy. The Department’s Mission Statement, Vision
Statement, Values and Strategic Issues.
Experiences Desirable for Clientele The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department
take tremendous pride in our facilities and our services. We strive to keep our facilities
well stocked, clean, staffed, maintained, and safe. In order to provide the highest quality
experience for the people of South Bend we strive to make our operations as desirable
as possible. To help us in achieving that goal, the Department has several monitoring
and feedback systems in place to evaluate satisfaction of our users and track desirable
results.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Masterplan Update 2009 – 2013
Recreation Plan 3 year 2011-2013
Activity Guide Sample
City Plan
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.1.2 Participant Involvement
Standard: The agency’s development of programs and services should involve participants.
Commentary: Participants should have involvement in (a) planning, through such means as club officers,
senior adult and teen councils, and ad hoc committees; (b) conducting activities, such as
serving as volunteer leaders on playgrounds, recreation aides for special group services,
judges for contests; (c) sponsors, such as playground advisory councils, program and/or team
sponsors, special project patrons; and, (d) policy recommendation through citizen advisory
committees and study groups at both the neighborhood and community-wide levels.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Describe the process and provide examples of how the agency
obtains and utilizes participants' input.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department involve the participants in program
development in several ways. Some examples include:
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Park Board meetings: the public is given a chance to present new ideas for programs,
facilities, land usage, etc. Neighborhood Associations, Weed and Seed Programs, Public
Forum and Feedback meetings, and Focus Group Meetings are further evidence.
Our programs are evaluated in several ways. They include but are not limited to staff,
participants, parents, and volunteers. We use several ways to gather this feedback.
Some examples include:
Participant evaluation forms
Internet information
Staff evaluations (both verbal and written)
Vendor evaluations
Secret Shopper
Public meetings
Park Board meetings
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department works in conjunction with several
collaborating agencies in the greater St. Joseph County area. Some examples include:
South Bend Community School Corporation Local Parochial Schools, Indiana
Department of Natural Resources, Law Enforcement Division, South Bend Fire
Department, Real Services, Izaak Walton League, Geminus Partnering for the Future,
Alcohol and Addictions Resource Center, C.O.P.S. gang violence prevention, American
Red Cross, South Bend Housing Authority, ASA Umpires Association, University of Notre
Dame, St. Joseph County Parks, St. Joe Valley Officials, South Bend Community Tennis
Association, R.O.C. Reducing Obesity Coalition of St. Joseph County, A.Y.I. Active Youth
Initiative –
All of these are avenues for program development by participants.
Agency Evidence of Compliance: The Recreation Program Book (2011) is available in
the reference library
Program evaluation of the 2011 Ribs and Blues Fest in available in the Accreditation File
Sample summaries of programs using the on-line class evaluation print outs are also
available in the Accreditation file
The Master Plan Update, Needs Assessment, Sec. K lists community feedback on parks
and program desires.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.1.3 Self-Directed Programs and Services
Standard: The agency should offer self-directed recreation opportunities.
Commentary: Self-directed programs and services provide for recreation opportunities where there is
only general supervision, including picnic facilities, tennis courts, roadways in scenic areas,
bridle trails, self-guiding nature trails, and open playgrounds. These self-directed areas,
facilities, and equipment should be provided to give an opportunity for individuals and
groups to participate without leadership, under only general supervision.
99
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of how the agency provides self-directed recreation
opportunities, including a list of such opportunities.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Self-Directed programs
Self directed programs are designed for participants to engage in recreational
opportunities under general supervision.
Splash Pads
Baseball and Softball Fields
Nature Trails
River Walk
Fitness trails
Tennis Courts
Basketball Courts
PlaygroundsDisc Golf
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The current South Bend Parks and Recreation Activity Guide is in the Accreditation File
The Program Inventory grid is available in the Accreditation File
The Recreation Program Book (2011) is available in the reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.1.4 Leader-Directed Programs and Services
Standard: The agency should offer leader-directed recreation opportunities.
Commentary: Leader-directed programs and services provide recreation opportunities where participant
involvement is directed by a leader, including skills instruction classes, such as tennis, crafts,
dance; synchronized swimming performance; creative dramatics for children.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of how the agency provides leader-directed
recreation opportunities, including a list of such opportunities.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend Parks and Recreation Department provides structured
leadership in the following areas of programming:
Instruction skill classes such as swim lessons, tennis lessons, golf lessons, martial arts,
and dance. Youth Sport Leagues including golf leagues, tennis leagues, jr. basketball
leagues, track, and baseball leagues. Guided interpretive programs including Sunday
Nature Trail Walks, Historic Signs on Riverwalk, and Nature Detectives. Selfenrichment classes including drawing, painting, scrapbooking, and computer training.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The current South Bend Parks and Recreation Activity Guide is in the Accreditation File
The Program Inventory grid is available in the Accreditation File
The Recreation Program Book (2011) is available in the reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
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6.1.5 Facilitated Programs and Services
Standard: The agency should offer facilitated recreation opportunities.
Commentary: Facilitated programs and services provided recreation opportunities where individuals and
groups of individuals are encouraged and assisted to operate independently of the agency. An
example of facilitated programs and services would be an individual or group that wishes to
start a community theater organization; the city may help initially by providing a meeting
place, some administrative help in publicity, and "seed money" if needed; eventually the
organization may become self-sustaining, Demonstration projects may be utilized for this
purpose.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of how the agency provides facilitated recreation
opportunities, including a list of such opportunities.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
South Bend Parks and Recreation assists many groups in providing guidance, facilities,
and other necessary services. The groups include wheelchair basketball, high school
track and cross-country, Hispanic Soccer League, High School Tennis, Chuck Wagoner
Little League, Mexican/American League, and basketball leagues.These programs
engage participants in developing skills they can use throughout all stages of their lives.
In other scenarios the department may offer an introductory level of programs and
refer participants to another provider for more advanced programming. This can be
seen in tumbling, ballet, and figure skating.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
A copy of the field rental and use schedule for outside agencies is available for review
in the Accreditation file.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.1.6 Fee-Based Programs and Services
Standard: The agency should offer programs and services for a fee.
Commentary: Not all programs and services can be offered without charge. To offer some programs and
services for a fee can greatly augment the recreational opportunities. Services for a fee may
include the rental of picnic pavilions, ice skates and skis, boats, videos, safety equipment.
Programs for a fee may include instruction, trips, and theater productions.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a listing of the fee-based programs and services within the
agency.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
South Bend Parks and Recreation charges nominal fees for activities. Fees are reviewed
by staff and approved by the Board of Park Commissioners. Fees are charged for, but
not limited to the following: Swim lessons, tennis lessons, golf course play, public
skating, special interest classes, group education, sports programs, and facility rentals.
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Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The current South Bend Parks and Recreation Activity Guide is in the Accreditation File
The Program Inventory grid is available in the Accreditation File
The Recreation Program Book (2011) is available in the reference library
The Fee structure guide for 2012 is available in the Accreditation File
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.1.7 Cooperative Programming
Standard: There should be cooperative programming among the public, commercial, and
nonprofit entities.
Commentary: The public park and recreation program should be coordinated with related programs of
other organizations in the community, such as the schools, voluntary agencies, and churches,
to provide maximum coverage with a minimum of duplication, as well as to reduce interagency competition for the time of an individual. Programs under joint auspices with other
community organizations should be established wherever feasible. In program development,
marketing and community action groups should be involved. It is important to insure groups
are well-balanced to truly represent the majority, as well as the minority, of community
desires.
The desirability of total community programming is in order to avoid unnecessary waste of
effort and finances. Frequently several agencies are found to be programming the same type
of activity for the same people at the same time -- while some activities and people are
neglected altogether.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide description of cooperative programming, with examples of
Memoranda of Understanding (MOU), Memoranda of Agreement (MOA), partnering, or
outsourcing.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The primary partner in the cooperative use of facilities and program operation is the
South Bend Community School Corporation through contract. Smaller, less detailed
arrangements are usually made for organizations generally using our standard facility
rental contracts with any changes to price or expectations made upon the agreement
and agreed to by both partners. Some facilities have specialized regulations beyond the
standard rental contracts for cooperative group use, and those are clearly defined and
signed for each agreement.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department usually refers to such operations as
Partner Agreements, and there is a complete listing of such arrangement on file.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
In the Accreditation File is the Partnership Grid created for the Active Youth Initiative
A copy of the Interlocal agreement with the South Bend Community School Corporation
is available in the Accreditation file.
102
The MOU with the Botanical Society of South Bend is in the Accreditation File.
The Administrative Manual lists Policy 8040 – Cooperative Agreements for operating
policies for such agreements.
.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.2 Objectives
Standard: There shall be specific objectives established for programs or services.
Commentary: Objectives shall be written in terms of what the program or service is supposed to do for
the participants. Frequently such objectives are written as general values to the individual,
such as "develop desirable personality traits" or "improve the mental and/or physical health."
While there is a place for this type of generalization, for objectives to be meaningful, they
should be more specific as to the actual outcome or impact desired by the program or service.
Only in so stating can objectives be used for evaluation purposes. The agency shall define the
program areas by the objectives. These can be defined by the program areas; such as; nature,
dance, music, sports, fitness, special events etc. These can also be defined further into levels
such as beginner, intermediate and advanced.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide objectives for programs or services.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Annual goals and objectives that support the Parks and Recreation Department’s mission and
philosophies are completed for each facility, program and service area in the Recreation
Division.
Goals and objectives are written as part of an annual plan designed to improve the facility or
program. Goals and objectives are used to evaluate the success and effectiveness of the facility
or program, as a strategic planning tool, and incorporated into employee performance
evaluations.
Goals and objectives for each component of the Recreation Division are included as
benchmarks in the performance-based budgeting process. Divisional goals and are included in
the 3-year Recreation Plan, and the Department’s Master Plan Action Step Matrix.
Every individual program also has stated goals and objectives by which the program is
evaluated annually. These are available in the Recreation Programming Book (2011)
Available for Review On-Site:
Copies of the Three-year Recreation Plan, and the Department’s Master Plan document are
available in the department’s reference library.
The Recreation Programming Book (2011) is available in the Reference Library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
103
6.3 Program Evaluation
Standard: Programs shall be evaluated regularly and systematically based on stated program
objectives.
Commentary: Program evaluations should be an integral part of the program planning process and should
clearly document the extent to which objectives are met. The agency should consider an
analysis of data collected from program evaluations in planning for programs.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of completed program evaluations with analyses.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
A variety of evaluation tools are used to evaluate South Bend Park and Recreation
programs. Some of these tools include: participant evaluations, calls to participants who
drop out of programs and staff evaluations (both formally and informally). In addition,
the Web site (www.sbpark.org) has built in feedback loops that are used by customers
for any issues or concerns they may have for a particular program. Evaluation reports
can be generated that are shared with appropriate staff in order that changes can be
made the next season the particular class or program is offered. During staff
evaluations program success and failures are discussed and what the supervisor plan of
action is. Program objectives are regularly reviewed as part of the budget process.
Available for Review On-Site:
Program evaluation of the 2011 Ribs and Blues Fest in available in the Accreditation File
Sample summaries of programs using the on-line class evaluation print outs are also
available in the Accreditation file
The Recreation Programming Book (2011) is available in the Reference Library
.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.4 Outreach to Underserved Populations
Standard: The agency shall proactively extend programs and services to residents who may be
underserved in the community.
Commentary: Parks and recreation programs and services shall be available to all residents regardless of
income, cultural background, geographic location, age or ability level. To encourage
participation in parks and recreation programs and services, agencies shall identify and
address barriers that may limit access by special populations in the community. For instance,
financial barriers may be addressed through reduced fees and scholarships. Geographic
barriers may be addressed through provision of transportation services or replication of
programs at more convenient locations throughout the community. Language and cultural
barriers may be addressed by use of interpreters or employment of staff that reflect the
cultural diversity of the community. Agencies may offer inclusion support services to ensure
access to programs and services for people of all abilities.
104
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Identify underserved populations (provide methodology and data
used for this analysis), describe specific barriers within the community that limit participation
and provide examples of outreach programs and services offered by the agency to meet the
needs of this population.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
It is the policy of the South Bend Parks & Recreation Department to provide and locate
community and neighborhood parks and recreation facilities that are readily accessible
to all populations within the city of South Bend. The department ensures that any
modifications to facilities, grounds, or construction of new facilities, particularly
playgrounds, exceed those requirements put forth by the Americans with Disabilities
Act.Programming for special needs population is addressed by the following:Our
department has a partnership with Logan Center which is our community’s main
provider for services including recreation for people of all ages with disabilities. We
provide funding to the recreation component to pay an individual’s wage for the year.
Rum Village nature center and park has a paved trail to provide a naturalistic
experience for people with disabilities. We provide a facility free of charge for a Wheel
Chair Basketball program. Potawatomi Park is the area’s first Universally Accessible
Playground.
We comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act for requests from participants to
mainstream individuals into our programs, i.e. hire an interrupter or sign language
individual, assign additional staff to work individually with the person with the
disability (white water rafting, camp counselors, swimming lessons), and other special
requests. We also modify programs to allow participation so that people with
disabilities can have a recreational experience, i.e. softball and jr. baseball league, camp
games and others.Our department tries to meet the need of lower income families by
providing neighborhood recreation centers in low income areas. Programming is
provided at no cost or a nominal fee. During the summer months we reach more youth
by providing an organized recreation component at several neighborhood parks within
our community. As part of this program, we have a special events component that
provides our facilities at a reduced rate, i.e. zoo, pool, water playground. We also offer
recreational opportunities at a discounted rate at various private sector venues, i.e.
skating rink, movie theater, bowling, putt-putt, etc. We offer subsidized rates for the
majority of our fee-based programming for youth year round. On a limited basis after
school programming is offered free to 12 - 14 year olds. We also work with various
private sector organizations throughout the year to provide services and program
opportunities at a reduced rate to our community centers.We provide programming
free or at a nominal fee for seniors at three recreational facilities. One of these facilities
provides a meal through a partnership with “Meals On Wheels”.Many of our programs
are mobile and when requested we take them to the individuals or groups.
Available for Review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is a map-indexed matrix demonstrating the full scope of
services, their locations, and their target user populations.
ADA Compliance and subsidized rate options are described in the Activity Guide,
available in the reference library.
Outreach is addressed in the Recreation Programming Plan, available in the Reference
Library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
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6.5 Scope of Program Opportunities
Standard: The agency's programs shall provide opportunities in all program fields for various
proficiency levels, ability, socio-economic levels, racial and ethnic backgrounds, ages,
and gender in accordance with the agency's statement of mission.
Commentary: The agency should take into consideration the total community offerings. Some
opportunities may be offered by other community agencies, both private and public. Also,
opportunities do not have to be available all at the same time, as there may be a multiyear
rotational plan and seasonal considerations. Opportunities for levels of proficiency may be
made by offering skills instruction, clubs, leagues, tournaments, theater groups, etc., for
different levels of ability. In offering opportunities from each of the program fields, there
should be special consideration given to those, which emphasize appreciation, understanding,
and development of skills.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a matrix or listing of programs by fields, demonstrating
clearly how the agency provides for opportunities for various proficiency levels, socioeconomic levels, racial and ethnic backgrounds, ages, and genders.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
South Bend Parks and Recreation offers diversified recreational opportunities in a variety of
program areas for various skill and ability levels and interests. These program opportunities are
designed to meet the basic needs people have in relation to proficiency, socio-economic
challenge, race and ethnic background, age or gender. Policies exist relative to issues such as
gender equality, and programs and policies which address socio-economic challenges such as
subsidized rates are in place to support those in need of financial assistance to enjoy recreation
programs and services. Free programming is also available primarily at our inner city centers
and our structured playground programs. The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s
Mission Statement declares that the department “serves the entire community and our guests.
We provide comprehensive, affordable leisure opportunities. The services are offered through
high quality programs, parks, facilities, green spaces and our diverse community resources.”
The mission statement does not distinguish between any participant or group based on level of
proficiency, socio-economic level, racial or ethnic background, age or gender. The broad
sweeping and inclusive mission statement takes into consideration that “community” means
any and all member of the South Bend area populations and its guests.
.
Available for Review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is a map-indexed matrix demonstrating the full scope of services, their
locations, and their target user populations.
The current edition of the seasonal Activity Guide is available in the reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.6 Selection of Program Content
Standard: The selection of program content, specific activities, and opportunities shall be based
upon an understanding of individual differences and the culture of the community.
Commentary: There should be a system of progression for activities based upon the abilities of the
participants. Program content should provide for individual differences of interests, abilities
106
(mental, social, physical), background experiences, etc. Activities selected should be suited
to and contribute toward fulfillment of the basic physical, emotional, social, and intellectual
requirements of individuals. Unique characteristics of different populations within the
community should be identified and related to the selection of activities. In selecting
activities, local resources and cultural characteristics should be capitalized upon. Program
content should be related directly to stated objectives of the specific program.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a list of program activities and describe how individual and
cultural interests were considered.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
South Bend Parks and Recreation strives to respond to community needs and desires by offering
a variety of programs and activities. Users and staff continually evaluate the programs, and
changes and improvements are made accordingly.
The department offers programs for all age segments including preschool, youth, teen, adult
and older adults. Programs are developed to provide a variety of skill levels including basic
developmental, beginning, intermediate, advanced, league and competitive opportunities. Some
programs are offered in a progressive approach with classes and activities building upon
previously learned skills or are based on age. The basic physical, emotional, social and
intellectual quality of life issues are addressed in the variety of sport, fitness, educational,
entertainment and life skills programs listed.
Examples: See Activity Guide
Pre School Programs: Pee Wee Basketball, Pee Wee Soccer, Junior Baseball, Princess Ballet,
Creative Movement, KinderDance, Pee Wee Tumbling, Wiggles + Giggles, Story Craft Time,
Pre-TEND Preschool, Pee Wee Tennis, Daddy/Daughter Dance, Mommy/Son Dance, Tea with
Santa, Breakfast with Santa, Holiday Skate Party, Arts in The Park
Youth Program: Learn to Swim, Kids Triathlon, Daddy/Daughter Dance, Mommy/Son Dance,
Little Dribblers, Little Dunkers, River City Basket Ball League, Junior Baseball, Beginner
Volleyball, Intermediate Volleyball, Beginning Ballet, Intermediate Ballet, Hip Hop Class, Baton,
Tumbling, Family Fitness Fun, Seasonal Crafts, Digital Photo Class, Martial Arts, Spring Fling
Camp, Rum Village Nature Detective Camp, Camp Awareness, Kids’ World, Tea with Santa,
Breakfast with Santa, Holiday Skate Party, Winter Break Camp, Arts in the Parks, Summer
Playground, Summer Track, Hoop It Up in Parks, Summer Magic Camp, U.S.A. Team Tennis,
Ralleyball, Tennis in the Parks, Tennis Lessons, Tennis Junior Excellence + Jr. Elite, Tennis
Reading Programs, Flag Football
Teen Programs: Learn to Swim, Life Guarding, Water Safety Instruction, After School Teen
R.O.C.K.S., Junior Baseball, River City Basketball, Summer Playground, Hoop It Up in Parks,
Summer Track, Fitness Classes, Tennis Lessons, Tennis Leagues, Tennis Tournaments
Adult Programs: Tennis Lessons, Leagues & Tournaments, Open Volleyball, Volleyball Leagues,
Softball League, Social Dance, Artists Workshop, Badminton, Martial Arts, Wheelchair
Basketball, Fitness Classes, Yoga, Boot Camp Class, Massages, Middle Eastern Dance, Computer
Classes
Older Adults: Senior Games, Fitness Classes, Computer Classes, Art Classes, Ceramic Classes,
Educational, Walking Club, Holiday Parties, Day and Overnight Trips, Billiard Tournaments,
Card Clubs
107
Progressive Programming: Computer Classes: Basic Windows I- Basic Windows 2- Excel,
Internet Explorer; Baseball: PeeWee (3-7), T-Ball (8-10), pitching and batting skills; Summer
Track 6-18; Hoop it Up in Parks and River City Basketball 7-8, 9-10, 11-12, 13-14, 15-18;
Tennis Lessons: Pee Wee Ralleyball, Junior Excellence, Junior Elite
Cultural programs and activities are an important part of addressing community needs, desires,
beliefs and value systems, and individual differences such as ability and socioeconomic
characteristics.
Examples:
Charles Black and Martin Luther King Junior Centers Afterschool Academy was designed to
give at-risk youth in the community academic assistance to achieve a higher level of success in
school
Youth Work Program was designed to provide older youth a positive first work experience by
matching workers to open position within our summer playground sites, concessions and River
City Basketball League
Arts in the Parks exposes youth to several forms of the arts throughout the summer
East Race and Potawatomi Concert Series exposes the public to a variety of music from jazz,
rock, classic, rap, and country
Afternoons R.O.C.K. at South Bend Intermediate Schools program is focused on supportive
prevention activities and structuring leisure time to be free of alcohol, tobacco and other drug
use.
Tru Soldiers is a violence prevention, life skills, leadership, training program that empowers
individuals to make their own decisions through good examples, good information, good
instruction and good advice so that they can be productive citizens in their communities. This
program is geared for male and female teenagers and is programmed year round.
Soldiers Basketball is a basketball driven initiative that provides young athletics with a safe and
healthy environment. This program allows them become the best basketball player and person
from within. All youth must participate in the academic portion of the program which includes:
maintaining a 2.5 GPA or higher, during the school year they must complete a minimum of 15
hrs every two weeks at the study table and they must demonstrate good sportsmanship at all
time. This program operates year round.
Y.E.S. – Young Entrepreneur Spirit (A Life Skills Program) is focused on how young people can
achieve success. It is about personal leadership, being the best one can be with the focus on
discipline. This program is composed of five different topics: Vision, Focus, Commitment,
Persistence and Discipline. Each topic is cover for four weeks. The participants meet once a
week for three hours and is open to youth 8 to 22 both male and female.
Available for Review On-Site:In the Accreditation File is a map-indexed matrix demonstrating
the full scope of services, their locations, and their target user populations.
The current edition of the seasonal Activity Guide is available in the reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
6.7 Community Education for Leisure
108
Standard: The agency should have a function to educate the community on the benefits, values,
and impacts of leisure services.
Commentary: Education of leisure should be continuous and operational in nature. It should directly
educate the residents about the benefits, value, and impacts of the leisure services provided
by the agency, and the positive impacts that parks and recreation can have on society.
As practitioners, a program should be developed that educates the public about the sometimes
subtle and intrinsic benefits that leisure time, and participation the recreation activities
provide.
Examples may include:
• Working with local schools to develop a class, or create a class within the agency’s program
regarding the benefits.
• Developing community presentations regarding the benefits and present at community
functions.
• Creating a “benefits” video to air on the agency’s cable TV channel.
• Organizing and categorizing agency publications according to the benefits associated with
the programs.
• Including benefit statements in the program description so that the consumer would see how
he or she would gain from participating in the program.
• Including the question of “How have you benefited from this program” in participant
evaluations, causing the participant to reflect up on the benefits of the program.
• Including the benefits of the departments’ programs and services in press releases and
public service announcements that are broadcast to the public through various media
channels.
• Conducting benefits-based program studies or demonstration projects.
Education of leisure services should occur in the practice of parks and recreation services.
Measurement of the efficacy of education efforts may be difficult, but a program should be in
place to supply this educational information to the public.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of the methods utilized by the agency to educate
the community on the value, benefits, and impact of leisure services.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
One of the Strategic Issues identified in this iteration of the South Bend Parks and Recreation’s
Master Plan Update was “Communicating the Vision.” The Action Steps describe the
Department’s plan and processes for community education on the benefits, values and impact
of leisure operations.
The Three-year Recreation Plan also identifies this as a key issue under both its Education and
Communications sections. There are steps there also for outreach and sharing the perspective.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Master Plan Update (2009-2013), Section M, Action Plan Action Steps is available in the
Reference library.
The 3 year Recreation Plan is available in the Reference library.
The Marketing Strategy and Plan (2011) is available for review in the Reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
109
6.8 Program and Service Statistics
Standard: The agency should collect statistics on its programs and services for evaluation and
future program and service development.
Commentary: Statistical data should be collected that is useful to the agency, such as proportion of
constituents receiving services, number of participants registered and attending, number of
groups and sessions; demographics of the participants such as the age, sex, cultural
background, marital status, parental status, educational level, occupation, and length of time
in community.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of statistics collected and how the agency utilizes
the data.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Department of Parks and Recreation staff creates and utilizes numerous
facility and program statistics. These management tools to monitor and display these
statistics include, but are not necessarily limited to, the following:
Quarterly Marketing Activity Reports
Used to track media appearances, Public Service Announcements, press conferences,
interviews, advertising programs, community appearances and outreach operations.
Quarterly Sponsorship Report
Produced to track in-kind, direct support, or partnership arrangements that
supplement our ability to offer many of programs. The Quarterly Sponsorship report is
used as a tool to build the annual Marketing Strategy and Plan.
Rectrac Reports
Used for registration and rentals, the Rectrac software produces a variety of useful tools
for producing and assessing program attendance, program revenue, facility rental use,
and frequency of use of our services by our patrons.
The Monthly Financial Statement
Produced for the Board of Park Commissioners, this report tracks year to date spending,
presents comparative attendances and current operation budget summations.
Division Reports
Monthly each division of the Department prepares and submits to the Board of Park
Commissioners a summation of pertinent statistics and activities. These reports are
usually the basis for each division’s public presentation to the Board at the public
monthly meetings.
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Annual Report
Many staff members maintain and use service statistics to aid decision-making within
their areas of operation. These statistics might be reported to the administration on
request, or if they are somehow notably unusual is some fashion. Many of these type of
statistics will be included in the annual report to the Board of Park Commissioners.
Available for review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File there is copy of a sample Quarterly Marketing Activity Report,
a sample of a Quarterly Sponsorship Report, a sample of Rectrac reports, and sample
Division Report to the Park Board.
On the Reference shelves is a copy of the Marketing Strategy Plan, 2012
A copy of the most current Annual Report is available in the department’s reference
library.
.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
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7.0 FACILITY AND LAND USE MANAGEMENT
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
7.1 Acquisition of Park and Recreation Lands
Standard: The agency should have established policies and procedures for the acquisition of lands
for park, recreation, conservation, and historical-cultural purposes.
Commentary: This authority usually originates in state enabling acts, is delegated to local governments
and is implemented through local charters and ordinances. Lands may be acquired for park
purposes through purchase, acceptance of gifts and bequests, and on occasion, through right
of eminent domain. The utilization of lands may include joint use and cooperative agreements
and lease agreements with other entities. Because land costs rise rapidly as areas are
developed, planned acquisition is crucial. Acquisition of lands shall be for both current and
projected needs of the community and based on policy and planning.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide policy and procedures for land acquisition and the citation
of legal authority to acquire lands.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department is governed by state, city and department
policies and procedures regarding the acquisition of all lands for park, recreation and
conservation reasons. A summary of these policies and procedures is as follows:




Indiana Code Chapter 14, Article 14 speaks specifically to acquisition of land for
recreational development. The general purpose of this chapter is “to provide for the
general health and welfare of Indiana citizens by the acquisition, construction,
improvement, and operation of public recreational facilities”. Code Chapter 14,
Articles 17, 17-2, and 17-4 also speak to property acquisition. Chapter 36, Section
10-3-11 states that the park board may “acquire real property, either within or
outside of Indiana”, and may “exercise the power of eminent domain under statutes
available to municipalities.” Code Chapter 36-10-4-25 states “the board may
acquire, lay out, and improve land for park purposes”
The South Bend Municipal Code, Article 11, Sec 2-137, Adoption of applicable
statute states that, “The Public Parks Department shall operate under provisions of IC
36-10-4, pursuant to IC 36-10-4-1(a) (Ord. No. 7108-82, § 6)
The South Bend Parks and Recreation’s Administration, Policies and Procedures
Manual (Policy 1020, Park Law) describe the above authority.
The legal authority for acquisition of land for park and recreation use comes from
Indiana Code (IC) 36-10-4. Specifically IC 36-10-4-25, which states, “the board
may acquire, lay-out, and improve lands for park purposes.”
Supplemental information guiding the acquisition and development of park and recreation
lands may be found in one or more of the following:
 The South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2009-2013)
 Individual park master site plans (see Standard 2.7.)
 The annual Capital Improvement Plan
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
The City of South Bend’s City Plan document, Land Use section.
The Board of Park Commissioners also promotes and encourages, where feasible, the shared
acquisition and development of parks and recreation facilities by way of written agreements
and partnerships and cooperative agreements with other service providers.
Available for Review On-Site:
Accreditation File includes copies of sited Indiana Code
Accreditation File includes copies of sited Municipal Code
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2009-2013), Sec M and Sec K is available
in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of City Plan is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.2 Development of Areas and Facilities
Standard: The agency should have established policies and procedures for the development of park
and recreation land and facilities.
Commentary: The need and use of land and facilities in relation to the current program goals of the
agency should be reviewed annually. The review should reflect a concern for optimum usage
and coordination with the total area and facility resources of the community. Applicable
open space and design standards should be considered.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide land development policies and procedures, with evidence of
annual review.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The program and development goals of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department are
formalized and reviewed frequently utilizing several formats.
All of the below, but not exclusively limited to those below, are utilized in setting
development guidelines:
City Plan, the City of South Bend’s 20-year comprehensive document provides overall
guidance and priority for development, and includes specific recommendations from
the Department for future park developments.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2009-2013) in its Action Matrix lists
several projects to be developed, including timelines and possible revenue sources
and also includes long-range issues for the Department to set as objectives in future
plans.
The Capital Improvement Plan is continually updated with frequent discussion and
establishment of project priorities over a five-year budgetary period.
Grants, donations and bequests will also effect the land development plans
Americans’ with Disabilities Act (ADA)
The annual submittal of the department’s operational and capital projects budget request can
include facets of any of the above components, and will also be inclusive of more rapidly
changing opportunities. The annual budget submittal and the resulting land development
113
projects that are requested are based on priority and funding allocated for the department’s
needs by the Administration and City Council.
The adopted City Plan spells out many of the land development policies for the Parks &
Recreation Department. As stewards of the natural environment, it is important to ensure the
preservation of environmentally sensitive areas and to plan for the parkland needs of our
growing community. Greenspace and parkland are essential to any city’s quality of life,
providing developed areas for relaxation. Maintaining open space offers opportunities for
natural system preservation, recreation, and education. Open spaces include farmland,
wetlands, riparian lands, forests and woodlands, parks and urban open space.
To achieve the community’s vision, the City will need to effectively plan for the future of the
community’s districts, neighborhoods, and corridors. The city should encourage mixed-use
development that enhance the pedestrian experience and encourage active street life,
especially in the downtown area. New developments will need to integrate well with their
surroundings. The City will need to focus development efforts within the Service Area to
promote compact, cost effective growth and assist in the preservation of green space. Smart
growth principles should be used in the development and decision making.
The City will need to provide sufficient land to meet the community’s projected growth in
2025 and encourage a compatible mix of land uses in the community. Consistency between
plans and ordinances relating to land use, and coordination between land use and
transportation planning will lead to more efficient and cost effective land use patterns. (City
Plan, Preserving Open Space, p. 30)
Available for Review On-Site:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2009-2013), Sec M and Sec K is available
in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of City Plan is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.3 Defense Against Encroachment
Standard: The agency should have procedures for protecting park and recreation lands and
facilities from encroachment.
Commentary: Proper planning often requires the acquisition of lands for park and recreation purposes
well in advance of the community's need for full development of programs and facilities.
During this interim period, particularly, there may be encroachment pressures for both public
and private purposes. Vigilance and determination are needed to preserve and protect the
long-term public interest in these areas. If areas held in reserve are used and publicized for
"use as trails, primitive camping, wetlands, etc.," the community will recognize them as
recreation (i.e. natural resource areas, property boundaries) and help resist encroachment.
The procedures should include progressive steps to address escalated encroachment issues.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the procedures regarding defense against encroachment.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Indiana Code 36-10-4-19 outlines Board authority for property and protection thereof. In
addition, the County and City of South Bend Planning Commissions control lands through
respective zoning laws.
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A large percentage of the Department’s land deed covenants and restrictions stipulate that
the land is deeded to the Board of Park Commissioners for “park purposes” and should the
land usage change, the land would revert back to the original owners or their heirs.
If federal, state or local grants money is used there are, in most cases, very stringent
restrictions placed on the property where the grant money was used. Examples would
include Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) and Indiana Waters monies.
Objectives LU 6 – 8 of the City Plan describe the City’s vision of land use and preservation.
The main goals are to focus development efforts within the service area; provide sufficient
land to meet the City’s projected growth in 2025; and preserve green space land uses (City
Plan, p. 32).
Available for Review On-Site:
Accreditation File includes copies of sited Indiana Code
A copy of City Plan is available in the Department’s reference library
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.4 Disposal of Lands
Standard: The agency should have established procedures regarding the disposal of park and
recreation lands.
Commentary: From time to time demographic shifts may change the need for recreation services in
certain geographic districts. Need for greater public interests, such as interstate highways,
may make it necessary to dispose of park lands in specific areas. In such cases negotiations
should insure that the public recreational benefits are not diminished. In many communities
the park and recreation departments receive cash and land to provide similar facilities in
another location within the community service area. Such disposal should be in accord with
the comprehensive plan. In many jurisdictions, law requires a referendum before the local
government may sell park, cemetery, riverfront, or waterfront property. Such legislative
requirements safeguard the community interests from short-term political decisions base on
expediency while allowing negotiation of long-term benefits.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the disposal of park and recreation land procedures.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The process for disposal of park and recreation lands is outlined in Indiana Code 36-10-4-18 as
added by Acts 1981, P.L309, and SEC. 111. This section of the law requires the preparation of
an ordinance authorizing the sale and submission to the legislative body (City Common
Council) of the City for passage. All proceeds of the sale are credited to the department. The
proceeds shall be expended for the improvement of the remaining parkland or for the purchase
of other land for park purposes, as the board considers best for the city.
All land or property valued at or above $5,000 and does not involve another government or not
for profit entity requires two appraisals, the approval of the Park Board and the above
referenced ordinance to City Council. Properties less than this value and procedures for transfer
to other government agencies or not for profit entities are addressed in this code also.
115
The Parks Department seldom has occasion to dispose of lands previously identified as being
for parks or open space. Should existing City property be deemed appropriate for sale, State,
City and department policy apply. State Code 36-10-3-11 states that the parks “board may
acquire and dispose of real and personal property”, and Code 36-10-4 states that the board may
“lease or sell any buildings, grounds, materials, equipment, or any parts of them owned by the
city that are under the control of the department and that the board determines are not required
for park purposes.”
In addition, if the property has ever been the recipient of grant funding from the federal
government, there are very restrictive provisions regarding the disposal of public owned
property and the remediation of that loss by a requirement to acquire additional property to
offset the loss.
Available for Review On-Site:
Accreditation File includes copies of sited Indiana Code
A copy of LWCF handbook (pages 8 is available in the Department’s reference library)
.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.5 Maintenance and Operations Management Plan
Standard: There shall be an established maintenance and operations plan for management of the
agency's park and recreation areas, facilities, and equipment.
Commentary: Parks and portions of large parks shall be identified according to the intended use of the
area, ranging from heavily used and highly developed areas to the large meadows and
wooded vistas that act as buffer zones and provide some sense of solitude. Each of these
areas shall be assigned an appropriate set of maintenance standards including both
recommended frequency and acceptable quality.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the current maintenance and operations management plan.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Maintenance, Operations and Standards are guided by the following documents:
The Parks & Recreation Department Master Plan, the Strategic Plan, staffing levels,
Annual Calendar of Events, Facility listings and directories, and Maintenance Division
procedures. In addition, each recreation facility has compiled a Facilities Manual,
which is unique to each facility.
The Park Maintenance Division carries out primary maintenance functions of the
department. This Division is comprised of thirteen sections, Safety/Risk, Facilities
Management, Cemeteries, Zoo Maintenance, Ice Rink/Pools, Skilled Trades, Fleet,
Plaza/East Race Maintenance, Coveleski Stadium, Greenspace Maintenance, Stock
Inventory, and Forestry.
The Forestry Division operates with numerous guidelines in their daily operations,
including the Natural Resources Plan, our Tree Board and by guidelines set forth by the
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Tree City program; Indiana Department of Natural Resources, and Indiana & Michigan
Electric Power (I & M).
The Department augments its in-house labor with contracts for professional services,
including design, equipment repairs, janitorial, general maintenance and special
projects. Specifications for bidding or Request For Proposals (RFP’s) are often used to
obtain these services.
Potawatomi Zoo conducts maintenance operations on all facilities within the Zoo under
the Maintenance Division of the Department, and independent but parallel
maintenance operations are conducted by the Golf Course maintenance staff under the
Director of Golf.
All three enterprises utilize a combination of in-house full time and seasonal
(temporary) labor along with subcontracting as referenced earlier. The full time
maintenance staff (with some exceptions at the Zoo) are members of the Teamsters
Local Union No.364.
Managers and supervisors prepare written goals and objectives each November. In
addition, we are guided by the City of South Bend Municipal Code, the City’s
Purchasing Guidelines, Internal Purchasing Guidelines, budget performance indicators,
the Teamster labor contract, written Work Rules, State of Indiana Chemical Application
Requirements, special postings and directives, the city’s Policy and Procedures Manual,
Drug Policy and directives from the City Safety & Risk Management (RM) Department.
All of these separate documents work together or independently in varying forms to
provide general guidance in our daily operations that include personnel (management
and discipline), equipment, facilities, safety, risk management, operations, training, etc.
Available for Review On-Site:
In Accreditation File is the Annual Maintenance Calendar
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2009-20013), Sec I – Park
Maintenance is available in the department’s reference library.
The Maintenance Division Manual is available for review from the Reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.5.1 Facility Legal Requirements
Standard: There should be a regular review of legal requirements related to facilities, such as
licenses, sanitary regulations, fire laws, and safety measures, and inspections of
adherence thereto.
Commentary: Special attention should be given aquatic facilities, child care facilities, concessions,
kitchens, and zoos.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a list of facilities, including date of last review and
inspection.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
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Legal inspections are carried out according to the following procedures:
The South Bend –St. Joseph County Building Department for all construction-related
issues and permits.
All fire extinguishers and exit lights are inspected on a regular basis.
All aquatic facilities are annually certified for operations by the South Bend-St. Joseph
County Department of Health. They make random site visits to all aquatic operations
during each season (June through August) and regularly inspect all commercial kitchen
facilities and/or vendors on varying cycles in the community centers. The Department
of Health is empowered by three legal sources; State Food Regulations - IC-4-1O-IAC7-15-l, City of South Bend Municipal Code; Chapter 113 - Food Operations and the
State Department of Health Rule IC 4-1O-IAC-6-2.
All elevators are inspected according to law by State Inspectors from the Elevator Safety
Division of the Office of the State Building Commissioner
Maintenance crews conduct annual inspections of all playground sites as well as daily
inspections as they perform their daily routines.
Aquatic vegetation control of the ponds at Elbel Golf Course wetlands in accordance
with Federal, State and local requirements.
Seasonal inspections of all HVAC systems.
The Fire Department conducts periodic, unannounced fire drills and
inspections at all occupied park facilities as well as the Office of the State Fire Marshal.
United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Exhibitor’s License - Zoo. (Zoo
maintains file)
USDA Captive Bred Wildlife Permit - Zoo. (Zoo maintains file)
ADA inspections of all facilities and play areas have been completed. They monitor
updates continually. (Copies of all inspections are on file at the Maintenance Offices)
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Indiana Occupational
Safety and Health Division (IOSHA) visit construction sites on a random or accident
based criteria.
Underground Storage Tanks (UST) are inspected on an annual basis by the Indiana
Department of Environmental Management’s (IDEM) Solid Waste/Underground
Storage Tank Section.
The City of South Bend’s Safety and Risk Management Division conducts regular,
documented walk-throughs of our facilities, and creates comprehensive reports citing
issues or infractions.
All facilities, whether constructed utilizing in-house staff or on a contractual basis, are
designed to be in full compliance with all applicable state and local, safety, emergency,
fire, and building codes and requirements. Although not required, the department
makes a practice of securing building permits prior to the start of any construction
project.
118
Proper orientation to safe work practices is an important element in accident
prevention. Employees must know and understand both the hazards to which they may
be exposed and the procedures, practices, and equipment which are necessary to
eliminate or reduce these hazards. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration
(OSHA) and the Indiana Occupational Safety and Health Administration (IOSHA)
provide the guidelines for avoiding hazards and reducing the risk of hazardous
situations. The City Risk Manager is the OSHA representative and will be consulted for
update standards and/or changes, as they occur.
Available for Review On-Site:
A Loss Prevention and Safety Audit file folder is present at each facility. A sample copy
is in the Accreditation File.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.5.2 Preventive Maintenance Plan
Standard: There should be a comprehensive preventive maintenance plan, which incorporates a
preventative program for each facility that includes regularly scheduled systematic
inspections and detailed safety checks.
Commentary: Special attention should be given to playground equipment, aquatic facilities, pedestrian
ways, etc.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the preventative maintenance plan and examples of facility
preventative maintenance programs with completed inspections and safety checks.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Written inspections are conducted at each facility, swimming pool, and playground on a
quarterly, seasonal, or as-needed basis. Short and long-term maintenance and repair
needs are documented and appropriate action taken based on severity of need and
maintenance priority.
The Annual Maintenance Calendar section of the Maintenance Manual utilized by the
South Bend Parks and Recreation Department contains information on what each of the
sections of this division do each month (or season) of the year.
An inspection of all facilities is carried out annually at different times of the year
including playgrounds. Most of the buildings are seasonal in nature so they are
inspected at opening in the spring and shut down in late fall. Work orders are
generated at those times for work required or safety issues.
The aquatic facilities are opened in June and closed in August. Water lines are emptied
and blown free to prevent freezing and pumps are inspected at both times. The pools
are winterized along with the bathhouses. The fountains at the John Hunt Plaza follow
the same basic procedures as the aquatic centers with start up in late April and shut
down in mid-October.
All equipment is inspected at these times and made ready for winter at shut down. In
addition to these inspections, each facility is visited on a regular basis by cleaning
crews, maintenance staff, supervisors and managers who visually or physically inspect,
repair or report on issues requiring attention and generate work orders for repair of all
items.
119
The park grounds maintenance involves, but is not limited to:turf maintenance, tree
maintenance, structure maintenance, landscape maintenance, and litter control.
The Division’s Foreman for skilled trades has included the Department’s HVAC systems
into the annual schedule for PM inspections.
Fleet Maintenance Operations (Park Garage) operate in conjunction with the City
Equipment Services Department. PM work is computerized and scheduled in
coordination with the service techs . Notices automatically appear for PM’s based on
mileage (derived from fueling reports) or hour meter readings. In addition to our
regular work program, winter assignments in the garage include golf course motorized
equipment as well as any major work required on high production mowers.
In addition, there are the safety inspections carried out by outside inspectors referenced
in 7.6.1 and the Parks and Recreation Department Safety & Risk and Fleet Supervisor.
Available for Review On-Site:
The template for the South Bend Park’s Loss Prevention and Safety Audit file folder is
available on site and at each facility
In Accreditation File, Annual Maintenance Calendar
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan (2004-2008), Sec I – Park
Maintenance is available in the department’s reference library.
The Maintenance Division Manual is available for review from the Reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.5.3 Recycling
Standard: There should be a recycling program for park and recreation facilities as well as the
agency’s administrative offices.
Commentary: The recycling program should include all major products suitable for recycling in the given
region with an emphasis on making the recycling process easy and convenient for park and
recreation users. The program should also include an educational component for both users
and employees.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide description of the recycling program for facilities and
administrative offices.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend is running a municipal-wide recycling program that the South
Bend Parks and Recreation Department is a component of.
Visible, well-identified separated recycling containers are available at our facilities and
offices.
Available for Review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is the City of South Bend’s recycling program description,
including for dangerous materials and obsolete computers.
120
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.6 Fleet Management Plan
Standard: The agency should have an established fleet management plan comprised of an
inventory and maintenance schedule of all vehicles and other major equipment, annual
inspections, and a replacement schedule.
Commentary: The plan should include a current inventory of vehicles and other major equipment,
regularly scheduled preventative maintenance, documented safety inspections of equipment,
records of repair and maintenance of vehicles and equipment, and a replacement schedule of
vehicles and other major equipment for the agency.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide fleet management plan.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Fleet maintenance on city owned rolling stock and construction equipment is performed by
the Fleet Maintenance Department under the authority of the Department of Public Works.
Routine preventative maintenance as well as major repairs are the responsibility of this
department.
The City of South Bend Fleet Maintenance sends a monthly list of vehicles that need
maintenance to all city departments.
The Parks and Recreation Department operates one of three city owned garage facilities. We
maintain our equipment though a combination of in-house mechanics and out-sourcing.
Records of our fleet and all equipment are maintained at Maintenance Facility/High Street.
Our PM program coordinated with Equipment Services contains individual records for every
vehicle and piece of equipment.
The Fleet Supervisor is responsible for the tracking and maintenance of this inventories and
schedules
Available for Review On-Site:
In Accreditation File, Monthly Maintenance list, Fleet listing.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.7 Agency-Owned Equipment and Property
Standard: There should be policies and procedures for the management of and accountability for
agency-owned equipment and property.
Commentary: Equipment and property policies and procedures should include the purchase and
distribution to authorized persons, proper training of appropriate personnel in use of
equipment, safe and secure storage of equipment, and maintenance of all equipment in
operational readiness and working order. Such property includes supplies, materials, tools,
expendable items, vehicles, installed and mobile equipment, and personal wear items used by
agency personnel, etc.
121
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide policy and procedures regarding agency-owned equipment
and property.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Fixed asset and inventory control policies, and the physical check and confirmation that
equipment is in the proper location and accounted for, form the basis for protection against
loss of city owned property.
City Policies have been formed specifically to address some appropriate use issues for
equipment and property, such as city vehicles and workplace computers.
The Parks and Recreation Department will provide all necessary equipment for participants
in departmental sponsored programs. This equipment is also inspected, repaired,
reconditioned, and replaced as necessary.
Purchase of equipment may be pooled with other departments who have similar or same
needs. Every effort is made to standardize performance specifications to ensure a fair
bidding process open to multiple manufacturers and vendors. The City of South Bend also
takes advantage of Quantity Purchase Award contracts issued by the State of Indiana that
enable municipalities to purchase vehicles at guaranteed prices with one vendor.
Personnel are trained on the proper operation of all equipment, including safety and
preventive maintenance procedures. Certain pieces of equipment, based on size and
complexity of operation, are assigned exclusively to qualified, certified personnel.
The City of South Bend Fleet Maintenance Department mechanics are charged with the
responsibility of maintaining service history records for all fleet equipment. Management of
accountability for the purchase and maintenance of all Parks Department computer
equipment is coordinated by the City of South Bend Information and Technology Services
Department. A list of all capital equipment for each city department is maintained by the
City of South Bend Controller’s Office. Every year each city department receives a list of all its
capital equipment to update and return to the Controller’s Office. Purchase and/or disposal
of any piece of capital equipment is done in conjunction with the City of South Bend’s
Naviline fixed asset module which is the software to monitor such activities..
The Department’s property is part of the City of South Bend’s comprehensive fixed asset
system, monitored under Navaline software. Assets of the Department are inventoried under
this system including land, land improvements, buildings, building improvements,
machinery and equipment, vehicles, improvements other than buildings (walks, parking
areas, drives, fences, retaining walls, pools, fountains, underground sprinkler systems, etc)
and construction projects (which are tracked as construction in progress from start to finish
and upon completion the dollars spent are transferred into a physical asset).
Purchase of equipment follows a procurement process that follows City of South Bend
Purchasing Policy and Procedures which are based on Indiana Code (LC.) 5-16, IC. 5-22,
T.C. 36-1.
Available for Review On-Site:
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual (Policy 31, and Policy 45, Computer
Use) is available in the Department’s reference library.
In Accreditation File 7.8 is a copy of the cited Indiana Code.
A copy of the City of South Bend Purchasing Policy and Procedures is available in the
department’s reference library.
122
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.8 Natural Resource Management and Environmental Stewardship
Standard: There shall be environmentally sound policies and procedures that are integral to all
operations.
Commentary: Policy and procedures are needed to address environmentally unique areas, wetlands,
riverbanks, and woodlands valuable for erosion control, nature study, wildlife habitat, water
supply reservoirs and water recharge areas. Critical elements include species selection for
trees and shrubs, integrated pest management, knowledge of plant succession communities,
and woodland ecology.
Even if the agency does not own or control the natural resource, there shall be procedures to
ensure environmental stewardship. The agency should work with other agencies to meet and
promote environmentally sound standards.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the established policies and procedures.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s has a detailed policy on
Natural Resource Management which includes the following:
VISION
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department will manage the
resources under its jurisdiction to help enhance and maintain the
ecological health of the environment and the social well being of
human populations.
Four basic principles support this vision:
1. Natural resources can be managed to provide for human use and a
healthy environment.
2. Resource management must be focused on principles to reduce the
need for single resource or single species management.
3. Stewardship, the involvement of people working with natural
processes, is essential for successful implementation.
4. The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department cannot achieve
this vision alone but can, by its management processes and
through cooperation and assistance from others, be a significant
contributor to its achievement.
With all our global issues and broad-based strategy, we must
remember to understand individual places and how people feel about
them, and weigh each detail in their management, design,
construction and long-term use.
In the current version of the Parks and Recreation Masterplan Update
the seventh point of our Mission is to Strengthen the Ethic of
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Environmental Stewardship, and the Action Steps of Section M are
coded, many directly targeted to this goal.
City Plan, The City of South Bend’s 25 year comprehensive
municipal plan also address Environmental Management under
Section 8
The City of South Bend’s newest Department, the Department of
Energy, has submitted a more comprehensive document that is
currently under review and may be available for inspection at the
time of the Visitation.
Available for Review On-Site:
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual (Natural Resource Management
Plan) is available in the Department’s reference library.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Masterplan Update (2009-2013)
Section M, Action Plan Matrix, is available in the Department’s Reference Library.
A copy of City Plan is available in the Department’s Reference Library.
.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.9 Environmental Sustainability
Standard: The agency should have an established environmental sustainability policy that
addresses energy conservation, environmentally preferable purchasing, water
conservation/quality protection and sustainable design/construction of buildings and
facilities.
Commentary: Parks and open spaces are essential green infrastructure providing carbon reducing
landscapes that help clean our air and water, recharge aquifers and reduce storm water runoff.
As stewards of these public spaces, parks and recreation agencies should set the example for
environmental stewardship by employing best practices in environmental sustainability
related to energy use, water management and consumption, product selection and facility
design.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the agency’s environmental sustainability policy and
examples that demonstrate its implementation.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Much like the standard about, many of the same policies and procedures and resources
that apply to resource management also deal with sustainability.
Under City Plan, Section 8 deals with water supply, energy conservation, air quality
issues, maintaining our urban tree canopy and other critical issues. Pertinent goals,
policies and objectives are mapped out in 8.I.
The Parks and Recreation Masterplan Update, Section M, the Action
Matrix and Action steps are coded by Stragetic goal, and several
across the document deal with sustainability.
124
Available for Review On-Site:
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual (Natural Resource Management
Plan) is available in the Department’s reference library.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Masterplan Update (2009-2013)
Section M, Action Plan Matrix, is available in the Department’s Reference Library.
A copy of City Plan is available in the Department’s Reference Library.
.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.10 Maintenance Personnel Assignment
Standard: The agency should have procedures for the assignment of competent personnel with
clearly defined duties for routine maintenance, repairs and minor improvements,
general cleanliness and overall attractiveness of areas, facilities, and equipment.
Commentary: Effective maintenance of grounds and facilities requires the selection, training, and
supervision of workers in a wide variety of tasks ranging from seasonal laborers to skilled
trades. Supervisory staff must be able to focus on maintenance management, such as
workload control, as well as supervise the technical details of maintenance work.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of methods used by the agency to assign staff.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Assignment of maintenance personnel is governed by the establishment of daily, weekly and
seasonal priorities. Daily priorities change frequently based on situations that occur beyond
our control (an accident in a park, dumped litter along a park roadway, snow removal,
fires). Weekly job assignments attempt to prioritize the maintenance and construction goals
and tasks to be accomplished in the work week, and to address number of personnel needed,
supplies, delivery schedules, etc.
Seasonal maintenance assignments are based on typical opening and closing of seasonal
facilities such as outdoor restrooms, tennis courts, swimming pools, ice rink, drinking
fountains, etc. These maintenance responsibilities must be completed in a narrow time
frame with consistent scheduling year to year.
Maintenance assignments are also based on the prioritization of work order requests
received from other department personnel. The Maintenance Division assembles the work
orders and prioritizes them based on need, safety, security, maintenance standards, and
available budget.
On a biweekly basis, maintenance staff meets to discuss the status of work projects, seasonal
openings and closing of facilities, and pending work orders.
Synopsis of duties relating to maintenance, repairs and minor improvements, general
cleanliness and overall attractiveness of areas, facilities and equipment under the Director of
Maintenance are as follows:
Safety Risk – Oversees the Safety & Risk policies set forth by the City of South Bend Safety
& Risk Division, as they deal with city municipal code, State of Indiana laws and
codes, and federal law.
125
Facilities Management – provides and insures that our park buildings and facilities are
well maintained, safe, and diversified.
Cemeteries – to offer patrons well maintained gravesites with a healthy trimmed
landscaping.
Zoo Maintenance – the South Bend Parks & Recreation Department operates the
Potawatomi Zoo, and its Maintenance component is responsible for the general
carpentry, plumbing, and building maintenance of the Zoo.
Ice Rink/Pools – Maintain the Howard Park Ice Rink, and variety of aquatics facilities in
tis inventory of facilities: Potawatomi Pool; Kennedy Water Playground; and
Southeast Park and LaSalle Park Splashpads.
Skilled Trades – workforce to include plumbers, carpenters, and electricians.
Fleet – maintain approximately 155 assorted pieces of equipment and vehicles
Plaza/East Race Maintenance – insures the East Race Waterway, East Race Trail,
Downtown Plaza, and Coveleski Stadium are well maintained.
Covelelski Stadium – complete exterior maintenance to the stadium, various capital
improvement projects, and purchase of mowers and other equipment for field
maintenance.
Greenspace Maintenance – maintain mowed areas in park system, athletic fields and
assigned city green space areas.
Stock Inventory – organization purchase, and distribution of stockroom items.
Forestry – maintains trees for the City of South Bend located in the tree lawn areas of the
City, and provides information to the community on proper tree care and
maintenance.
Available for Review On-Site:
A complete copy of the job descriptions for the Department are available in the department
reference library.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Maintenance Manual has organizational charts for
Maintenance personnel assignment.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Masterplan Update (2009-2013), Section I- Maintenance
is available for review from the Department’s reference library.
In the Accreditation File are samples of the Work Orders and the tracking systems for work
assignments.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
7.11 Capital Asset Depreciation and Replacement
Standard: The agency should have an established depreciation and replacement schedule for all
park and recreation capital assets.
Commentary: Capital assets including buildings, facilities, and equipment have predictable life cycles
that should be recognized in schedules that identify the useful life of each element and the
126
associated costs of replacement. Replacement costs may be reflected in annual depreciation
or a lump sum at the end of the element’s useful life. Replacement schedules for buildings,
site improvements and fixed equipment typically include a number of components, each
having their own predictable life. Whereas, replacement schedules for mobile equipment
(beyond routine preventive maintenance) and computer hardware generally anticipate
replacement of the entire unit. Capital asset depreciation and replacement schedules,
including projected costs of replacement, should be reflected in the agency’s financial plan.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the capital asset depreciation and replacement schedule.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
All capital assets of the Department are included in the City of South Bend’s
comprehensive fixed assets system. The Superintendent (overall) and the Fiscal
Director are the points of contact for the City Controllers Office involving all capital
(fixed) assets.
Capital Assets
Capital Assets include, land, land improvements, monuments, buildings, building
improvements, construction in progress, machinery, equipment, vehicles and
infrastructure. All land is capitalized but not depreciated. All items having a useful life
of more than one year, and having a unit cost of $5,000 or more are capitalized. A
capital asset meeting these criteria is reported and depreciated in the government wide
financial statements.
Assets that are not capitalized (items less than $5,000) are expensed in the year of
acquisition. An inventory of items costing less than $5,000 but more than $1,000, along
with computers is kept and classified as non-capitalized items in GRAMS.
Each division, during the budgeting process, also runs with knowledge of its own
replacement and depreciation issues, and includes those forecasts in its requests for
funds for the upcoming year and in its submissions to the longer-term CIP.
The regular preventative maintenance schedules and the information on repairs and
improvements created by safety inspections also have predictable annual allocations
(based upon the expected depreciation of facilities and their assets) and are accounted
for in the projected budgets.
The Capitol Improvement Plan (CIP) which is tied to the Five-Year Parks and Recreation
Master Plan (2009 - 2013) is partially built upon these projections, and the Action
Matrix lists, among new projects and goals, the five-year anticipated replacements and
repairs across the Department.
Replacement of construction and grounds equipment is scheduled on an as needed
basis. Maintenance personnel within the department have become accustomed to
extending the life cycle of most construction and grounds equipment to allow for the
longest use life acceptable. Replacement, when it becomes necessary, of large
equipment such as automotive vehicles, trucks and larger moving stock such as trash
packers, and small equipment such as mowers, weed-eaters and the like are budgeted
in the appropriate annual operating budget line for the particular activity unit that is
making the budget request.
127
The Master Plan Action Priority Matrix (Section M) also details
replacement/elimination/depreciation of assets within the Department. A total costing
is tabulated at the end of the matrix.
Depreciation Methods
The City depreciates capital assets, except roads/streets and curbs, by the straight-line
method. There is no salvage value. Depreciation is calculated at year-end. Land is not
depreciated according to generally accepted accounting principles.
Straight Line Depreciation Groups include along with their most common useful lives:
Vehicles 5 years
Office Equipment — 5 years
Heavy Equipment — 10 years
Buildings —40 years
Building Components (HVAC, roofing, etc) —20 years
Land Improvements — structure (parking lots, athletic courts, swimming pools) — 25
years
Land Improvements — Groundwork (golf course, athletic fields, landscaping, fencing)
—25
years
Outdoor Equipment — (playground equipment, radio towers) —25 years
Grounds Equipment — (mowers, tractors, attachments) — 5 years
While these assets are depreciated fully by these amounts per the policy unfortunately
budget limitations do not allow for replacement of these assets at the time of their full
depreciation at all times.
Despite this limitation, it is the responsibility of the Superintendent through the
Division Supervisors/Foreman to monitor the condition of all facilities and equipment replacing, renovating or remodeling, as funds are available or surplus as needed.
Managers and supervisors will recommend or advise on equipment that is to be
surpluses and/or no longer serviceable. It will then be declared surplus by Board
resolution on the recommendation of the administrative staff. Disposal follows state law
and is conducted in an annual auction sponsored by the City Purchasing Department.
Optionally, and based on condition, equipment is traded to reduce the purchase of new
equipment.
Available for Review On-Site:
In the Accreditation File is the Capital Assets Policy
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
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8.0 PUBLIC SAFETY, LAW ENFORCEMENT AND
SECURITY
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
8.1 Laws and Ordinances
Standard: Public safety and law enforcement within parks and recreation areas and facilities shall
be governed by laws and ordinances, some of which may be enacted specifically for the
control and management of parks and recreation areas and facilities.
Commentary: These laws and ordinances provide the foundation for controlling activities and behavior
within the jurisdiction of the agency. General municipal codes, laws and ordinances and state
and federal laws are applicable to parks and recreation areas and facilities. However, these
laws generally have broad application and lack specificity as they relate to the control and
management of parks and recreation areas and facilities. Special laws and ordinances may be
enacted to specifically address and guide public use and behavior and may delegate authority
to issues and enforce permits, licenses, rules and regulations applicable to parks and
recreation areas and facilities. Specific municipal codes, laws and ordinances shall be posted
or readily available to park patrons.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation of the prevailing laws, ordinances and codes
that pertain specifically to areas and facilities under the jurisdiction of the agency including
documentation of approval.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The complete body of the City of South Bend’s Municipal Code is maintained by the City
Clerk’s office, and for reference, it can be accessed through the internet at:
http://www.municode.com/resources/gateway.asp?pid=1397&sid14
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual is available in the Department’s reference library. Section A.2
(Park Law).
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.2 Authority to Enforce Laws by Law Enforcement Officers
Standard: The authority of Law Enforcement Officers to enforce laws and ordinances pertaining
specifically to activity within parks and recreation areas and facilities shall be clearly
established to ensure that enforcement actions are upheld.
129
Commentary: Enforcement of laws and ordinances within parks and recreation areas and facilities is
vested with law enforcement officers. These law enforcement officers may be employed by
the agency (such as park rangers or park police) or be provided by a local law enforcement
agency. The authority to enforce laws and ordinances within parks and recreation areas and
facilities must be established through assignment within the agency, by contract(s) with
another agency or by policy of the general government policy board.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation that establishes the authority of law
enforcement officers to enforce laws and ordinances within the agency’s jurisdiction.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The authority for all law enforcement issues relating to parks and recreation rests
entirely with the City of South Bend Police Department, with the sole exception being
the ability of Park Rangers to issue minor citations to citizens in violation of municipal
code while on park properties.
Under special circumstances, a special provision in the Park Law (IC 36-10-4-9, C, 4)
gives the Board of Park Commissioners authority to “Require the department of public
safety of the city to detail police officers to execute the orders and enforce the rules
made by the board and to be subject to the board, with the city executive deciding any
disagreement between the two (2) departments as to the number and duration of the
details of police officers.”
The department makes a clear and distinct separation between the performance of Park
Ranger duties and law enforcement functions. Their role is not one of security or
enforcement, although as a set of eyes as they move about their assignments, they can
be of use in reporting incidents to the South Bend Police and deterring undesirable
activities merely by their presence.
All law enforcement functions with regard to handling evidentiary items, disruptive
behavior, and other incidents are the sole responsibility of the South Bend Police
Department. Park Rangers manage cash deposits for our operations, maintain an after
hours presence at our parks and facilities, offer assistance to park users, respond to
neighborhood complaints, and make sure parks and buildings are vacated at closing
hours. They are specifically directed to not pursue law enforcement activities.
Incidents regarding disruptive behaviors may first be reported by a Park Ranger but are
turned over to the police department for investigation and appropriate law enforcement
action.
Fire and intrusion alarm systems contained within certain park facilities are maintained
by contract with Indiana Security, a private corporation. Alarms are directed to the
Communications Department (dispatch) of the South Bend Police Department unless
individual facility managers are contacted and dismiss the alarm by approved
authorization methods. A member of the full time of the Park Rangers is assigned to
have primary responsibility for all alarms. This position is the owner’s representative to
coordinate all alarm issues with the provider.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5050 Park Security) is available in the Accreditation
File.
130
Minutes of the Board of Public Safety granting limited powers to Park Ranger is
included in the Accreditation File.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.3 Law Enforcement Officer Training
Standard: Law enforcement officers with the authority to enforce laws within areas and facilities
under the jurisdiction of the agency must have proper training in order to carry out
their roles and responsibilities.
Commentary: Law enforcement officers may or may not be employed by the agency, but someone needs
to have the authority to enforce laws in parks, recreation areas and facilities. These law
enforcement officers must participate in structured training programs to assure proper
execution of their duties. Applicable training updates and refreshers are critical in
maintaining quality law enforcement services.
In many instances, the park and recreation agency relies on the services of law enforcement
officers from other jurisdictions or departments within the governmental subdivision. These
law enforcement officers should through the requirements of their respective law enforcement
agency receive proper training.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples that the current training program for law
enforcement officers having jurisdiction within the parks and recreation agency includes the
full scope of responsibility and provides for ongoing training updates.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The current policy of the department regarding Park Ranger personnel is all hiring and
training for these positions will be done with the guidance and cooperation of the South
Bend Police Department, and that the Park Rangers will have access to training in the
following areas:






Crime Scene Preservation
Incident Management
Gang Activity
Handling of Disruptive Behaviors
Accident Investigations
Handling of Evidentiary Items
Additional training for the Park Rangers will be documented and will follow the
guidelines outlined by their own training manual.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Accreditation File contains the training schedule and agenda from the City of South
Bend’s Safety and Risk Management Division.
A copy of the Park Ranger Training Manual is available for review in the Department’s
reference library.
131
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5050 Park Security) is available in the Department’s
reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.4 Public Safety and Law Enforcement Role of Agency Staff
Standard: Agency staff has a role in educating and informing patrons of laws, ordinances, rules
and regulations that apply to parks and recreation areas and facilities. This role and
level of authority shall be established through policy directive.
Commentary: Regardless of whether the agency employs law enforcement officers or contracts for law
enforcement services, agency staff has a responsibility to educate patrons on the proper use of
parks, recreation areas and facilities. Agency staff is the first line to redirect behavior in an
effort to gain compliance with ordinances, rules and regulations. Agency staff must
understand that when patrons fail to comply with laws and ordinances, enforcement of these
laws and ordinances thereby becomes the responsibility of the sworn law enforcement
officers.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation that defines the role of agency staff in public
safety and enforcement of laws, ordinances, rules and regulations.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department provides training and resources
from its manuals and through its orientation of employees, and there will be a more
formal process in the spring with the General Safety Training for all staff. Through
various “in-house” opportunities Parks and Recreation employees and volunteers will
receive “one-on-one” from their direct supervisors. This is less formal and conducted
on an as-needed basis.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of Policy 5050 (Park Security), 5070(Evidence), and 5080 (Disruptive
Behavior) is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.4.1 Staff Liaison to Law Enforcement Officers
Standard: There should be formalized liaison assignments for agency staff to the official law
enforcement officers providing public safety and law enforcement service to the agency.
Commentary: Agencies having law enforcement officers on staff such as park police or park rangers
generally have established roles based on the agency’s organizational structure and
relationships defined through job descriptions and position assignments. For agencies relying
on the services of law enforcement officers from other jurisdictions or departments within the
governmental subdivision, it is essential that formalized liaison relationships be established
132
between agency staff and the official law enforcement organization. Multiple staff within the
agency may have assignments based on organizational roles and responsibilities. In any
event, the liaison assignments should be clearly documented.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide current documentation formalizing the liaison assignment(s)
to agency staff with the law enforcement authority responsible for enforcement of laws and
ordinances within the parks and recreation areas and facilities.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Superintendent of the Parks and Recreation Department is the chief liaison with the
Chief of Police of the City of South Bend and is the coordinator of all law enforcement
activities or needs related to parks and recreation. The Chief in turn appoints a
command level officer to act as liaison to the superintendent for day-to-day issues and
special projects.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5050 Park Security) is available in the Department’s
reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.4.2 Public Safety and Law Enforcement In-Service Training for Staff
Standard: Agency staff should understand their role in public safety and law enforcement and
relationships with law enforcement officers having jurisdiction within parks and
recreation areas and facilities.
Commentary: In-service training for agency staff on their role, responsibility and relationship to law
enforcement officers is critical to assure appropriate response to public safety needs. Inservice training should be extended to front line staff such as lifeguards and park attendants to
assure that they are fully prepared to respond to law-enforcement incidents.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide current documentation of in-service training for agency staff,
defining their role in public safety and law enforcement.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Park and Recreation employees must know and understand their relationship with the
police department and the role they play in safety and security within the Department.
Educating employees and safety officers through policies, procedures and training is
an essential part of the department’s risk management plan. The goal of the
department’s training is to develop safety awareness in our employees. This awareness
will enable them to recognize hazards they may be subjected to through their
positions, and to take adequate precautions. This training cannot be effective unless it
is a continuous program.
133
A general safety and security training is presented to all staff annually through the
Park Ranger operations and new orientation and annual orientation programs also
cover this training.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5040 Risk Management, 5070(Evidence), and 5080
(Disruptive Behavior) and 5050 (Building Security)) is available in the Department’s
reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.4.3 Handling of Disruptive Behavior
Standard: There should be established procedures prescribed for agency staff for response to
disruptive behavior at agency areas and facilities.
Commentary: The agency should define the role of staff in response to disruptive behavior. Procedures
should identify staff’s role in education of patrons, intervention when an incident occurs,
documentation of behavior and delineation of law enforcement roles in handling behavioral
issues.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide current procedures regarding handling of disruptive
behavior.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Disruptive behavior could be vandalism found by a maintenance worker, assault on a
park patron, or theft from a facility locker. All Department employees will receive
training to handle these situations.
Training is annual and to be incorporated into the General Safety Training program
sponsored by the South Bend Parks and Recreation Safety Committee.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5040 (Risk Management), 5050 (Park Security) and
5080 (Disruptive Behavior)) is available in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of the Facility Manual template listing handling disruptive behaviors is available
in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.4.4 Traffic Control, Parking Plans, and Crowd Control
Standard: Large-scale events hosted or facilitated by the agency require planning and coordination
of traffic, parking and crowd control should be coordinated with the official law
enforcement agency having jurisdiction over the affected areas.
134
Commentary: Large-scale events hosted by the agency or authorized by permit to a third party should
address traffic control, parking and crowd control. Plans should specifically define the role of
the event sponsor, agency staff, the law enforcement agency and traffic layouts of the venue,
traffic routes and personnel assignments.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide evidence that illustrates the coordination of traffic control,
parking plans and crowd control for activities and events hosted or facilitated by the agency.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
All city parks have clearly marked sidewalks, pathways, driveways and parking lots.
Facilities are inspected and evaluated regarding the safe movement of vehicles and
pedestrians on a case by case basis. For example, a pedestrian crosswalk across a city
street at the O’Brien Center is preceded by speed bumps and warning signs. At Rum
Village Park, a nature trail crossing at the park’s entry road is signed with reflective
road crossing markers. At Pinhook Park, a drive entering a busy city street received a
warranted stop sign after evaluation of the conditions. The installation of regulatory
or safety signs is governed by the Department of Public Works with ultimate approval
required by the Board of Public Works.
Special events might occasionally require the use South Bend Police Traffic, V.I.P.
(Volunteers In Policing) Staff, and C.V.O. volunteers to direct participants and
spectators to available parking areas, and each has or is given specific instruction and
in-service training, and wears a reflective safety vest for visibility in traffic, but park
staff does not direct or manage traffic as part of normal operations.
Annual park and recreation events that do require modifications to normal traffic
patterns, such as the Kid’s Triathlon, do have traffic plans created in partnership with
the Department of Traffic and Lighting, who arranges the signage and oversees the
personnel who will manage the conditions before, during and immediately after the
event.
Available for Review On-Site:
The Accreditation File contains a copy of the Kid’s Triathlon traffic plan as a sample.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.4.5 Handling of Evidentiary Items
Standard: Procedures should be established that guide agency staff in the preservation and
handling of evidentiary items from discovery until transferred to the appropriate law
enforcement authority.
Commentary: Agency staff, in carrying out their duties and responsibilities, may discover contraband or
other evidentiary items that may be critical in law enforcement investigation and legal
prosecution. Procedures should be established in coordination with the appropriate law
enforcement agencies to define staff roles in ensuring that evidentiary items are preserved
until the proper law enforcement agency assumes command of the scene.
135
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the procedures defining the role and responsibility of agency
staff in the discovery, preservation and handling of evidentiary items.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Park and Recreation employees are trained to provide awareness and guidance when
entering a crime scene. All Park and Recreation employees shall be trained in
recognizing a crime scene and in securing the scene to protect evidence.
Training is annual and to be incorporated into the General Safety Training program
sponsored by the South Bend Parks and Recreation Safety Committee.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5040 Risk, and 5070 (Evidence)) is available in the
Department’s reference library.
A copy of the General Safety Training Manual is available in the reference library.
In the Accreditation Folder are sample sign-in sheets from the 2012 season.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.5 General Security Plan
Standard: The agency shall have a comprehensive general security plan addressing all major
areas, buildings and facilities under its jurisdiction.
Commentary: The general security plan may be a compilation of security plans from each major area,
building or facility. Plans for each major area, building or facility should be available at each
site. At a minimum, these plans should include locking key systems and associated
assignments; alarm system and assignment of security codes; opening and closing
procedures; fire alarm and fire suppression systems; emergency evacuation procedures; and
critical incident response procedures. Hazardous or flammable materials storage areas are to
be clearly identified in plans and at each specific site. Signage at each site should be installed
in accordance with the unified signage system. To be effective, the security plan needs to be
updated annually or when a new area, building or facility is added or security systems are
modified or due to legislative changes.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the agency’s general security plan with documentation
illustrating that it is reviewed annually and updated to reflect current conditions.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Cooperation with the South Bend Police Department is essential to provide this
security. Both departments communicate and work together regularly to try and deter
unwanted activity within the South Bend Park system.
The Department of Parks and Recreation welcomes and encourages the presence of
City of South Bend sworn law enforcement officers in all department facilities and at
all department sponsored events. If deemed necessary, the department may specifically
136
request City sworn law enforcement officers to provide on site monitoring of a facility
or a department sponsored event. On occasion, staff may request extra law
enforcement patrols for department sponsored events, or around department
facilities/parks that have been deemed “at-risk.”
Security of facilities is a primary departmental concern. Keys are issued to personnel
based on level of authority and need. A log of all keys issued is kept by the Office
Manager. Unauthorized duplication of South Bend Parks and Recreation Department
keys is grounds for disciplinary action up to and including termination. South Bend
Parks and Recreation Department keys are not to be loaned to individuals (including
staff) without written authorization of a division director or the Administrator. Loss of
department keys is a loss of property and security to the department. Employees shall
be responsible for the cost of replacing lost keys and any locks or lock sets necessary to
protect the security or department property.
Foremen are assigned to be on 24-hour call - seven days a week to monitor and assist
police and fire when alarms occur. A video surveillance system has also been installed
for O’Brien Recreation Center and soon to be installed at the O’Brien Skate Park.
Facility Operation Manuals exist for each recreation facility and program as well as
most maintenance centers. These operation manuals include the following information
but are each unique to the facility and/or program and contain other information as
well.

Emergency procedures and phone numbers

Emergency evacuation and tornado plans

Emergency Stand by Call Listing and Schedule

Daily operational information regarding opening and closing

Visitor use policies

Cash handling

MSDS Sheets (if applicable) procedures, procedures and preparedness
documents
Safety Audits — The City of South Bend’s Safety and Risk Management Division
conducts regular, documented walk-throughs of our facilities, and creates
comprehensive reports citing issues or infractions. The Parks and Recreation
Department carries out internal safety audits periodically per standard operating
procedure. Inspections are assigned regularly and conducted prior to the next safety
meeting or special event. Checklists are filled out and a copy of the findings is kept on
file with the Safety & Risk Foreman. A copy is also provided to the immediate supervisor
of the facility or program.
Work Orders for repairs and corrective methods are generated and are corrected
within five working days of the report if at all possible.
Security and Fire Alarms - Internal electronic fire and security alarms are used
throughout the system. An on-call foreman is assigned a vehicle and communications
equipment to respond to any/all fire and intrusion alarms. The Foreman on-call and
137
Park Rangers monitor facilities such as the O’Brien Recreation Center, Charles Black
Recreation Center, Newman Center, Martin Luther King Center, Potawatomi Zoo, and
the Botanical Conservatory. These individuals are the first responders to fire and
security alarms with the Division Head acting as second responder.
On call Foreman List- The Department has a system whereby Foremen rotate on a 24hour call status to handle any and all park issues. This system insures that there is
always a staff person to respond to all incidents.
Available for Review On-Site:
The O’Brien Facilities Manual is available in the department’s reference library.
At copy of the Safety Inspection and Security Folder for O’Brien Center in on the
reference shelves.
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual (Policy 30- Safety, Policy 44 –
Work Zone Safety) is available in the department’s reference library.
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5050 – Building Security and Policy 5040 Risk) is
available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.6 Emergency Management Plan
Standard: Park and recreation agencies, having roles in emergency management systems within
their local jurisdiction, should be aware of the applicable operations plan.
Commentary: Roles may vary depending on the scope of services provided by the agency and the
location of its areas and facilities. For agencies near large metropolitan areas or identified by
other means, being aware of the applicable operations plan may not be sufficient. In these
cases, the agency’s specialized staff, buildings and equipment may be integral to the plan and
may be deployed in the event of a large-scale emergency. The U. S. Office of Homeland
Security provides guidance and support for the preparation and maintenance of emergency
management plans.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the applicable emergency management plan with the most
recent date of approval. If, due to security concerns, the emergency management plan is not
available for public review, acceptable evidence is the emergency management plan’s table of
contents.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Crisis, catastrophic, emergency conditions, or other related incidents occurring on
department owned properties, or properties directly or indirectly affected by such
incidents shall be immediately reported the Crisis Team Head – the Superintendent of
Parks. In his/her absence, the Administrative Director shall be notified. All department
personnel shall strictly adhere to the established policies and direction of law
enforcement and emergency personnel assigned to the incident, and shall provide
assistance, personnel, and equipment as requested, as spelled out in the Department’s
Crisis Communication Plan.
138
Several of the Department heads have been FEMA trained and certified and the Parks is
a strong component of the local Emergency Management System which is spearheaded
by the City’s Fire Department
Available for Review On-Site:
The City of South Bend’s Safety and Risk Management Manual, OSHA Programs for the
City of South Bend, is available in the department’s reference library.
The City of South Bend Policies and Procedures Manual (Policy 30- Safety, Policy 44 –
Work Zone Safety) is available in the department’s reference library.
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5050 – Park Security) is available in the Department’s
reference library.
A copy of the Crisis Communication Plan is available in the Department Reference
Library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
8.6.1 In-Service Training for Agency Staff
Standard: Through the use of in-service training, agency personnel should understand their role in
ongoing security and emergency management.
Commentary: All staff have a role in security and emergency management. In-service training informs
staff of their role and defines specific procedures for routine operations as well as response to
critical incidents and emergencies.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide documentation of in-service training programs on general
security and emergency management, including a dated outline of the presentation topics and
a roster of participants.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Training comes from two sources for the South Bend Parks and Recreation staff. At
the citywide level, Human Resources and/or the City’s Safety/Risk Management
Department will conduct training sessions. This may be specialized training for small
groups of employees, like chain-saw safety, or respirator training for example, or it
may be broader OSHA training on Lock Out/Tag Out procedures that are required for
every city employee. The second source of training is from the Department itself.
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department provides training and resources
from its manuals and through its orientation of employees, and there will be a more
formal process in the spring with the General Safety Training for all staff. Through
various “in-house” opportunities Parks and Recreation employees and volunteers will
receive “one-on-one” from their direct supervisors. This is less formal and conducted
on an as-needed basis.
The department is committed to the safety of all participants, spectators, employees
and volunteers. In order to provide a safe environment, a risk management plan is
reviewed by the Department’s Safety & Risk Manager, and the City’s Risk Manager.
The plan includes responsibilities for risk management, hazard recognition and
inspections, accident/incident reporting, equipment, facilities, emergency action plan,
training.
139
Division Directors of the department have full authority and responsibility to take
necessary steps to maintain the safest possible environment with their units. It is each
Division Director’s responsibility to
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5040 (Risk Management), 5050 (Park Security)
A copy of the General Safety Training Manual is available in the reference library.
In the Accreditation Folder are sample sign-in sheets for training from the 2012
season.
Sited orientation material is available in the Accreditation File.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
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9.0 RISK MANAGEMENT
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
9.1 Risk Management Plan
Standard: There shall be a risk management plan reviewed on a regular basis which encompasses
analysis of risk exposure, control approaches and financial impact for the agency.
Commentary: A comprehensive risk management plan is essential to minimize legal liabilities and
personal injuries. A risk management plan analyzes the programs/services offered and
facilities/areas managed for personal injury and financial loss potential and identifies
approaches to handle such losses. It sets forth basic policies and procedures to manage the
identified risks.
The agency shall implement approaches for identification and control of risks based on the
specific needs of the agency. There is no prescriptive method for identification of all risks
suitable for all entities; the method and tools used will vary. Risk management is an on-going
process and its effectiveness must be systematically evaluated and adjustments made as
appropriate. Responsibilities must be assigned and structure set in place to implement an
effective plan.
The analysis shall include the direct costs (staffing, insurance, prevention) and indirect costs
(time lost from work by injured employees, damage to equipment and facilities, failure to
provide services and loss of income) of the agency’s risk management.
In some cases, the risk management plan and function may occur outside the park and
recreation agency by a higher government authority.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the current risk management plan with the most recent
review date and approval by the proper authority.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
City of South Bend publishes the Policies and Procedure Manual and OSHA Programs
for City of South Bend, prepared by Gibson Risk Management Services, LLC. These two
documents detail the citywide Risk Management Plan and several major IOSHA
stipulated policies. The manuals is continually updated.
Responsibility for safety and risk management is an essential component of the success
of the programs of the department. The staff of the department is committed to the
safety of all participants, spectators, employees and volunteers. When all employees and
volunteers within the department are aware that risk management is valued by the
staff, desired attitudes will result in performance of duties which allow the City of
South Bend to transfer, avoid or control risks in its recreational and sports programs. It
is exceptionally important that the professional staff of the South Bend Parks and
Recreation Department become personally involved in risk management, or the goal of
141
reducing risk exposure to the department, and to the City of South Bend itself, cannot
be achieved.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5040 Risk Management,)
A copy of the City of South Bend, Policies and Procedures (Policy 30 – Safety, Poly 44Safety in the Workplace) is available in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of OSHA Programs for the City of South Bend, the City of South Bend’s Risk
Management Manual, is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
9.1.1 Statement of Policy
Standard: The agency should have a policy for risk management that is approved by the proper
authority.
Commentary: The policy entity for the agency must set the direction and give appropriate authority for
implementing operational practices and procedures for the parks and recreation agency.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the risk management policy including indication of approval
by the proper authority.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The City of South Bend Department of Safety & Risk Management oversees risk
management issues for all departments. The Safety & Risk Management Department
handles administrative processing and adjudication of private citizen claims, worker
compensation and safety issues, based on input from the individual departments. South
Bend Parks & Recreation Department has its own internal Safety & Risk Manager who
works with the City Department regarding all procedures and training for employees.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies
and Procedures Manual (Policy 5040 Risk Management, 5070(Evidence), and 5080
(Disruptive Behavior) and 5050 (Building Security)) is available in the Department’s
reference library.
A copy of the City of South Bend, Policies and Procedures (Policy 30 – Safety) is
available in the Department’s reference library.
A copy of OSHA Programs for the City of South Bend, the City of South Bend’s Risk
Management Manual, is available in the Department’s reference library.
In the Accreditation File are inspection reports from the most recent safety audits.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
9.1.2 Risk Management Operations Manual
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Standard: There should be a manual(s) of operating procedures for carrying out the risk
management plan, accessible to all agency personnel.
Commentary: Specific implementation procedures are important element in a risk management plan.
Guidelines for implementation of the procedures should be put together into a risk
management manual to provide an authoritative guide and immediately available reference
for all levels of employees. Not all employees need a full copy of the manual, but it should
be available, and pertinent aspects should be given to the employees in accord with their
responsibilities.
Particular attention should be given to national, state and local emergency plans and
procedures directed toward large-scale natural disasters, such as earthquakes, tornadoes,
hurricanes, forest fires, and floods, and include evacuation procedures, inventory and location
of equipment and materials, displacement plans for facility residents and activities, and
psychological aid for staff affected by emergency, etc. Plans also should be prepared for civil
disturbances, as well as emergency care both for special events with a large number of
attendees and for on-going activity in the parks and recreational facilities. Special
cooperative arrangements should be made with other public departments and agencies,
private contractors, and community organizations.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the risk management operations manual and demonstrate
how employees of all levels are made aware of the aspects pertinent to their responsibilities.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Division Directors of the department have full authority and responsibility to take
necessary and reasonable steps to maintain the safest possible environment with their
units. It is each Division Director’s responsibility to (a brief summation follows):

Provide the leadership and direction essential to maintain loss and accident
prevention policies

Enforce the safety program

Ensure up to date records of certifications are maintained

Set an example to those employees under their supervision

Make certain that safety and risk management training is integrated into all
employee training

Coordinate/conduct (or cause to be conducted) safety awareness clinics

Annually include a discussion of risk management issues, including accident
prevention, in in-service training for all staff.
Supervisory personnel are key to the successful implementation of the risk management
program. Each of the Area Managers, Superintendent, Maintenance Supervisors, and
Program Supervisors shall (a brief summation follows):

Take responsibility for safe and healthful work conditions

Ensure that each employee fully understands and follows established work
procedures, and maintain necessary emergency care certifications

Make certain that all safety precautions are observed

Ensure that required safety equipment is available and used properly

Ensure that all employees are fully trained, and when necessary, retrained for
the job they are assigned to do

Close down programs, facilities or areas which are considered to be hazardous
143

Enforce all facility use and/or program use policies, rules or guidelines
Employees are required to exercise due care in the course of their work to prevent
injuries. They should report all unsafe conditions to their supervisor, keep work areas
clean and orderly, document all accidents, attend safety training sessions, use personal
protective equipment when required, and learn and observe safety rules, procedures
and policies.
Volunteers should: report all unsafe conditions to supervisory staff immediately, learn
and observe the safety rules/procedures/policies, never operate a city owned vehicle,
read and sign a waiver statement.
All South Bend Parks and Recreation facilities shall be inspected a minimum of one (1)
time per year. This general safety inspection will be completed by the City of South
Bend Safety and Risk Management Department, or its authorized agent.
The Parks Department will provide all necessary equipment for participants in
departmental sponsored programs. This equipment is also inspected, repaired,
reconditioned, and replaced as necessary.
Personnel are trained on the proper operation of all equipment, including safety and
preventive maintenance procedures.
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of OSHA Programs for the City of South Bend, the City of South Bend’s Risk
Management Manual, is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
9.1.2.1 Accident and Incident Reports
Standard: There should be established procedures for accident and incident reporting and analysis
of accident and incident reports.
Commentary: There should be an accident/incident report form, in addition to police, vehicle accident, or
insurance reports, which includes identification information (who), specific location of
accident (where), description of accident in terms of action of injured and sequence of
activity (what), possible preventative measures the injured could have taken, procedures
followed in rendering aid, and disposition. Data should be obtained in an appropriate manner
to support planned and coordinated accident prevention programs within the agency.
Accident/report forms should be available to all employees at all times. Incident reports also
must be made for such instances as disturbances, lost children, stolen items, vehicles breakins, traffic accidents, etc.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the accident/incident form(s) and the procedures for
documenting and analyzing accidents and incidents.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
All reported accidents and injuries involving the public, program participants,
volunteers, and department employees are investigated and documented.
144
The South Bend Parks and Recreation is required to comply with established City of
South Bend accident and incident reporting procedures. These are administered by the
Safety and Risk Department of the City of South Bend, and are described on the forms,
and in the OSHA Programs for the City of South Bend, by Gibson Insurance Group,
which is our city safety and risk Manual.
Available for review On-Site:
OSHA Programs for the City of South Bend, by Gibson Insurance Group, Sec 19,
Accident/Incident reporting and Record Keeping.
In the Accreditation File are copies of the currently utilized Accident and Incident
Report Forms.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
9.1.3 Personnel Involvement and Training
Standard: The risk management function within the agency should involve active interaction
among personnel at all levels.
Commentary: Interaction is essential at all levels of the organization. The direct service employees have
insights to risks that are critical to implementation of risk management procedures. The
employees must be assured of their importance to ensure successful risk management.
Employees at all levels of the organization must be trained to understand the risk
management operational procedure.
Suggested Evidences of Compliance: Demonstrate how personnel at all levels are included in the risk
management function of the agency.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Parks and Recreation Department risk management policy spells out all levels of
responsibility for risk management, involving all entire organization and every
employee or volunteer. They are:
A. Superintendent
The Administrator has the ultimate responsibility for the safety and implementation of a
risk management program in the Department of Parks and Recreation. Safety Audits
and the requests for funds and the plans to correct or mitigate concerns come to him.
B. Division Directors
Division Directors of the department have full authority and responsibility to take
necessary and reasonable steps to maintain the safest possible environment within their
unit(s). It is important that a constant effort be directed toward preventing accidents
and injuries to participants, volunteers and employees, and reducing liabilities in each
of the respective program areas. As a result, it is each Division Director’s responsibility
to:
1. Provide the leadership and direction essential to maintain loss and accident
prevention policies.
2. Develop specific written employee work rules regarding hazardous tasks in
order to minimize the possibility of injury and property damage.
145
3. Enforce the safety program and take disciplinary action against an employee or
participant willfully disregarding the program, rules or policies.
4. Ensure up to date records of all certifications and training dates of full-time,
part-time, and volunteer staff are maintained.
5. Set an example to those employees under their supervision, and give safety
equal emphasis and weight with such factors as generation of revenue, participant
development, and quality customer service.
6. Make certain that safety and risk management training is integrated into all
employee training and is developed as a continuing effort in daily operations.
7. Coordinate/conduct or cause to be conducted, safety awareness clinics as well
as CPR and first aid in-serve training for designated staff.
8. Annually include a discussion of risk management issues including accident
prevention and plans to promote accident reduction at staff meetings.
9. Actively identify and report safety hazards within assigned facilities, programs
or services, and promptly review all accident prevention recommendations.
Establish programs and issue directives to implement feasible recommendations.
C. Supervisory Personnel
Area Managers, Superintendent and Maintenance Supervisors, and Program
Supervisors are key to the successful implementation of the risk management program.
The individuals in each of these positions have the responsibility for the safe actions of
their employees and the safe operation and condition of equipment within their
program and work areas. They have full authority to enforce the provisions of the risk
management program. Each of the Area Managers, Superintendent and Maintenance
Supervisors, and Program Supervisors shall:
1. Take responsibility for safe and healthful work conditions for participants and
employees. Be accountable for preventable injuries, accidents and liabilities caused
by their employees.
2. Ensure that each employee fully understands and follows established work
procedures, and maintain necessary emergency care certifications.
3. Make certain that all safety precautions are observed, including the use of
proper safeguards for all activities in all facilities.
4. Ensure that required safety equipment and personal protective equipment for
each job, task or activity is available and used properly. Make sure employees
and/or participants are instructed and understand the use and necessity for
protective equipment on specific potentially hazardous tasks or activities.
5. Ensure that all employees are fully trained and when necessary, retrained for
the job they are assigned to do. Make sure they understand the safe way each task
must be accomplished.
6. Recommend the correction of deficiencies found in equipment, facilities, work
procedures, rules and knowledge that adversely affect safety effort.
7. Close down programs, facilities or areas to further use which are considered to
be hazardous to both employees and participants, because of weather conditions,
faulty facilities or equipment. Remove personnel and/or participants from
hazardous conditions when they are not wearing or using protective equipment.
8. Enforce all facility use and/or program use policies, rules or guidelines by
being impartial in disciplinary action against those participants or employees who
fail to conform.
In addition, the supervisory personnel should be alert for evidence of improper
attitudes in employees that could result in an employee being involved in an accident.
Action should be taken to change these attitudes through counseling, training or
disciplinary measures where other courses of action are ineffective.
146
Safety suggestions and written comments from employees should be encouraged. All
programming staff should be receptive to safety suggestions of employees and ensure
these are forwarded on to the Safety and Risk Foreman for evaluation.
D. Employees
Employees are required to exercise due care in the course of their work to prevent
injuries to themselves, to their fellow workers and to the participants within programs.
Employees should:
1. Report all unsafe conditions to their supervisor immediately. Complete
necessary report documentation.
2. Keep work areas clean and orderly, and make sure facilities are safe to work in
or conduct programs in.
3. Document all accidents and report the more serious accidents to their
supervisor.
4. Attend safety training sessions and maintain necessary certifications.
5. Use personal protective equipment where required. Dress safely and sensibly.
6. Learn and observe the safety rules, procedures and policies.
7. Take an active interest and part in the safety program.
Finally, the Policy document “5050 Risk Management” was created by staff and is
reviewed and updated by staff for approval.
Available for review on site:
OSHA Programs for City of South Bend
A copy of the City of South Bend, Policies and Procedures (Policy 30 – Safety, Poly 44Safety in the Workplace) is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
9.2 Risk Manager
Standard: There should be an individual with risk management responsibility and authority to
carry out the policies established for risk management of the park and recreation
agency.
Commentary: Agencies should be engaged in aggressive loss control management and monitoring. It is
essential to assign responsibility for this vital role and ensure it receives the credibility and
acceptance it warrants so as to not be perceived only as insurance purchase. Operationally,
for most effective implementation, a risk manager will be designated. The risk manager must
be given authority to carry out the policies established regarding risk management, both with
the employees and the administration. The risk manager will work closely with the finance
office of the agency in facilitating the financial approaches determined to be most appropriate
and with the administrator/supervisors of the programs and services in obtaining essential
employee performance as related to reduction of programmatic risks.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Demonstrate the assignment of risk management responsibility to an
individual authorized to carry out the policies established for risk management.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Safety Foreman oversees the Department’s risk
management programs and liaisons with the City of South Bend Safety and Risk
Management Department.
147
Available for Review On-Site:
A copy of the City of South Bend, Policies and Procedures (Policy 30 – Safety) is
available in the Department’s reference library.
The Job Description of the Assigned Foreman is in the Accreditation File
The highlighted organizational chart showing the assigned position is in the
Accreditation File.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
148
10.0 EVALUATION AND RESEARCH
NOTE: Standards marked with a star () are fundamental standards, and are required of all
agencies seeking accreditation.
10.1 Evaluation Analysis
Standard: There shall be a process for evaluation to assess the outcomes of park and recreation
programs, services areas and facilities, completed annually at a minimum and linked to
the agency’s planning process.
Commentary: Evaluatory practices occur throughout a park and recreation agency’s operations. The
agency shall perform an analysis of the multitude of evaluatory functions within the agency,
to assess the outcomes of programs and services provided by the agency.
The analysis includes identification of the qualitative and quantitative tools listed below, an
analysis of the evaluation results and linked to the agency’s planning process.
The analysis may include data gathered from the following qualitative and quantitative tools:
 Annual evaluation of goals and objectives
 Trend analysis
 Data gathering for planning
 Community inventory and need index
 Service statistics
 Recreation services management – program needs and effectiveness
 Program evaluation
 Risk management determination of nature of, and extent of, risks
 Financial reports
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Demonstrate that the comprehensive analysis has been considered by
the agency in its annual planning process. Describe the process for evaluation and cite
examples for how this data has been used by the agency.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The following is the current systematic evaluation plan being utilized by the South Bend
Parks and Recreation Department:
Annual evaluation of goals and objectives are part of the annual performance-based
budget process. The benchmarks (objectives) for each unit of the Department are to be
tied to one or more of goals and strategic issues of the South Bend Parks and Recreation
Department Master Plan (2009-2013). The comparison of each unit of the
Department’s actual results on these benchmarks to what their submitted goals for
these benchmarks were for last year’s budget cycle is evaluated by the Superintendent,
the respective Division heads and staff responsible for that unit.
Department staff employee’s goals, and the goals of the various operations they oversee,
are evaluated as part of their performance appraisals on an annual basis at the end of
each year. The objectives for each employee should reinforce the objectives of each
149
segment of the operations of the Department that they are responsible for.
Standard 4.1.9)
(See
Goals are an integral part of the department Master Plan. A timetable of actions that are
to take place are defined, along with what section of the Department is responsible for
results, and where possible funding will come from. Progress achieved towards these
goals are reviewed on an annual basis and presented to the public and to the Board of
Park Commissioners usually at the beginning of the following year. The entire Master
Plan is evaluated and goals are re-prioritized every five (5) years. The most current
update of the plan was presented to the Parks Board and the public in 2004. This new
plan sets the course of action for staff through the end of the year 2013. This working
document drives the department’s planning decisions and serves as a report card to the
South Bend community. Changes in the community’s needs or the department’s
resources could result in a change of priorities in the plan in coming years. Staff always
encourages the community and the Parks Board to regularly review and comment on
the plan. (See Standards 2.4 and 2.6)
The strategic issues of the Master Plan are designed to highlight broad issues, assist in
finding usable alternatives, and suggest specific strategies for the South Bend Parks and
Recreation Department. It is the philosophy of the Board of Park Commissioners and
department staff that they shall, by working with citizens, determine what core services
and facilities are a high priority for the local South Bend community. (See Standards
2.2, 2.4., and 2.9)
Data gathering for analysis and planning is a continuous process. Fiscal management
review for future planning is completed in July every year, with presentation of the
Department’s annual operating budget to City Council. The budget is passed by
September 30 every year, to go into effect on January 1 of the following year. Monthly
Fiscal Statements for presentation to the Board and as-needed reports to the Department
management team are regularly used as evaluation tools. (See Standard 6.9,)
Internal and independent audits, regular cash reports and tracking techniques oversee
the handling of funds. (See Standard 5.3)
Formal and informal assessments of recreation services are conducted on an ongoing
basis throughout the year by patrons and staff. Formal evaluations are conducted at the
end of some classes, and customer feedback systems are utilized by all units of the
Department. (See especially Standard 2.2, 2.4.4, and 2.9. )
Risk management determination regarding the nature and extent of occupational risks
are evaluated through regular safety inspections, and reports are issued on status and
progress to the Superintendent. (See Standard 9.1.2)
The American Zoo and Aquarium Association (AZA) accredit the Potawatomi Zoo. The
last inspection and certification was summer 2004. There are 217 accredited zoos in
the United State. The AZA accreditation process follows a five-year cycle and the areas
that are reviewed and certified include: governing, authority, support organizations,
finance, physical facilities, safety/security, animal collection, veterinary care,
conservation, education, research and planning.
Marketing staff has utilized questionnaires within the survey and evaluation process to
determine effectiveness of various advertisement methodologies that the department
utilizes to inform citizens of available department programs and services. A marketing
plan, with targets for measurable success is used to focus the Department’s effort in
effective two-way communication. (See Standards 3.3, and 3.4 (all)).
150
Analysis of operations is an ongoing task in the South Bend Parks and Recreation
Department. Professional staff submit monthly reports which are channeled up
through the organization. Each Division head summarizes the monthly reports
provided by his/her staff and submits a divisional report for review by the Board of
Park Commissioners and by the Superintendent.
Monthly fiscal statements with pertinent comparative benchmarks of operations and
occasional operation or task-specific fiscal reports are prepared for the Department’s
management team as tools for analysis by the Department’s Fiscal Division.
Program and facility evaluations and public feedback from the designed channels all
provide data to be used for immediate use.
The bi-weekly Division Head meeting between the Executive Director and the Division
heads of the Department are utilized to analyze policy, management and operational
issues, and can be used to make rapid, Department-wide adjustments if required.
Two portions of the standard year, at mid-year during the budgeting process for the
next fiscal cycle and at year’s end, when all staff and most program evaluations are
completed, are particularly appropriate for operational appraisal as each both the
budget and evaluation cycles require a thorough departmental assessment.
Available for Review On-Site:
South Bend Parks and Recreation Department Master Plan (2009-2013), Sec. M Action
Steps Matrix, Sec K, Issues, is available in the Department’s reference library.
In the Accreditation file are the annual staff evaluation forms used by the Department.
In the Accreditation file Safety Audits and facility reports.
In the Accreditation File Are survey forms, and summation reports on user feedback.
A copy of the Potawatomi Zoo’s Accreditation submission folder is available in the
Department’s reference library.
A copy of the 2011 Budget and several issues of the Monthly Financial Statements used
as monitoring tools are available in the Department’s reference library.
The Recreation Programs Book 2011 is available in the Resource Library for review.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
10.1.1 Position Responsibility for Evaluation
Standard: There should be specific personnel within the agency responsible for managing the
evaluation analysis.
Commentary: Specific assignment of responsibility for evaluation and research is critical for agency
accountability of programs and operations. The technical expertise for evaluation may be
provided through private consultant contracts or service contracts with an educational
institution having the technical expertise to direct the evaluation program of the agency.
Actual implementation of evaluation may be a shared responsibility involving planning,
operational and program personnel.
151
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide the job descriptions of the staff person(s) responsible for the
comprehensive evaluation analysis and/or the consultant contracts or service agreements.
The documentation should also include the resume(s) of experience and training of the
incumbent staff or consultant(s) providing this service.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
The Executive Director of the Department acts as the primary director of the evaluation and
research process, although each of the Department Directors will conduct evaluation in
their areas of specialties. Evaluation of operations is a component of every member of the
full-time staff.
The Department utilizes outside consultants for evaluation and projects either beyond its
current expertise or time restraints.
Within the South Bend Parks and Recreation Department, two divisions primary undertake
the evaluation process. The Recreation Division is responsible for planning and evaluation
as it applies to the delivery of classes, services or programs, and the Administrative Division
is responsible for strategic planning for the Department and for answering various
evaluation and research tasks.
The Recreation Division is responsible for planning and researching on how to best utilize
the Department’s assets for the benefit of the community’s leisure, life style, recreational,
educational, and health and wellness needs. The Recreation Division works closely with the
Administrative Division to research and plan programs for the South Bend Community and
evaluate their impacts and effects.
The Administrative Division is responsible for creating or overseeing the creation of the
various planning documents for the Department, such as the Strategic Plan, and the
Department’s Five-Year Master Plan. The Administrative Division works in conjunction
with City and regional planning agencies as a contributor in City documents, such as the
comprehensive City Plan, and regional or state-wide documents like The Indiana State Trails,
Greenways & Bike Plan, produced by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.
The Administrative Division is also responsible for the overseeing the budget and fiscal
planning for the Department and various research tasks including a comprehensive
evaluation program and marketing research.
Available for review On-Site:
A complete list of job descriptions for the Department is available in the reference library.
Copies of the South Bend Parks and Recreation Master Plan 2004-2008, The City of South
Bend City Plan, and the Indiana State Trails, Greenways & Bike Plan are available for review
in the Department’s reference library.
Qualified staff within the Department, as described above, are involved in many facets of
evaluation for the our operations directly. The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department
also works with various city planning teams, either utilizing their expertise for our projects
or serving as specialists and advocates for park and recreation issues for larger survey and
evaluation projects such as the work on the City of South Bend’s comprehensive City Plan.
When a project is beyond the skills or ability of the Department to handle effectively inhouse, outside consultants are utilized.
In the Accreditation Files are a short listing of the credentials of Chuck Lehman, of Lehman
and Lehman and of Greg Kil, of Kil Architecture and Planning, both used extensively in
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develop of properties, and in park planning and in the evaluation process. (See also Standard
4.8)
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
10.2 Experimental and Demonstration Projects
Standard: There should be at least one experimental or demonstration project or involvement in
some aspect of research, as related to any part of park and recreation operations, each
year.
Commentary: Departments are encouraged to undertake action research, exploratory investigations,
operational studies and demonstration projects to develop better methods in conducting
programs for all types of groups. These undertakings provide a means for the agency to test
new or different approaches/techniques and systematically evaluate its effectiveness. Every
agency, regardless of size, can undertake some type of study for the enhancement of its
operations.
Since the community is the laboratory for recreation and park research and the public
recreation and park agency is one prime channel thereto, when requested, collaborative
efforts with individual researchers, private research organizations, graduate students, and
educational institutions for appropriate research projects should be considered.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide a report on an experimental or demonstration project for the
last year and list projects for the last 5 years.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
There should be at least one experimental or demonstration project or involvement in some
aspect of research, as related to any part of park and recreation operations, each year.
Healthy Communities Research and Management Project
The South Bend Parks and Recreation Department has been selected as a Beta Site for the
testing and developing of this national program designed to test and reposition parks and
recreation organizations as instruments of change to address childhood obesity.
An outgrowth of this three-year project has been the creation of the community-wide Active
Youth Initiative which involves the larger community and a new steering committee has just
recently been formed and is working in cooperation with the local schools, not-for-profits
and other service providers.
Weight Winners Program and Camp
This program and camp is specifically designed for children 8-12 years of age who have
moderate to extreme weight problems. The camp atmosphere is physically active,
emotionally safe, and nutritionally sound. The staff encourages children to try new things,
motivates them not to give up, and will help to foster a sense of discovery in each child.
Participants enjoy playing gym games, trying new exercises, sampling new foods, discussing
various nutritional topics, and meeting interesting guest speakers. Even beyond these,
participants also enjoy fields trips and other typical program and camp activities.
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Junior Golf Programs
Studebaker Junior Golf Program: This program is designed to introduce golf basics to
children between 5 to 17 years in order to improve their skills and build their confidence. It
offers weekly play as well as group clinic instruction.
Tiny Tots Golf Class: This class is designed for children age 3 to 7. It is a fun and exciting
way to learn golf that utilizes the SNAG (Start New At Golf) equipment. This means that no
regular golf equipment is used for this class.
St. Joseph County Junior Tour: This program provides a competitive arena for children ages
10 to 17. Participants must be experienced golfers who are able to play at a certain level.
They need to understand the rules and etiquette of the game. This program is not for a
novice golfer and swing instruction is not provided.
Kids Triathlon
The City of South Bend’s Parks and Recreation Department hosts an annual KID’S
TRIATHLON. This event was created to promote healthy lifestyles for the children in our
community as well as children from forty-five other communities. The KID’S TRIATHLON
features a 25 yard swim (75 yards for 13-14 age group), a 1.3 mile bike ride and a half mile
run. As each participant crosses the finish line, a winner’s medal is draped around their neck
by the Park Superintendent. There are also sponsors and community civic organization
members who volunteer for this honor. Over the past seven years, this event has expanded
from 250 children to as many as 600 children. We have presented this event as a model for
other cities at both the state and national level. Our presentation teaches communities how
to organize and conduct a successful Triathlon.
AYI – The Active Youth Iniative
.
Available for Review On-Site:
Program summaries are available for the cited Demonstration Projects in the Departmental
Research library.
The Year One Findings and Warrant for Action Document from the HCRM project is in the
Accreditation File.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
10.3 Staff Training for Evaluation of Programs, Services, Areas, Facilities
Standard: There should be ongoing training opportunities for all personnel of the agency involved
in evaluation of programs, services, areas and/or facilities.
Commentary: Effective implementation of the agency’s evaluation and research functions requires that
all personnel involved in evaluation be properly trained. The training should be provided in
the context of the comprehensive evaluation analysis, address qualitative and quantitative
measurements, identification of applicable evaluation tools, data analysis and application of
findings.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples of evaluation and research training opportunities
completed by agency personnel, including syllabus or curriculum outline, training dates and
participant list.
Agency Evidence of Compliance:
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The City of South Bend’s Human Resources Department provides classes throughout the
regular year, several of which are targeted to improving supervisory skills to staff.
The Department also provides opportunities outside the department/city for staff to receive
specialized training. Much of this type of training is directly related to the effective
administration and evaluation of programs and staff. Attendance at conferences or other
professional development shall be determined by the amount of funds that are made
available through the budget process. It is the interest of the Board of Park Commissioners to
provide every opportunity for the staff to attend professional development seminars when
possible. The Executive will designate specific personnel to attend appropriate seminars.
When authorization is approved, the department shall pay all justified expenses when
appropriate. (If out of state travel is involved, a pre-approved travel request form must be
filled out prior to the travel date.) (See Standard 4.6.1, 4.6.2, 4.6.4)
The staff is involved in an annual retreat at the end of every year the covers training and
specific skills development.
Available for Review On-Site:
A complete listing of the job descriptions for the Department is available for review in the
reference library.
The Accreditation File contains samples of gathered syllabi and training programs attended
by staff over the past five years.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
10.4 Quality Assurance
Standard: The agency should monitor and evaluate the quality of its programs, services, areas and
facilities from the user's perspective.
Commentary: Today's park and recreation users are increasingly discerning in terms of facility, program,
and service quality. Failure to provide this quality will damage relationships with customers
and stake-holders reduce potential revenues and increase long-term operating costs.
Park and recreation agencies must be sensitive to the issue of quality assurance and customer
relations. Customer relations and hospitality training are important elements of quality
assurance, but are not enough, by themselves, to guarantee quality recreation experiences.
There must be total quality management. It takes consistency of effort and time to realize and
continually improve quality. Quality assurance requires focused organizational decisionmaking, processes, and employee efforts toward meeting, and where possible exceeding,
customer expectations.
The quality assurance function within the agency should include methods and standards for
improving the quality of programs, services, areas and facilities. A quality assurance
function within the agency should be the responsibility of the administrator or designated
personnel.
Suggested Evidence of Compliance: Provide examples for monitoring and evaluating quality assurance
within the agency (examples: customer comment cards, secret/mystery shopper surveys,
verbal surveys of users, program evaluations, focus groups).
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Agency Evidence of Compliance:
Program participants are encouraged to provide feedback regarding their satisfaction
with a program or facility. The Department of Parks and Recreation uses numerous
methodologies to regularly monitor and evaluate all department facilities, programs,
and services to ensure that quality is continuously maintained. Participants are able to
provide feedback through several methods. These methodologies include, but are not
necessarily limited to, the following:










Face to face contact with department staff
Written surveys
Post program evaluations
Mystery Shoppers
Phone calls to staff
Web feedback from our “Comments to Parks” online.
Advisory Groups
Focus meetings
Neighborhood meetings
Unsolicited comments at Park Board
Because a staff member is always present at a structured event or program, participants
are able to provide immediate feedback regarding the quality of the program.
Participants are also asked to fill out an evaluation, which may be done on-site, or offsite and returned to the department office. This often gives participants a non-intrusive
vehicle to provide honest feedback.
Available for review On-Site:
The Park and Recreation Department’s Administration, Policies and Procedures Manual
(Policy 1070- Quality Assurance, 3240- Survey Policy) is available in the Department’s
reference library.
In the Accreditation File are survey forms from Departmental operations.
A copy of the Department’s Master Plan (Sec K1 –K32, Focus Groups-Needs Assessment,
is available in the Department’s reference library.
Agency Self Review:
Met
Not Met
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Attachment #1 – response to Standard 1.1.1.1
Executive Organizational Chart
Mayor
of
South Bend
South Bend
Common Council
Board of Park
Commissioners
Superintendent
South Bend
Parks & Recreation
Department
Mayor of South Bend is an elected official who serves as the Chief Executive for the government of the
City of South Bend.
The South Bend Common Council is an elected legislative body of six council districts and three at-large
positions, representing the interest of the citizens of the City of South Bend. They are the body that
authorizes funds for park and recreation expense.
The Board of Park Commissioners is a body appointed by the Mayor, and established by Indiana statute
36-10-3. They have exclusive government, management, and control of all parks and recreation areas
within the City/Town, subject only to the laws of the State. They are the policy-making body for the
Parks and Recreation Department.
The Superintendent of the South Bend Parks & Recreation Department is appointed by the Mayor of the
City of South Bend, and whose appointment is subject to the approval of the Board of Park
Commissioners. His role is the chief Administrator for the Agency.
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commission for accreditation of park and recreation agencies