Diamond Corner Building, 68 Eloff & Market Street, Johannesburg
P O Box 8769, Johannesburg, 2000
Telephone: (011) 355-1900
Fax: (011) 355-1000
Email: [email protected]
Website: http://www.gdard.gpg.gov.za
GAUTENG IDC NGUNI CATTLE DEVELOPMENT TRUST:
PILOT PHASE
1
TABLE OF CONTENTS
1. Introduction
2. Project Objectives
3. Legal Entity
4. Stakeholders
5. Criteria for participation
6. The Application Process
7. Funding
8. Loaning of Cattle to Participating Farmers
9. Constraints
10. Risks and Mitigation
11. Project Duration
12. Work Breakdown Structure
13. Consultations
14. Key Success Factors
2
4
5
6
6
7
8
10
10
11
12
12
13
14
14
DEFINITIONS
Gauteng IDC Nguni Cattle Development Trust - A trust established to further the objectives
as set out in the Gauteng IDC Nguni Trust as registered
Project Manager – a person appointed by the Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural
Development and seconded to the Trust to implement the objectives and business of the
Trust
Nguni cattle – a breed of cattle classified as such by the Nguni Breeding Society
Loan cattle – Nguni cattle loaned to participating farmers
3
1.
INTRODUCTION
Livestock production is a major industry in South Africa with a value of more than R50,0
billion (Stats SA, 2006).
According to the National Emergent Red Meat Producers
Organisation – Nerpo (2011), South Africa has 13, 5 million cattle with 5.4 million (40) owned
by the small-holder sector. The largest percentage of animals is produced in provinces that
have large tracts of land such as the Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Free State, Limpopo,
Mpumalanga, Western Cape and North West. In 2007, Gauteng had 257 000 cattle, and 94
000 sheep and these figures were 1, 84% and 0, 37% respectively of the total number of
animals produced in the country (Annual Agriculture Economic Review, 2008). However, in
terms of value, the province is among the leading contributors to the total value of livestock
products (Stats SA: 2006). The main contributing sub-sectors/industries to farming income
in Gauteng are animal/livestock and horticulture comprising 80% of the provincial total with
livestock being the largest contributor (Annual Agriculture Economic Review, Final Report:
2008).
South Africa produces about 85% of its beef requirements and the remaining 15% is
imported from countries such as Namibia, Botswana, Swaziland, Australia, New Zealand
and the European Union (EU). This could be attributed to the high level of demand that
outstrips the supply. There is, however, spare capacity to meet this shortage especially in
the communal areas. As indicated earlier, Gauteng contributes 1,84% towards the supply of
beef in South Africa. This is due to the limited land resources in the province.
Cattle Distribution and Density in Gauteng
Cattle distribution in Gauteng mainly corresponds to the land parcels with an area greater
than 25ha and areas with a grazing vegetation land-cover. The urban and residential areas
of Johannesburg, Pretoria and the East and West Rand show little or no concentration of
cattle. Relatively high concentration occurs in the areas of Rust de Winter, Heidelberg,
Kempton Park, Nigel, Vereeniging and Bronkhorstspruit. These areas occur in the outskirts
of the urban commercial and residential centres. The high values in Bronkhorstspruit and
Heidelberg could be associated with feedlots.
In terms of density, areas of Krugersdorp, Nigel and Heidelberg stand out as areas of high
cattle concentration. The high density in the west of Johannesburg corresponds well with the
location of Soweto.
Livestock industry Value chain
Figure 1 illustrates the typical structure of the livestock and meat industry in general. It
commences with the primary producers leading to feedlots, abattoirs, wholesalers and
retailers. From the abattoir the meat could be taken directly to retailers or processed into
value-added products /exported. The hides and skins could be processed into other
products such as leather, gelatine, etc. In Gauteng, significant value occurs from the feedlot
onwards. As stated earlier, primary production requires land and Gauteng has the smallest
land area compared to the other provinces. The province, however, has the biggest market
for processed livestock products.
4
Primary producers
Feedlot
Abattoir
Imports/Exporters
Wholesalers
Retailers
Processors
Hides and Skins
Consumers
Figure 2: Diagrammatic illustration of the operation of the meat industry
(Source: DoA, Commodity Profile: 2006)
Gauteng Nguni Partnership
Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (GDARD) intends to enter into
an agreement with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) and the University of
Pretoria (UP) to promote/develop the breeding and production projects with focus on Nguni
cattle by black farmers in Gauteng Province. The project will involve the loaning of a predetermined number of pregnant Nguni heifers to interested and qualifying farmers in the
province who should return the off-springs (same number, breed or rand equivalent of the
loaned cattle) within a period of 5 years. A trust known as the Gauteng IDC Nguni Cattle
Development Trust is currently being established to act as an implementation agency for this
project.
The following findings have been established through research done by the Nguni Cattle
Breeders’ Society on the performance of the breed in comparison to others:







2.
Is highly fertile with long productive life;
Is the most resistant to ticks of all breeds in South Africa and it shows tolerance to
tick borne diseases;
Is an excellent dam line for cross breeding, with no calving difficulties;
Crosses perform well in feedlots;
Has meat tenderness characteristics similar or exceeding that of exotic breeds;
Shows higher proportion of total weight and meat in the high priced cuts compared
to exotic breeds at the same subcutaneous fat level;
Has increased nitrogen recycling back to the rumen which improves microbial growth
and organic matter digestion, reducing the nitrogen requirement on low quality
pastures, and therefore needs little or no supplementing during winter.
Project Objectives


The main objective of the Project is to build nucleus herd of superior genetic quality
with the purpose of transferring these qualities to the provincial herd;
Promote the conservation and use of Nguni breed (conserve through utilization)
5



Support livestock farmers in establishing a resilient herd for economic and
environmental sustainability;
Establish successful Nguni stud cattle breeders in Gauteng Province; and
To empower farmers through the deployment of modern technologies which
contribute towards better herd health and husbandry management.
Secondary objectives of the project are:




3.
The establishment of a niche and recognised “Nguni beef market”;
The promotion of sustainable and holistic grazing systems in compliance with longterm grazing capacities, to provide for livestock during critical dry periods and periods
of drought;
The development of skills and capacities necessary to establish a generation of
future black commercial farmers; and
Affirmative steps to eradicate bovine reproductive diseases within the targeted areas.
Legal Entity
The project will establish a Trust known as the Gauteng IDC Nguni Cattle Development
Trust whose Trustees will be nominated from the following organisations:




Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development; (2 representatives)
Industrial Development Corporation; (2 representatives)
University of Pretoria (2 representatives)
Representatives of participating farmers (optional).
Beneficiaries of the Trust will be individuals/legal entities who have shown interest in the
project and meet pre-determined qualification criteria.
The Gauteng IDC Nguni Cattle Development Trust will be the implementing agent for the
Nguni Project in Gauteng.
The Trust will be an autonomous financial and administrative entity that effectively supports
Nguni Cattle Development in the Province. The Board of Trustees is the main decision
making body that will be held accountable for implementing the project in the Province.
4.
Stakeholders
The main stakeholders are GDARD, IDC, UP and participating Farmers in Gauteng
Province. The role of the stakeholders is summarised below:
4.1
Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (GDARD)





Provide partial funding for project implementation
Provide infrastructure support to farmers through various programmes like CASP,
Illima Letsema, Land Care, etc.;
Provide livestock extension services to participating farmers;
Provide primary animal health care and other veterinary services to participating
farmers through the Veterinary Services Branch;
Link farmers with the market though other partners involved in the project;
6



4.2
Industrial Development Corporation





4.3
Co-sponsor of the project;
Provide loan funds to the Trust for the purchase and processing of Nguni cattle;
Provide overall strategic support and guidance to the project in line with other
provinces; and
Receive repayment in the form of progeny or rand value of the loaned cattle.
Assist farmers participating in the project with an exit strategy once their obligations
are met.
University of Pretoria


4.4
Provide technical assistance, expertise, research, predetermined knowledge and
skills transfer of identified farmers through GDARD “accredited” (approved) service
providers; and
Marketing of the project in Gauteng.
Gauteng Participating Farmers





4.5
Appoint a project manager, on a fulltime basis to be seconded to the Trust;
Facilitate the coaching and training of participants to ensure that the appropriate
husbandry practices are administered to the cattle; and
Appoint a network of veterinary private practitioners for emergency clinical work -it is
impractical for state veterinarians to attend to emergencies as these can happen
after working hours. GDARD should make emergency funds available to cover such
expenses. State veterinarians will conduct regular routine herd health visits.
Receive (Loan) cattle, retain them in safe custody and exercise good and acceptable
standards of livestock management in their use and propagation to establish a
Nucleus Herd;
Remove/separate all non-descript/ non Nguni type bulls held by them from the
introduced Nguni herd;
Keep records of production;
Undertake recommended sustainable resource management practices; and
Return the predetermined number of off-springs of Nguni cattle/or rand equivalent to
the trust as a repayment of the loaned cattle (Comply with the obligation to Pass on
the Gift).
The Project Manager
The project manager is responsible for the day to day running of the project as per the Trust
Mandate. The Job description and other performance management requirements will be
drafted at a later stage. The project Manager will be appointed by the Gauteng Department
of Agriculture and Rural Development and seconded to the Trust. The project manager
will receive technical advisory support from the Technical Committee.
4.6
Other Stakeholders
Other stakeholders who are keen on advancing the objectives of the Trust will be identified
and their role in the project clearly defined.
7
5.
Criteria for Participation in the project by interested farmers












Applicants should be black as defined in the BBBEE Act;
Applicants should provide proof of being South African citizens - residing in
Gauteng Province (certified copy of ID and proof of residence);
Applicants should show willingness to participate in the project and identify with its
objectives;
Applicants should have access to suitable land of a minimum of 500 ha, with
sufficient grazing to accommodate the pre-determined number of cattle as per the
carrying capacity of the land and the expansion of the herd;
The farm must have natural resource management infrastructure, e.g. veld fire belts;
The farm should also have physical security infrastructure and the applicant must be
willing to implement prescribed animal identification and security measures like
branding, daily kraaling etc.
The farm must have basic infrastructure like perimeter and internal fences, suitable
handling facilities, adequate water availability, dipping facilities, feeding equipment
for supplements, camps, etc.;
Applicants must be willing to participate in capacity building/training programmes;
Record of participation in local farmers organisations/livestock associations will be an
added advantage;
Registered legal entities must show compliance with all laws, including tax;
Applicants must be willing to sign a loan agreement with the Trust;
Proof of the above criteria will be required.
NB: A detailed assessment scorecard is attached as annexure 1.
6.
The Application Process
Internal consultations with departmental staff, management, extension officers will be done
to make them aware of the project.
A call for application will be publicised through the appropriate media. The project will use
one or more of the following channels:





Pamphlets;
Departmental website;
Radio
Newspapers; and
Public platforms by the MEC and departmental officials;
8
The application process similar to that from other Provinces implementing the project will be
adopted and used. It entails the following steps:
Step 1: Application to Participate in the Project
Farmers will respond to the advert by completing and attaching all the required documents
and submit their applications through post or hand delivery. Extension Services Officials will
receive the applications, verify them for completeness and forward them to the project
manager.
Step 2: Processing of Applications
Regional committees will then conduct screening. All applications will then be submitted to
the technical committee. Any areas needing clarity are referred back to the district. Trustees
will then hold interviews for applicants. Designated groups are targeted. It is also acceptable
for groups to apply provided they have group constitutions and resolutions. Applicants who
do not own their land should be in possession of valid lease contracts with a time span of at
least 10 years????. In cases where these would expire before the 5-year period, DRDLR or
lessor would be requested to extend such before the application can be processed further.
Step 3: Physical Farm Infrastructure Assessments of Farmers (shortlisted only)
Shortlisted candidates will be notified and appointments for physical assessment will be
arranged.
First assessment: Veld assessment will be done by the UP and GDARD (Technical Team).
Assessment reports will be submitted to the Project Manager’s Office.
Second assessment: Only farmers with positive veld assessments reports will be visited by
the Project Manager and duly delegated Technical Committee members to inspect
infrastructure, institutional issues and verifications.
Step 4: Final Recommendation
Evaluation and final recommendations to the Trust will be done by the Technical Committee
based on all the assembled documents from applications and veld assessment reports.
Individual applications which reached the interview phase will be presented to the committee
by the Project Manager. Final recommendations submitted to the Board of Trustees for final
interview and who will also make a FINAL DECISION on who should benefit. The Contracts
and terms and conditions will be explained to the farmers before they sign them.
9
Step 5: Appointment of beneficiaries
All public servants, IDC and UP employees and their families do not qualify to apply for
participation in the project. Approved beneficiaries will be notified, GDARD regional offices
and local municipalities notified and the cattle delivery dates communicated.
Step 6: Delivery of cattle
Before delivery of cattle a contract will be signed between the farmer(s) and the Trust
representative while the GDARD officials at provincial level sign as Witnesses to the Trust
and GDARD officials at regional level act as Witnesses to the Farmers.
Step 7: Monitoring of the upkeep of the loaned cattle
All the loaned cattle will be monitored for welfare, husbandry, herd health, reproduction,
losses (theft, deaths,)
7.
Funding
GDARD will transfer an amount of R2 100 0000.00 which will be used by the IDC to lend to
the Trust.
The project will receive funding through a loan of R2 100 000.00 from IDC. An amount of
R1 900 000.00 will be used to purchase Nguni Cattle and R200 000.00 will be supplied as a
grant to the beneficiaries. The IDC will contribute an equivalent amount which will be used
to purchase loan animals. The Trust can also receive money from other parties who are
willing to contribute to the objectives of the project. It is expected that a participating farmer
will be given 30 heifers and one bull. At an average cost of R11 500 per heifer and R15 000
per bull, it is expected that a total of 10 farmers will be assisted at a cost of R360 000 per
farmer at the commencement of the project. The total number of Nguni Cattle that will be
purchased is 300.
8.
Loaning of Cattle to Participating Farmers
The Trust will sign a loan agreement (annexure 2) with the participating farmers who will
receive 30 pregnant Nguni heifers and 1 bull, place them in their farms and practice good
animal husbandry. Participating farmers will be expected to return the same number of
loaned cattle or rand equivalent to the Gauteng Nguni Development Trust within a 5-year
period. Grant animals will not be returned. The returned animals should be the off-springs of
the loaned cattle.
Nerpo (2011) classified the emergent red meat sector as follows:


Commercially oriented (communal land) - Have at least 25 cattle and sell regularly;
and
Subsistence oriented - Sell 1 - 3 animals per year depending on cash needs.
At an estimated carrying capacity of 8.5 ha per Large Stock Unit, for the initial loaned
livestock, a total of 1 275 ha (155 LSU x 8.5 ha) will be required. A calving rate of 82%
means that there will be an additional land requirement for 123 calves, bringing the total land
10
requirement to 2 363 ha (278 LSU x 8.5 ha). A minimum of 473 ha per farmer is therefore
required for a farmer to participate in this project.
9.
Constraints
9.1
Access to land
Access to land in Gauteng is a major constraint for production of cattle under extensive
grazing system. The price of land is high as agricultural land competes against industrial
and residential developments. Access can also be defined as land demarcated by a
municipality and handed to an aspiring participant, who will ensure that the land is
adequately fenced off to prevent the mixing of the cattle with those belonging to other
owners.
9.2
Access to funding
Access to funding for emerging farmers is another constraint that is related to land
ownership. However, various Development Financial Institutions (DFIs) are developing
products that do not rely on land as collateral.
9.3
Reproductive diseases
“A recent study was conducted in which two hundred and thirty-nine cattle from Gauteng
Province in South Africa were tested for various pathogens causing reproductive diseases
including bovine viral diarrhoea/mucosal disease (BVD/MD) virus, infectious bovine
rhinotracheitis/infectious pustular vulvovaginitis (IBR/IPV) virus, Neospora caninum and
Brucella abortus using various tests. For BVD/MD virus, 49.37% tested positive, 74.47% for
IBR/IPV virus, 8.96% for Neospora caninum and 3.8% for Brucella abortus. A high
seroprevalence of antibodies to both BVD/MD virus and IBR/IPV virus was evident. One
hundred and forty-three bulls were tested for Campylobacter fetus and Trichomonosis fetus,
and a low prevalence of 1.4% and 2.1% respectively was found in this study.”(Njiro SM, et
al, 2011)
The threat of reproductive diseases is therefore a reality and a risk which should be
proactively mitigated in order to ensure the success of the project. Participation in disease
control schemes such the Bovine Brucellosis control scheme should be a pre-requisite. This
would include the Bovine Tuberculosis Scheme, even if it’s not a reproductive disease.
9.4
Controlled diseases
Gauteng has been in a fortunate position in that a number of ‘controlled diseases’ as defined
under the Animal Diseases Act (Act 35 of 1984), have not been diagnosed or are not
endemic. Examples of such diseases are Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD, Corridor Disease
(CD), Trypanosomiasis (Nagana), etc. Diseases such as Malignant Catarrhal Fever (MCF)
have been diagnosed owing to the keeping of cattle in close proximity to Blue Wildebeest.
Among others, one of the risk mitigating strategies would have to be practicing due diligence
in ensuring that animals are not sourced from infected zones as described in the Act.
Secondly, it would be in the interest of the success of the project to ensure that the targeted
participating farms are not in close proximity to wildlife farms.
9.5
Other important diseases
11
In addition to the above, the participating farmers would have to ensure that their livestock is
vaccinated against other common/important diseases such as Lumpy Skin Disease (LSD),
Blackquarter, Botulism, Anthrax, Pasteurellosis, etc.
10.
Risks and Mitigation
The following risks are identified:
Risk
Impact
Likely hood
Mitigation
(low/medium/high) Low/medium/high
Default by High
Medium
Good
farmers
screening
and
reference
checks
Bad
Medium
Medium
Monitoring
animal
and
husbandry
extension
Diseases
High
Medium
Animal health
outbreaks
program
(refer
above)
Stock
theft
11.
High
High
Risk Owner
Trust
Farmer
Farmer
Community
Farmer
policing and
SAPS
Insurance,
branding,
good
and
trustworthy
stockmanship
Project Duration
The project will be piloted for 5 years after which a review of the pilot phase will be done.
The results of the pilot phase will inform the full scale roll-out of the Gauteng IDC Nguni
Cattle Development Trust program in Gauteng.
12
12.
Work Breakdown Structure
Activity
Duration
Resources
No
of
days
Begin
End
Registration of
the Trust
Signing
of
loan
agreements
Training
of
Trustees
Drafting
of
Concept
Document
Development
of a policy
framework
Opening
of
Trust
Bank
account
October
2012
October
December
2012
October
1
October
October
1
26 Sep 12
28 Sep 12
2
Budget
1 February
2013
28
February
2013
1
1000
Meeting with
Project
Manager from
Limpopo
15 January
2013
2012
1
0
Stakeholder
consultation
15 January
2013
30
Steering
Committee
Launch of the
Project
Appointment
of a Project
Manager
To
be
advised
1 January
2013
28
February
2013
To
be
advised
31 March
2013
1
To be advised
Securing of a
proper holding
facility
for
animals that
would
have
been bought
before
they
are distributed
Advertising to
invite
beneficiaries
Processing of
applications
Verification of
1
March
2013
31 March
2013
1 February
2013
28
February
2013
31 March
28
Project
manager
31
31
31
Project
manager
Project
300
0
0
26 October
1
March
2013
1
March
manpower
Responsible
person
0
March
80
465 919
13
Mr
Tommy
Mohajane
Mr F Mavhandu
and Dr Dietana
Nemudzivhadi
Mr
Tommy
Mohajane
Mr F Mavhandu
and
Steering
Comm
Ms
Ncumisa
Mcata
Mr F Mavhandu
and
Dr
Nemudzivhadi
and
other
Trustees
Steering
Committee
Mr
Mike
Mosifane and
Dr
Nemudzivhadi
Project
manager (to be
appointed
by
GDARD
and
seconded
to
the Trust)
beneficiaries
Signing
of
loan
agreements
with
beneficiaries
Purchase of
Nguni Cattle
2013
1
March
2013
2013
31 March
2013
1 May 2013
31
2012
July
Processing
1 May 2013
July
92
150 000
Delivery
of
cattle
to
successful
applicants
Monitoring
and
evaluation
1 May 2013
31
2013
31
2013
July
92
50 000
13
manager
Project
Manager
Trust
31
92
1 900 000
Continuous
Project
Manager
Trustees
Project
Manager
Project
Manager
and
and
Project
Manager
Consultations
Consultations will be held with various stakeholders including the following:
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
AFASA
NAFU
WARD
YARD
AGRI GAUTENG
Other livestock associations
14.
Key Success Factors
14.1
Sourcing and selection of animals
The Nguni breed is known for its tendency to have hereditary defects. It is therefore of
utmost importance to ensure that cattle are sourced from the right parent stock. It is strongly
advised that cattle should not be sourced privately without obtaining clearance from the
Highveld Nguni Club. Animals can also be sourced from sales/auctions which are done
under the auspices of the Nguni Society. Stock is classified under the following categories:

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
Appendix A: Not much information is available on the parents. Inspections are only
done on the phenotype but not progeny.
Appendix B: Information is available on both parents
Appendix SP: These are full stud animals. Information can be obtained to five
generations. Such information is available at the stud society
14
Bulls
It is desirable for bulls to be of superior genetic quality. This will in turn determine the quality
of progeny for future breeding. Breeding soundness tests should be conducted and certified
by a veterinarian contracted to GDARD
Heifers
Only pregnant heifers will be sourced for the project subject to complying with any of the
above criteria. These will also have to be certified by a contracted veterinarian.
14.2
Biosecurity
This section should be read in conjunction with section 9.3 to 9.5 above. Experts caution that
the Nguni breed is very susceptible to European Redwater and therefore all the necessary
precautions need to be taken to prevent this disease. The disease is transmitted by ticks and
has been known to almost wipe out entire herds. It has often been associated with the
movement of cattle from one area to another. The implications therefore are that animals
should be treated against ticks as well as vaccinated prior for this disease and others such
as heartwater. The vaccine for European Redwater is fairly mild and can thus be
administered to pregnant animals with minimum risk of losses.
For this reason all newly purchased animals will be held in a predetermined facility for a set
period before being distributed to participants. The same principle will apply to progeny
returned from participants at the end of the 5-year period.
14.3
Breeding management
There are different approaches to breeding management in a herd kept under extensive
conditions. The following options are available:

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

Bulls running with cows and heifers throughout the year. The advantage of this
system is that it does not require intensive management. Calves are born throughout
the year and this minimizes mortalities associated with winter breeding season. It has
been shown that Nguni cows do tend to synchronize themselves with the season,
calving in spring. This has been our experience in most of the 47 herds we have
distributed (reference).
Bulls running with cows and heifers during breeding season: The advantage of this
system is that it ensures that calves are born at a set calving season, which enables
easy planning and management. The disadvantage is that the calving season would
often be during the winter season. In a province such as Gauteng which normally
experiences severe winters, this could contribute to a high incidence of mortalities if
the timing of the breeding is miscalculated.
Artificial insemination and Embryo transfer: These two methods would require
intensive management and therefore not recommended for farmers where good
management systems have not been established. Nguni cattle are known to not give
a lot of embryos for ET and success rate is around 50% (reference).
In cases where cross breeding is practiced, it is recommended to rather use a nguni
female with another breed bull. The cows are low maintenance and produce normal
15
size calves through their inherent ability to limit the calf size. The value lies in the
females rather than the males.
The recommended approach for this project will be to allow bull to run with the heifers all
year round.
Bull management

All bulls entering the projects should undergo breeding soundness examination and
certification by an experienced veterinarian. They should also be pre-tested for
reproductive conditions such as Trichomoniasis.
Heifer management

Only pregnant heifers should be selected and should also be examined and certified
by a veterinarian.
Calf management
The following statistics should provide acceptable livestock management guidelines:





14.4
Calf mortalities should be around 5% from birth till weaning
Acceptable stillborn rate is around 1%
Bull calves are usually marketed at 8-9 months. There is no need to castrate
Heifers can be bred at 17-18 months, under good management. The ideal age
however is two years.
They should calve at 30-36 months of age.
Training
Participating farmers will need to undergo appropriate training on the basics of beef cattle
management which should be managed by UP
14.5
General management
Participating farmers will be required to either manage the farm on a full time basis or
appoint a full time manager who will be authorised to make decisions
14.6
Appointment of a full time project manager (PM)
The creation of the above post is paramount to the success of the project. Experience from
other provinces has proven that this is an absolute necessity. The incumbent should be
suitably qualified with technical skills required to implement the project. This individual will
play the following role:




The incumbent will be responsible for sourcing of animals from auctions or other
suitable sources.
A technical committee (field officials) should also be appointed for each region and
should work directly with the PM.
This is the engine of the project. Each region should have representatives in the
committee. They visit beneficiaries regularly and provide a report of their findings.
The board will visit each project annually.
16
15.
Recommendation
It is recommended that the HOD approves the Concept Document for the Gauteng IDC
Nguni Cattle
Recommendation approved/ approved with amendments/ not approved
Ms. S. Sekgobela
Head of Department
Date:
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ANNEXURE 1: FARMER SELECTION CRITERIA
Criteria
Scores
1
1. LAND
Suitable location
Available Grazing
Size of Grazing Land
Availability of water
2. Natural Resource Management Infrastructure
Landcare and veld management awareness
Veld fire belts availability and condition
Committed and adhere to sustainable resource
management practices
3. Farm Infrastructure
Condition of Boundary Fence
Condition Internal Fences
Water Reservoirs/ Dams
Water reticulation
Condition of Feeding equipment (for supplements)
Condition of drinking points
Condition of Dipping facilities
Condition of Stock Handling Facilities (Crush pens &
kraals)
Sheds / Storage facilities
4. Farmer Development Capacity
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2
3
4
5
Belong or willing to affiliate to a Commodity Organisation
Participate or willingness to participate in a Training
Programme
Participate in a Mentorship Programme
Received or willing to receive Enterprise Management
training
Experience in Cattle Production (Disease treatment,
5. Institutional Arrangements
Affiliated to a Farmer Organisation
Affiliated to a Cattle Association
Organisation has Constitution and/ or Bylaws
Collaborate with other Farming Organisations/
Commodity Associations
Daily Management of Cattle
* Cattle Owners
* Herders
* Kids
6. Security
6.1. Physical / Managerial
Registered Brand Mark
Daily kraaling
Secured Camps
Daily herding
6.2. Legal
Registered Business / Legal Entity
Registered Tax Payer.
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Registered for VAT
Bank Account
Business Bank Balance
Willingness and ability to enter into a contract
Farmers should demonstrate willingness to:1. Participate in the programme
2. Belong to a commodity organization/ an organized
farming structure
3. Nominate and decide on animals recipients
4. Participate in training programmes
5. Participate in mentorship programmes
6. Provide security to animals, thus include: use of Trust
Brand Mark for identification purpose, provide herd
minders and secure overnight camps and kraals.
7. Avail herd data as and whenever required
8. Avail their herds for continuous health inspection
9. Subject their herd(s) for Cow Cleaning obligation as
prescribed by the Funder
10. Provide care and maintenance of the animals
11. Practice “Pass on the Gift” notion as prescribed in the
agreement with the Funder
12. Committed and adhere to sustainable resource
management practices.
13. Development and maintenance of farm infrastructure
14. Agree not to dispose of, pledge or in any way part
with the possession of the Nucleus Herd, or any part of it
prior to the Passing of the Gift.
Source: Limpopo IDC Nguni Cattle Trust (2012)
RATINGS: The ratings from 1 to 5 designate POOR/ Not Existing to EXELLENT
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ANNEXURE 2: LOAN AGREEMENT BETWEEN GAUTENG IDC NGUNI CATTLE DEVELOPMENT
TRUST
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gauteng idc nguni cattle development trust: pilot phase