Slide 1
Employment Workshops
For Adults on The Autistic
Spectrum
Welcome
Slide 2
Session 5:
DISCLOSING A DISABILITY
INTRODUCTIONS
GROUND RULES
DISCLOSING DISABILITY
FILM TIME
EVALUATION OF WORKSHOP
Slide 3
Ground Rules
If possible, consider using a flip chart.
Writing ideas down as they are
shared gets everyone involved in the
process and provides a nice visual.
The official ground rules can be
placed on the flip chart for reference
back to them as needed.
Slide 4
DISCLOSING A DISABILITYWHAT DOES THE LAW SAY?
Doesn’t mean positive discrimination,
just fair treatment and reasonable
adjustments.
If you have a disability you are
protected by The Equality Act
2010. This act makes it unlawful
for employers to treat an applicant
or employee with disabilities less
favourably than other applicants or
employees for any reasons
connected to their disability unless
there is justification for such
action.
Slide 5
WHAT IS MEANT BY A
DISABILITY?
The Equality Act 2010 considers
someone to be disabled if they
have a physical or mental
impairment that has a substantial
and long-term adverse effect on
their ability to carry out normal
day-to-day activities.
‘substantial’ is more than minor or
trivial
‘long-term’ means lasting 12
months or more
Slide 6
DISCLOSING A DISABILITY,
IT’S A PERSONAL THING
Under the Equality Act 2010 you
can choose whether or not to
disclose your disability when
applying for a job.
BUT if the job you are applying for
will put you in situations where
your disability could present a risk
to your own health and safety or to
that of your colleagues then you
MUST disclose it.
Autism / Asperger Syndrome is
recognised as substantial and long
term.
It does vary in the extent of the effect
it has.
Main web site
http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/
2010/15/contents
For example someone who is deaf
would be at danger working in a
factory with moving fork lift trucks.
The fork truck warns it is reversing by
going beep beep.
Slide 7
I DON’T WANT TO
DISCLOSE MY DISABILITY !
You may not want the employer to
know about your disability, as you
feel they may reject your
application immediately.
You may feel that your disability
does not actually affect your ability
to do the job so why draw attention
to it.
You may feel that your application
will not be considered on its
merits.
Slide 8
WHY CONSIDER DISCLOSING
A DISABILITY !
You are protected by the Equality
Act 2010
It is AGAINST THE LAW for
employers to discriminate against
disabled people in their
recruitment and selection
procedures.
If you do disclose the law against
discrimination can protect you, if
you don’t it can’t.
Slide 9
WHY CONSIDER DISCLOSING
A DISABILITY !
‘Reasonable Adjustments’
Under the Equality Act 2010,
employers must consider making
any 'reasonable adjustments' you
might need to enable you to work
for them.
As long as you can do the job safely
there is no obligation to disclose BUT
this has some consequences.
Slide 10
Slide 11
WHAT IS A REASONABLE
ADJUSTMENT?
EXAMPLE OF SOME REASONABLE
ADJUSTMENTS FOR AUTISM
As a group let’s come up with
some possible adjustments that
might help someone on the
spectrum in work.
Written instructions
Clear written schedule
Facing the wall
Quiet office
Clear instructions
Fixed routine
Small groups
Noise cancelling headphones
Regular short extra 5 minute breaks
Accommodated schedules eg 10:00 to
6:00
No Christmas decorations at my work
station
WHAT IS A REASONABLE
ADJUSTMENT?
Have you had a difficulty in the
past in a work place or
volunteering position that a
“reasonable adjustment” would
have made easier.
Slide 12
WHY CONSIDER DISCLOSING
A DISABILITY !
If your employer does not know
you have a disability, they cannot
make adjustments to help you
succeed in your job.
An employment tribunal might
decide that your employer was
justified in failing to make
adjustments for you.
Could an employer know about
your autism if you didn’t tell him?
Slide 13
WHY CONSIDER DISCLOSING
A DISABILITY !
Many employers are committed to
employing disabled people and
may actively seek to recruit people
with disabilities to reflect their
commitment to a diverse
workforce. Look out for the Two
Ticks symbol
Check employers' equal
opportunity policies as well.
Slide 14
THINGS TO CONSIDER.
Before making your decision,
some things to think about :
The nature of your disability and
the work.
The terms and conditions of the
job.
The nature and culture of the
employer: have you looked at
their website?
Does it refer to ways in which they
help people with disabilities?
Slide 15
THINGS TO CONSIDER.
Are there any health and safety
issues that need to be addressed?
The consequences of not
disclosing your disability.
Could your disability come to light
in some way in the future?
If that happened how would you
deal with it?
SOME EMPLOYERS ACTIVELY SEEK
DISABLED STAFF.
THEY “FEEL GOOD” ABOUT
EMPLOYING PEOPLE WITH A
DISABILITY.
Slide 16
SO YOU’VE DECIDED TO
DISCLOSE.
DISCLOSE IN A POSITIVE WAY
DON’T JUST TALK ABOUT THE
NEGATIVES
Slide 17
POSITIVES
Excellent attention to detail
Methodical – picking and packing
roles
Accuracy - cataloguing and filing
Good long term memory
Very knowledgeable in areas of
interest
Strong research skills (project
work)
Logical problem solving skills
Visual thinkers
Slide 18
SO WHEN WOULD BE GOOD?
Application stage:
There may be a section on the
application form asking about any
serious health conditions or
disabilities. Although you don't
have to disclose your disability
here, you mustn't lie. If you don't
want to disclose, simply don't
answer the question. You can also
use the personal statement
section of the form to tell an
employer about your disability.
GENERALISATIONS BUT AS A GROUP
THESE ARE COMMON ATTRIBUTES
Slide 19
SO WHEN SHOULD BE GOOD?
Application stage:
Being open about the impairment
would provide a very good answer
to demonstrate a key competency
required by the job;
The nature of the job is such that it
MAY be seen as an advantage to
have impairment, e.g. applying for
a role as a disability officer;
Look for an opening to be positive.
Slide 20
SO WHEN WOULD BE GOOD?
Application stage:
The employer is positive about the
recruitment of disabled people and
may for example be a ‘two ticks’
employer;
You may feel that not disclosing
leaves out a part of who you are.
Does it actually give you a better
chance.
Slide 21
SO WHEN WOULD BE GOOD?
CV:
It accounts for the unusual make
up of your CV e.g. longer than
average spent acquiring certain
qualifications.
It may explain periods which show
as gaps in your career history;
It may show why your application
may look ’thin’ in terms of
experience or achievements .
Use it to make your CV better not
worse.
Slide 22
SO WHEN WOULD BE GOOD?
COVERING LETTER:
If you mention your disability here,
emphasise how it has further
developed the skills and
experience mentioned in your CV.
However, only raise this when it's
relevant to your application. For
example, point to how well you've
achieved your goals despite any
difficulties. Employers value
perseverance and drive.
Slide 23
SO WHEN WOULD BE GOOD?
PRE-INTERVIEW STAGE:
This may be when you want to
identify practical needs so you can
compete equally with other
applicants.
If you haven't been asked about
your needs, take the initiative and
contact the employer in advance they may need time to make
arrangements.
Slide 24
SO WHEN WOULD BE GOOD?
INTERVIEW:
you may feel more comfortable
disclosing when you can discuss
the implications face-to-face and
more clearly demonstrate your
skills.
If you've previously mentioned
your disability, the interview can
be an opportunity to expand on the
positive effects it's had on your life
and how it's enhanced your
employability.
Work out a script.
Try not to be timid.
Example practical adjusrtments
Remember, equality act, ‘reasonable
adjustments’
Need to refer to written notes
need one question at time.
Not looking you in the face
Not making eye contact
Not facing a bright window
Voice might sound monotonous /
monotonic
Slide 25
SO WHEN WOULD BE GOOD?
IN THE JOB:
You may decide not to disclose
your disability until you've been
offered the job or started.
You can decide who to tell - your
manager or HR - and you can also
request that colleagues aren't told.
If your condition affects the way
you work, it may be helpful to be
open with colleagues so they
understand and can help you with
anything you may need..
Slide 26
WHAT SHOULD I SAY?
Let’s write a short script and try it
out.?
What would I put in my CV or
covering letter?
Keep your disclosure statement short,
simple and to the point. Do not go
into a long explanation of the history
of Asperger Syndrome, scientific
theories about its cause, or all of the
ways that someone can be affected.
Instead, summarize the condition in 1
or 2 sentences, state your challenges,
and list the specific accommodations
that you believe will address them.
I have a condition called Asperger
Syndrome that makes it hard for me
to remember oral instructions. I work
well with written instructions to learn
the proper procedure for tasks.”
“One of the side effects of my autism
is I’m very sensitive to office noise. If
I wear headphones I can concentrate
well.”
“My Asperger syndrome means I am
very good at paying attention to detail
which makes me a good technician ”
My Asperger syndrome means I don’t
have great social skills. It also means I
don’t get involved in office gossip.
My Asperger syndrome means that I
can be uncomfortable with changes in
routine, it also means I am
uncomfortable leaving work early or
getting to work late.
Although my Asperger syndrome can
make me anxious I have learned
strategies that mean I have overcome
this and now work confidently in the
work place.
My Asperger syndrome means that I
see the world differently. It also
means that my creative output is
distinctive and innovative.
Slide 27
MAIN POINTS AGAIN
BE POSITIVE:
Only discuss your disability in
terms of its relevance to your
performance in the job. Don't go
into personal detail.
Always be positive about your
disability and use it to provide
evidence of the skills employers
look for.
Slide 28
MAIN POINTS AGAIN
BE POSITIVE:
Emphasise positive achievements
and give examples.
You may have gained skills such
as flexibility,
determination, the
ability to perform
under pressure and
creative problemsolving as a result of
your disability,
Don’t be afraid to use these as
selling points.
Slide 29
MAIN POINTS AGAIN
BE POSITIVE:
Make a positive statement about
your disability to remove any
doubts an employer may have.
Don't assume they’ll have a
negative attitude - your
experiences and skills may give
you the edge over other
candidates.
Slide 30
IT’S ALL ABOUT THE JOB
Slide 31
Don’t focus the whole of your
application or interview on the
issue of your disability. Focus on
your suitability for the job.
Most interviewers have little
experience of autism and most
know little of the implications. Be
prepared to say what adjustments
you would need in order to do the
job effectively.
Speak to an advisor you trust
about whether, when and how to
tell an employer about your
disability.
FILM TIME
Talking about An Autism Spectrum
Diagnosis at Work (7:03)
Slide 32
EVALUATION
How has this session gone for you
?
Did you contribute ?
Were you listened to ?
Did you feel comfortable ?
Have you found out anything new
?
Is there anything we need to
change for next time?
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Explanatory Notes - Powerpoint - Session5