SYLLABUS
1. Subject Name : Bilingualism and Language Education
2. Subject Code : MKT303/ Elective Compulsory Course
3. Credit Unit
: 2 sks
4. Semester
: 3
5. Lecturers
:
a. Drs. H. Sudarsono, MA, PhD, 082159541002, [email protected]
b. Dr. H. Ikhsanudin, M.Hum, 08125626966
6. Office Hours : 09.00-16.00
7. Class time
:
8. Class Venue
: Lab/MML
9. COURSE OVERVIEW
This course starts from the initial the concepts about a language, dialect, and bilingual.
The students will also study the factors how to promote bilingualism and how to
maintain language and how to shift from one language to another language. Other topics
of this subject include language ideologies and attitudes, the social motivations for
language use in interpersonal interactions, inter-cultural communication, lexical
borrowing; what happens to grammars in bilingual contacts, codeswitching;
pyscholinguistics and bilingualism, age of acquisition and success with a second
language, language policies and globalization, bilingualism, and cognition
10. COURSE OBJECTIVES
After attending this subject the students will be able:
a. recognize the concepts that relate with bilingualism and language education,
b. learn how to measure bilingualism,
c. learn how a language is promoted, maintained, and shifted, and other
sociolinguistic phenomena among the bilingual individuals and bilingual
communities.
d. Learn language acquisition and language politics in the global era.
11. CLASS ACTIVITIES
Students will work towards thecourse goals by
a. Reading and lectures providing overviews of the literature. This will help
students understand the topics of the course.
b. Performing critical analysis of research papers from journals through classroom
presentation and written work).
12. PREREQUISITES:
NIL
13. ASSESSMENTS
13.1 TYPE OF ASSESSMENT
a. Participation in class meetings
10%
b. Short paper
20%
c. Mid-term Exam/Class presentation
30%
d. Final Exam/Long paper/Individual Project 40%
13.2 GRADING OF ASSESSMENT
a. 90-100 = A,
b. 80-89 =A-,
c. 75-79= B+,
d. 70-74 = B,
e. 60-69=B-
13.3 NOTES OF ASSESSMENT
a. Participation in class meetings.
A large part of this course is built around discussion—working together to
critically analyze research papers. Students are requested to contribute the
class to help the lecturer learn. This will be assessed in attendance and ability
to participate in discussion.
b. Short paper
Students must present a short paper/ a preliminary analysis (3-5 pages)
reviewed from a journal paper/ a book chapter. The paper review is
performed on power point format. To help get discussion about class papers
going, students need to bring at least one written question on the article. In
addition, if students didn’t understand parts of the article, they need to add
written clarification questions. The short assessments will be graded √ of √–,
and will not receive substantial written comments.
c. Long paper
The long paper (10-15 pages) will be graded and returned with written
comments. To help students get a hang of the requirements of the assignment,
they will have an opportunity to re-write your first long assessment.Your final
paper will basically be a long version of an assessment (10-15 pages). The
papers with a high quality of academic article will be published in a book or
journal.
By the end of the second week, students will select a paper, drawing on a list
of papers given by the lecturer taken from a set of journals. By the end of the
fourth week, you’ll need to turn in a short assessment of the selected paper.
Your final paper will be an extended version of a long assessment the selected
paper. It will critically assess the paper, drawing on at least 2 other additional
research articles to evaluate the claims made by the authors.
14. COURSE POLICY
a. Students turn off all cell phones during the class,
b. Students are not allowed to do emailing, web browsing and other computer
activity during class unless this is part of the course assignments,
c. Students are required to hand in all assignments. Please contact the instructor in
advance if you need to skip a class, or cannot make a deadline. There will be no
d. make-up exams or homework without a documented medical excuse
e. Students have to do the work on time. Due dates are firm; attendance in class is
not optional. The highest possible letter grade for work handed in during the
first 24 hours after class will be a B. The lecturer will give comments and
suggestions on work turned in later than this, but you will receive no credit for
the assignment.
f. If students have a problem, give the lecturer sufficient time to help them. If they
have tried to do an assignment, but can’t seem to complete it, come to the
lecturer well before it’s due. If you are unable to come to a class, try to let the
lecturer know beforehand, or as soon as possible after class. Students’ reasons
for class absences need to be verifiable.
g. Students may work with other students, but the finished product must be the
student own. Working together is a big part of the in-class work; it is hoped that
this will extend outside of the classroom. However, for most assignments,
students’ written work must be their own.
15. COURSE OUTLINE
MEETING
TOPIC
SUB-TOPICS
REFERENCE
WEEK
1
Introduction
Bilingualism: Definitions and
Distinctions; Measurement of
Bilingualism; Languages in
Societies; and Attitudes about
language
Colin Baker,
Foundations of
Bilingual Education
and Bilingualism, p 150; Carol MyersScotton, Multiple
Voices an Introduction
to Bilingualism, p-115;
WEEK
2
Language,
Dialect, Pidgins;
and Creoles
What counts as a language?;
Problems with mutual
intelligibility; Dialects as
groupings under a language; The
written language and dialects;
Identifying the standard dialect;
Who speaks a dialect?; Creation
of pidgins and creoles; Pidgins;
and Creoles;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 16-33
and 176-185; Pieter
Muysken and René
Appel, Language
Contact and
Bilingualism, p-174185
WEEK
3
Bilinguals and
Factors
Who is a bilingual?; Defining
bilingualism; Factors promoting
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Promoting
Bilingualism
bilingualism; and Conditions of
displacement
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 36-65;
Colin Baker,
Foundations of
Bilingual Education
and Bilingualism, p 5293;
WEEK
4
Language
Three useful models of
Maintenance and community organization;
Shift
Allocation of varieties; Diglossia
and domains; Convergence and
attrition;Representative case
studies; The younger generation
and bilingualism; and Separating
language maintenance from
cultural maintenance;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 70-105;
Colin Baker,
Foundations of
Bilingual Education
and Bilingualism, p 5174; Pieter Muysken
and René Appel,
Language Contact and
Bilingualism, p-11-19
WEEK
5
Ideologies and
Attitudes
Language attitudes vs. language
ideologies; Power and the
economy of language; How
languages identify groups;
Language attitudes; Theoretical
models and the expression of
attitudes; and Language ideology;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 107140; Pieter Muysken
and René Appel,
Language Contact and
Bilingualism, p-32-44
WEEK
6
The Social
Motivations for
Language Use in
Interpersonal
Interactions
Linguistic varieties as social
indices; More than meets the ear;
Language varieties absorb
meanings from situations;
Speakers have their own
motivations for choices, too;
Models to explain conversational
choices; What accommodation
means; Markedness Model:
Another model of social
motivations;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 142174;
WEEK
7
Codeswitching
Codeswitching: concept; types;
and functions; Characterizing
larger Embedded Language
phrases in Matrix Language
frames; The 4-M model; Code
choices within a Conversation
Sudarsono,
Codeswitching a study
on the Speech of
Indnesian and
Javanese Educated
Bilinguals, p 13-67;
Analysis approach; and
Summary on explaining bilingual
conversations;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 232287; Pieter Muysken
and René Appel,
Language Contact and
Bilingualism, p-117128
WEEK
8
MID-TERM TEST
WEEK
9
Lexical
Borrowing
Lexical borrowing; Cultural and
core borrowings; Core borrowings;
Less direct borrowings; How
borrowed words are integrated;
Morphological integration; Nouns
vs. other categories; and What
borrowings can tell us;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 208231; Pieter Muysken
and René Appel,
Language Contact and
Bilingualism, p-164173
WEEK
10
Inter-cultural
Communicatio
n
Languages are different and so are
cultures; Dividing up societies as
individualistic or collectivistic;
High- and low-context messages;
Five areas of potential differences;
Is silence golden?; Ideas about
“good” conversational routines
differ; The faces of politeness; How
to ask for something in different
cultures; Cross-cultural ideas
about power differentials; and
Managing cross-cultural conflicts;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 175206;
WEEK
11
Pyscholinguisti
cs and
Bilingualism
Themes in psycholinguistics and
bilingualism; Classifying bilinguals;
Validity and experimental
methodologies; The mental
lexicon; Levels of activation;
Testing for selective access;
Models of language production;
Memory; and Bilingualism, the
brain, and aphasia;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 288322;
WEEK
Second
Introducing child bilingualism;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
12
WEEK
13
Language
Successes in child bilingualism
Acquisition and studies; advantages and
Learning
disadvantages of bilingualism;
Learning a second language later;
Age-related issues and the brain;
and Second language acquisition
(SLA) as formal instruction;
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 323366; Pieter Muysken
and René Appel,
Language Contact and
Bilingualism, p-82-93
Bilingualism
and Cognition
Pieter Muysken and
René Appel, Language
Contact and
Bilingualism, p 73-80
Varieties of bilinguals,
Simultaneous and sequential
learning, and Transfer of effect of
L1 on L2 learning,
WEEK
14
Language
EducationPolicies and
Globalization
WEEK
15
REVIEW
WEEK
16
FINAL TEST
World Englishes and Language
Education; language planning;
Status planning; Corpus planning;
Acquisition planning; English in
the world; and The European
Union and Europe’s new industry:
Translating;
Shondel J. Nero. 2006.
Dialects, Englishes,
Creoles, and Education,
p-19-38; Pieter
Muysken and René
Appel, Language
Contact and
Bilingualism, p-46-70;
Carol Myers-Scotton,
Multiple Voices an
Introduction to
Bilingualism, p 367410;
16. REFERENCES
a. Myers-Scotton, Carol. 2006. Multiple Voices: An Introduction to Bilingualism.
Carlton: Blackwell Publishing.
b. Muysken, Pieter and Appel, René. 2005. Language Contact and Bilingualism.
Amsterdam: Amsterdam University Press.
c. Sudarsono. 1993. Codeswitching: a Study on the Speech of Indonesian and
Javanese Educated Bilinguals. Masters Thesis. La Trobe University. Bundoora
d. Baker, Colin. 1996. Foundations of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism.
Clevedon: Multilingual Matters Ltd.
e. Brisk, Maria Estela Bar. 1999. Quality Bilingual Education Defining Success. A
paper presented at the Symposium on Language Policy Bar Ilam University,
Israel.
f. Nero, Shondel J. 2006. Dialects, Englishes, Creoles, and Education. London:
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
Pontianak, 3 September 2013
Lecturers
Drs. H. Sudarsono, MA, PhD
NIP 19580414 1987031001
Dr. H. Ikhsanudin, M.Hum
NIP 196611051992031003
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Bilingualism and Language Education